MIRTAZAPINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 076119/001.

Names and composition

"MIRTAZAPINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MIRTAZAPINE.
It belongs to the class Other antidepressants and is used in Depression (Central Nervous System)

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
076119/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076119/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076119/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076122/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076122/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076122/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076176/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076176/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076176/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076189/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076189/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076189/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076219/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076219/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076219/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076241/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076241/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076241/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076244/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076244/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076244/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076270/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076270/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076270/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076307/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
076307/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
076307/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
076308/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076308/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076308/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076312/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076312/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076312/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076336/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076336/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076336/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076541/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076541/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076541/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076541/004 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
076689/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
076689/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
076689/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
076901/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
076901/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
076901/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
076921/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
076921/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076921/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076921/004 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
077376/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
077376/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
077376/004 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
077666/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
077666/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
077666/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
077959/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
077959/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
077959/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
205798/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
205798/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
205798/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
076119/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076119/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076119/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076122/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076122/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076122/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076176/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
020415/001 REMERON MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
021208/001 REMERON SOLTAB MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
076176/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
020415/002 REMERON MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
021208/002 REMERON SOLTAB MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
076176/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
020415/003 REMERON MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
021208/003 REMERON SOLTAB MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
076189/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076189/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076189/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076219/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076219/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076219/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076241/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076241/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076241/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076244/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076244/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076244/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076270/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076270/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076270/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076307/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
076307/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
076307/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
076308/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076308/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076308/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076312/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076312/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076312/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076336/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076336/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076336/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076541/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076541/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076541/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
076541/004 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
076689/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
076689/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
076689/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
076901/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
076901/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
076901/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
076921/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
076921/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076921/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076921/004 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
077376/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
077376/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
077376/004 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
077666/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
077666/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
077666/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 45MG
077959/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
077959/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
077959/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG
205798/001 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 15MG
205798/002 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 30MG
205798/003 MIRTAZAPINE MIRTAZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 45MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Combining Remeron (Mirtazapine) and Wellbutrin?
My doctor just prescribed me 7.5 mg of mirtazapine to take in the evening to help with insomnia and anxiety. I have been on Wellbutrin for over a year now, and I am wondering how well these two medications work together. I'm a pretty fit 22 year old, and the Wellbutrin basically knocks out any food cravings I... Asked by Yong Steady 2 months ago.

My doctor just prescribed me 7.5 mg of mirtazapine to take in the evening to help with insomnia and anxiety. I have been on Wellbutrin for over a year now, and I am wondering how well these two medications work together. I'm a pretty fit 22 year old, and the Wellbutrin basically knocks out any food cravings I get. I've heard that mirtazapine has made people gain weight, but is this necessarily true? Or is it more something where you have cravings but won't gain the weight if you don't binge? Also, does anyone have experience with taking mirtazapine as a sleep aid? I've heard mixed results. Anyhow, thanks in advance everyone. Answered by Otha Herb 2 months ago.

Mirtazapine isn't a tricyclic antidepressant (it's tetracyclic, and it's kind of an oddball). It has antihistamine effects at lower doses, and serotonergic/adrenergic effects that dominate more at higher doses. I actually have some personal experience with this combination. I was on Wellbutrin for years (still am), but was still struggling with some insomnia and a little bit of anxiety. I also had lost a little too much weight on Wellbutrin due to lack of appetite. Tried trazodone, but it gave me memory problems, so tried mirtazapine next, 7.5mg. It worked a little too well. In the morning I didn't want to get out of bed, because it was extremely pleasant to stay in bed... but that wasn't helping my productivity! It definitely stimulated my appetite! It was kind of nice to really enjoy and anticipate food again... except that I would enjoy it so much I'd just want to munch on something all the time, even when I wasn't hungry, like some sort of oral fixation. My prescriber and I actually tried going *up* in dose, because of having more NE/5HT effects. Tried 15mg, then 30mg, then 45mg. It was better at the higher doses, but still worked just a little bit TOO well. So, I gave up on it. I gained about 15lbs during the time I was on it, which put me about 7lbs over the weight that I really should be at. I lost the extra pounds over the course of the following months from Wellbutrin's appetite suppression. I believe I gained weight on mirtazapine simply from all the extra calories I ate. I sure ate a lot of them. (This, as opposed to weight I gained being on Paxil years ago, which as far as I could tell was because it slowed my metabolism to a grinding halt; my eating habits were not dramatically changed.) During my trial with mirtazapine, I tried a couple times taking my Wellbutrin at night to see if it would kick in conveniently in the morning to help wake me up from the mirtazapine. It didn't work for me; it just made me sleep very restlessly. I have heard of people doing this, though. Anyway, good luck. I hope it works well for you (but not TOO well)! Answered by Josef Raabe 2 months ago.

