Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 008085/002.

Names and composition

"METHOTREXATE SODIUM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of METHOTREXATE SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008085/002 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
011719/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 20MG BASE per VIAL
011719/003 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
011719/004 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 2.5MG BASE per ML
011719/005 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
011719/006 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
011719/010 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040054/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
040233/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
040263/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040263/002 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per 10ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
081099/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
081235/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
088648/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
088935/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 20MG BASE per VIAL
088936/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
088937/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089158/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089263/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089293/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 20MG BASE per VIAL
089294/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089295/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089296/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 250MG BASE per VIAL
089308/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089309/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089322/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089323/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 2.5MG BASE per ML
089341/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per 4ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
089342/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 200MG BASE per 8ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
201749/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
207812/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008085/002 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
011719/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 20MG BASE per VIAL
011719/003 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
011719/004 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 2.5MG BASE per ML
011719/005 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
011719/006 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
011719/007 METHOTREXATE LPF METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
011719/009 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
011719/010 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
011719/011 METHOTREXATE PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 2.5GM BASE per 100ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
011719/012 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per 40ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
011719/013 METHOTREXATE PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 500MG BASE per 20ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML) **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011719/014 METHOTREXATE PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 20MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 10MG BASE per ML)
040054/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
040233/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
040263/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040263/002 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per 10ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040265/001 METHOTREXATE PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
040266/001 METHOTREXATE PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
040385/001 TREXALL METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
040385/002 TREXALL METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 7.5MG BASE
040385/003 TREXALL METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
040385/004 TREXALL METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 15MG BASE
040632/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
040716/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per 40ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040767/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040768/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per 10ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040843/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per 40ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040850/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
040853/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG per 10ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
081099/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
081235/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
081242/001 FOLEX PFS METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
086358/001 MEXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 20MG BASE per VIAL
086358/002 MEXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
086358/003 MEXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
086358/004 MEXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per VIAL
087695/001 FOLEX METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per VIAL
087695/002 FOLEX METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
087695/003 FOLEX METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
088648/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
088760/001 MEXATE-AQ METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
088935/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 20MG BASE per VIAL
088936/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
088937/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
088954/001 FOLEX METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per VIAL
089158/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089161/001 ABITREXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089180/001 FOLEX PFS METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089263/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089293/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 20MG BASE per VIAL
089294/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089295/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089296/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 250MG BASE per VIAL
089308/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089309/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089322/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
089323/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 2.5MG BASE per ML
089340/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
089341/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per 4ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
089342/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 200MG BASE per 8ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
089343/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per 10ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
089354/001 ABITREXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089355/001 ABITREXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089356/001 ABITREXATE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per VIAL
089887/001 MEXATE-AQ PRESERVED METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
090029/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per 40ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
090039/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
090039/002 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per 10ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
200171/001 METHOTREXATE PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per 4ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
201529/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per 2ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
201529/002 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per 4ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
201529/003 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 200MG BASE per 8ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
201529/004 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 250MG BASE per 10ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
201530/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE METHOTREXATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per 40ML (EQ 25MG BASE per ML)
201749/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
207812/001 METHOTREXATE SODIUM METHOTREXATE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE
208400/001 XATMEP METHOTREXATE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 2.5MG BASE per ML

