Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017498/001.

Names and composition

"MICRONASE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GLYBURIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017498/001 MICRONASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017498/002 MICRONASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017498/003 MICRONASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017498/001 MICRONASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017498/002 MICRONASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017498/003 MICRONASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017532/001 DIABETA GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
017532/002 DIABETA GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017532/003 DIABETA GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
020051/001 GLYNASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
020051/002 GLYNASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
020051/003 GLYNASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 4.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020051/004 GLYNASE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
020055/001 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
020055/002 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
020055/003 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
074388/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074388/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
074388/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074591/001 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
074591/002 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
074591/003 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 4.5MG
074591/004 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
074686/001 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
074686/002 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
074686/003 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 4.5MG
074686/004 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
074792/001 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
074792/002 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
074792/003 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
075174/001 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
075174/002 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
075890/001 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
075890/002 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
075890/003 GLYBURIDE (MICRONIZED) GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
075947/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
075947/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 3MG
075947/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
076257/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
076257/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076257/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077537/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
077537/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
077537/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090937/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
090937/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
090937/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
203581/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
203581/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
203581/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
206079/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
206079/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
206079/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
206749/001 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25mg
206749/002 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5mg
206749/003 GLYBURIDE GLYBURIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Explain to a patient how to take the following medications:?
amoxicillin 500 mg; 2 caps stat then 1 tid x 7 days Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast Asked by Chara Klose 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500gm: Take 2 capsules by mouth now then 1 capsule by mouth three times a day for 7 days. Micronase 5mg: Take 1 tablet by mouth every morning 30 minutes before breakfast. Every instruction needs: * an action word: take, insert, instill, inject.... * a what: 1 tablet, 2 capsules, 2 drops, 1 suppository..... * a route: by mouth, rectally, right ear..... * a direction: every morning, 4 times a day..... Answered by Gino Trevigne 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500mg. Take 2 caps now then take 1 cap three times a day for seven days then stop. Micronase 5mg. 1 tab every morning 30 minutes before breakfast Answered by Moshe Weltmer 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500mg.= Take 2 tablets now, then 1 tablet 3 times a day for 7 days. Sorry...don't know the other one. Answered by Antonio Mcloone 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Ione Knost 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Rigoberto Hunnicut 1 year ago.


?How does the drug glipizide interfere with the drug antenol as dar as reacrions?
Asked by Justa Mazell 1 year ago.

a diabetes medication such as insulin, glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase, Glynase), glipizide (Glucotrol), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), or metformin (Glucophage); if you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to take atenolol, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Answered by Regine Morowski 1 year ago.


If you take Metformin/Glucophage, what can you do to calm your stomach?
I'm supposed to work my way up to 3 pills a day. This stuff really upsets my stomach. Is there anything I can do to make these pills easier to swallow, so to speak?? Asked by Maricruz Gruett 1 year ago.

