Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010104/003.

Names and composition

"MEPHYTON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PHYTONADIONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010104/003 MEPHYTON PHYTONADIONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010104/003 MEPHYTON PHYTONADIONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
011745/001 KONAKION PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 0.5ML
011745/003 KONAKION PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
012223/001 AQUAMEPHYTON PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML ***Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012223/002 AQUAMEPHYTON PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 0.5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
083722/001 PHYTONADIONE PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 0.5ML
084060/001 PHYTONADIONE PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 0.5ML
084060/002 PHYTONADIONE PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
087954/001 VITAMIN K1 PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 0.5ML
087955/001 VITAMIN K1 PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
087956/001 VITAMIN K1 PHYTONADIONE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML

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Answered questions

Which is an antagonistic to coumadin, mephyton,biaxin, or entex LA?
Asked by Geoffrey Hardrict 12 months ago.

Mephyton, which is one of the names for phytonadione or simply, vitamin k. Answered by Jeanie Cavasos 12 months ago.

I believe that you are trying to ask about " ANTIDOTE" INSTEAD OF "antagonistic". Anyway if that's the case: An antidote to coumadin is --Phytonadione which can be any of these: Vitamin K1, AquaMEPHYTON, or Mephyton. >>So it is mephyton. Answered by Isa Friendly 12 months ago.


Coumadin antagonist?
im having a very hard time with this question.. anyone who could help.. it would be verrrry appreciated!Dan is currently taking the drugs Mephyton, Biaxin, and Entex LA for his chronic celiac disease and acute sinusitis. He was just prescribed Coumadin for thrombosis, and it has no therapeutic effect. Dan’s... Asked by Dannette Kingson 12 months ago.

im having a very hard time with this question.. anyone who could help.. it would be verrrry appreciated! Dan is currently taking the drugs Mephyton, Biaxin, and Entex LA for his chronic celiac disease and acute sinusitis. He was just prescribed Coumadin for thrombosis, and it has no therapeutic effect. Dan’s doctor suspects it’s a case of drug antagonism. Which drug is Dan taking that is antagonistic with Coumadin? Answered by Ching Avants 12 months ago.

I think Mephyton, Vitamin K? Sudden increases in Vitamin K may decrease effect of Coumadin. I think they are trying to do opposite things, the Mephyton to clot the blood and the Coumadin to thin it. Answered by Janiece Suns 12 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: coumadin antagonist? im having a very hard time with this question.. anyone who could help.. it would be verrrry appreciated! Dan is currently taking the drugs Mephyton, Biaxin, and Entex LA for his chronic celiac disease and acute sinusitis. He was just prescribed Coumadin for thrombosis, and it has no therapeutic... Answered by Kenna Tout 12 months ago.

My advice to you would be to call your pharmacist and see what he/she says. If you don't get a satisfactory answer there, call Bristol-Meyers Squib (the manufacturers of Coumadin) at 1-800-321-1335. They should be able to provide that information for you. Answered by Beth Tomb 12 months ago.

The pulse rate you quote would not be proper beats. They'd be some form of 'multiple beats', -very inefficient, and the effective pressure driving blood round would be low, -not high. So no risk of heart damage from pressure. The brain would cause the high pulse rate to try to get the pressure UP, to enable 'supply' to meet 'demand', but probably would not be succeeding. THat's the danger. High pulse rate is not (of itself) damaging. What's damaging is whatever is the cause of the high pulse. Alcohol, of course would be obviously one cause, and if you were on drugs/medication that's probably another. Given your cardiac history it sounds like a dangerous episode which might well have been fatal. There's a very high probability that it would be if repeated, and that all you've written is correct. Answered by Mindy Tribbey 12 months ago.

Warfarin is used to prevent blood clots from forming or growing larger in your blood and blood vessels. It is prescribed for people with certain types of irregular heartbeat, people with prosthetic (replacement or mechanical) heart valves, and people who have suffered a heart attack. Warfarin is also used to treat or prevent venous thrombosis (swelling and blood clot in a vein) and pulmonary embolism (a blood clot in the lung). Warfarin is in a class of medications called anticoagulants ('blood thinners'). It works by decreasing the clotting ability of the blood. Phytonadione (vitamin K) is used to prevent bleeding in people with blood clotting problems or too little vitamin K in the body. Phytonadione is in a class of medications called vitamins. It works by providing vitamin K that is needed for blood to clot normally in the body. Clarithromycin is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria, such as pneumonia (a lung infection), bronchitis (infection of the tubes leading to the lungs), and infections of the ears, sinuses, skin, and throat. It also is used to treat and prevent disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection [a type of lung infection that often affects people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)]. It is used in combination with other medications to eliminate H. pylori, a bacteria that causes ulcers. Clarithromycin is in a class of medications called macrolide antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Guaifenesin thins the mucus in the air passages and makes it easier to cough up the mucus and clear the airways, allowing you to breathe more easily. It relieves the coughs of colds, bronchitis, and other lung infections. Consult your doctor or Pharmacologist. Please see the web pages for more details on Warfarin (generic name) Coumadin (brand name), Phytonadione (generic name) Mephyton (brand name), Clarithromycin (generic name) Biaxin (brand name) and Guaifenesin (generic name) Entex LA (brand name). Answered by Woodrow Pree 12 months ago.


Does anyone know anything about this drug?(Mephton)?
I have a 28 year old uncle that did that cancer until just recently. Now it's in remission and he's home. He was prescribed some medication that is called "mephton". My aunt called me and asked me to look it up becuase they were just curious what it was for, but I cannot find it anywhere on the... Asked by Elodia Neas 12 months ago.

