MONOPRIL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019915/002.

Names and composition

"MONOPRIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of FOSINOPRIL SODIUM.

Answered questions

Can i take monopril while im taking amoxicillin?
yea thats my bad i meant motrin not monopril sorry about that Asked by Corinne Hickam 4 months ago.

hi yesterday i felt really bad and my doctor told me that i had either strep throat or tonsillitis and he prescribed me amoxicillin and some other medicine to control my cough i just wanted to know if i could take monopril while im taking amoxicillin to reduce my fever because tylenol is just not doing the trick i still have my fever thank you for your help Answered by Justin Tasch 4 months ago.

Monopril is used for high blood pressure, not fevers. Do you have the correct medication? If tylenol is not helping the fever then switch to ibuprofen. Answered by Jenice Balza 4 months ago.


Arethere any problems with taking CoQ10 while also taking lipitor, Trandate, and Monopril?
Asked by Cecil Stilner 4 months ago.

yes...they all make u die...eventually! Answered by Virgina Blevens 4 months ago.

Call a pharmacy to ask Call the local hospital for a nurse ask them Call your states Poison Control Agency and ask them Go on-line to Dr.com or search for medical sites and check there. Answered by Nicol Annas 4 months ago.

Yes your spelling gets relay bad and you do not use spell check. Ask a real medical person! Not some smoe on answers.. Answered by Shani Beames 4 months ago.

Go see a doctor / pharmacist Answered by Mozell Beyer 4 months ago.


Will Monopril (Blood Pressure Medication) Show in a drug screen?
Short background, I am enlisting into the military and wondering if this medication will show up on the blood test at MEPS? If I don’t use it, I am sitting at the DQ level of 140/90 and with it, I am well under. But needing meds for hypertension is DQ right away. Just want in! Actual Drug taken is Fosinopril... Asked by Jillian Antona 4 months ago.

Short background, I am enlisting into the military and wondering if this medication will show up on the blood test at MEPS? If I don’t use it, I am sitting at the DQ level of 140/90 and with it, I am well under. But needing meds for hypertension is DQ right away. Just want in! Actual Drug taken is Fosinopril (off brand, cheaper on price) Answered by Carl Sellen 4 months ago.

Absolutely nothing you have ingested will show on any blood screening if that specific item is not being tested for!! Answered by Van Machuca 4 months ago.


What cause a high systolic number in your bp and how is it treated?
i dont use salt and can not exercise for long do to fibromyalgia. Asked by Georgeann Molinski 4 months ago.

There is absolutely no doubt that Coreg is causing your high systolic pressure, by lowering your heart rate and the only way you can convince yourself I'm correct is to gradually wean yourself off them. Your pulse rate will gradually rise to normal again (may take a couple of months for their effects to wear off) and as your pulse rate rises your systolic will fall. I promise you that systolic pressure will fall in direct relationship to the rise in your pulse. Not taking the beta blocker won't kill you, and the hctz and monopril will still give you the right medication. Answered by Herb Kiefer 4 months ago.

Pushing blood through too much plumbing will drive pressure. Are you overweight? Sickle cell will drive pressure. Are you Black? This will mimic fibro. Diabetes, too. Are you diabetic? Sugar scrapes the insides of your arteries, and that will drive pressure. Neuropathy also mimics fibro. Driving blastocytes through capillaries will clog them and lead to the same stuff as 1 or 2. Are you anemic? Jaundiced? Have a liver issue? You need to talk to your doc. Fibromyalgia is a non-diagnosis. It is what they say about pain when they have not come up with another cause. I just found five that would add up wioth your blood pressure on the strength of a 10th grade college prep biology class alone. Answered by Aiko Norko 4 months ago.


Can you tell me about Lisinopril?
My brother got this prescribed by a Doctor for his blood pressure, but it's not working that good per my brother's words. Can you tell me about it? Asked by Jamee Carda 4 months ago.

