MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 065379/001.

Names and composition

"MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
065379/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065410/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065413/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065416/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065433/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065451/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065457/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065477/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065491/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065520/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065521/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090055/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090111/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090253/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090419/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090456/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090464/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090499/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090606/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090661/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090762/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
091249/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091315/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
200197/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
203005/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050759/001 CELLCEPT MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per ML
050722/001 CELLCEPT MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
050723/001 CELLCEPT MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065379/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065410/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065413/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065416/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065433/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065451/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065457/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065477/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065491/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065520/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
065521/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090055/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090111/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090253/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090419/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
090456/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090464/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090499/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090606/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090661/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
090762/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
091249/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091315/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
200197/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
203005/001 MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per ML

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Answered questions

What is Cellcept? How goes it work?
Asked by Hortensia Stoehr 1 month ago.

Brand Name: CellCept Generic Name: Mycophenolate Mofetil CellCept is a drug indicated for the prevention of organ rejection in patients receiving allogeneic (human to human) renal (kidney), cardiac or hepatic transplants. CellCept should be used at the same time with cyclosporine and corticosteroids. CellCept (Mycophenolate) is used in combination with other medications to keep your body from attacking and rejecting your transplanted organ (e.g., kidney, liver, heart). It belongs to a class of medications called immunosuppressants. This medication works by lowering your body's immune system activity. CellCept decreases the body's ability to protect against illness and infection, and may also increase your risk of developing lymph node tumors (lymphoma) and other types of tumors. Therefore, this medication must only be given under close medical supervision. Discuss the risks of taking mycophenolate with your doctor. CellCept is available for oral administration as capsules containing 250 mg ,500 mg of mycophenolate mofetil. Also as a powder for oral suspension, which when constituted contains 200 mg/mL mycophenolate mofetil. CellCept Intravenous should be administered within 24 hours following transplantation. CellCept Intravenous can be administered for up to 14 days; patients should be switched to oral CellCept as soon as they can tolerate oral medication. Hope this info helps! . Answered by Shaina Warling 1 month ago.


Immunosuppressant Drugs? Lung Condition. Please only help if you can!?
Thanks Xion, I think it may actually be that last one cuz that sounds really familiar, it's so stupid as well cuz I made a mental note to remeber the name of the drug and then as soon as I walked out of the doctors office I completely forgot it. Thanks Asked by Queen Nead 1 month ago.

Ok so I have an underlying lung condition which in time may or may not get worse but my doctor wants to start me on a new medication but I can't remember the name of it. I was previously on Imuran but I started vomitting after 4 or so days of being on the lowest dosage possibly. Theres another drug but I cant remember what it's called, it's another immuno suppressant and I've tried looking it up but I can only remember that it started with an M. If anyone could help me I would really appreciate it as I'd like to know about this drug more before I go on it. Also I'm in australia so I dont know if its only available here or other parts of the world. The only other information I know about it is that it's roughly a 1 - 2000$ a year drug. Thanks in advance. Answered by Aide Sabir 1 month ago.

Mycophenolate Mofetil (CellCept) Answered by Eileen Berquist 1 month ago.

You will find that medications have different names in different countries, even if they are made by the same company. The name that you will want to use on here is the generic name (not the brand name), if you know it. I dont know quite what your question is, so I hope that this information is helpful.... Answered by Willow Cartmell 1 month ago.


What the pills cellcep does?
this pills is instructed to take after a kidney transplant Asked by Katie Hutzler 1 month ago.