Mirtazapine is classified as a tricyclic antidepressant. Wellbutrin (bupropion) is an antidepressant. Using the two together increases toxicity. Impaired cognitive and motor skills are additive. More than 10% of the patients who use Remeron have increased appetite and weight gain. It's hard not to binge when you feel ravenous. Over 10% of the people who take Remeron find that it makes them sleepy. Answered by Danica Knaggs 2 months ago.


Mirtazapine and increased sex drive?
I've heard Mirtazapine increases sex drive. Is that true? Asked by Arron Slappey 2 months ago.

Mirtazapine is an antidepressant introduced by Organon International in 1996 used for the treatment of mild to severe depression. Although Mirtazapine has a tetracyclic chemical structure the pharmaceutical company have chosen to promote the drug using the acronym noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), although there is only modest evidence from their research department to support its claimed effects. Indeed, recent work by researchers independent of Organon International has failed to replicate much of the original data. The difference in receptor profile from the 'parent' drug, mianserin, appears to be non-existent, at least with respect to those properties that are hypothesised to be relevant . Due to its unique pharmacologic profile, mirtazapine is virtually devoid of anticholinergic effects, serotonin-related side effects, and adrenolytic effects (orthostatic hypotension and sexual dysfunction). As such it may be preferable to SSRIs in some patients. Mirtazapine is relatively safe if an overdose is taken. It does not increase sex drive. I hope this helps. Please vote for the best answer! Answered by Krissy Cheaney 2 months ago.


Does anyone have any really helpful info on Mirtazapine?
I am taking 30mg of this drug as of 2 weeks ago and I hate it. I couldn't do the full 30mg at once so I split it taking 15mg every 12 hours. The problem is this, I have this really weird buzzing and zapping that goes on in my head but only on the left side. It's maddening and I want to taper down to 15mg... Asked by Myron Lafkas 2 months ago.

I am taking 30mg of this drug as of 2 weeks ago and I hate it. I couldn't do the full 30mg at once so I split it taking 15mg every 12 hours. The problem is this, I have this really weird buzzing and zapping that goes on in my head but only on the left side. It's maddening and I want to taper down to 15mg daily, The way I was perscribed this med is a very long story but bottom line is, I don't have a doc I can go to about this until Feb. Please help. Answered by Alia Colborn 2 months ago.

I've been on Mirtazapine for a year now, originally I took 30mg then the dose was increased to 45mg, the maximum dose. I experienced strong hunger pangs when I first started taking the drug, and have gained a lot of weight on it. The sedative effect of it, experienced by 1 in 10 people who take Mirtazapine according to the patient information leaflet, has only recently worn off for me. As many depressed people have trouble sleeping this side effect is often seen as a helpful thing by doctors, it is why my old psychiatrist first put me on it. I've never experienced this "brain zap" and head buzzing thing personally. You should speak to your doctor about this. Most side effects from anti-depressants ease or go completely once your body is used to it,so it's worth giving the Mirtazapine a chance and sticking with the dose your doctor originally prescribed until Febuary. If the side effects persist you should be able to see any doctor as a visitor/guest if its an emergency. I hope the side effects pass soon. Mirtazapine has helped my depression and balanced out my mood in a way that Prozac on it's own didnt. I know everyone responds to anti-depressants differently but Mirtazapine is only used for severe depression so it's likely to be a more stronger/effective anti-depressants than lots of others. Take care. Answered by Tamika Dess 2 months ago.

mirtazapine lasts in the body for around 2-3 days. dosing every day will cause brain levels to gradually increase....perhaps, you could dose every 2 days? maybe the side effects will decrease. i also had the brain zaps on mirtazapine....i hate it. lame drug. but it helps some people. Answered by Kasha Wademan 2 months ago.