i would tell the doctor. GENERIC NAME: metformin BRAND NAME: Glucophage , Glucophage XR, Glumetza DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Metformin is an oral medication that lowers blood glucose (sugar) and is used for treating type 2 diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that lowers glucose levels in blood by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by increasing the removal of glucose from the blood by muscle and fat tissues. Diabetes results because of reduced production of insulin and reduced uptake (and effects) of insulin on the body's tissues. Metformin acts by increasing the sensitivity of liver, muscle, fat, and other tissues to the uptake and effects of insulin. These actions lower the level of sugar in the blood. Unlike glucose-lowering drugs of the sulfonylurea class, e.g. glyburide (Micronase; Diabeta) or glipizide (Glucotrol), metformin does not increase the concentration of insulin in the blood and, therefore, does not cause excessively low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) when used alone. In scientific studies, metformin reduced the complications of diabetes such as heart disease, blindness and kidney disease. Metformin was approved by the FDA in December of 1994. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Metformin tablets: 500, 850, and 1000 mg. Glucophage XR (extended release) tablets: 500 and 750 mg.� Glumetza tablets(extended release) 500 and 1000 mg. STORAGE: Store at room temperature between 20-25�C (68-77�F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Metformin is used for treating type II diabetes in adults and children. It may be used alone or in combination with other diabetic medications. Metformin also has been used to prevent the development of diabetes in people at risk for diabetes and to treat polycystic ovaries. DOSING: For adults, metformin usually is begun at a dose of 500 mg twice a day or 850 mg once daily. The dose is gradually increased by 500 mg weekly or 850 mg every two weeks as tolerated and based on the response of the levels of glucose in the blood. The maximum daily dose is 2550 mg given in three divided doses. If Glucophage XR tablets are used, the starting dose is 500 mg daily with the evening meal. The dose can be increased by 500 mg weekly up to a maximum dose of 2000 mg once daily or in two divided doses. Glumetza tablets are given once daily.� Metformin should be taken with meals. For pediatric patients 10-16 years of age, the starting dose is 500 mg twice a day. Dosage can be increased by 500 mg weekly up to a maximum dose of 2000 mg. Glucophage XR has not been studied in children. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Cimetidine (Tagamet), by decreasing the elimination of metformin from the body, can increase the amount of metformin in the blood by 40%. This may increase the frequency of side effects from metformin. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Most experts agree that insulin is the best treatment for pregnant women with diabetes. NURSING MOTHERS: Metformin is excreted into breast milk and can therefore be transferred to the nursing infant. Nursing mothers should not use metformin. SIDE EFFECTS: The most common side effects with metformin are nausea, vomiting, gas, bloating, diarrhea and loss of appetite. These symptoms occur in one out of every three patients. These side effects may be severe enough to cause therapy to be discontinued in one out of every 20 patients. These side effects are related to the dose of the medication and may decrease if the dose is reduced. A serious--though rare--side effect of metformin is lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis occurs in one out of every 30,000 patients and is fatal in 50% of cases. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are weakness, trouble breathing, abnormal heartbeats, unusual muscle pain, stomach discomfort, light-headedness and feeling cold. Patients at risk for lactic acidosis include those with reduced function of the kidneys or liver, congestive heart failure, severe acute illnesses, and dehydration. Answered by Rosalba Nerbonne 1 year ago.

Metformin is known for causing gastic issues.... let your doctor know. There are alternative medications you can try. Answered by Dallas Herod 1 year ago.

If it weren't for draconian drug laws you could take a hit off a joint, that would calm your stomach right down. Unfortunately the idiots running this country think it makes you turn into a murderer and a rapist... They watched 'reefer madness' one too many times as children. Answered by Kiera Cornejo 1 year ago.

A good meal with meat and bread. Just watch your weight Answered by Rene Mccaskill 1 year ago.


Explain to a patient how to take the following medications:?
amoxicillin 500 mg; 2 caps stat then 1 tid x 7 days Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast Asked by Tracey Fosher 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500gm: Take 2 capsules by mouth now then 1 capsule by mouth three times a day for 7 days. Micronase 5mg: Take 1 tablet by mouth every morning 30 minutes before breakfast. Every instruction needs: * an action word: take, insert, instill, inject.... * a what: 1 tablet, 2 capsules, 2 drops, 1 suppository..... * a route: by mouth, rectally, right ear..... * a direction: every morning, 4 times a day..... Answered by Romelia Caneva 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500mg. Take 2 caps now then take 1 cap three times a day for seven days then stop. Micronase 5mg. 1 tab every morning 30 minutes before breakfast Answered by Easter Landborg 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500mg.= Take 2 tablets now, then 1 tablet 3 times a day for 7 days. Sorry...don't know the other one. Answered by Francesca Hornak 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Monique Eighmy 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Carlos Vanvleet 1 year ago.


?How does the drug glipizide interfere with the drug antenol as dar as reacrions?
Asked by Raul Hanger 1 year ago.

a diabetes medication such as insulin, glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase, Glynase), glipizide (Glucotrol), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), or metformin (Glucophage); if you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to take atenolol, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Answered by Terrence Cudworth 1 year ago.


If you take Metformin/Glucophage, what can you do to calm your stomach?
I'm supposed to work my way up to 3 pills a day. This stuff really upsets my stomach. Is there anything I can do to make these pills easier to swallow, so to speak?? Asked by Kimiko Kammes 1 year ago.