I have Lupus and have been asked to take it, but have tried other meds first. njext is cell cept. I had info for lupus and cell cept, but did find this information for you. do here you go. CellCept Generic Name: mycophenolate mofetil (oral/injection) (my ko FEN o layt MO fe til) Brand Names: CellCept What is mycophenolate mofetil? Mycophenolate mofetil lowers your body's immune system. The immune system helps your body fight infections. The immune system can also fight or "reject" a transplanted organ such as a liver or kidney. This is because the immune system treats the new organ as an invader. Mycophenolate mofetil is used to prevent your body from rejecting a kidney, liver, or heart transplant. This medication is usually given with cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral) and a steroid medication. Mycophenolate mofetil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What is the most important information I should know about mycophenolate mofetil? This medication can lower the blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being around others who are ill. You may also have an increased risk of certain forms of cancer. To be sure your blood cells do not get too low, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. Mycophenolate mofetil products may contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have pheynlketonuria (PKU), or if you otherwise need to restrict your intake of phenylalanine. Mycophenolate mofetil has caused birth defects in animals, and there may be a similar risk in humans. Do not use mycophenolate mofetil if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. To make sure you are not pregnant before using mycophenolate, you may need to have a pregnancy test within 1 week before your treatment starts. Unless you have had a hysterectomy, you must use effective birth control to keep from getting pregnant while using this medication. Birth control is recommended even if you have have been infertile (unable to get pregnant) in the past. Use two effective non-hormonal forms of birth control (condoms, diaphragm, or spermicides) while you are using mycophenolate mofetil and for at least 6 weeks after your treatment ends. Do not open the medicine capsule or crush or chew a tablet. Do not use a pill that has been accidentally broken. The medicine from a crushed or broken pill can be dangerous if it gets in your eyes, mouth, or nose, or on your skin. If it does come in contact with these areas, wash your skin with soap and water or rinse your eyes with water. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how to safely handle and dispose of a broken tablet or capsule. If you need to have any type of surgery, you may need to temporarily stop using mycophenolate mofetil. Be sure the surgeon knows ahead of time that you are using this medication. Mycophenolate mofetil may increase the risk of developing skin cancer. Limit exposure to sunlight and UV light by wearing protective clothing and using a sunscreen with a high protection factor (SPF). What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using mycophenolate mofetil? Before using mycophenolate mofetil, tell your doctor if you have: a stomach ulcer or other disorders of your stomach or intestines; an allergy to a drug preservative called polysorbate 80 (also called Tween) if you are going to be treated with mycophenolate mofetil injection; kidney disease; a viral, bacterial, or fungal infection; or a rare hereditary deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HGPRT) such as Lesch-Nyhan and Kelley-Seegmiller syndrome. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use mycophenolate mofetil, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Mycophenolate mofetil products may contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have pheynlketonuria (PKU), or if you otherwise need to restrict your intake of phenylalanine. Mycophenolate mofetil has caused birth defects in animals, and there may be a similar risk in humans. Do not use mycophenolate mofetil if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. To make sure you are not pregnant before using mycophenolate, you may need to have a pregnancy test within 1 week before your treatment starts. Unless you have had a hysterectomy, you must use effective birth control to keep from getting pregnant while using this medication. Birth control is recommended even if you have have been infertile (unable to get pregnant) in the past. Use two effective non-hormonal forms of birth control (condoms, diaphragm, or spermicides) while you are using mycophenolate mofetil and for at least 6 weeks after your treatment ends. It is not known whether mycophenolate mofetil passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use mycophenolate mofetil without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use mycophenolate mofetil? Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger or smaller amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Mycophenolate mofetil is usually given twice a day. Follow your doctor's instructions. The injection form of this medication is given through a needle placed into a vein. The injection is usually given within 24 hours after your transplant. You may be given the injection for up to 14 days before you switch to the oral (pill) form of mycophenolate mofetil. Take each oral dose with a full glass of water. Take mycophenolate mofetil oral medication on an empty stomach, 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Shake the mycophenolate mofetil oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. Do not open the mycophenolate mofetil capsule or crush or chew a tablet. Do not use a pill that has been accidentally broken. The medicine from a crushed or broken pill can be dangerous if it gets in your eyes, mouth, or nose, or on your skin. If it does come in contact with these areas, wash your skin with soap and water or rinse your eyes with water. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how to safely handle and dispose of a broken tablet or capsule. This medication can lower the blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being around others who are ill. You may also have an increased risk of certain forms of cancer. To be sure your blood cells do not get too low, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. Store mycophenolate mofetil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. The oral suspension may be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator. Do not allow the suspension to freeze. Throw away any unused suspension after 60 days. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of a mycophenolate mofetil overdose may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, unusual bleeding or bruising, and signs of infection. What should I avoid while using mycophenolate mofetil? Use two forms of birth control to prevent pregnancy while you are using this medication, and for at least 6 weeks after your treatment ends. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Avoid contact with people who have colds, the flu, or other contagious illnesses. Contact your doctor immediately if you develop signs of infection. Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with this medication. The vaccine may not be as effective in your body. If you need to have any type of surgery, you may need to temporarily stop using mycophenolate mofetil. Be sure the surgeon knows ahead of time that you are using this medication. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Mycophenolate mofetil can increase your risk of skin cancer. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Mycophenolate mofetil side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using mycophenolate mofetil and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; bloody, black, or tarry stools; painful or difficult urination; or numbness or tingly feeling. Continue using mycophenolate mofetil and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: upset stomach, nausea, or vomiting; diarrhea or constipation; mild weakness; tremor or dizziness; anxiety, sleep problems (insomnia); swelling of the feet or lower legs; or a skin rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect mycophenolate mofetil? Before using mycophenolate mofetil, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: other medicines that weaken the immune system, such as azathioprine (Imuran), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), tacrolimus (Prograf), or daclizumab (Zenapax); cholestyramine (Questran); an antacid (prescription or over-the-counter); or acyclovir (Zovirax), ganciclovir (Cytovene), or valacyclovir (Valtrex). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use mycophenolate mofetil or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There may be other drugs not listed that can affect mycophenolate mofetil. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about mycophenolate mofetil written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Mycophenolate mofetil is available with a prescription under the brand name CellCept. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. CellCept 250 mg-blue/brown capsules CellCept 500 mg-lavender, capsule-shaped, film-coated tablets CellCept Oral Suspension 200 mg/mL-white to off-white, mixed fruit flavor suspension Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.08. Revision Date: 1/14/07 2:32:32 PM. Answered by Kyoko Brenneman 1 month ago.

