MYAMBUTOL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016320/001.

Names and composition

"MYAMBUTOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016320/001 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
016320/002 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
016320/003 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016320/004 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016320/001 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
016320/002 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
016320/003 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016320/004 MYAMBUTOL ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
075095/001 ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075095/002 ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
076057/001 ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
078939/001 ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078939/002 ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE ETHAMBUTOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG

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A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

How do you pronounce Rifadin, myambutol?
how do you pronounce this drugs??? Asked by Piedad Comes 1 month ago.

i believe they are pronounced "riff-uh-din" and "my-am-byoo-tall" Answered by Sang Kintz 1 month ago.

As long as you can spell it, I wouldn't worry about the pronunciation :) Answered by Alva Schollmeier 1 month ago.


M scared. I have Tuberculosis.when will blood in cough stop?
I have been diagnosed Tuberculosis and i am already taking medicines for the last three days. Doctors recommended Injection shots today for stopping blood. I hope it does. The question is when will the blood stop?I had pain in my ribs to begin with and coughed a lot for the last 6 months. Please help. i am... Asked by Lita Cambi 1 month ago.

I have been diagnosed Tuberculosis and i am already taking medicines for the last three days. Doctors recommended Injection shots today for stopping blood. I hope it does. The question is when will the blood stop? I had pain in my ribs to begin with and coughed a lot for the last 6 months. Please help. i am already under medication. M dead scared. Answered by Machelle Fucile 1 month ago.


Do TB preventive course is any way harmful & Can I eat my old homeopathic medicine during my Tb course .?
Asked by Lizabeth Spartz 1 month ago.

Oh no, not at all. The drug regimen for Tuberculosis as matter of rule starts with the strongest medicines. These are Rifampcin, Isoniazid, and the latest drug Floxin (Ofloxacin). Sometimes Myambutol is also combined. By the way did your sputum culture come positive for the Acid Fast Bacteria?? Doctors usually prescribe Tuberculosis medicines on the basis of x-rays and clinical symptoms. But x-rays also have to be compared like a year old one with the latest to show if there is any increase in the lesions, cavities, shadows, etc. I wish I could know what other symptoms you have like dry cough, fatigue, rank blood in the morning, etc. Now coming to your question about having your old homeopathic medicines it is the most unwise thing to do. One cannot combine homeopathic medicines because you never know how that would interact and affect the allopathic medicines. So you should definitely rule that out. There is more possibility of harm than benefit. Moreover there is no recognized or known treatment in homeopathy for Tuberculosis. Did you have a culture and sensitivity test for your Acid Fast Bacteria? There are now some strongly resistant strains of Tuberculosis. If you are smoking it would be suicidal because a treatment for one year would extend to twenty months or so. Kindly be careful. And I wish you all the best of health. Don't worry TB is a curable disease but any experimentation may cause harm. Thanks. Answered by Miguel Cambronne 1 month ago.

Ask the doctor who is giving you the preventative TB course...depends exclusively on what treatment you're getting and what medicines you normally take, homeopathic or otherwise. Answered by Luanna Fouquet 1 month ago.


Tuberculosis Question...?!!?
So I'm suppose to be doing this poster for my Biology Honors classes researching on bacterial pathogen including a description with name (what is the shape of the organism, what cell structures does it have...), organisms (mode of operation, how it attacks and spreads), most common victims, where it is most... Asked by Johnnie Dahlheimer 1 month ago.

So I'm suppose to be doing this poster for my Biology Honors classes researching on bacterial pathogen including a description with name (what is the shape of the organism, what cell structures does it have...), organisms (mode of operation, how it attacks and spreads), most common victims, where it is most likely to be found, most common injury done to victims, is it considered dangerous, number of victims, most effective treatment against it, and other identifying characteristics and I'm not sure if the information from the research I've done is accurate or not. Also, I am missing a couple of info that I need for the poster so if you could look over the stuff I gathered and maybe add to it would be great! Thanks in advance! 1. Description with name (what is the shape of the organism, cell structures it has): Mycobacterium tuberculosis, large rod-shaped, missing info about cell structure...D: 2. Organism (mode of operation, how it attacks, spreads): missing mode of operation...and how it attacks...it spreads when you have a weak immune system and you are physically close to someone because it is passed easily from one person to another. 3. Most common victims: People with weakened immune systems, elders, infants 4. Where it is likely to be found: Lungs? Not sure... 5. Most common injury done to victims: scarring of lungs? meningitis? not sure... 6. Armed and Dangerous (rate from 1-10 on danger level): YES...not sure how to rate it. 7. Number of victims: One third of the world. 8. Most effective treatment: Anti-bacterial medications such as rifampin, myambutol and others. 9. Other identifying characteristics: I don't know help...? Again, thanks in advance! Sorry that it was a bit lengthy to read, but please help! xD Answered by Cassondra Freelove 1 month ago.