i would tell the doctor. GENERIC NAME: metformin BRAND NAME: Glucophage , Glucophage XR, Glumetza DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Metformin is an oral medication that lowers blood glucose (sugar) and is used for treating type 2 diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that lowers glucose levels in blood by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by increasing the removal of glucose from the blood by muscle and fat tissues. Diabetes results because of reduced production of insulin and reduced uptake (and effects) of insulin on the body's tissues. Metformin acts by increasing the sensitivity of liver, muscle, fat, and other tissues to the uptake and effects of insulin. These actions lower the level of sugar in the blood. Unlike glucose-lowering drugs of the sulfonylurea class, e.g. glyburide (Micronase; Diabeta) or glipizide (Glucotrol), metformin does not increase the concentration of insulin in the blood and, therefore, does not cause excessively low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) when used alone. In scientific studies, metformin reduced the complications of diabetes such as heart disease, blindness and kidney disease. Metformin was approved by the FDA in December of 1994. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Metformin tablets: 500, 850, and 1000 mg. Glucophage XR (extended release) tablets: 500 and 750 mg.� Glumetza tablets(extended release) 500 and 1000 mg. STORAGE: Store at room temperature between 20-25�C (68-77�F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Metformin is used for treating type II diabetes in adults and children. It may be used alone or in combination with other diabetic medications. Metformin also has been used to prevent the development of diabetes in people at risk for diabetes and to treat polycystic ovaries. DOSING: For adults, metformin usually is begun at a dose of 500 mg twice a day or 850 mg once daily. The dose is gradually increased by 500 mg weekly or 850 mg every two weeks as tolerated and based on the response of the levels of glucose in the blood. The maximum daily dose is 2550 mg given in three divided doses. If Glucophage XR tablets are used, the starting dose is 500 mg daily with the evening meal. The dose can be increased by 500 mg weekly up to a maximum dose of 2000 mg once daily or in two divided doses. Glumetza tablets are given once daily.� Metformin should be taken with meals. For pediatric patients 10-16 years of age, the starting dose is 500 mg twice a day. Dosage can be increased by 500 mg weekly up to a maximum dose of 2000 mg. Glucophage XR has not been studied in children. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Cimetidine (Tagamet), by decreasing the elimination of metformin from the body, can increase the amount of metformin in the blood by 40%. This may increase the frequency of side effects from metformin. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Most experts agree that insulin is the best treatment for pregnant women with diabetes. NURSING MOTHERS: Metformin is excreted into breast milk and can therefore be transferred to the nursing infant. Nursing mothers should not use metformin. SIDE EFFECTS: The most common side effects with metformin are nausea, vomiting, gas, bloating, diarrhea and loss of appetite. These symptoms occur in one out of every three patients. These side effects may be severe enough to cause therapy to be discontinued in one out of every 20 patients. These side effects are related to the dose of the medication and may decrease if the dose is reduced. A serious--though rare--side effect of metformin is lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis occurs in one out of every 30,000 patients and is fatal in 50% of cases. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are weakness, trouble breathing, abnormal heartbeats, unusual muscle pain, stomach discomfort, light-headedness and feeling cold. Patients at risk for lactic acidosis include those with reduced function of the kidneys or liver, congestive heart failure, severe acute illnesses, and dehydration. Answered by Belinda Wondoloski 1 year ago.

Metformin is known for causing gastic issues.... let your doctor know. There are alternative medications you can try. Answered by Yelena Poree 1 year ago.

If it weren't for draconian drug laws you could take a hit off a joint, that would calm your stomach right down. Unfortunately the idiots running this country think it makes you turn into a murderer and a rapist... They watched 'reefer madness' one too many times as children. Answered by Almeda Smyntek 1 year ago.

A good meal with meat and bread. Just watch your weight Answered by Lesha Lofte 1 year ago.


Explain to a patient how to take the following medications:?
amoxicillin 500 mg; 2 caps stat then 1 tid x 7 days Micronase 5 mg; i tab qam 30 min ac breakfast Asked by Carl Goldizen 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500gm: Take 2 capsules by mouth now then 1 capsule by mouth three times a day for 7 days. Micronase 5mg: Take 1 tablet by mouth every morning 30 minutes before breakfast. Every instruction needs: * an action word: take, insert, instill, inject.... * a what: 1 tablet, 2 capsules, 2 drops, 1 suppository..... * a route: by mouth, rectally, right ear..... * a direction: every morning, 4 times a day..... Answered by Shan Lan 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500mg. Take 2 caps now then take 1 cap three times a day for seven days then stop. Micronase 5mg. 1 tab every morning 30 minutes before breakfast Answered by Guillermina Bene 1 year ago.

Amoxicillin 500mg.= Take 2 tablets now, then 1 tablet 3 times a day for 7 days. Sorry...don't know the other one. Answered by Chanelle Mccombs 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Alishia Schrodt 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Lesley Normington 1 year ago.