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A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Emerson Fairless 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Oleta Almsteadt 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Kiara Yum 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Gaylord Madrid 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Erna Laraway 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Lewis Palmrose 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Aleshia Kale 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Marilu Czarnota 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Malcom Doud 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Mei Karhoff 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Fran Zielesch 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Bruno Randt 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Delphia Bosson 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Marcellus Mccrane 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Corrin Sturch 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Deon Jurado 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Alease Kevin 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Darwin Colabrese 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Goldie Higby 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Cassondra Beitler 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Kendra Heltsley 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Chu Langmyer 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Shari Buehlman 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Khalilah Riech 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Nola Verjan 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Will Huff 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Heidi Crary 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Barbar Trotti 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Refugio Saka 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Andy Jalonen 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Sang Humm 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Leta Mcguire 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Sherilyn Dino 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Pedro Viera 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Angelika Osofsky 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Damon Sylvian 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Rosalind Easterly 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Donetta Zaidi 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Karina Niro 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Annmarie Hilyer 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Melida Barnfield 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Karrie Wiatrak 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Deetta Vollucci 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Jude Vanvalen 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Lana Tevebaugh 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Tonette Kerbs 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Genna Venturi 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Tawana Ungar 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Ariana Holguin 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Kiersten Melich 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Aleida Burdge 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Melvin Hannasch 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Mariel Meiler 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Stuart Bellessa 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Lavera Nicastro 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Lana Blanquart 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Minerva Irizarry 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Alishia Gietz 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Leigh Hemenway 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Oma Garlett 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Everett Githens 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Tracee Acri 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Loyce Aynes 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Briana Lindley 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Floy Edwardson 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Willard Massman 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Janell Maune 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Lynell Fecko 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Royal Sockalosky 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Loise Berisha 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Kareen Talvy 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Melida Sheston 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Deidre Haggins 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Haydee Kocian 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Dylan Defries 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Elisa Hanner 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Lorina Wolthuis 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Denisha Scherrer 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Emelina Watler 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Lyle Pettibone 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Eloisa Gullatte 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Virginia Mcfarlane 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Consuelo Schreiner 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Cassandra Loxtercamp 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Alice Vandy 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Justin Debartolo 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Retha Castell 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Clay Arnesen 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Adaline Finnegan 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Isiah Throgmorton 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Milan Corney 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Marcelene Snowball 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Domingo Jilek 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Clora Maule 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Coleman Melius 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Demarcus Besant 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Marquis Eggeman 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Angle Jeanfrancois 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Demetrius Jevnikar 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Chelsie Fresh 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Nelida Lew 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Christian Rampley 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Columbus Maddaloni 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Rickey Schaadt 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Millard Trevis 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Carolyn Cardani 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Yasuko Malvern 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Devona Sknerski 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Nga Belfast 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Karey Perisho 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Celestine Hirschfeld 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Marisha Lebeda 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Iona Toscani 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Ila Mcsween 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Winfred Rabidoux 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Evonne Bonam 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Lelah Rima 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Tenisha Kirstein 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Misty Vrablic 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Lyndsey Sowels 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Joe Birley 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Tameka Baters 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Susanna Kebort 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Ileana Mulder 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Devin Silfies 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Adella Klimas 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Lemuel Arendt 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Un Vegar 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Marion Mcfarlain 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Lacresha Vernon 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Arletha Hennis 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Chara Ferryman 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Williams Coltrain 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Nena Santrizos 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Analisa Amie 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Benedict Antila 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Nevada Umholtz 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Val Liranzo 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Desmond Lawrence 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Jeanene Kasserman 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Jetta Grieshaber 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Cammie Ollmann 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Argelia Nejman 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Elton Salgado 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Micaela Hemrich 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Olen Koegel 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Dortha Brooks 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Rosanne Beerer 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Karine Bemer 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Jeramy Kabat 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Son Maradiaga 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Lorriane Moorhouse 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Shayne Loeppke 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Chaya Renollet 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Sharmaine Kohler 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Leila Ramnarine 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Ethan Liebsch 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Merlene Shigeta 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by James Delaet 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Luther Nquyen 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Tran Chirino 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Mauricio Bruchey 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Marybeth Merksamer 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Zola Roel 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Odell Mettlen 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Esmeralda Gavette 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Dori Alerte 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Maren Penatac 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Renay Boyea 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Caryl Policz 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Torri Akhand 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Ema Pacapac 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Earnestine Geffers 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Frankie Yerkovich 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Barney Bartosh 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Sabra Strous 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Evan Dorsey 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Siu Pruette 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Celena Norse 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Mikaela Savinar 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Rhett Witwer 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Lisha Adjei 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Ivy Eron 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Sasha Masero 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Adrian Nolf 