It's a highly effective antidepressant, more effective than many others. However it can lead to weight gain so its used less often. 2 weeks is too early to say, give it a month - you might get used to it. Answered by Keith Boda 2 months ago.

mirtazapine is excellent and has worked well for me, its one of the best anti depressants there is with virtually no side effects. Answered by Bret Simmering 2 months ago.

try webmd.com or go to a free clinic, the tapping would drive me crazy Answered by Clayton Firebaugh 2 months ago.


Does Mirtazapine interact with any of these herbal medicines?
-St. John's Wort- Ginkgo biloba- Milk thistle- Valerian root-5-HTPI'm currently taking the herbal stuff for various things, such as anxiety and depression, but my shrink has recently prescribed me Mirtazapine. I haven't started taking it yet, and I need to know which of the herbs I would... Asked by Deon Berkovich 2 months ago.

-St. John's Wort - Ginkgo biloba - Milk thistle - Valerian root -5-HTP I'm currently taking the herbal stuff for various things, such as anxiety and depression, but my shrink has recently prescribed me Mirtazapine. I haven't started taking it yet, and I need to know which of the herbs I would have to stop taking. If it comes down to a choice, do you think it would be better for me to stick with the herbal remedies or go with the chemicals? Answered by Elois Kruer 2 months ago.

Hey, St. Johns Wort: Remeron (mirtazapine) and St. John's wort (Major Drug-Drug) MONITOR CLOSELY: Concomitant use of agents with serotonergic activity such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, 5-HT1 receptor agonists, ergot alkaloids, lithium, St. John's wort, phenylpiperidine opioids, dextromethorphan, and tryptophan may potentiate the risk of serotonin syndrome, which is a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition thought to result from hyperstimulation of brainstem 5-HT1A and 2A receptors. Symptoms of the serotonin syndrome may include mental status changes such as irritability, altered consciousness, confusion, hallucinations, and coma; autonomic dysfunction such as tachycardia, hyperthermia, diaphoresis, shivering, blood pressure lability, and mydriasis; neuromuscular abnormalities such as hyperreflexia, myoclonus, tremor, rigidity, and ataxia; and gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. DO NOT MIX. Ginkgo Biloba: Remeron (mirtazapine) and Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo) (Moderate Drug-Drug) GENERALLY AVOID: Certain preparations of ginkgo biloba have been reported to induce seizures. There may be a theoretical risk of increased seizure potential when used with other agents that can lower the seizure threshold such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI antidepressants or anorectics), monoamine oxidase inhibitors, neuroleptic agents, central nervous system stimulants, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, other tricyclic compounds (e.g., cyclobenzaprine, phenothiazines), carbapenems, cholinergic agents, fluoroquinolones, interferons, chloroquine, mefloquine, lindane, and theophylline. Ginkgo products may contain varying amounts of 4'-O-methylpyridoxine (ginkgotoxin), a known neurotoxin found primarily in ginkgo biloba seeds but also detected in lesser amounts in the leaves. In vivo, 4'-O-methylpyridoxine competes with vitamin B6, which causes an indirect inhibition of glutamate decarboxylase and subsequent decrease in the formation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. There have been published case reports of generalized convulsions and vomiting within several hours after ingestion of large amounts of ginkgo nuts/seeds, including in young children and healthy individuals with no known personal or family history of epilepsy. Many more cases, including fatalities, occurred in Japan in the 1930s to the 1960s during a food shortage when ginkgo nuts served as an important source of food. Some investigators have suggested that the amounts of ginkgotoxin in commercial extracts are too low to exert a detrimental effect. Nevertheless, a case report describes two elderly, previously well-controlled epileptic patients who presented with recurrent seizures within two weeks of initiating treatment with a ginkgo extract. Both patients remained seizure-free several months after discontinuing the extract, with no alteration to their anticonvulsant medications. SHOULD NOT MIX. Milk Thistle: Okay to mix these two medications together.' Valerian Root: Remeron (mirtazapine) and Valerian (Moderate Drug-Drug) MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients.SHOULD NOT MIX. 5-HTP: Remeron (mirtazapine) and 5-Hydroxytryptophan (Major Drug-Drug) MONITOR CLOSELY: Concomitant use of agents with serotonergic activity such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, 5-HT1 receptor agonists, ergot alkaloids, lithium, St. John's wort, phenylpiperidine opioids, dextromethorphan, and tryptophan may potentiate the risk of serotonin syndrome, which is a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition thought to result from hyperstimulation of brainstem 5-HT1A and 2A receptors. Symptoms of the serotonin syndrome may include mental status changes such as irritability, altered consciousness, confusion, hallucinations, and coma; autonomic dysfunction such as tachycardia, hyperthermia, diaphoresis, shivering, blood pressure lability, and mydriasis; neuromuscular abnormalities such as hyperreflexia, myoclonus, tremor, rigidity, and ataxia; and gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. DO NOT MIX. Hope this helps, Answered by Christiane Adamyan 2 months ago.