?How does the drug glipizide interfere with the drug antenol as dar as reacrions?
Asked by Angel Hettich 1 year ago.

a diabetes medication such as insulin, glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase, Glynase), glipizide (Glucotrol), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), or metformin (Glucophage); if you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to take atenolol, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Answered by Titus Uptmor 1 year ago.


If you take Metformin/Glucophage, what can you do to calm your stomach?
I'm supposed to work my way up to 3 pills a day. This stuff really upsets my stomach. Is there anything I can do to make these pills easier to swallow, so to speak?? Asked by My Buel 1 year ago.

i would tell the doctor. GENERIC NAME: metformin BRAND NAME: Glucophage , Glucophage XR, Glumetza DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Metformin is an oral medication that lowers blood glucose (sugar) and is used for treating type 2 diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that lowers glucose levels in blood by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by increasing the removal of glucose from the blood by muscle and fat tissues. Diabetes results because of reduced production of insulin and reduced uptake (and effects) of insulin on the body's tissues. Metformin acts by increasing the sensitivity of liver, muscle, fat, and other tissues to the uptake and effects of insulin. These actions lower the level of sugar in the blood. Unlike glucose-lowering drugs of the sulfonylurea class, e.g. glyburide (Micronase; Diabeta) or glipizide (Glucotrol), metformin does not increase the concentration of insulin in the blood and, therefore, does not cause excessively low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) when used alone. In scientific studies, metformin reduced the complications of diabetes such as heart disease, blindness and kidney disease. Metformin was approved by the FDA in December of 1994. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Metformin tablets: 500, 850, and 1000 mg. Glucophage XR (extended release) tablets: 500 and 750 mg.� Glumetza tablets(extended release) 500 and 1000 mg. STORAGE: Store at room temperature between 20-25�C (68-77�F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Metformin is used for treating type II diabetes in adults and children. It may be used alone or in combination with other diabetic medications. Metformin also has been used to prevent the development of diabetes in people at risk for diabetes and to treat polycystic ovaries. DOSING: For adults, metformin usually is begun at a dose of 500 mg twice a day or 850 mg once daily. The dose is gradually increased by 500 mg weekly or 850 mg every two weeks as tolerated and based on the response of the levels of glucose in the blood. The maximum daily dose is 2550 mg given in three divided doses. If Glucophage XR tablets are used, the starting dose is 500 mg daily with the evening meal. The dose can be increased by 500 mg weekly up to a maximum dose of 2000 mg once daily or in two divided doses. Glumetza tablets are given once daily.� Metformin should be taken with meals. For pediatric patients 10-16 years of age, the starting dose is 500 mg twice a day. Dosage can be increased by 500 mg weekly up to a maximum dose of 2000 mg. Glucophage XR has not been studied in children. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Cimetidine (Tagamet), by decreasing the elimination of metformin from the body, can increase the amount of metformin in the blood by 40%. This may increase the frequency of side effects from metformin. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Most experts agree that insulin is the best treatment for pregnant women with diabetes. NURSING MOTHERS: Metformin is excreted into breast milk and can therefore be transferred to the nursing infant. Nursing mothers should not use metformin. SIDE EFFECTS: The most common side effects with metformin are nausea, vomiting, gas, bloating, diarrhea and loss of appetite. These symptoms occur in one out of every three patients. These side effects may be severe enough to cause therapy to be discontinued in one out of every 20 patients. These side effects are related to the dose of the medication and may decrease if the dose is reduced. A serious--though rare--side effect of metformin is lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis occurs in one out of every 30,000 patients and is fatal in 50% of cases. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are weakness, trouble breathing, abnormal heartbeats, unusual muscle pain, stomach discomfort, light-headedness and feeling cold. Patients at risk for lactic acidosis include those with reduced function of the kidneys or liver, congestive heart failure, severe acute illnesses, and dehydration. Answered by Alpha Wessling 1 year ago.

Metformin is known for causing gastic issues.... let your doctor know. There are alternative medications you can try. Answered by Tameka Miesse 1 year ago.

If it weren't for draconian drug laws you could take a hit off a joint, that would calm your stomach right down. Unfortunately the idiots running this country think it makes you turn into a murderer and a rapist... They watched 'reefer madness' one too many times as children. Answered by Earlean Cogill 1 year ago.

A good meal with meat and bread. Just watch your weight Answered by Misty Cureton 1 year ago.


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