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Juliet Schwebach 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Melodie Brailsford 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Ester Duhon 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Amie Vangerbig 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Delilah Morello 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Thurman Haviland 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Amber Savitz 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Judith Mohs 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Porfirio Boulos 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Amal Holcombe 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Santos Buscher 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Sherly Schornick 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Armanda Arrants 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Eusebio Calverley 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Marilu Milly 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Minta Lindy 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Pa Mansouri 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Rebbeca Hamlin 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Vanda Economides 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Karleen Fillmore 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Zandra Bruckmeier 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Robby Winsor 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Minh Razze 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Sean Bahoora 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Tatiana Pavelich 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Arianna Collari 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Alisia Brindger 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Warren Mindingall 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Nancee Buquo 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Alonso Blanca 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Maris Middlesworth 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Jennette Heusinkveld 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Jenell Pangallo 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Nick Truax 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Lashonda Sherbo 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Vonda Mctague 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Tiffanie Molt 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Demetrice Kestner 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Reagan Gregas 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Sherilyn Zalk 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Ardith Jacquet 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Myrle Miessner 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Cary Common 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Beckie Prich 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Natacha Peasant 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Karan Nonamaker 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Roseann Bachmann 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Bea Alto 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Kacy Scheets 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Wilber Stickley 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Bert Poeppelman 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Bertie Veile 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Clara Berte 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Christian Chae 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Barbera Rodriques 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Helen Marander 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Hwa Hairster 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Azalee Kapper 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Catherine Utsey 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Lean Hollenbaugh 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Vernetta Laessig 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Rivka Mcginister 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Neville Thorsness 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Lashunda Uimari 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Alyse Ondic 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Liberty Estrade 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Georgene Jakubiak 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Lakenya Redway 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Angelo Swancey 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Zenaida Layson 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Ena Hellmich 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Ursula Consla 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Lana Eberts 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Cori Schneller 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Melinda Scaturro 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Santina Milbrandt 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Jenine Battistone 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Hope Gerbatz 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Dortha Utley 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Leanne Finocan 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Ria Hassell 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Ila Scoles 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Regine Howells 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Astrid Steans 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Nickie Celeste 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Roderick Wittnebel 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Ilse Dahlheimer 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Tai Schumann 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Valeri Klawiter 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Jovita Andujo 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Sophie Selbert 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Carmella Buesing 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Katherina Kellis 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Scot Liapis 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Jose Dotson 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Yuriko Audelhuk 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Carlton Shabot 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Felicidad Poe 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Scott Oberson 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Mildred Henein 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Nicol Zenteno 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Catarina Pourner 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Joanne Tabbert 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Angila Followell 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Mikaela Comins 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Helaine Clingerman 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Stephen Wittbrodt 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Carl Moffett 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Adela Kalin 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Gerard Maupin 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Nell Flaming 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Elmer Shouts 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Rheba Poths 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Ilona Flook 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Mae Burling 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Adriene Arimoto 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Trudy Aspri 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Arnold Heidemann 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Katina Mark 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Yasuko Dursteler 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Noe Schaf 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Helaine Bettenhausen 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Emelda Steinburg 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Yuri Nolle 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Joanna Stoutenger 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Marisa Catanzarite 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Alonzo Boenig 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Charlie Cervantes 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Armando Cecchi 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Brunilda Odonahue 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Mireille Hatt 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Leila Rocker 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Brady Balangatan 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Giuseppina Aronson 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Tara Kounkel 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Liberty Bull 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Katharina Fonner 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Lona Freguson 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Johnette Boughner 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Veta Horack 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Eula Bromberg 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Oswaldo Ohlrich 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Billi Romjue 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Shad Raczkowski 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Ramiro Aloia 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Bettye Mckibbens 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Leontine Northington 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Carita Dobosh 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Taneka Henter 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Samual Benischek 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Janett Klare 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Enriqueta Japak 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Jamal Devitto 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Ja Paloma 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Vicenta Waite 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by Marisol Stenseth 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Alvina Stagner 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Elina Mattern 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Candelaria Minarcin 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Raymon Janis 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Stacie Bathurst 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Reyna Cass 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Garfield Banbury 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Shelby Keba 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Millicent Hotter 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Kristi Niesman 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Michal Klitz 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Johnsie Richey 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Rocky Strayhorn 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Pierre Nellis 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Rickey Paet 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Elliott Kelsey 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Danita Scherrer 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Jermaine Dearin 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Kent Gick 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Donette Goodrow 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Denita Tankxley 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Marvel Pavolini 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Seth Cancro 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Alona Thevenin 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Angel Neas 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Carin Wesson 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Pablo Coak 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Ivana Pesenti 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Kitty Cutia 1 year ago.