Question about mirtazapine and white blood cells?
I started taking Mirtazapine 15mg a day, a week ago for anxiety. It says on the label in rare cases "Sudden severe deficiency in the number of white blood cells in the blood"How true is this and will this increase my chance of catching HIV through unprotected oral sex. I know the risk is usually low... Asked by Lonnie Wohlfahrt 2 months ago.

I started taking Mirtazapine 15mg a day, a week ago for anxiety. It says on the label in rare cases "Sudden severe deficiency in the number of white blood cells in the blood" How true is this and will this increase my chance of catching HIV through unprotected oral sex. I know the risk is usually low but not zero. Answered by Tonisha Bolivar 2 months ago.

Hey, Mirtazapine is a type of antidepressant (sometimes called a tetracyclic antidepressant). It is used to help treat depression. Doctors may prescribe it for other reasons as well. In very rare cases, this drug may cause a very low white blood cell count, which greatly increases the risk of serious infections. Your doctor may check your white blood cell count during treatment. Be sure to let your doctor or nurse know right away if you have any signs of infection, such as fever (100.5° or higher), chills, pain when passing urine, sore throat, a new cough, or bringing up sputum. HIV spreads from person to person through these body fluids: -Blood -A man's semen and "pre-***" (pre-seminal fluid) -Fluids in a woman's vagina (vaginal secretions) -Breast milk You do not get HIV just by touching or being touched by infected blood or body fluids. The virus must get inside you and into your blood. It gets inside you through an open cut or sore on your skin or on a mucous membrane. These membranes are found in the penis, vagina, anus, rectum, mouth, and eyes Having a lowered WBC count dosen't nesessarily mean you have a ''better'' chance of getting HIV or other STDs or viruses. Hope this helps, Answered by Belen Yotter 2 months ago.

Blood is an excellent source of human DNA. DNA is present in white blood cells of humans, but not red blood cells which lack nuclei. A dime-sized spot of blood, approximately 50 µl in volume, is enough DNA for a typical VNTR analysis. That's why when you see a picture of a blood they have holes like a donut. Answered by Davina Korona 2 months ago.


My bf gave me his mirtazapine 30mg to help me sleep but just looked they are anti-depressants?
No he prob shouldnt have gave them me he just sees me ill alot from not sleeping! And when your so tired but cant sleep you take what ever if someone says it will help. I dont have the perfect life where i wake up to a amazing job and life! Stressed out mainly! Asked by Brent Sumi 2 months ago.