Cellcept is used in combination with other medications to keep your body from attacking and rejecting your transplanted organ (e.g., kidney, liver, heart). It belongs to a class of medications called immunosuppressants. This medication works by weakening the body's defensive response to your new organ. Answered by Margarete Denfip 1 month ago.


What does "Mylan 472" mean?
I've got a full bottle of what is supposed to be Mycophenolate 500MG, or CellCept. They belong to my dad, who had a kidney transplant and these are supposed to prevent organ rejection. But these pills are a pinkish-orange color and have MYLAN imprinted on one side and 472 on the other. The pills that he usually... Asked by Ami Kiko 1 month ago.

I've got a full bottle of what is supposed to be Mycophenolate 500MG, or CellCept. They belong to my dad, who had a kidney transplant and these are supposed to prevent organ rejection. But these pills are a pinkish-orange color and have MYLAN imprinted on one side and 472 on the other. The pills that he usually gets are purple. Can anybody tell me what "MYLAN 472" is? Answered by Janett Donndelinger 1 month ago.

This is the brand new generic form of Cellcept. Mylan is the name of the pharmaceutical company that makes them. Their site says: "PITTSBURGH, May 7 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Mylan Inc. (Nasdaq: MYL) today announced that its subsidiary Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. received final approvals from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs) for Mycophenolate Mofetil Tablets, 500 mg, and Mycophenolate Mofetil Capsules, 250 mg. Mycophenolate Mofetil is the generic name for Roche's CellCept(R), which is indicated for the prevention of organ rejection in patients receiving kidney, heart or liver transplants". Answered by Wilhelmina Bevilacqua 1 month ago.