Try the Mayo clinic website. If you go on wikipedia use their reference sites so you can trust the info. Answered by Toby Winton 1 month ago.

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system. Symptoms of TB in the lungs may include A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer Weight loss Coughing up blood or mucus Weakness or fatigue Fever and chills Night sweats If not treated properly, TB can be deadly. You can usually cure active TB by taking several medicines for a long period of time. People with latent TB can take medicine so that they do not develop active TB. When the inhaled tuberculosis bacteria enter the lungs, they can multiply and cause a local lung infection (pneumonia). The local lymph nodes associated with the lungs may also become involved with the infection and usually become enlarged. The hilar lymph nodes (the lymph nodes adjacent to the heart in the central part of the chest) are often involved. In addition, TB can spread to other parts of the body. The body's immune (defense) system, however, can fight off the infection and stop the bacteria from spreading. The immune system does so ultimately by forming scar tissue around the TB bacteria and isolating it from the rest of the body. Tuberculosis that occurs after initial exposure to the bacteria is often referred to as primary TB. If the body is able to form scar tissue (fibrosis) around the TB bacteria, then the infection is contained in an inactive state. Such an individual typically has no symptoms and cannot spread TB to other people. The scar tissue and lymph nodes may eventually harden, like stone, due to the process of calcification of the scars (deposition of calcium from the bloodstream in the scar tissue). These scars often appear on x-rays and imaging studies like round marbles and are referred to as a granuloma. If these scars do not show any evidence of calcium on x-ray, they can be difficult to distinguish from cancer. Sometimes, however, the body's immune system becomes weakened, and the TB bacteria break through the scar tissue and can cause active disease, referred to as reactivation tuberculosis or secondary TB. For example, the immune system can be weakened by old age, the development of another infection or a cancer, or certain medications such as cortisone, anticancer drugs, or certain medications used to treat arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease. The breakthrough of bacteria can result in a recurrence of the pneumonia and a spread of TB to other locations in the body. The kidneys, bone, and lining of the brain and spinal cord (meninges) are the most common sites affected by the spread of TB beyond the lungs. Answered by Dick Schwertfager 1 month ago.

You're on the right track, but really you should do your own research. All the info you seek is readily available in libraries or on the Internet. Answered by Madeline Siwek 1 month ago.

SHAME ON YOU THUY xD Answered by Son Mcloud 1 month ago.


Tuberculosis?
what is the method of respiration for tuberculosis and what are the environmental conditions for favorable growth for tuberculosis? this is for a paper i have to write Asked by Trey Kimple 1 month ago.