Overdose on naproxen sodium?
if a teen was prescribed naproxen (one 550mg a day) for cramps, would they get high or o.d. or something?!?! i need to now asap, im worried about a friend!!! Asked by Irina Muszar 1 year ago.

Anaprox and Naprelan are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve mild to moderate pain and menstrual cramps. They are also prescribed for relief of the inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (the most common form of arthritis), and for ankylosing spondylitis (spinal arthritis), tendinitis, bursitis, acute gout, and other conditions. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Anaprox. * Side effects of Anaprox may include: Abdominal pain, constipation, difficult or labored breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, heartburn, nausea, red or purple pinpoint spots on the skin, rash-like symptoms, ringing in the ears, water retention Naprelan shares some of the above side effects, but also has some of its own: * Side effects of Naprelan may include: Back pain, flu symptoms, infection, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, sore throat, urinary infection If Anaprox is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Anaprox with the following: ACE inhibitors such as the blood pressure medication captopril Antiseizure drugs such as phenytoin sodium Aspirin Beta blockers, including blood pressure drugs such as propranolol hydrochloride Blood thinners such as warfarin sodium Certain water pills (diuretics) such as furosemide Lithium Methotrexate Naproxen in other forms, such as naproxen Oral diabetes drugs such as glyburide Other pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen Probenecid Warfarin If you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day, check with your doctor before using painkillers. Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Any medication taken in excess can cause symptoms of overdose. If you suspect an overdose of Anaprox, seek medical attention immediately. * Symptoms of Anaprox overdose may include: Drowsiness, heartburn, indigestion, nausea, vomiting Answered by Maybell Brunson 1 year ago.

naproxen is nothing but asprin. And yea it can cause bleeding of the stomach. And is used as a blood thinner. Answered by Jodi Walstad 1 year ago.

you can od on any medication. will it get her high, no. it might make her feel sick or something. this is an anitflamitory you can buy over the counter. its found in pamprin. btw your friend is lucky to have someone who is so concerned. Answered by Brett Woodbury 1 year ago.


HAD A MISCARRIAGE & NEED SOME HELP!!!!!!?
So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last... Asked by Santiago Humber 1 year ago.

So i had a miscarriage 2 months ago and since then i have been going to the follow-up appointments and my hcg levels have not gone completely down they stayed at 11. so my doctor prescribed me the mysoprostol pill which is i guess like the abortion pill and that only helped it go down to 8 i took the pill last monday. now the doctor tells me that since it only went down to 8 they want to prescribe me the METHOTREXATE SODIUM injection. However i am very unsure on whether i should take it or not. I am afraid that it could damage any future pregnancies. I continue to ask them why this is happening but they still remain without answer saying everyones body is diff. Answered by Graig Rodiguez 1 year ago.

Doctors aren't perfect and they don't always know what's best. It sounds like instinctually, you aren't comfortable with the idea of getting this shot. And instinct should be enough for you to go to another doctor and get a second (or third, or fourth) opinion, until you feel like you're doing the right thing. Don't ever feel pressured to say yes to a medical procedure just because one doctor recommended it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your doctor, but never ignore your instincts. That voice inside of you doesn't lie, and there is a mind-body connection that each person has inside of them. Get your research and second opinions together, and don't get that shot unless you feel like its the right thing to do for YOU. Answered by Rebecca Lain 1 year ago.

I am by no means an expert in hcg levels, but it seems to me that your body just needs time. I personally would not accept the shot. Perhaps if the level did not go down after at least a few more months, I would. But, not after only 2 months. I would at least recommend getting a second opinion before doing anything you're not completely comfortable with. Answered by William Tix 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Dortha Crisanti 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Adah Keylor 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Holli Bidner 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Marshall Reichart 1 year ago.


My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver?
My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Asked by Megan Senavanh 1 year ago.

All I can say is Naproxen is used for all forms of arthritis, inflammatory disorders, gout, back pain, ankylosing spondylitis, bone pain, period pain, migraine and general pain relief. It should be used with caution in psychiatrically disturbed patients, epilepsy, severe infection, heart failure and kidney disease. And do not take if suffering from peptic ulcer at present or in recent past, If your due for surgery (including dental surgery), Suffering from bleeding disorders or anaemia, Or suffering from proctitis.(suppository only). Common side effects are stomach discomfort, diarrhoea, constipation, heart burn, nausea, headache, dizziness. Unusual side effects are blurred vision, stomach ulcer, ringing noise in ears, retention of fluid, swelling of tissue, drowsiness, itch rash, shortness of breath. Severe but rare effects (stop medication, consult a doctor): Vomit blood, pass blood in faeces, other unusual bleeding, asthma induced by medication. It also has interactions with other drugs and must not be used with anticoagulants (eg. warfarin), probenecid, diuretics, lithium, methotrexate, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors. Answered by Zane Focks 1 year ago.