Why did he give them? He told me talk half of one before bed if i cant sleep. i do get down sometimes but this is a bit ott. do they make you sleep because i took half of one my arms started to ache and my heart was pounding but i couldnt sleep. Or does he think i am depressed!!! Me and him are having words for sure about this! Answered by Solange Bledsoe 2 months ago.

I didnt ask if it would kill me did i! Grow up half a tablet wont kill me! Oh my life! Yeah i didnt ask you about my relationship noone has the perfect relationship ao wined your neck in! He gave them to me to help as he knows ive had a hard time! Just wanted to know dp they help you sleep if you cant answer get a life and fack off! Answered by Lavelle Eisele 2 months ago.

Mirtazapine is a tetracyclic antidepressant. These are an older class of antidepressants which, because they have more side effects, are not usually the first choice for physicians to prescribe. They were popularized in the 1970s. While sedation can be one of their adverse effects, so can certain central nervous system reactions, such as the one you had. No, half a tablet won't kill you, but tetracyclic overdoses tend to be fatal, more so than the newer generations of antidepressants. You sound stressed but not depressed. I understand that your boyfriend was trying to help, and while some tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants can be used as analgesics (pain meds), they're not effective as sleeping aids. Antidepressants do not have a gentle mechanism of action. They affect the neurotransmitters in your brain and body. Neurotransmitters are chemicals that sit in the spaces between nerve endings, and you can end up with a crapload of bad reactions when you start taking them. You had an anticholinergic reaction called tachycardia. This is common for people taking tetracyclics. I have taken tricyclic/tetracyclic antidepressants, so this does come from experience. Even at 50, I don't have an amazing job and a perfect relationship, but I have learned to live and sleep without medications. I have certainly been where you were, and have desperately taken something that I thought would help but that backfired badly. My suggestion is that if you are feeling situational stress and anxiety, see a physician who can evaluate you and prescribe something appropriate. And do have words with your boyfriend, but not too harshly. He was only trying to help. Answered by Val Wende 2 months ago.

I attempted this drug a couple of months in the past, and my document stated (I suppose) that I could understand if the drug was once going to support or no longer after approximately 10 days. Now I have bipolar, no longer essential melancholy, in order that might make a change. Anyhow, you must name up your document and inform them what the disorders are and possibly take a look at some thing else. It could be very very irritating going via the meds till you uncover some thing that works. Some persons by no means uncover meds to support, (like me) however my psychiatrist tells me that's distinctive, so that you on the whole will uncover some thing. Next time you get a brand new drug, ask the document how lengthy it is going to be earlier than you are going to understand if the drug helps. All the psych meds have nasty facet results, however what facet results an person may have is fairly unpredictable - a few persons good fortune out and do not get any critical facet results. Other persons need to come to a decision that's worse, the melancholy or the facet results. It is fairly a hit and miss proposition getting meds that paintings - be certain you preserve making an attempt, despite the fact that! Just do not think all defeated in case you need to cross via a pair or 3 extra medicines till you uncover some thing. This is par for the path, regrettably! Make certain you're getting a few counseling too. Research suggests that meds AND counseling are a lot more strong than both on their possess. Answered by Rueben Dubej 2 months ago.

this is a stupid question because why the hell would you even take pills that are prescribed to you? that's a good way to kill yourself!! not to mention you should get a new boyfriend cuz he obviously don't give a crap about you! oh and btw anti depressants usually keep you from getting sleep! Answered by Larisa Hort 2 months ago.

Mirtazapine can be used off label as a hypnotic, a sleeping tablet. However, he shouldn't have given you that tablet. Answered by Jake Nila 2 months ago.

since they are not your meds, they might not be helping them like you should.(also anti depressants are often used as sleeping pills because they dull the mind kind of.....it's complicated.) but you should not be taking someone else's prescribed drugs - they could have adverse effects. Answered by Cara Mazin 2 months ago.