I have a 28 year old uncle that did that cancer until just recently. Now it's in remission and he's home. He was prescribed some medication that is called "mephton". My aunt called me and asked me to look it up becuase they were just curious what it was for, but I cannot find it anywhere on the internet or in any medical books. I thought maybe I was just overlooking it in the lists here on the internet but when I type it in..it says that there is 0 results found. Maybe it's a generic brand but still wouldn't it exist somewhere. If you know anything about this medication or where I could find information about it I would appreciate it. Thank you. Answered by Lawana Thanos 12 months ago.

I think the reason why you couldn't find any information was you didn't have the right spelling. It's called Mephyton or Vitamin K. Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin which plays an important role in blood clotting. This medication is used to prevent and treat hypoprothrombinemia (low blood clot factor levels) caused by vitamin K deficiency. HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth as directed. Do not increase your dose, take this more often or stop taking this without first consulting your doctor or pharmacist. If you are using "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin): depending on your dosage of vitamin K, it can reverse the effects of warfarin for up to two weeks, which may be undesirable. Therefore, be sure to take your vitamin K and "blood thinners" exactly as directed. If you develop easy bruising or bleeding, seek immediate medical attention. You may require additional vitamin K. Mephyton Oral is used to treat the following: Decrease in the Blood-Clotting Protein Prothrombin, Decreased Blood-Clotting from Low Vitamin K, Tendency Toward Bleeding Easily in a Newborn Baby, Prevention of Neonatal Hemorrhagic Disease, Decrease in Blood-Clotting Protein caused by Antibiotics, Blood Clotting Protein Deficiency due to AnticoagulantsMephyton Oral may also be used to treat: Abetalipoproteinemia, Blockage of Normal Bile Flow, Closure of Some or All of the Major Bile Ducts he following side effects are associated with Mephyton Oral: Infrequent side effects: Taste ProblemsLess Severe Temporary Redness of Face and NeckLess Severe Answered by Mireille Fleischner 12 months ago.


Antidotes for theses poisons...?
please can you give me a list of antidotes for these piosons. no website links and no ride comments. i need antidotes for Snake venom (be specific on the type of medicine) Rodenticide (if swallowed) Bleach and Carbamates from Insect repellent (if swallowed) Asked by Charisse Larcher 12 months ago.

Snake venom requires a specific anti-serum -- serum with antibodies to the venom of that specific type of snake. There are a variety of rodenticides. Some block the action of vitamin K, so high dose vitamin K (Mephyton) will work. Bleach is best countered with water (dilution) or milk (dilution, plus dissolved materials that can consume some bleach. Carbamates are insecticides, not insect repellents. Poisoning is treated with atropine to counter the symptoms and pralidoxime to neutralize the carbamate. Answered by Susan Shemwell 12 months ago.


Why do you need a certain amount of thiamine and riboflavin in your diet every day, but not vitamin A & D?
Asked by Roselia Denise 12 months ago.

Thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), the rest of the B vitamins and vitamin C are not stored in the body. They need to be 'replenished' every day. Vitamin A (retinol), vitamin D (calcitriol) along with vitamin E (ergocalciferol) and vitamin K (phytonadione) are 'fat soluble' vitamins and can be stored, to some degree, in the body. While these vitamins need to be replaced, the body can draw from these stores within the body. EDIT: Doc J is correct, I humbly stand, partially corrected. Busy day, sorry. Vitamin E is d-alpha-tocopherol. From a Pharmaceutical standpoint, phytonadione (Mephyton) is the tablet form of vitamin K and Aqua-Mephyton is the injectable form. Rocaltrol (calcitriol) and Drisdol (ergocalciferol) are the oral forms of vitamin D. Aquasol E is the oral form of vitamin E. Aquasol A is the oral form of vitamin A. Answered by Cleo Kubitz 12 months ago.

Hi Claudia. ... because thiamine and riboflavin are NOT STORED in any significant amounts in the body. A and D, on the other hand, are stored in the body - thus a DAILY supply is not an absolute requirement. Best wishes and good luck. p.s. I feel I must correct some of the absolutely incorrect information provided by the 'pharmacist'. First, Calcitriol is 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D - the active, hormonal form that is made from Vitamin D (cholecalciferol). Second, ergocalciferol is NOT vitamin E, it is the plant-based form of vitamin D. Next, vitamin E consists of four different forms of Tocopherols and 4 forms of Tocotrienols (it is NOT ergocalciferol, as noted above). Finally, Vitamin K is either phylloquinone, which is derived from green plants, or menaquinones, which are synthesized by bacteria. There is also menadione - a man-made, synthetic form of vitamin K. Oh, one more point. Vitamin A exists in three different chemical forms in the body: retinol, retinal, and retinoic acid. Answered by Tilda Philavong 12 months ago.

One cannot generalize, for example B12 is a B vitamin and water soluble but stored for months in the liver. Vitamin K is produced by bacteria in the gut so is less essential in the diet. Other than that, the reasons given above are correct. Answered by Alejandrina Dubin 12 months ago.

You are sadly mistaken--an insufficiency of either one, and certainly of both, is a virtual guarantee of bad health. A can be abused by doses that are too massive. D3 is not retained by the body, is flushed out all the time, and must be taken daily in substantial doses if you get little sun or have certain skin criteria. Please Google Vitamin A and Vitamin D3 and get some information before you assume anything or ask any more questions. Answered by Dung Vavra 12 months ago.


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