MUCOMYST Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 013601/001.

Names and composition

"MUCOMYST" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ACETYLCYSTEINE.

Answered questions

Why do doctors give people mucomyst before heart cath?
What does it actually do? Asked by Horacio Krawitz 5 months ago.

Mucomyst is usually given to patients with high levels of creatinine (or patients with kidney failure) before cardiac catheterization because it helps protect the kidneys and liver when clearing the contrast dye. The current theory is that it somehow binds to the free radicals that can be produced by the dyes used in these procedures and therefore spares the kidney tissues damage caused by processing them. A surprising revelation shows that acetylcysteine (Mucomyst, Parvolex) can help prevent renal damage from dyes that are given during certain diagnostic tests...CT scans, angiograms, etc. These contrast agents are the third most common cause of acute renal failure in hospitalized patients.Acetylcysteine is thought to improve renal blood flow and have antioxidant properties. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Mucomyst Solution: Cold, clammy skin; drowsiness; fever; inflammation of the mouth or tongue; nausea; runny nose; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Mucomyst Solution: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); mouth sores; throat and lung irritation. Take care always! OIRAM Answered by Anastasia Tepper 5 months ago.

Well...I'd be more than happy to join the many brothers and sisters who are taking your friend's need and lifting them up before the King's throne! I don't know if the cath ahs already been performed. If not, I'll be asking God to lead the cardiologist and guide his hand. To give him a calm heart and the wisdom to know what is exactly needed. I also want to ask our King to have His angels minister to your friend as he recovers from the procedure. May there be no complications, and may God HImself, the Great Physician see your friend heals completely and with no complications. And not to forget his family either. May the Living God wrap them in His arms and give them a sense of peace throughout all of this, a calmness they have never felt, and to have the sense of assurance that all wll be fine. Traveling Prayer Warrior Answered by Elaina Mcneilly 5 months ago.

I couldn't just sit around and do nothing like my doctors suggested. They didn't want me to do anything or to take herbs or herbal remedies, but I had to try something - they just wanted me to do dialysis! This program allowed me to take control of my health. I went from Stage 4 to Stage 3 kidney disease. It was easy to do and my BUN, creatinine and anemia are all in better ranges. Reversing Your Kidney Disease? Answered by Carmina Laursen 5 months ago.

It is given to people at high risk for developing renal failure from contrast nephropathy (kidney toxicity from dye). Its effectiveness is debatable. Answered by Martin Ockey 5 months ago.


What is mucomyst used for?
i was given this to counter act tylenol why? Asked by Arden Macgowan 5 months ago.

Mucomyst is N-acetylcysteine, a precursor of glutathione. Glutathione is an antioxidant that prevents free radical damage by NAPQI, a metabolite of acetaminophen, among others. You don't have enough glutathione available to prevent NAPQI from destroying your liver in the event of an acetaminophen overdose, so the MDs boosted the amount available by providing the precursor for its synthesis. q Answered by Alpha Belken 5 months ago.


Mucomyst with Atrovent?
We're having a little debate here at work: Because mucomyst when inhaled can trigger bronchospasm, we always co-administer or pretreat with a bronchodilator. Does the bronchodilator have to be a beta agonist? Some of us say yes, because it's the quickest acting or because anticholinergics (Atrovent)... Asked by Stephen Brixius 5 months ago.

We're having a little debate here at work: Because mucomyst when inhaled can trigger bronchospasm, we always co-administer or pretreat with a bronchodilator. Does the bronchodilator have to be a beta agonist? Some of us say yes, because it's the quickest acting or because anticholinergics (Atrovent) can be drying. Others of us say that any short-acting bronchodilator will do, including Atrovent. What say you all? Answered by Rob Alvanas 5 months ago.

Any bronchodilator will do. Mucomyst only rarely has the side effect of bronchospasms. It is a preventative measure, it doesn't happen every time. Atrovent does not dry up secretions per se'. It inhibits mucus production from goblet cells located in the respiratory tract stopping further secretion production, so why wouldn't you want to give it to someone with excess secretions. I think it should be considered if not already in use. Answered by Damaris Basulto 5 months ago.

In my hospital, we always give mucomyst with both a beta agonist and an anticholinergic. We have a pulminologist who is famous for ordering mucomyst with Atrovent, Ventolin, and Pulmicort. That thing takes at least 30 minutes to nebulize. Edit: However our hospital will automatically dc mucomyst after four days. The pulmicort is bid, the atrovent is usually qid and the ventolin is q4. Answered by Ashton Genao 5 months ago.

mucomyst atrovent Answered by Particia Kenimer 5 months ago.

