Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012111/002.

Names and composition

"MYDRIACYL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TROPICAMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012111/002 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012111/004 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
084305/001 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
084306/001 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012111/002 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012111/004 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
040064/001 TROPICAMIDE TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
040067/001 TROPICAMIDE TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
040314/001 TROPICACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
040315/001 TROPICACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
084305/001 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
084306/001 MYDRIACYL TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
087636/001 TROPICAMIDE TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
087637/001 TROPICAMIDE TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
088230/001 MYDRIAFAIR TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
088274/001 MYDRIAFAIR TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
088447/001 TROPICAMIDE TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
089171/001 TROPICAMIDE TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
089172/001 TROPICAMIDE TROPICAMIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%

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Answered questions

Mydriacyl for glaucoma? (dogs)?
My dog has Mydriacyl 1/2% for glaucoma, it did make it better but from what I'm reading online it's not for glaucoma? And people with glaucoma shouldn't take it? He gets 1 drop in each eye every night, and he has been for about 2 years. Could someone please clarify for me if this is the right use of... Asked by Ona Larew 1 year ago.

My dog has Mydriacyl 1/2% for glaucoma, it did make it better but from what I'm reading online it's not for glaucoma? And people with glaucoma shouldn't take it? He gets 1 drop in each eye every night, and he has been for about 2 years. Could someone please clarify for me if this is the right use of these eyedrops, cause I can't seem to find glaucoma anywhere in its list of uses. Thanks. Answered by Elfriede Wonser 1 year ago.

Mydriacyl is used for cataracts, not glaucoma and it enlarges the pupil of the eye making it easier for the dog to see. It should only be used on a short time basis as there are serious side-effects. You may have misunderstood your vet, and if you haven't already, I would get in touch with an opthamologist specialist veterinarian. Answered by Della Bruchman 1 year ago.

I think you need to ask the prescribing vet this question. I too have done a brief search and can find nothing specific re using this for glaucoma. However, a vet does a good number of years in training, to learn which drugs would be appropriate for certain conditions. So one can only assume he knows what he's doing!!? Further, if it's helping your dog's condition, that's all good? Do you trust your vet? Does he specialise in eye conditions? I ask this because our practice has a vet who does this, another specialises in bones, another in skin conditions and another in alternative meds alongside conventional vet treatments. Sometimes using the internet can be counter-productive. A little knowledge, and all that? ps I am not familiar with this drug. Answered by Jessie Shacklett 1 year ago.


Dilating eyedrops?
which medicine is used as dilating eyedrops for eye exams? Asked by Roselle Pessolano 1 year ago.

Neosynephrine and Mydriacyl. They burn, so often an anesthetic eye drop is used as well, as mentioned by the Optometry student. Atropine can be used, but lasts almost 2 weeks, so in only used in special circumstances, when you need the pupil dilated a long time- as in some disease states. Answered by Loriann Phippen 1 year ago.

Depends. I'd say probably the most common thing is tropicamide, either 0.5% or 1%. The lower percentage has its effects wear off faster, and neither one affects your accommodative ability too much for too long. Another option is phenylephrine, usually 2.5%. It can be used in conjunction with tropicamide to get the pupil more dilated. Some people don't like it because it lasts a bit longer and, if absorbed systemically, could potentially cause problems in people with heart disease. Lastly, we have cyclopentolate, 0.5% or 1%, which is usually used for young people (kids/teenagers) or anyone considering laser surgery. It not only dilates the pupil, it also freezes your accommodative (focusing) ability, eliminating some of the problems in getting an accurate prescription. (It's also used pre-cataract surgery for the same reason.) So yeah - those are the three most common drops that pretty much any optometrist or ophthalmologist probably has kicking around the office. Answered by Pei Hudalla 1 year ago.


Mydriacyl for glaucoma? (dogs)?
My dog has Mydriacyl 1/2% for glaucoma, it did make it better but from what I'm reading online it's not for glaucoma? And people with glaucoma shouldn't take it? He gets 1 drop in each eye every night, and he has been for about 2 years. Could someone please clarify for me if this is the right use of... Asked by Pilar Dobesh 1 year ago.

My dog has Mydriacyl 1/2% for glaucoma, it did make it better but from what I'm reading online it's not for glaucoma? And people with glaucoma shouldn't take it? He gets 1 drop in each eye every night, and he has been for about 2 years. Could someone please clarify for me if this is the right use of these eyedrops, cause I can't seem to find glaucoma anywhere in its list of uses. Thanks. Answered by Lavonne Parham 1 year ago.

Mydriacyl is used for cataracts, not glaucoma and it enlarges the pupil of the eye making it easier for the dog to see. It should only be used on a short time basis as there are serious side-effects. You may have misunderstood your vet, and if you haven't already, I would get in touch with an opthamologist specialist veterinarian. Answered by Neil Pahmeier 1 year ago.

I think you need to ask the prescribing vet this question. I too have done a brief search and can find nothing specific re using this for glaucoma. However, a vet does a good number of years in training, to learn which drugs would be appropriate for certain conditions. So one can only assume he knows what he's doing!!? Further, if it's helping your dog's condition, that's all good? Do you trust your vet? Does he specialise in eye conditions? I ask this because our practice has a vet who does this, another specialises in bones, another in skin conditions and another in alternative meds alongside conventional vet treatments. Sometimes using the internet can be counter-productive. A little knowledge, and all that? ps I am not familiar with this drug. Answered by Verlie Carew 1 year ago.


Dilating eyedrops?
which medicine is used as dilating eyedrops for eye exams? Asked by Delilah Veillon 1 year ago.

Neosynephrine and Mydriacyl. They burn, so often an anesthetic eye drop is used as well, as mentioned by the Optometry student. Atropine can be used, but lasts almost 2 weeks, so in only used in special circumstances, when you need the pupil dilated a long time- as in some disease states. Answered by Emilia Valenzvela 1 year ago.

Depends. I'd say probably the most common thing is tropicamide, either 0.5% or 1%. The lower percentage has its effects wear off faster, and neither one affects your accommodative ability too much for too long. Another option is phenylephrine, usually 2.5%. It can be used in conjunction with tropicamide to get the pupil more dilated. Some people don't like it because it lasts a bit longer and, if absorbed systemically, could potentially cause problems in people with heart disease. Lastly, we have cyclopentolate, 0.5% or 1%, which is usually used for young people (kids/teenagers) or anyone considering laser surgery. It not only dilates the pupil, it also freezes your accommodative (focusing) ability, eliminating some of the problems in getting an accurate prescription. (It's also used pre-cataract surgery for the same reason.) So yeah - those are the three most common drops that pretty much any optometrist or ophthalmologist probably has kicking around the office. Answered by Arminda Hegel 1 year ago.


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