I'm not sure what it is you want to know about lisinopril. It's not capitalized, this is the generic name for Zestril and Prinivil. It's in the classification of antihypertensive meds known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors. Although the action is unnkown, it's thought to result primarily from the suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The most common adverse reactions are dizziness, orhtostatic hypotension, nasal congestion and diarrhea. A few of the less common adverse effects are headache, fatigue, nausea, impotence, rash and a persistent dry nonproductive cough. The life-threatening adverse reactions are hyperkalemia and rarely, anaphalaxis with afcial, throat and laryngeal edema. It has a number of drug interactions. Interacts with Capsaicin to cause an ACE-inhibitor-induced cough. May cause hyperkalemia when used with potassium-containing salt substitutes. It can increase creatinine, BUN, potassium, bilirubin levels and liver function test values. The treatment of hypertension is typically a 3-step one. Step 1 is making changes in diet, weight loss and changes in lifestyle (no smoking, reduced or no drinking, exercise, stress management). If this doesn't work, Step 2 is introducing an antihypertensive while continuing Step 1. Dosage adjuments may be needed for maximum effectiveness. If both Steps 1 & 2 fail to produce the desired results, Step 3 is adding another antihypertensive. I have no idea what your brother's dosage is and for how long he's been using it or anything else he's done to lower his blood pressure but he may need a dosage adjustment. He should also be following Step 1. Suggest he speak to his doctor. Answered by Son Gironda 4 months ago.

Yes it is for your blood pressure, and yes if you stop it for 2 weeks your blood pressure will go back up. Lisinopril is actually used to help kidneys, it acts in the kidneys to lower the filtration pressure (blood pressure in the kidney) this is beneficial for the kidneys long term, but in some patients it lowers the filtration pressure to much, to the point that the kidneys can't filter the blood properly. From what you are describing, I would bet this is what is going on. Just stop taking the lisinopril, they will check you again in a few weeks and may put you back on a lower dose of the lisinopril or try a different blood pressure medications. Answered by Darrin Collinson 4 months ago.

Zestril Classification Answered by Sherie Suennen 4 months ago.

Prinivil Classification Answered by Inell Alnutt 4 months ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Wally Grow 4 months ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Marylouise Bohland 4 months ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Herminia Losolla 4 months ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Yee Trueluck 4 months ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Marin Uy 4 months ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Minerva Erving 4 months ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Sabine Carline 4 months ago.


Question about Lisinopril?
11 months on 10 mg Lisinopril does work for me. My BP ranges from 110/73 to 120/84. I don't get the coughing, but I still have a constant numb feeling around my upper gum's/lower sinus area. Like I'm smoking/smelling poison ivy. I have researched other review boards of this med, and don't see... Asked by Lavada Passow 4 months ago.

11 months on 10 mg Lisinopril does work for me. My BP ranges from 110/73 to 120/84. I don't get the coughing, but I still have a constant numb feeling around my upper gum's/lower sinus area. Like I'm smoking/smelling poison ivy. I have researched other review boards of this med, and don't see anyone else complaining of this. I know two other people that take it, and they don't get this effect. My question is, are there any online charts comparing the ingredients of each particular BP med? ie: which have ace inhibitors, which don't? So far, I am looking to try Benicar. Thanks. Answered by Cleora Delara 4 months ago.

ACE inhibitors usually end in "pril"..for example, lisinopril, monopril, ramipril, etc. If the side effects are bothersome, benicar is a good choice. It falls in the ARB class. However, check and make sure insurance pays for the drug since its still brand name only. Answered by Jolie Miners 4 months ago.

my wife takes lisinopril without these side effects. You might try atenolol (beta blocker) and you will stay in a low price range. Not sure if Benicar and these other two are in same price range, but I know Atenolol is cheap. Answered by Lucille Antinarelli 4 months ago.


My bp was very high at the Dr's last night it was 180/101 pulse was 105.?
i had an echo done and two stress tests in april nothing was found. the dr did take blood and a urine sample. Asked by Lana Pellietier 4 months ago.

Your Blood pressure is high and severe. (stage 3 hypertension). It may affect the functioning of the vital organs such as heart, brain and kidney. Your pulse pressure is 180--101 = 79 mmHg. Optimum pulse pressure is 40 mmHg. Since the pulse rate is > 100 beats per minute, you have tachycardia. Tests may be done to look for: * High cholesterol levels * Heart disease, such as an echocardiogram or electrocardiogram * Kidney disease, such as a basic metabolic panel and urinalysis or ultrasound of the kidneys Answered by Angeles Bealer 4 months ago.

There are drugs that can lower your blood pressure right away, but the sudden drop isn't pleasant. Bed rest will keep your heart from working so hard. Why don't you call your doctor's office with your questions? Do you have a follow-up appointment soon? Answered by Leigha Balow 4 months ago.


Types of hypertension medication?
From some information, i know that there are few types of high blood pressure medication:* calcium channel blocker, e.g Amlodipine* ACE inhibitors, e.g Zestril* HCTZ* beta blockersMy mother is suffering high blood pressure, and currently taking Amlodipine 10mg daily, but it seems not reducing... Asked by Mui Virts 4 months ago.