this will help you with your paper Tuberculosis Treatment Date updated: December 21, 2006 Content provided by MayoClinic.com Until the mid-20th century, people with tuberculosis were routinely cared for in sanitariums - often for years - where the clear, cold air, abundant food and enforced rest were believed to heal the lungs and halt the wasting that's characteristic of the disease. Often, the treatment not only helped cure TB, but also prevented its spread. Today, medications are the cornerstone of tuberculosis treatment. The therapy is lengthy. Normally, you take antibiotics for six to 12 months to completely destroy the bacteria. The exact drugs and length of treatment depends on your age, overall health, the results of susceptibility tests, and whether you have TB infection or active TB. Treating TB infection If tests show that you have TB infection but not active disease, your doctor may recommend preventive drug therapy to destroy dormant bacteria that might become active in the future. In that case, you're likely to receive a daily dose of the TB medication isoniazid (INH). For treatment to be effective, you usually take INH for six to nine months. Long-term use can cause side effects, including the life-threatening liver disease hepatitis. For that reason, your doctor will monitor you closely while you're taking INH. During treatment, avoid using acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and avoid or limit alcohol use. Both greatly increase your risk of liver damage. Treating active TB disease If you're diagnosed with active TB, you're likely to begin taking four medications - isoniazid, rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), ethambutol (Myambutol) and pyrazinamide. This regimen may change if susceptibility tests later show some of these drugs to be ineffective. Even so, you'll continue to take several medications. Depending on the severity of your disease and whether there is drug resistance, one or two of the four drugs may be stopped after a few months. Sometimes the drugs may be combined in a single tablet such as Rifater, which contains isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide. This makes your therapy less complicated while ensuring that you get the different drugs needed to completely destroy TB bacteria. Another drug that may make treatment easier is rifapentine (Priftin), which is taken just once a week during the last four months of therapy. Sometimes you may be hospitalized for the first two weeks of therapy or until tests show that you're no longer contagious. Completing treatment is essential Because TB bacteria grow slowly, treatment for an active infection is lengthy - usually six to 12 months. After a few weeks, you won't be contagious and may start to feel better, but it's essential that you finish the full course of therapy and take the medications exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Stopping treatment too soon or skipping doses can create drug-resistant strains of the disease that are much more dangerous and difficult to treat. Drug-resistant strains that aren't treated can quickly become fatal, especially in people with impaired immune systems. In an effort to help people stick with their treatment regimen, some doctors and clinics use a program called directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS). In this approach, a nurse or other health care professional administers your medication so that you don't have to remember to take it on your own. Treatment side effects Side effects of TB drugs aren't common, but can be serious when they do occur. All TB medications can be highly toxic to your liver. Rifampin can also cause severe flu-like signs and symptoms - fever, chills, muscle pain, nausea and vomiting. When taking these medications, call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following: Nausea or vomiting Loss of appetite A yellow color to your skin (jaundice) A fever lasting three or more days that has no obvious cause, such as a cold or the flu Tenderness or soreness in your abdomen Blurred vision or colorblindness Treating drug-resistant TB Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is any strain of TB that can't be treated by the two most powerful TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. Extensive drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is a newly developed strain of TB that's resistant to the same treatments that MDR-TB is, and additionally XDR-TB is resistant to three or more of the second-line TB drugs. Both strains develop as a result of partial or incomplete treatment - either because people skip doses or don't finish their entire course of medication or because they're given the wrong treatment regimen. This gives bacteria time to undergo mutations that can resist treatment with first-line TB drugs. MDR-TB can be treated. But it requires at least two years of therapy with second-line medications that can be highly toxic. Even with treatment, many people with MDR-TB may not survive. And when treatment is successful, people with this form of TB may need surgery to remove areas of persistent infection or repair lung damage. Treating these resistant forms of TB is far more costly than treating nonresistant TB, making therapy unaffordable in many parts of the world. Because these resistant infections are spreading and could potentially make all TB incurable, some experts believe that ineffective treatment is ultimately worse than no treatment at all. Treating people who have HIV/AIDS Treating people who are co-infected with TB and HIV is a particular challenge. HIV-positive people are especially likely to develop MDR-TB and to rapidly progress from latent to active infection. What's more, the most powerful AIDS drugs - protease inhibitors - interact with rifampin and other drugs used to treat TB, reducing the effectiveness of both types of medications. To avoid interactions, people living with both HIV and TB may stop taking protease inhibitors while they complete a short course of TB therapy that includes rifampin. Or they may be treated with a TB regimen in which rifampin is replaced with another drug that's less likely to interfere with AIDS medications. In such cases, doctors carefully monitor the response to therapy, and the duration and type of regimen may change over time. Without treatment, most people living with both HIV and TB will die, often in a matter of months. In such cases, the primary cause of death is TB, not AIDS. Answered by Gabriel Saner 1 month ago.


URGENT QUESTION 2!?
If It Is tuberculosis in my girlfriends lungs, could you give me some stuff about it like. Can It Go Away. If Not Is There Ways To Get It Too Go Away. All Stuff Like That. Thanks For All Your Help, Your Help Is Greatfully Apreicated! Asked by Vernita Mandiola 1 month ago.

Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infection that primarily affects your lungs. Every year, tuberculosis kills nearly 2 million people worldwide. The infection is common — about one-third of the human population is infected with TB, with one new infection occurring every second. Tuberculosis has plagued human beings for millennia. Signs of tubercular damage have been found in Egyptian mummies and in bones dating back at least 5,000 years. Today, despite advances in treatment, TB is a global pandemic, fueled by the spread of HIV/AIDS, poverty, a lack of health services and the emergence of drug-resistant strains of the bacterium that causes the disease. Tuberculosis spreads through airborne droplets when a person with the infection coughs, talks or sneezes. In general, you need prolonged exposure to an infected person before becoming infected yourself. Even then, you may not develop symptoms of the disease. Or, symptoms may not show up until many years later. Left untreated, tuberculosis can be fatal. With proper care, however, most cases of tuberculosis can be treated, even those resistant to the drugs commonly used against the disease Treatment Until the mid-20th century, people with tuberculosis were routinely cared for in sanitariums — often for years — where the clear, cold air, abundant food and enforced rest were believed to heal the lungs and halt the wasting that's characteristic of the disease. Often, the treatment not only helped cure TB, but also prevented its spread. Today, medications are the cornerstone of tuberculosis treatment. The therapy is lengthy. Normally, you take antibiotics for six to 12 months to completely destroy the bacteria. The exact drugs and length of treatment depends on your age, overall health, the results of susceptibility tests, and whether you have TB infection or active TB. Treating TB infection If tests show that you have TB infection but not active disease, your doctor may recommend preventive drug therapy to destroy dormant bacteria that might become active in the future. In that case, you're likely to receive a daily dose of the TB medication isoniazid (INH). For treatment to be effective, you usually take INH for six to nine months. Long-term use can cause side effects, including the life-threatening liver disease hepatitis. For that reason, your doctor will monitor you closely while you're taking INH. During treatment, avoid using acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and avoid or limit alcohol use. Both greatly increase your risk of liver damage. Treating active TB disease If you're diagnosed with active TB, you're likely to begin taking four medications — isoniazid, rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), ethambutol (Myambutol) and pyrazinamide. This regimen may change if susceptibility tests later show some of these drugs to be ineffective. Even so, you'll continue to take several medications. Depending on the severity of your disease and whether there is drug resistance, one or two of the four drugs may be stopped after a few months. Sometimes the drugs may be combined in a single tablet such as Rifater, which contains isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide. This makes your therapy less complicated while ensuring that you get the different drugs needed to completely destroy TB bacteria. Another drug that may make treatment easier is rifapentine (Priftin), which is taken just once a week during the last four months of therapy. Sometimes you may be hospitalized for the first two weeks of therapy or until tests show that you're no longer contagious. Completing treatment is essential Because TB bacteria grow slowly, treatment for an active infection is lengthy — usually six to 12 months. After a few weeks, you won't be contagious and may start to feel better, but it's essential that you finish the full course of therapy and take the medications exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Stopping treatment too soon or skipping doses can create drug-resistant strains of the disease that are much more dangerous and difficult to treat. Drug-resistant strains that aren't treated can quickly become fatal, especially in people with impaired immune systems. In an effort to help people stick with their treatment regimen, some doctors and clinics use a program called directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS). In this approach, a nurse or other health care professional administers your medication so that you don't have to remember to take it on your own. Treatment side effects Side effects of TB drugs aren't common, but can be serious when they do occur. All TB medications can be highly toxic to your liver. Rifampin can also cause severe flu-like signs and symptoms — fever, chills, muscle pain, nausea and vomiting. When taking these medications, call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following: Nausea or vomiting Loss of appetite A yellow color to your skin (jaundice) A fever lasting three or more days that has no obvious cause, such as a cold or the flu Tenderness or soreness in your abdomen Blurred vision or colorblindness Treating drug-resistant TB Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is any strain of TB that can't be treated by the two most powerful TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. Extensive drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is a newly developed strain of TB that's resistant to the same treatments that MDR-TB is, and additionally XDR-TB is resistant to three or more of the second-line TB drugs. Both strains develop as a result of partial or incomplete treatment — either because people skip doses or don't finish their entire course of medication or because they're given the wrong treatment regimen. This gives bacteria time to undergo mutations that can resist treatment with first-line TB drugs. MDR-TB can be treated. But it requires at least two years of therapy with second-line medications that can be highly toxic. Even with treatment, many people with MDR-TB may not survive. And when treatment is successful, people with this form of TB may need surgery to remove areas of persistent infection or repair lung damage. Treating these resistant forms of TB is far more costly than treating nonresistant TB, making therapy unaffordable in many parts of the world. Because these resistant infections are spreading and could potentially make all TB incurable, some experts believe that ineffective treatment is ultimately worse than no treatment at all. Treating people who have HIV/AIDS Treating people who are co-infected with TB and HIV is a particular challenge. HIV-positive people are especially likely to develop MDR-TB and to rapidly progress from latent to active infection. What's more, the most powerful AIDS drugs — protease inhibitors — interact with rifampin and other drugs used to treat TB, reducing the effectiveness of both types of medications. To avoid interactions, people living with both HIV and TB may stop taking protease inhibitors while they complete a short course of TB therapy that includes rifampin. Or they may be treated with a TB regimen in which rifampin is replaced with another drug that's less likely to interfere with AIDS medications. In such cases, doctors carefully monitor the response to therapy, and the duration and type of regimen may change over time. Without treatment, most people living with both HIV and TB will die, often in a matter of months. In such cases, the primary cause of death is TB, not AIDS. GekKO! Answered by Jc Beckes 1 month ago.