I guess it really depends on your patient .... I would use the Albuterol or Levalbuterol .... Atrovent is grossly overprescribed .... in my opinion (obviously there is a place for this drug ... but not for everyone ...ie, see Allbetteryall) ... Studies have shown that Atrovent generally provides less bronchodilation than do beta agonists and they generally begin to take effect more slowly. Atrovent is not known to dry secretions .... Atropine yes ... Atrovent no! Answered by Penney Brantner 5 months ago.

We always give mucomyst with a fast acting bronchodilator, albuterol or xopenex. Atrovent takes longer to act and is drying so we don't use it. Answered by Adam Kurtz 5 months ago.


Would a Mucomyst treatment affect a person's cardiac activity?
I was sitting in with a telemetry technician and we were watching a guy's ECG. I can't remember what his baseline rhythm was, but I know it wasn't a normal sinus rhythm. Every time he received a Mucomyst treatment, he would start having runs of V-tach. The tele tech would inform the RN each time it... Asked by Marylyn Blotsky 5 months ago.

I was sitting in with a telemetry technician and we were watching a guy's ECG. I can't remember what his baseline rhythm was, but I know it wasn't a normal sinus rhythm. Every time he received a Mucomyst treatment, he would start having runs of V-tach. The tele tech would inform the RN each time it would occur, and the RN stated he was getting his Mucomyst treatment again. The doctor came in and said that Mucomyst would not be the cause of his runs of V-tach. I did look up the medication and did not read any drug facts about cardiac side effects, so I'm just curious if it was merely coincidence? Perhaps anxiety driven response? Or was there a connection that may be rare? I'm a nursing student so I'm just curious about these little things that pop up from time to time. Answered by Macy Ailshire 5 months ago.

It shouldn't have been caused by the Mucomyst (N-acetylcysteine) itself unless that person had a hypersensitivity to acetylcysteine. If that was the case, then the drug probably wouldn't have been administered in the first place. Also, I'm not 100 percent that a hypersensitivity would necessarily cause a V-tach but I know it could cause a tachycardia.. I assume the drug was taken via inhalation. When people use an inhalation advice, they usually end up holding their breath after administration. The act of inhalation probably had an effect on the heart at that time (think of V/Q ratio maybe). . This is my educated guess (could be wrong...could be right). There could be other factors involved such as other drugs or the general health of the patient (I'll take a wild guess and say your patient could of been elderly). Answered by Shanelle Axon 5 months ago.

I felt great after my first chemo for my lung cancer. Chemo side effects usually hits about 2-3 days after infusion. Hopefully he will have good premeds and anti nausea pills to help him thru the rough spots. He may be tired emotionally and physically from the long day of chemo, I don't know how long his infusion will be but mine were 7.5 hours each time. Just be sure to keep the house fairly quiet so he can rest. BTW- "they" only gave me less than a year to live as well... its been three years since my diagnosis so your BF's Dad may be around longer than they think ;-) Answered by Janette Boocock 5 months ago.

Not if it really was N-acetylcysteine. Bronchospasm can occur, but it probably wouldn't have resolved spontaneously. It was either a problem with the nebulizer, or a problem with the medication. Too bad no one investigated so we could know for sure. m Answered by Yolanda Tamm 5 months ago.


What pharmacy in Bakersfield carries mucomyst?
Asked by Evie Ochwat 5 months ago.

There is a 24-hr Walgreens pharmacy on the east side of town that is pretty well-stocked. I want to say it's near San Joaquin Memorial, but I'm not 100% sure. Anyway, they might have Mucomyst. Answered by Darius Chalow 5 months ago.

Mucomyst is also used before a patient is given intravenous contrast dye to protect the kidneys. Research is still divided as to its effectiveness. BTW, the liquid form smells worse than rotten eggs. Answered by Gladys Timm 5 months ago.

I wasn't aware that mucomyst was used much anymore, at least for breathing problems. It is still used for acetaminophen overdoses. Answered by Adriana Nunamaker 5 months ago.


Mucomyst-10?
Asked by Coleman Hommell 5 months ago.

And your question is??? Answered by Blake Lorenzen 5 months ago.

Yep, it's nasty. lol My patient's would usually refuse. Answered by Tamica Castor 5 months ago.

