Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 009698/002.

Names and composition

"MILTOWN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MEPROBAMATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009698/002 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009698/004 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
083919/001 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009698/002 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009698/004 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
010028/004 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
010028/005 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
011284/001 MEPROSPAN MEPROBAMATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
011284/002 MEPROSPAN MEPROBAMATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 400MG
012455/002 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE CAPSULE/ORAL 400MG
014322/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014322/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014359/001 NEURAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014359/002 NEURAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014368/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014368/004 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014474/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014474/004 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014547/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014547/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014601/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014882/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014882/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015072/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015139/005 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015139/006 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015417/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015417/003 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015426/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015426/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015438/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015438/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016069/001 MEPRIAM MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016249/001 TRANMEP MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016928/003 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
040797/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
040797/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
080380/001 BAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
080380/002 BAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
080655/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
080699/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
080699/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083304/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
083308/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083343/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083442/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083494/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083618/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083830/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
083919/001 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084030/001 AMOSENE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084153/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084181/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084220/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084230/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084274/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084329/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084332/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084369/001 TRANMEP MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084435/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084438/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084546/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084547/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084589/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084744/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084744/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084804/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084804/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
085719/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
085720/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
085721/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
086299/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
087825/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
087826/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
088011/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
089538/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
090122/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
090122/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
200998/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
200998/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG

Ask a doctor

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Answered questions

Do doctors still prescribe the drug marketed under the name Miltown?
Asked by Syreeta Baiotto 1 year ago.

I do not believe Miltown is still made. Meprobamate (generic name) is, however it is rarely used. Answered by Olene Turturo 1 year ago.

I work in a busy pharmacy as a certified tech, I've never seen that prescribed. Not even in the generic. It may still be made, but just not prescribed in the USA Answered by Cheryll Longbottom 1 year ago.


I have a question about synthetic compounds- is there any way to figure this out?
Someone asked me a random question about whether the drugs chlorpromazine and miltown share the same synthetic compound. I have no idea what this means. Do you know the answer, ot could you at least point me in the right direction to finding out? Asked by Mellie Pumphery 1 year ago.

Warning to users of tranquilizing drugs: they should not be taken with alcohol... Tranquilizer: Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine)... Meprobamate: (brand names: Miltown, Equanil)... Meprobamate (brand names: Miltown, Equanil) effects marked improvement in a somewhat smaller percentage of hospital patients than chlorpromazine or reserpine, but is most popular with the patients, as well as with millions of walkie-talkie neurotics. Noted for its sleep-inducing action and lack of side effects, it also seems to check excessive sweating (which some of the other drugs aggravate)... Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine), first of the ataraxics or tranquilizing drugs used in North America, has clinched its leadership as the one most generally effective in treating the severe mental illnesses that usually need hospitalization. The earlier used, the better. It is best in agitated cases, least effective (and occasionally harmful) in the depressed. After three years of experience with it, doctors are less jittery, though still wary, about undesirable reactions—lowering of blood pressure, damage to the liver or white blood cells... Answered by Kerri Yeldell 1 year ago.


Anyone know of any older medicines that are still around but not usually prescribed?
Asked by Lelah Miskell 1 year ago.

Ever hear of the movie "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest?" It was about psychiatric patients, to sum it up without giving too much of the movie away. Back in the 1950s, doctors in psychiatric institutions prescribed a medication called "Acepromazine" and its main use was for psychiatric patients, particularly those who were combative, as it has a strong tranquilizing effect. After the 1950s, the practitioners began to see problems associated with the drug; and it was made illegal for human consumption (although, for some ironic reason, it's still "okay" for dogs and cats... something to think about.) This medication does still currently exist, and is completely legal for veterinarians to use in the sedation of dogs and cats; but it has long-since stopped being a legally prescribed medication for human use. So yes, I think that fits your question, as it is a) still around and b) not usually prescribed Answered by Jae Sypult 1 year ago.

Aspirin. It was invented by Bayer in 1899. Other old medications include opiates like laudanum, which has been around probably since ancient times. Marijuana also fits in to that category. Answered by Alissa Saadd 1 year ago.

Pretty much the entire MAOI class, most barbiturates and the "stigma" class (flunitrazepam, methamphetamine, etc.). Answered by Bennie Ciarlante 1 year ago.