Naproxen Sodium Side Effects Answered by Margaretta Phetsanghane 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: My father is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) is it harmful for the liver? My father has a history of fatty liver and he is taking Naproxen Sodium (Skelan) 3 times a week to help him exercise. Does taking Namproxen Sodium outweighs the benefits due to the fact of his liver condition? Answered by Tyron Batista 1 year ago.

No, any medication is filtered by the liver anyway. This is what the liver does. The benefits of exercise for his health and body are allot better then any problems his liver might have filtering it. A fatty liver isn't as bad as you may think. Although it's not as healthy as a normal liver, it's allot better than it being cirrhotic. The medication would be more helpful for your father than not taking it. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Debora Sirianni 1 year ago.


Is cold turkey causing anorexia?
my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a... Asked by Chet Ladonne 1 year ago.

Hi I'm leslie. I'm 15 years old and have microscopic polyarteritis nodosa, ADHD, OCD, post tramatic depression, anxiety, and many other problems. I take pillls 4x a day to function- methotrexate sodium, diclofenac sodium, amitryptaline, clonidine, strattera, fluxotine and fluvoxotine. The spelling probably isn't correct but yea. I know cold turkeying is bad but it's annoying and causes a feeling of dependency when you take so many pills. I haven't been eating or hungry since I stopped all about a week and a half ago. Also insomnia, throwing up, motionsickness, runny nose, and cold sweats. Help??? Answered by Ronald Napper 1 year ago.

my doctor in my town said i was anorexic..... i thought she was wrong so thank you. i live in kremmling, CO where there are only 1500 people in my town. the hospital here isnt qualified to say anything or do anything for me. i am only allowed to go to Denver childrens hospital to Dr Hollister because he is a oncologist/rhemutologist specialist. but i went to the ER after i had fainted. today i have eaten 1/2 a hamburger and 4 otter pops, most ive eaten all week. i started my pills again when i got home. thank you all for your help :) Answered by Carlo Nealen 1 year ago.

Anorexia is a mental illness that is developed when people continue to deny themselves food, even when they're hungry. If continued, this can become an addiction and is really hard to stop. It does not sound like stopping your pills is causing anorexia, but it's certainly making you very sick. This is very dangerous for both your physical and mental health. In the past, I have stopped taking my psychiatric medications without telling anyone, and I ended up in a medical hospital for four days, and then I was transferred to an adolescent unit in a psych hospital. I'm a girl only a year older than you, so I can understand how it feels to not want to take medications, especially if you don't want them to rule your life. They way you did it, however, is again very, very dangerous. Talk to your doctor about it, and maybe you can try getting off of some of them. It sounds like you actually do need some of your medications, and that's something you will have to learn to accept. You might feel that they make you weak, but actually, not taking them makes you weak because you're not taking care of yourself. When you have a fever you take medicine right? Or a headache? Or (if you have asthma) you take your inhaler when you need it don't you? The list can go on, and this is the same thing. Answered by Betty Andren 1 year ago.

You should start taking your pills again. For sure. I was once on Lexapro and started trying to wean off it and then I totally blacked out for days! My mom had to do everything for me! I had no control over my actions or thoughts! My mom thought I was going to be mentally disabled for life! Just go to your doctor, or actually go to a NEW doctor! (why would they put you on ALL of that medicine at once? It just doesn't make sense to me) You need to let a doctor know everything you are on and how it is making you feel. I hope you can find a way to get better and not have to depend on all that medicine. Answered by Tobi Pacho 1 year ago.