I'm truly am sorry to hear such news. Tuberculosis is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs. But, TB bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal. If you have active TB, your doctor may recommend that you take 4 medicines: Isoniazid Rifampin (one brand name: Rifadin) Ethambutol (brand name: Myambutol) Pyrazinamide Answered by Leon Neverman 1 month ago.

I'm sorry to hear that Taylor. TB is a deadly infectious disease that affects most of the body's systems. If you're looking to treat it, it may take about half a year up to a year to completely kill all of the bacteria. Two antibiotics that would be helpful are rifampicin and isoniazid. Hope all gets better soon. Answered by Henry Sandona 1 month ago.

My first theory grew to become into spray him with water on an identical time as doing it yet if you consider that he's doing it once you won't be able to see it i think of he's doing it out of boredom in all probability. Is he going on sufficient walks? Is he being performed with/socialized with different canines? Tie the curtains up while leaving the room and/or take the canine with you to maintain a watch on him. And advance walks/canine park visits. additionally, while leaving and not in a position to take him with you, then positioned him outdoors (why go away a canine contained in the homestead once you will desire to head get grocery's which will pee everywhere) Get new curtains so the scent would be "long gone" acceptable now, it rather is his "pee spot" (canines will numerous cases continuously pee contained in the comparable area) eliminate his spot, that would desire to help. Thats all my suggestions. Answered by Adam Poffenroth 1 month ago.

Immediate treatment at a hospital!!!!!! Vaccinate the both of you. Tell any friends or family that you have been in contact or were exposed to this disease.They also should be checked and vaccinated if they already haven't been. Answered by Donnette Volbrecht 1 month ago.


Treatment and prevention of Tuberculosis?
Im doing a project Asked by Catarina Teach 1 month ago.