What meds cause Glaucoma?
Does anyone know if any of the following meds can cause glaucoma? Prograf Cellcept Warfarin Levothyroxin Cozaar Lisinopril Ferrous Sulfate Procrit Asked by Marylee Ahimud 1 month ago.

tacrolimus (Prograf) no mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) no Warfarin no levothyroxine no losartan (Cozaar) no lisinopril no Ferrous sulphate no epoetin ( Procrit) no None have been linked to glaucoma as a side effect. Answered by Nery Knebel 1 month ago.

Secondary glaucoma is caused by: * Drugs such as corticosteroids (prednisone or cortisone) According to Leonard Levine, Ph.D., certain drugs can "impair the biological health of the visual system." For example, the Physicians' Desk Reference lists 94 medications that can cause glaucoma, including antihypertensives, antidepressants, and steroids, such as cortisol, which can destroy vital collagen tissue in the eye. Both herbal ephedrine and pseudoephedrine have central nervous system (CNS) stimulating properties. Ephedrine is the stronger of the two, but both are considered stronger than caffeine. The glaucomatous person should avoid these substances, particularly Ma-huang, licorice, and belladonna. Note: Antihistamines can increase pressure within the eye. If using drugs for other conditions, always inform your doctor of an existing glaucoma condition to avoid prescribing drugs that might adversely affect the disease. Obviously, it behooves individuals relying upon prescription drugs to thoroughly acquaint themselves with the side effects. The use of certain medications that inhibit cholinergic response has been linked to a higher incidence of glaucoma. An anticholinergic drug blocks acetylcholine receptors, resulting in the inhibition of parasympathetic nerve impulses. This action would make stronger the sympathetic nervous system, an action that could dilate the pupil and relax the iris sphincter. Dilation of the pupil could make smaller the passage between the iris and cornea, complicating the exit of the aqueous humor. Difficult question. I can't find any answer in spite of thorough search. Answer:Losartan or Lisinopril (Not sure). Side effects of both medicines include swelling of the eye. Answered by Jed Reisling 1 month ago.

i thought glaucoma was what you put on nachos. Answered by Lucas Purinton 1 month ago.

that's a tricky question.. Answered by Roosevelt Krason 1 month ago.


I have Hyperkeratotic eczema really bad.?
I've been dealing with this problem for a couple years, and have seen 9 different doctors. I have one doctor that is able to control the condition with the combination of tar and steroids. However, the steroids have lost thier effect and the doctor refuses to inject them any longer. Are there any other... Asked by Lavinia Main 1 month ago.

I've been dealing with this problem for a couple years, and have seen 9 different doctors. I have one doctor that is able to control the condition with the combination of tar and steroids. However, the steroids have lost thier effect and the doctor refuses to inject them any longer. Are there any other treatments that anyone knows about? I would really like to be able to walk again. Answered by Sari Neel 1 month ago.