First he is not a psychiatrist second any drug but particularly psych meds can have iterations with other psych meds, alcohol and other drugs that can kill. And you can have sudden massive side effects from these drugs alone. Answered by Adan Okonski 2 months ago.


Any suggestions for an herbal alternative to mirtazapine?
Asked by Doreatha Neonakis 2 months ago.

Fleas do much more harm than the chemicals do. They can cause a dog to become anemic and they are a cause of tapeworms, just to name a few common problems with way too many fleas. Some dogs do react to some of the chemical products for topical monthly treatments. My dogs reacted to them until I tried BioSpot which they tolerate really well. I knew a guy with a Golden Lab that swore by Brewer's yeast with garlic. Some pet stores sell this and it's great for a dog's skin and coat and does have some repellant effect. I'd say try it, but if it doesn't stop the fleas pretty quick, then using the chemicals would be better than flea infestation and flea related complications. Talk to a Vet about any home remedies suggested because some can be toxic to dogs if taken in the wrong amount, or if used at all. Answered by Chasity Kichline 2 months ago.

Check out drbobmartin.com or google him he is a great resource for alternative medicine and has a talk show sat and sun. in az the radio station 550am and u can also drop an email and he can help u some more Answered by Emilio Gildemeister 2 months ago.

Mirtazapine Alternative Answered by Dorla Swindall 2 months ago.

The closest thing that may be similar is Rauwolfia serpentina (the reserpine extract, specifically). Answered by Kenna Siggers 2 months ago.


Kava Kava And Mirtazapine?
Is it safe to take Kava Kava while taking Mirtazapine? If not, how long would it take to withdraw the Mirtazapine to make taking Kava safe? Asked by Neville Mcmickle 2 months ago.

Mirtazapine actually has little to no known negative interactions with other substances. Because it is NOT an SSRI or an MAOI, any sort of serotonin release caused by the kava won't result in serotonin syndrome like the SSRI's or MAOI's. In terms of anti-depressants, Mirtazapine is one of the safest for use in combination therapy. Answered by Kanesha Conda 2 months ago.


Anyone here been on Mirtazapine?
Has anyone here been prescribed Mirtazapine for depression/trouble sleeping? I read that it can cause serious weight gain and I'm nervous. I also feel completely drained all day long, and have trouble speaking coherently. If you haven't been on Mirtazapine, have you had any of these problems with other... Asked by Robbie Shongo 2 months ago.

Has anyone here been prescribed Mirtazapine for depression/trouble sleeping? I read that it can cause serious weight gain and I'm nervous. I also feel completely drained all day long, and have trouble speaking coherently. If you haven't been on Mirtazapine, have you had any of these problems with other SSRIs? Answered by Alesha Powells 2 months ago.

I am currently on 15mg of Mirtazapine at bedtime for insomnia and have been for over 7 years. I have not had a problem with weight gain, however everyone is different and will react differently to medications. I have never had problems with being feeling drained or having problems speaking. I really think you need to contact your doctor about those symptoms. In my opinion it doesn't sound that is a good fit for you. I have been on SSRIs and although they didn't help with sleep, I tended to lose weight on them and never had the side effects that you are experiencing. Mirtazapine is not an SSRI, it is an tetracyclic which is a different type of anti-depressant. It is usually used in addition to other anti-depressants. Please see your doctor, I honestly don't think that it is helping you as much as another medication like and SSRI or SNRI could. I'm also very concerned about the effects you are experiencing. Take Care and many blessings, Michelle Answered by Jacquelyn Pries 2 months ago.


Does drowsiness go away after time when you are on Remeron (mirtazapine)?
I am on day two of taking Remeron, generic name: mirtazapine. I have serious somnolence (a drowzy, groggy feeling). I was taking 1/2 the lowest dosage, and when I called my doctor to complain about the drowziness yesterday she told me to cut the pill again, so now I am taking 1/4 of the lowest dose! I am still... Asked by Bernadette Rondell 2 months ago.