TUBERCULOSIS:: Tuberculosis (TB),has been around for many many yrs.it has declined in the past century, but there has been an increase with the homeless folks living in the inner cities and people infected with HIV also from other country's., TB is a long lasting (chronic) bacterial infection. You can breath this in from someone elses sneezes or coughs since its an air boren disease. TB varies directly with the frequency and intensity of your contacts with people who are infected .TB results from the bacterium mycobacterium tuberculosis. If a person is expsoed to TB this organism may gain entry to the lungs Can be infected but have no symptoms initially, or you may develope a light fever or cough. The TB organism can spread through the lymph nodes and blood to almost any part of the body. Areas most commonly effected are the lungs and the membranes that cover the lungs (pleural membranes), the spine ,large joints, and the kidneys, if the kidneys are effected the feeling is like a bad bladder infection. A simple skin test can let a person know if they have been infected. this test is a small needle with the tuberculin purified protein derivative into the skin . If infected this will cause a reaction at injection site within 48-72 hours if this is very active infection or the immune system is suppressed the TB test reaction may be falsely negative. A preliminary diagnosis of TB is often based on a chest X ray where changes may appear within 2-3 months after the initial infection.Your doctor may want a person to collect sputum for staining and examination under a microscope. A diagnosis is confirmed by growing the organism (culturing) in a laboratory. The sputum is usually the easiest sample to obtain for a culture,another way is urine and stomach secretions.Stomach secretions are collected by passing a small tube through the nose,down the back of the throatthrough the esophagus and into the stomach.the doctor may get preliminary results fr4om a staining test much faster than a culture the staining is up in 24 hours as to the culture takes at least 3-8 weeks because the TB bacterium grows very slow. Some strains of the TB organism require different or more intensive treatments than other strains.Sometimes the TB develops within week after initial exposure.however the TB organism may lie dormant for years before the disease becomes apparent. The disease may be reactivated under a weak immune system with age,alcoholism. and malnutrition or the use of immunosuppressant medications or the present of certain illnesses like HIV / Aids or Cancers. Drugs have been the main treatment for this disease but as time goes on the drugs offered have become resistant (the organisms) that have been commonly usedActive Tb strats with 4 type drugs isoniazid (Laniazid,Nydrazid), Rifampin (Rifadin). Pyrazinamidecan be combined into one pill (rifater)and Ethambutol(myambutol).. To determine the bactera's sensitivity or resistance to each drug cultures of either stutum or other body secetions or tissues are evaluated in a laboratory when theses results are complete some drugs may need to be replaced with either stronger or a new drug all together. Once a drug regimen is started improvement is seen in the symptoms in 3-4 weeks.with a follow up chest X ray this treatment may last for 1 year this is to be sure the TB is destroyed for good. If you have a positive TB skin test especially if you or some one you know has been in close contact with any one with the TB diseasethe doc may consider giving you isoniazid to decrease the risk of developing active TB this must be taken for 9 months in addition the rest of the family may have to take this or another similar one to keep all from getting the TB disease. Answered by Jonna Janning 1 month ago.


Tuburculosis?
Ok so me and my family went to a wedding and then 4 days later they said a guy that went there had tuburculosis and so now like a thousand people went and got this shot where at the begginning its like a bubble then they say dont mess with it then i went today and they measured a bump where they took the shot and... Asked by Kate Mcmanuis 1 month ago.

Ok so me and my family went to a wedding and then 4 days later they said a guy that went there had tuburculosis and so now like a thousand people went and got this shot where at the begginning its like a bubble then they say dont mess with it then i went today and they measured a bump where they took the shot and they said to go tomorrow(some people didnt have anything) so now i'm nervous now what was the shot? what are the chances of me having turbuculosis? and the guy that had it knew and he still went to the wedding! Answered by Candyce Deshazior 1 month ago.