Systemic therapy Systemic therapy includes steroids, immunosuppressive agents (eg, azathioprine, cyclosporine), retinoids (including acitretin), and/or PUVA. Consider the use of systemic glucocorticoids or intralesional steroids in acute episodes when local therapy fails. These agents are not helpful for long-term treatment because of a potential for severe adverse effects. Cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate either alone or in combination with steroids may be used for severe, recalcitrant cases. These agents have also been tried as steroid-sparing agents in chronic relapsing eczema. For hyperkeratotic eczema, consider the use of aromatic retinoids, such as acitretin, which help control hyperkeratosis. These agents are best used in relatively low doses because of adverse effects. Therapy may need to be continued indefinitely in cases of hyperkeratotic eczema and is often accompanied by topical occlusive therapy, with combined or alternating steroids and keratolytics (5-20% salicylic acid) or tar preparations. Other treatment options include treatment with intradermal injections of botulinum toxin A, X-ray therapy, and disulfiram (Antabuse). Botulinum toxin A has been shown to improve symptoms of itching and vesicular formation in controlled left-right comparison studies. This therapy may be used alone or in combination with topical steroids. However, the mechanism of action in reducing the severity of palmoplantar eczema is disputed. Some proposed mechanisms are a disruption of the afferent nerve supply of the skin, which may reduce sweating, which is known to exacerbate the condition. X-ray irradiation has been used in some patients with resistant chronic eczema of the hand. Take care not to exceed the maximum safe cumulative lifetime dose by using dosimetry. External-beam mega-voltage radiation therapy was reportedly successful in treatment of this condition in 1 patient. Typically, ionizing radiation is not used to treat hand eczema. Disulfiram may be administered as a nickel-chelating agent in patients with known nickel sensitivity. Id reactions tend to resolve with treatment of primary infection. Consider systemic antibiotics if secondary infection is suspected. Guard against group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection in particular because cellulitis, lymphangitis, and septicemia may occur. Culture suspicious lesions. Sedation may help. Answered by Graig Calger 1 month ago.


How do you treat myastemia gravis?
Asked by Monika Fastic 1 month ago.

What Are the Treatments? There is no cure for myasthenia gravis, but it is treated with medications and sometimes surgery. You may be put on a medication called pyridostigmine that increases the amount of acetylcholine available to stimulate the receptors. Prednisone and other immunosuppressant drugs, like azathioprine, cyclosporine, or cyclophosphamide, may be given to slow down the production of anti-acetylcholine antibodies. Research is under way to determine if another immunosuppressant, mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), is as effective. Initial results look promising and show it to be effective and to have fewer side effects than do azathioprine and cyclosporine. In severe cases, you may need to have your blood sent through a special machine that removes the antibody-containing plasma and replaces it with antibody-free plasma. This is called plasmapheresis. You may also be given a preparation called immunoglobulin through a needle in a vein. If you have a thymoma, you will need surgery to remove your thymus. In fact, your doctor may recommend that you undergo this surgery even if no tumor is present because removal of the thymus seems to improve symptoms in many patients. If you begin to have difficulty breathing due to weakness of the respiratory muscles, you may need to be admitted to the hospital intensive care unit and placed temporarily on a respirator. Myasthenic crisis often occurs when you develop a severe infection, so you'll probably need to be treated with antibiotics as well. Situations that affect myasthenia gravis include: changes in thyroid function. surgery. radiation therapy. infection. Certain medications can exacerbate symptoms of myasthenia gravis, including: antibiotics (particularly those called aminoglycosides). narcotic medicines. penicillamine. magnesium. anesthetic agents. muscle relaxants. some drugs used to treat heart arrhythmias. Some women notice that their symptoms worsen around the time of their menstrual period. Pregnancy's effect on myasthenia gravis is unpredictable; about one-third of all woman have an improvement in their symptoms, one-third have no change, and one-third suffer an exacerbation. How Can I Prevent Myasthenia Gravis? There are no known ways to prevent myasthenia gravis. If you already have the condition, take these steps to avoid an exacerbation: Try to prevent infections by careful hygiene and avoiding sick people. Treat infections promptly. Do not become overheated or too chilled. Avoid overexertion. Learn effective methods of dealing with stress in your life. Answered by Meta Livezey 1 month ago.

Trick It was a treat for 2 points lol :) Answered by Petronila Markus 1 month ago.


Question about Methotrexate...?
I have undifferentiated mixed connective tissue disease. I've tested positive for Sjogren's syndrome a few years back, but it is not primary. That means that I either have Lupus or Rheumatoid Arthritis. I've been taking plaquenil for 4+ years and had some toxicity. My dose has been decreased and I... Asked by Merilyn Rowley 1 month ago.