The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given?
the physician orders 0.2 g meprobamate (equanil,miltown) tabs. The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given? Asked by Anjelica Syner 1 year ago.

one-half of one tablet Answered by Stephan Flood 1 year ago.

Here's the formula....desired (what is ordered by the physician) divided by what you have on hand times the quantity (in this case tablets). 0.2 grams / 400 mg X 1 tablet first you will have to convert the 0.2 g to milligrams by moving the decimal 3 places to the right making for 200 mg. now you have 200 mg / 400 mg X 1 tablet. I'll let you do the math from here. Answered by Leola Conales 1 year ago.


Do doctors still prescribe the drug marketed under the name Miltown?
Asked by Jammie Walshe 1 year ago.

I do not believe Miltown is still made. Meprobamate (generic name) is, however it is rarely used. Answered by Kay Bedeau 1 year ago.

I work in a busy pharmacy as a certified tech, I've never seen that prescribed. Not even in the generic. It may still be made, but just not prescribed in the USA Answered by Janis Valladares 1 year ago.


I have a question about synthetic compounds- is there any way to figure this out?
Someone asked me a random question about whether the drugs chlorpromazine and miltown share the same synthetic compound. I have no idea what this means. Do you know the answer, ot could you at least point me in the right direction to finding out? Asked by Dorotha Maisonet 1 year ago.

Warning to users of tranquilizing drugs: they should not be taken with alcohol... Tranquilizer: Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine)... Meprobamate: (brand names: Miltown, Equanil)... Meprobamate (brand names: Miltown, Equanil) effects marked improvement in a somewhat smaller percentage of hospital patients than chlorpromazine or reserpine, but is most popular with the patients, as well as with millions of walkie-talkie neurotics. Noted for its sleep-inducing action and lack of side effects, it also seems to check excessive sweating (which some of the other drugs aggravate)... Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine), first of the ataraxics or tranquilizing drugs used in North America, has clinched its leadership as the one most generally effective in treating the severe mental illnesses that usually need hospitalization. The earlier used, the better. It is best in agitated cases, least effective (and occasionally harmful) in the depressed. After three years of experience with it, doctors are less jittery, though still wary, about undesirable reactions—lowering of blood pressure, damage to the liver or white blood cells... Answered by Carlyn Beacham 1 year ago.


Anyone know of any older medicines that are still around but not usually prescribed?
Asked by Enola Whiteford 1 year ago.

Ever hear of the movie "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest?" It was about psychiatric patients, to sum it up without giving too much of the movie away. Back in the 1950s, doctors in psychiatric institutions prescribed a medication called "Acepromazine" and its main use was for psychiatric patients, particularly those who were combative, as it has a strong tranquilizing effect. After the 1950s, the practitioners began to see problems associated with the drug; and it was made illegal for human consumption (although, for some ironic reason, it's still "okay" for dogs and cats... something to think about.) This medication does still currently exist, and is completely legal for veterinarians to use in the sedation of dogs and cats; but it has long-since stopped being a legally prescribed medication for human use. So yes, I think that fits your question, as it is a) still around and b) not usually prescribed Answered by Felton Wisner 1 year ago.

Aspirin. It was invented by Bayer in 1899. Other old medications include opiates like laudanum, which has been around probably since ancient times. Marijuana also fits in to that category. Answered by Jimmy Hershey 1 year ago.

Pretty much the entire MAOI class, most barbiturates and the "stigma" class (flunitrazepam, methamphetamine, etc.). Answered by Austin Worstel 1 year ago.


The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given?
the physician orders 0.2 g meprobamate (equanil,miltown) tabs. The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given? Asked by Maira Yokely 1 year ago.

one-half of one tablet Answered by Beckie Winegard 1 year ago.

Here's the formula....desired (what is ordered by the physician) divided by what you have on hand times the quantity (in this case tablets). 0.2 grams / 400 mg X 1 tablet first you will have to convert the 0.2 g to milligrams by moving the decimal 3 places to the right making for 200 mg. now you have 200 mg / 400 mg X 1 tablet. I'll let you do the math from here. Answered by Inez Leamon 1 year ago.


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