Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019532/001.

Names and composition

"MYKROX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of METOLAZONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019532/001 MYKROX METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017386/001 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017386/002 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017386/003 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
018535/001 DIULO METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
018535/002 DIULO METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
018535/003 DIULO METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019532/001 MYKROX METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
075543/003 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076466/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076466/002 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076482/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ ORAL 10MG
076482/002 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076600/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076698/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076698/002 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076698/003 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076732/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076833/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076891/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

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Answered questions

CHF Patient NOT on ACE Inhibitor?
I'm not sure the 1st response answered my question. I looked up the medications and know what they are but none are ACE inhibitors. Asked by Keneth Brimer 1 year ago.

My 62 year old mother is on the following medications to treat CHF: Torsemide Metolazone Spironolactone Metoprolol Coreg Digoxin Coumadin She is also a diabetic currently on Humalog & Lantus. From my research, it does not appear that any of these medications are ACE Inhibitors which I've read are very good at treating CHF. Can someone tell me why the doctor doesn't have her on one of those? Her current infraction is about 10-15% and a couple of weeks ago the doctor told me that it won't be much longer until she passes. I just am concerned that maybe his treatment of her is not as good as it could be. Any help would be appreciated. Thank You! Cindy Answered by Melanie Lamas 1 year ago.

Torasemide (rINN) or torsemide (USAN) is a pyridine-sulfonyl urea type loop diuretic mainly used in the management of edema associated with congestive heart failure. It is also used at low doses for the management of hypertension. It is marketed under the brand name Demadex. Metolazone is a thiazide diuretic (or, rather, a thiazide-like diuretic because it acts similarly to the thiazides but does not contain the benzothiadiazine molecular structure) marketed under the brand names Zaroxolyn and Mykrox. It is primarily used to treat congestive heart failure and high blood pressure. Spironolactone (marketed under the trade names Aldactone, Novo-Spiroton, Aldactazide, Spiractin, Spirotone, Verospiron or Berlactone) is a diuretic and is used as an antiandrogen. It is a synthetic 17-lactone drug that is a renal competitive aldosterone antagonist in a class of pharmaceuticals called potassium-sparing diuretics, used primarily to treat heart failure, ascites in patients with liver disease, low-renin hypertension, hypokalemia, and Conn's syndrome as well as high blood pressure. Metoprolol is a selective β1 receptor blocker used in treatment of several diseases of the cardiovascular system, especially hypertension Carvedilol is a non-selective beta blocker/alpha-1 blocker indicated in the treatment of mild to moderate congestive heart failure (CHF). It is marketed under various trade names including Coreg (GSK), Dilatrend (Roche), Eucardic (Roche), and Carloc (Cipla) as a generic drug (as of September 5, 2007 in the U.S.).[1], and as a controlled-release formulation, marketed in the US as Coreg CR (GSK). Digoxin (INN) (pronounced /dɨˈdʒɒksɨn/[1]), also known as digitalis, is a purified cardiac glycoside extracted from the foxglove plant, Digitalis lanata.[2] Its corresponding aglycone is digoxigenin, and its acetyl derivative is acetyldigoxin. Digoxin is widely used in the treatment of various heart conditions, namely atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter and sometimes heart failure that cannot be controlled by other medication Warfarin (also known under the brand names Coumadin, Jantoven, Marevan, and Waran) is an anticoagulant. Please see the web page for more details on adverse effects of Angiotensi converting enzime inhibitors. Consult your doctor. Answered by Brett Lindblom 1 year ago.

The first answerer gives very detailed answers. Often too detailed. By 'infarction' do you mean ejection fraction? If so, 10-15 % is quite low. If she isn't seeing one now, she needs a good cardiologist. To answer your question, she SHOULD be on an ACE inhibitor. The only reason not to is either an allergy OR renal failure. I'm surprised by the metoprolol & Coreg. They are both in the same class of drugs. There's no benefit to doing both. I'd stick with as much Coreg as she can handle. Good luck. Answered by Lieselotte Correiro 1 year ago.

About 12-15 years ago these drugs were only initiated in hospital by specialists. These days however they are routinely used in the community by GPs. Answered by Kenisha Bannister 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Brandie Victorin 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Jenna Riden 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Eliseo Vounas 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Narcisa Swider 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Moshe Weist 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Lamar Cleare 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Ronda Slavens 1 year ago.


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