If you stop taking pills that you need just cold turkey, then your body is going to react to not having them anymore. You're detoxing right now. Never quit drugs/pills cold turkey. And for the love of G-d, eat something. But nothing to rich, that would be a shock to your system. Try chicken soup. -Tila Answered by Sonny Uva 1 year ago.

you should never go off prescribed medications cold turkey. FIRST, you should discuss this with your doctor. if he/she agrees then you should wane of slowly, lowering the dose of the pills day by day till your body can handle and control itself without the pills. your body is reacting badly toward the missing of pills. that's what happens when alcoholics and drug addicts get off their stuff, their body reacts badly. you should always do this under the eye of a doctor. tell your doctor, please Answered by Reanna Uchimura 1 year ago.

Why are you stop taking your pills, this is bad, really bad. Answered by Marya Madrid 1 year ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Clyde Havermann 1 year ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Janita Primrose 1 year ago.


Do you suffer from, or is the onset of arthritis starting to make it's presence known?
Rheumatoid arthritis runs in my family, I can't go a night without waking up from the pain in my shoulders. Is there any medication that can help? Asked by Teri Fritchey 1 year ago.

DMARDS -- Disease modifying Anti-rheumatic drugs are many -- They are best used at the early stages of RA, but can help throughout. Commonly used oral DMARDs: Antimalarial medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) or chloroquine (Aralen) Leflunomide (Arava) Methotrexate such as Rheumatrex Sulfasalazine such as Azulfidine Less commonly used oral DMARDs: Azathioprine such as Imuran Cyclophosphamide such as Cytoxan or Neosar Cyclosporine such as Neoral or Sandimmune Gold salts such as Ridaura or Aurolate Minocycline such as Dynacin or Minocin Penicillamine such as Cuprimine or Depen Biological DMARDs: Abatacept (Orencia) Adalimumab (Humira) Anakinra (Kineret) Etanercept (Enbrel) Infliximab (Remicade) Rituximab (Rituxan) Also NSAIDS -- None steroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Naproxen Sodium and so on can help with inflammation and pain. Immunosuppressant drugs can help immensely but have to be used with care due to side effects and the effects of a suppressed immune system -- Corticosteroids like prednisone are commonly used. Finally stronger opioid analgesics (painkillers) are prescribed for pain that cannot be controlled through other means -- Darvocet, Vicodin, Lortab, Codeine products and so on would fall into this category. Usually a combination of all treatments with lifestyle modification is the best combination treatment. A rheumatologist would be your best bet for the most informed doctor to manage your RA. Good luck, Answered by Shamika Copa 1 year ago.


Taking Ciprofloxacin.?
Im taking Cipro 500mg and it says not to take antacids, iron or vitamins, Do you think its okay to take nght time sleep aid with this medication? Asked by Hugo Cyler 1 year ago.

as always consult your pharmacist or the prescribing medical doctor for questions regarding your medications --i would not to be on the safe side read this from web md Some products that may interact with this drug include: live bacterial vaccines (e.g., typhoid, BCG), "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, hydrocortisone), cyclosporine, drugs removed from your body by certain liver enzymes (such as clozapine, duloxetine, phenytoin, ropinirole, tacrine), drugs for diabetes (e.g., glyburide, insulin), methotrexate, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen), probenecid, sevelamer, strontium, tizanidine, theophylline, urinary alkalinizers (e.g., potassium/sodium citrate). Many drugs besides ciprofloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), and certain antipsychotic medications (e.g., pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), among others. Also report the use of drugs that might increase seizure risk when combined with this medication such as isoniazid (INH), phenothiazines (e.g., chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline), among others. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Avoid drinking large amounts of beverages containing caffeine (coffee, tea, colas), eating large amounts of chocolate, or taking over-the-counter products that contain caffeine to keep you awake and alert. This drug may increase and/or prolong the effects of caffeine. Although most antibiotics probably do not affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, some antibiotics may decrease their effectiveness. This could cause pregnancy. Examples include rifamycins such as rifampin or rifabutin. Be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should use additional reliable birth control methods while using this antibiotic. Answered by Jerrell Hillwig 1 year ago.

I even have acid reflux illness and that i take Nexium. Nausea is a million of the area effects of Zantac. yet nonetheless majority of alot of medicine do reason nausea. If it become me i might communicate with my physians approximately it. Answered by Anjanette Gehrig 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Delphia Heitz 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Thomas Wilhelm 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Palma Moss 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Dusty Sassaman 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Scot Deamer 1 year ago.


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