What about it? Foul stuff! Answered by Kerry Yengich 5 months ago.


Is treating with mucomyst beneficial in a tylenol overdose if the tylenol level is zero?
Asked by Timothy Emmette 5 months ago.

Probably not, but in theory, if the level is drawn late and the APAP has been metabolized, but there's still NAPA in the circulation, it could. It isn't the acetaminophen, after all, that's the problem, but the n-acetyl.... Answered by Isadora Hilgers 5 months ago.

Mucomyst For Tylenol Overdose Answered by Marianela Baseley 5 months ago.


Pharmocology math ??? need help?
pulmonologist adds mucomyst 10% to an existing nebulizer treatment. for the patient to recieve 100 mg of mucomyst, how many ml must be withdrawn? Asked by Lucien Mujalli 5 months ago.

100 mg = 100 ml 100/0.1 = 1000 ml Therefore, 1000 ml must be withdrawn. Answered by Lanny Moratto 5 months ago.


Dose cardiac catheteration do for the heart and if a kidney transplant patient needs one?
what dose a cardiac catheration do for the heart and if a kidney transplant patient needs it dose the cardiac catheteration see and veiw the arteries of the heart and chambers and mytrovalves and the anterior wall of the heart and the aortia of the heart and the blood supply and what dose it mean if a kidney... Asked by Wanetta Juhnke 5 months ago.

what dose a cardiac catheration do for the heart and if a kidney transplant patient needs it dose the cardiac catheteration see and veiw the arteries of the heart and chambers and mytrovalves and the anterior wall of the heart and the aortia of the heart and the blood supply and what dose it mean if a kidney transplant patient develops a blockage of the arteries dose it mean the arteries are clogged what kind of contrast is used dose the cardiac catheter go threw the groin neck or arm and what kind of mucomyst dose a transplant patient have to take before they get contrast and what kind of catheter is used and what kind of surgical insturments are used Answered by Ramona Verdon 5 months ago.

Cardiac catheterization allows visualization of the heart and blood vessels. In instances of a clogged artery, there are a number of ways a cardiologist can remove the debris through cardiac catheterization. Sometimes a stent is placed, other times a balloon is used. Also something called a Swann-Gantz catheter can be used to measure the pressure within the heart chambers. The catheter typically is inserted through a blood vessel in the groin, often times the femoral artery. Sometimes the catheter is inserted in the forearm. The type of contrast used is an iodine-related dye so its important that people allergic to iodine or with shellfish allergies not take it. There are many types of catheters and it depends on the patient and his/her situation in determining what kind is best. Mucomyst is usually given to patients with high levels of creatinine (or patients with kidney failure) before cardiac catheterization because it helps protect the kidneys and liver when clearing the contrast dye. Answered by Jasmin Atkinson 5 months ago.

I couldn't just sit around and do nothing like my doctors suggested. They didn't want me to do anything or to take herbs or herbal remedies, but I had to try something - they just wanted me to do dialysis! This program allowed me to take control of my health. I went from Stage 4 to Stage 3 kidney disease. It was easy to do and my BUN, creatinine and anemia are all in better ranges. Reversing Your Kidney Disease? Answered by Cristin Vannorsdell 5 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013601/001 MUCOMYST ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
013601/002 MUCOMYST ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013601/001 MUCOMYST ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
013601/002 MUCOMYST ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
021539/001 ACETADOTE ACETYLCYSTEINE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 6GM per 30ML (200MG per ML)
070575/001 MUCOSIL-10 ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10%
070576/001 MUCOSIL-20 ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20%
071364/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10%
071365/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20%
071740/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE Solution/ Inhalation, Oral 10%
071741/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE Solution/ Inhalation, Oral 20%
072323/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10%
072324/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20%
072489/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10%
072547/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20%
072621/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10%
072622/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20%
073664/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10%
074037/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20%
200644/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 6GM per 30ML (200MG per ML)
203173/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 6GM per 30ML (200MG per ML)
203624/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 6GM per 30ML (200MG per ML)
203853/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 20%
204674/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE SOLUTION/INHALATION, ORAL 10%
207358/001 ACETYLCYSTEINE ACETYLCYSTEINE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 6GM per 30ML (200MG per ML)
207916/001 CETYLEV ACETYLCYSTEINE TABLET, EFFERVESCENT/ORAL 500MG
207916/002 CETYLEV ACETYLCYSTEINE TABLET, EFFERVESCENT/ORAL 2.5GM

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