From some information, i know that there are few types of high blood pressure medication: * calcium channel blocker, e.g Amlodipine * ACE inhibitors, e.g Zestril * HCTZ * beta blockers My mother is suffering high blood pressure, and currently taking Amlodipine 10mg daily, but it seems not reducing it. Before she also took Zestril, but she often got cough of it. How each of the medication above function and suitable for a patient? What is the difference of one to another? Answered by Charmaine Hansteen 4 months ago.

Since your mom was having a side effect from Zestril, her anti-hypertensive was changed to Amlodipine. If your mom's bp is not responding to amlodipine, visit her doctor so that the doctor can change her medication. I am also wondering when do you check your mom's bp? if she takes the tablet in the AM, the blood pressure should be lower by the PM. I am also wondering if your mom's ankles or legs are puffy. Angiotensin II is a very potent chemical that causes the muscles surrounding blood vessels to contract and thereby narrows the blood vessels. The narrowing of the vessels increases the pressure within the vessels and can cause high blood pressure (hypertension). Angiotensin II is formed from angiotensin I in the blood by the enzyme, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). ACE inhibitors are medications that slow (inhibit) the activity of the enzyme, which decreases the production of angiotensin II. As a result, the blood vessels enlarge or dilate, and the blood pressure is reduced. This lower blood pressure makes it easier for the heart to pump blood and can improve the function of a failing heart. In addition, the progression of kidney disease due to high blood pressure or diabetes is slowed. ACE inhibitors are used for controlling blood pressure, treating heart failure and preventing kidney damage in people with hypertension or diabetes. They also benefit patients who have had heart attacks. In studies, individuals with hypertension, heart failure, or prior heart attacks who were treated with an ACE inhibitor lived longer than patients who did not take an ACE inhibitor. Because they prevent early death resulting from hypertension, heart failure or heart attacks, ACE inhibitors are one of the most important group of drugs. Some individuals with hypertension do not respond sufficiently to ACE inhibitors alone. In these cases, other drugs are used in combination with ACE inhibitors. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are a class of drugs that block the entry of calcium into the muscle cells of the heart and the arteries. It is the entry of calcium into these cells that causes the heart to contract and arteries to narrow. By blocking the entry of calcium, CCBs decrease contraction of the heart and dilate (widen) the arteries. e.g. captopril (Capoten), benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) fosinopril (Monopril), ramipril (Altace), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), and trandolapril (Mavik). In order to pump blood, the heart needs oxygen. The harder the heart works, the more oxygen it requires. Angina (heart pain) occurs when the supply of oxygen to the heart is inadequate for the amount of work the heart must do. By dilating the arteries, CCBs reduce the pressure in the arteries. This makes it easier for the heart to pump blood, and, as a result, the heart needs less oxygen. By reducing the heart's need for oxygen, CCBs relieve or prevent angina. CCBs also are used for treating high blood pressure because of their blood pressure-lowering effects. CCBs also slow the rate at which the heart beats and are therefore used for treating certain types of abnormally rapid heart rhythms. CCBs are used for treating high blood pressure, angina, and abnormal heart rhythms (e.g., atrial fibrillation). They also may be used after a heart attack, particularly among patients who cannot tolerate beta-blocking drugs, have atrial fibrillation, or require treatment for their angina. (Unlike beta blockers, CCBs have not been shown to reduce mortality or additional heart attacks after a heart attack.) CCBs are as effective as ACE inhibitors in reducing blood pressure, but they may not be as effective as ACE inhibitors in preventing the kidney failure of high blood pressure or diabetes. e.g. Amlodipine, verapamil, diltiazem Beta-blockers are used to lower high blood pressure, relieve angina (chest pain), correct arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats), reduce the risk of dying after a heart attack and treat heart failure. Some beta-blockers are used to prevent migraine, some can reduce physical symptoms associated with anxiety, such as palpitations and shaking, and some are used for relief of symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland). There are also eye drops containing certain beta-blockers that are used to treat glaucoma, an eye condition caused by a build-up of pressure due to reduced drainage of fluid from the eye, which can result in blindness. up to the top. e.g.Acebutolol (Sectral) Atenolol (Tenormin) Betaxolol hydrochloride (Kerlone, Betoptic) Bisoprolol fumarate (black triangle Cardicor, Monocor) Carteolol hydrochloride (Teoptic) black triangle Carvedilol (Eucardic) Celiprolol hydrochloride (Celectol) Esmolol hydrochloride (Brevibloc) Labetalol hydrochloride (Trandate) Levobunolol Metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc, Lopresor) Metipranolol Nadolol (Corgard) black triangle Nebivolol (Nebilet) Oxprenolol hydrochloride (Trasicor) Pindolol (Visken) Propranolol hydrochloride (Inderal) Sotalol hydrochloride (Beta-cardone) Timolol maleate (Betim, Timoptol) Answered by Hyun Critcher 4 months ago.