I am on day two of taking Remeron, generic name: mirtazapine. I have serious somnolence (a drowzy, groggy feeling). I was taking 1/2 the lowest dosage, and when I called my doctor to complain about the drowziness yesterday she told me to cut the pill again, so now I am taking 1/4 of the lowest dose! I am still terribly groggy. My doc said to give the medication a week and I might become immune to the drowziness... but I can't function. For those of you on Remeron, will my drowziness go away once the drug builds in my system, or should I just stop taking this now because it won't get any better? Answered by Marni Wishart 2 months ago.

I take Remeron (mirtazapine), and yes this is a common reaction and the drowsiness does decrease over time - it is a side-effect of the medication and your body does adjust. That is why you should take this medication just before going to bed - it is the best time to take it regardless. One of the reasons my Doctor chose Remeron was because I also suffer from insomnia; the medication does make you sleepy, so that was a plus for me in the beginning. But your body will adjust; it's only been two days and it will get better every day (and in my case it did very quickly), and later instead of feeling too sleepy, or sluggish, you will just feel calm - which makes it easier to sleep. Stay on the minimun dosage for as long as you need to (and your body should adjust quickly to such a low dosage; you will probably feel a difference after the first week). Remember this; everyone is different and everyone adjusts to any medication at their own pace. Also, as I mentioned above, starting at such a low dosage really shouldn't take your body too long to adjust - I would give it at least 2 to 3 weeks - just 2, if you notice a signicant difference. After that you should gradually increase the dosage, until you are at the level that you feel is the most beneficial for your condition. Again, the amount of your dosage is also an important factor in determining what works for you best. As I mentioned above, everyone is different and you may not require a very high dosage; the only way to find the correct dosage is to gradually increase it and stay at a particular dosage for a period of time. If you find that it is working for you at a certain dosage, then stay with that dosage. Just a note: I have tried many antidepressants over the years and have had trouble with so many of them, that I just stopped taking them. It really is a case of trial and error to find the right antidepressant, and the right dosage for your metabolism. I finally decided to give it one more try and after reviewing the ones I had tried in the past with my Doctor, he wanted me to try Remeron - and I am so glad I did. I finally found the right antidepressant for me - the side-effects at the beginning were mild and short-term (and they ALL have side-effects). I hope you have the same success. I wish you all the best - and please, give Remeron your best shot. EDIT: I just read Michele's post and she is totally corect: 1) about it being used as a sleep aid, which I addressed in my answer, and 2) about the weight gain - but I would like to be a little more specific about the weight gain. For the first year that I was on Remeron, I was on a low dosage and weight gain was not a problem. But later, I needed to have my dosage increased to a high level and I did gain a significant amount of weight. But I wasn't eating properly anyway, and craving a lot of sweets (remember we're talking about depression and unfortunately poor eating habits goes with the territory), but, the medication was working for me and because I was feeling better, that gave me the incentive to start eating a proper diet and to start exercising - which, in turn, made me feel even better. So the weight gain, at least in my case, turned out to be a blessing in disguise. I am at a good weight now, and for the first time in a long time, I actually feel healthy! Answered by Kandra Erbst 2 months ago.

Remeron Drowsiness Answered by Iola Lever 2 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does drowsiness go away after time when you are on Remeron (mirtazapine)? I am on day two of taking Remeron, generic name: mirtazapine. I have serious somnolence (a drowzy, groggy feeling). I was taking 1/2 the lowest dosage, and when I called my doctor to complain about the drowziness yesterday she told me to cut the pill again, so now I am taking 1/4 of the lowest... Answered by Librada Arcuri 2 months ago.

Many physicians use Remeron solely for that property (as a sleep aid for people who are depressed). You might be better off taking it in the evening instead of in the morning. In addition, this med is NOTORIOUS for weight gain. If you have weight concerns, you might want to keep your eye on that while you are taking this medication. Best of luck, ~M~ Answered by Naomi Farhat 2 months ago.


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