I have undifferentiated mixed connective tissue disease. I've tested positive for Sjogren's syndrome a few years back, but it is not primary. That means that I either have Lupus or Rheumatoid Arthritis. I've been taking plaquenil for 4+ years and had some toxicity. My dose has been decreased and I started taking Methotrexate in August. I currently take 10 mg. I've noticed minimal (very, very minor) improvement in joint swelling. I seem to have 2-3 good days a week, but still have considerable swelling in my joints. I see my rheumatologist in 3 weeks, but I thought I would ask anyone who is taking methotrexate to see how long it took them to know it is working. My major complaint is fatigue. I'm exhausted and I don't think the fatigue is worth the minimal improvement. If anyone who is currently taking this med can give me some advice, I would greatly appreciate it. Should I hang in there? I'm also doing homeopathic treatments with a doc and aqua therapy 2-3x a week. Answered by Jackeline Pounders 1 month ago.

I have systemic lupus. I have not taken methotrexate, but I did receive it intravenously in the hospital along with pulse steroids. I had bone marrow failure from the lupus and a very high sed rate, including pericarditis and other things. I too take plaquenil. I have been off prednisone for 6 months. I still take mycophenolate mofetil-Cellcept-for lupus kidney disease. It is hard to know whether it is the medication or the disease making you tired. Autoimmune mixed connective tissue diseases are extremely trick to manage. I would hang in there until you see your rheumy. Keep a journal of your activities and your symptoms. You may see some connections and this journal will be very useful to your rheumatologist. Please be sure to tell all your doctors and practitioners what the others are doing. If you have a good working relationship with your rheumatologist, you should be able to talk about your homeopathic and other complementary treatments with him or her. If you cannot talk this openly, get another doctor. The stress of the disease and its management are enough to bring on fatigue. Add to that the fact that the disease ITSELF causes fatigue and it is no wonder you feel that way. You did not get to your current level of inflammation overnight and it will not go down overnight. Are you on prednisone too? Did you have chloroquine retinopathy from the plaquenil? Feel free to email me at [email protected] Best wishes. Be patient. Answered by Cori Furna 1 month ago.

I have had RA for 8 years and have been on Methotrexate for all 8 years. I previously also took plaquenil but was told by my rheumatologist that the side effects were not worth the small benefit. With methotrexate you must be careful about mouth ulcers, therefore be sure to take folic acid as well to deter this side effect. Methotrexate does minimize the pain and aches but not as effectively or consistently as either Enbrel, Remicade or Humira. I have been using Enbrel with the methotrexate now for a year and notice an significant improvement, however none of these will help with the exteme fatigue. There are other meds that can help with the fatigue, you just have to be the "squeaky wheel" and don't give up. I would suggest asking about one of the other three meds I mentioned (however they are all pretty expensive so check with your health insurance first). Hope this helps. Answered by Bruna Brickner 1 month ago.


My boyfriend had a kidney transplant about 5 years ago, is it safe for him to take sex enhancement pills?
My boyfriend had a kidney transplant about 5 years ago. Hes doing okay but we were wondering if its safe for him to take a sex enhancement pill? he takes two types of medication a day which is Tacrolimus & Mycophenolate mofetil. Asked by Delaine Wambach 1 month ago.

Depends upon his renal history and current lab results. Those kind of drugs will reduce BP and that may prove harmful in that internal organs are similarly affected. Answered by Gaylord Means 1 month ago.


Cellcept interaction question?
I am writing a report on cellcept for my industrial tox class. If you can help with these questions or point me to a place that i can find this info out at, I would appreciate it! Does anybody know of a chemical that might be found in the workplace that could react with this drug?What chemical in cold... Asked by Ashton Cookman 1 month ago.

I am writing a report on cellcept for my industrial tox class. If you can help with these questions or point me to a place that i can find this info out at, I would appreciate it! Does anybody know of a chemical that might be found in the workplace that could react with this drug? What chemical in cold medicine reacts with Cellcept? Answered by Lacy Lanpher 1 month ago.


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