Types Of Hypertension Medication Answered by Vernon Chilcott 4 months ago.

I had high blood pressure for 30 years. All the pills do is relax you. What I do now is take 2 tbls. of heinz apple cider vinegar in a glass of water before a meal. I still eat salt and salty foods. I drink 2 or 3 gallons of water to wash the salt out. I know what the doctor will say: wrong! But I prayed and meditated to be helped and I have been cured. Read the heinz apple cider vinegar website for more info. Tell mom to take heart healthy. Vinegar will relax you. I have no more wild mood swings either. No more depression and my hair and nails are long and strong. Vinegar has been used as treatment for thousands of years. Vinegar has 93 vitamins and minerals so it will beat osteoporosis and tooth loss. Answered by Mozella Gluck 4 months ago.

you are not asking the right person. make an appointment for your mother with the doctor who prescribes. if she allows it, go with her and have your questions answered by a professional who has your mother's full medical history available. Answered by Everett Schoenhals 4 months ago.

tell her to take 100mg of aspirin daily..it thins the blood fast..tell her also to avoid SALT and saturated fat in her diet..fruits and veggies overload will reduce her hypertension in no time.. Answered by Trang Hickley 4 months ago.


Show me the medication lisinopril?
Asked by Dino Bezner 4 months ago.

lisinopril Generic Name: lisinopril (lyse IN oh pril) Brand names: Prinivil, Zestril What is lisinopril? Feedback for lisinopril As a treatment for... Avg User Ratings [?] High Blood Pressure 10 3 comments Rate it! Heart Attack 8.0 1 comments Rate it! Heart Failure Be the first to rate it 0 comments Showing 3 of 4 conditions - Show All... Compare with other drugs. Share your Experience Ask a Question Lisinopril is in a group of drugs called ACE inhibitors. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme. Lisinopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. Lisinopril may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What is the most important information I should know about lisinopril? Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lisinopril? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to lisinopril or to any other ACE inhibitor, such as benazopril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik). Before using lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: * kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); * liver disease; * heart disease or congestive heart failure; * diabetes; or * a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren's syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use lisinopril, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Lisinopril could cause birth defects in the baby if you take the medication during pregnancy. Use an effective form of birth control. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether lisinopril passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take lisinopril? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Lisinopril can be taken with or without food. Vomiting, diarrhea, or heavy sweating can cause you to become dehydrated. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure while you are taking lisinopril. Drink plenty of water each day while you are taking this medication. To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood pressure will need to be checked on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking lisinopril. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. Store lisinopril at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of a lisinopril overdose may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting. What should I avoid while taking lisinopril? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can further lower your blood pressure and may increase some of the side effects of lisinopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Lisinopril side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe stomach pain; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: * feeling light-headed, fainting; * urinating more or less than usual, or not at all; * fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; * tired feeling, muscle weakness, and pounding or uneven heartbeats; * chest pain; or * swelling, rapid weight gain. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: * cough; * dizziness, drowsiness, headache; * nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, upset stomach; or * mild skin itching or rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect lisinopril? Before taking lisinopril, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: * lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith); * gold injections, or aurothioglucose (Solganal); * a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con; * salt substitutes that contain potassium; * insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth; * aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others; or * a diuretic (water pill). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use lisinopril or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There may be other drugs not listed that can affect lisinopril. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Where can I get more information? * Your pharmacist has information about lisinopril written for health professionals that you may read. * Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. * Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Lawrence Yagi 4 months ago.

this isnt a question....why dont you go talk to a pharmacist Answered by Trudy Luginbill 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019915/002 MONOPRIL FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019915/003 MONOPRIL FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019915/004 MONOPRIL FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019915/002 MONOPRIL FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019915/003 MONOPRIL FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019915/004 MONOPRIL FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076139/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076139/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
076139/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
076188/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076188/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
076188/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
076483/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076483/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
076483/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
076580/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076580/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
076580/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
076620/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076620/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
076620/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
076906/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076906/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
076906/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
076987/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076987/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
076987/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
077222/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077222/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
077222/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
077531/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077531/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
077531/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
091163/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
091163/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091163/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG
205670/001 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
205670/002 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 20MG
205670/003 FOSINOPRIL SODIUM FOSINOPRIL SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 40MG

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