Sad to say many people have it and we are not aware of it. The shot was a TB shot it's to check if you have it, if the lump ramains on your arm after you've been checked it's a possible chance you may have it, but again if you rubbed it or iched it then you could of screwd up the test. Around the world, TB is a common, life-threatening infection spread through airborne droplets from a sneeze, cough or even just talking. Signs and symptoms Date updated: December 21, 2006 Content provided by MayoClinic.com Although your body may harbor the TB bacteria, your immune system often can prevent you from becoming sick. For that reason, doctors make a distinction between: TB infection. This condition, sometimes called latent TB, causes no symptoms and isn't contagious. Active TB. This condition makes you sick and can spread to others. However, the infection may be asymptomatic for years, even though it's active and causing damage. Your immune system begins to attack TB bacteria two to eight weeks after you're infected. Sometimes the bacteria die, and the infection clears completely. In other cases, the bacteria remain in your body in an inactive state and cause no tuberculosis symptoms. In still other cases, you may develop active TB. TB mainly affects your lungs (pulmonary tuberculosis), and coughing is often the only indication of infection initially. Signs and symptoms of active pulmonary TB include: A cough lasting three or more weeks that may produce discolored or bloody sputum Unintended weight loss Fatigue Slight fever Night sweats Chills Loss of appetite Pain with breathing or coughing (pleurisy) Tuberculosis also can target almost any part of your body, including your joints, bones, urinary tract, central nervous system, muscles, bone marrow and lymphatic system. When TB occurs outside your lungs, signs and symptoms vary, depending on the organs involved. For example, tuberculosis of the spine may result in back pain, and tuberculosis that affects your kidneys might cause blood in your urine. Tuberculosis can also spread through your entire body, simultaneously attacking many organ systems. Treating TB infection If tests show that you have TB infection but not active disease, your doctor may recommend preventive drug therapy to destroy dormant bacteria that might become active in the future. In that case, you're likely to receive a daily dose of the TB medication isoniazid (INH). For treatment to be effective, you usually take INH for six to nine months. Long-term use can cause side effects, including the life-threatening liver disease hepatitis. For that reason, your doctor will monitor you closely while you're taking INH. During treatment, avoid using acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and avoid or limit alcohol use. Both greatly increase your risk of liver damage. Treating active TB disease If you're diagnosed with active TB, you're likely to begin taking four medications - isoniazid, rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), ethambutol (Myambutol) and pyrazinamide. This regimen may change if susceptibility tests later show some of these drugs to be ineffective. Even so, you'll continue to take several medications. Depending on the severity of your disease and whether there is drug resistance, one or two of the four drugs may be stopped after a few months. Sometimes the drugs may be combined in a single tablet such as Rifater, which contains isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide. This makes your therapy less complicated while ensuring that you get the different drugs needed to completely destroy TB bacteria. Another drug that may make treatment easier is rifapentine (Priftin), which is taken just once a week during the last four months of therapy. Sometimes you may be hospitalized for the first two weeks of therapy or until tests show that you're no longer contagious. Completing treatment is essential Because TB bacteria grow slowly, treatment for an active infection is lengthy - usually six to 12 months. After a few weeks, you won't be contagious and may start to feel better, but it's essential that you finish the full course of therapy and take the medications exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Stopping treatment too soon or skipping doses can create drug-resistant strains of the disease that are much more dangerous and difficult to treat. Drug-resistant strains that aren't treated can quickly become fatal, especially in people with impaired immune systems. In an effort to help people stick with their treatment regimen, some doctors and clinics use a program called directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS). In this approach, a nurse or other health care professional administers your medication so that you don't have to remember to take it on your own. Treatment side effects Side effects of TB drugs aren't common, but can be serious when they do occur. All TB medications can be highly toxic to your liver. Rifampin can also cause severe flu-like signs and symptoms - fever, chills, muscle pain, nausea and vomiting. When taking these medications, call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following: Nausea or vomiting Loss of appetite A yellow color to your skin (jaundice) A fever lasting three or more days that has no obvious cause, such as a cold or the flu Tenderness or soreness in your abdomen Blurred vision or colorblindness Treating drug-resistant TB Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is any strain of TB that can't be treated by the two most powerful TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. Extensive drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is a newly developed strain of TB that's resistant to the same treatments that MDR-TB is, and additionally XDR-TB is resistant to three or more of the second-line TB drugs. Both strains develop as a result of partial or incomplete treatment - either because people skip doses or don't finish their entire course of medication or because they're given the wrong treatment regimen. This gives bacteria time to undergo mutations that can resist treatment with first-line TB drugs. MDR-TB can be treated. But it requires at least two years of therapy with second-line medications that can be highly toxic. Even with treatment, many people with MDR-TB may not survive. And when treatment is successful, people with this form of TB may need surgery to remove areas of persistent infection or repair lung damage. Treating these resistant forms of TB is far more costly than treating nonresistant TB, making therapy unaffordable in many parts of the world. Because these resistant infections are spreading and could potentially make all TB incurable, some experts believe that ineffective treatment is ultimately worse than no treatment at all. Answered by Diana Chisley 1 month ago.


Tuberculosis Question...?
So I'm suppose to be doing this poster for my Biology Honors classes researching on bacterial pathogen including a description with name (what is the shape of the organism, what cell structures does it have...), organisms (mode of operation, how it attacks and spreads), most common victims, where it is most... Asked by Carlie Lizak 1 month ago.

So I'm suppose to be doing this poster for my Biology Honors classes researching on bacterial pathogen including a description with name (what is the shape of the organism, what cell structures does it have...), organisms (mode of operation, how it attacks and spreads), most common victims, where it is most likely to be found, most common injury done to victims, is it considered dangerous, number of victims, most effective treatment against it, and other identifying characteristics and I'm not sure if the information from the research I've done is accurate or not. Also, I am missing a couple of info that I need for the poster so if you could look over the stuff I gathered and maybe add to it would be great! Thanks in advance! 1. Description with name (what is the shape of the organism, cell structures it has): Mycobacterium tuberculosis, large rod-shaped, missing info about cell structure...D: 2. Organism (mode of operation, how it attacks, spreads): missing mode of operation...and how it attacks...it spreads when you have a weak immune system and you are physically close to someone because it is passed easily from one person to another. 3. Most common victims: People with weakened immune systems, elders, infants 4. Where it is likely to be found: Lungs? Not sure... 5. Most common injury done to victims: scarring of lungs? meningitis? not sure... 6. Armed and Dangerous (rate from 1-10 on danger level): YES...not sure how to rate it. 7. Number of victims: One third of the world. 8. Most effective treatment: Anti-bacterial medications such as rifampin, myambutol and others. 9. Other identifying characteristics: I don't know help...? Again, thanks in advance! Sorry that it was a bit lengthy to read, but please help! xD Answered by Andrea Celmer 1 month ago.

9 )Tuberculosis is characterised by involvment in the lungs in more than 80% of cases in HIV-negative patients. •Primary disease is frequently located in the middle and lower lobes of lungs ,which usually heals spontaneously and a calcified nodule remains.Hilar and paratracheal lymphadenopathy are common.In immunocompromised patients ,primary disease may progress rapidly to clinical disease with cavitation,pleural effusion and hematogenous dissemination. • Post primary disease is usually localized to apical and posterior segments of upper lobes and the superior segments of lower lobes.Early symptoms include presence of productive cough ,may be with haemoptysis,pleural effusion ,dyspnoea ,orthopnea,anorexia ,malaise etc.Chest X-Ray may show typical apical cavity and changes like pleural effusion,nodularity and miliary or diffuse infiltrates in lung parenchyma. •Systemic features include fever ,night sweats, fatigue and loss of appetite.long standing untreated cases of tuberculosis may develop systemic secondary amyloidosis.Disease can be limited ,or extensive cavitation develops .Extensive disease can cause dyspnea and respiratory distress. •Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis occurs in two-thirds of HIV infected patients involves lymph 5) organ and tissue damage 4) kidneys, joints and the brain 3)prevalent in Sub Saharan Africa and SE Asia East Europe the lowest cases are in Scandinavain.. 6) rate it high since its been spreading fast in other countries Answered by Jeannette Linney 1 month ago.


Why must I take Tuberculosis (TB) medicine even if results are negative?
First coughing for 3 months Dec 2010 & Jan 2011/ Feb 2011 followed by back pain especially in early morningsI had chest pain and sputum was coming out for Jan & Feb (2 months) After that slow pain that gradually increased after 2 months....I had visited a hospital , the doctor looked at 3 xray from the... Asked by Leoma Dalla 1 month ago.

First coughing for 3 months Dec 2010 & Jan 2011/ Feb 2011 followed by back pain especially in early mornings I had chest pain and sputum was coming out for Jan & Feb (2 months) After that slow pain that gradually increased after 2 months.... I had visited a hospital , the doctor looked at 3 xray from the past 3 months , when I had already took so many antibiotics gave IV with 2mg Rocephin, and gave CBC and blood ESR Test. ESR was before 20 then after 2 weeks got reduced to 15 After that the Internal Medicine doctor prescribed me Azithromycin & Zeenat. After a month , I went to another internal medicine doctor and complained of chest pain , He told me it was T.B , by looking at my old xray. .. according to him I prescribed me avalox... After that I went to a chest physician (F.C.C.P) in the month of May 2011 After that he also looked at my Xray and told me that it is T.B high chance So he told me to undergo bronscoschopy to reveal the right findings.. After the the reports came back after 2 weeks A.F.B Culture was Negative A.F.B Smear also negative Fungal smear was positive So he gave me medication for the fungal for a week along with the medicines for T.B The T.B Medicines he gave me were : - Rifampin (Rifadin), ethambutol (Myambutol), and pyrazinamide & isoniazid (INH). He told me to take them daily also for 6 months After 3 weeks I took a ESR test it showed me ESR Rating 2.. But My liver test Uric acid was very high 750 ml/g Also the C.T Scan according tot the doctor showed t.b bacteria. But I mnot usre must I take all those tablets ,im only 24 and Im not sure whether the T.B drugs I still have to consider taking even though the results are negative Answered by Rolanda Sandvik 1 month ago.

You need a doctor to answer that question, I suggest the one who prescribed the drugs. Just ask him/her. Answered by Eddie Reichman 1 month ago.


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