Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019578/001.

Names and composition

"MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019578/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076175/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
076392/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
076523/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
077699/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019578/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019591/001 LARIAM MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076175/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
076392/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
076523/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
077699/001 MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEFLOQUINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG

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Answered questions

Question about anti-malarial drug,Larium?
She is taking a repellent that contains 100% DEET,which is what her professor told her to use. She is going with a group;her professor has been going every year for 30 years. They are staying in Cuenca,but will also be going to the Amazon basin and the Galapagos Islands. She has been vaccinated for typhoid,yellow... Asked by Willard Caddell 1 year ago.

My niece is going to Ecuador in the fall for 10 weeks,and she is supposed to take Larium weekly to prevent malaria.The drug,however,has many side effects and I was wondering if anyone has taken it and had a bad reaction. Also,we have read that a person can take doxycycline instead. What can you tell me about Larium and should she take it or try for doxycycline? Answered by Tonette Lashute 1 year ago.

She is taking a repellent that contains 100% DEET,which is what her professor told her to use. She is going with a group;her professor has been going every year for 30 years. They are staying in Cuenca,but will also be going to the Amazon basin and the Galapagos Islands. She has been vaccinated for typhoid,yellow fever and rabies and also hepatitis,meningitis and tetanus. It's the trip of a lifetime,we just want to make sure she is as safe as possible! Answered by Kiesha Donoghue 1 year ago.

she can use odomos mosquito repellant cream to safeguard her against mosquito and other insects.it has no side effects Lariam (mefloquine hydrochloride) is an antimalarial agent available as 250-mg tablets of mefloquine hydrochloride (equivalent to 228.0 mg of the free base) for oral administration. lariam is indicated for the treatment of mild to moderate acute malaria caused by mefloquine-susceptible strains of P. falciparum (both chloroquine-susceptible and resistant strains) or by Plasmodium vivax. There are insufficient clinical data to document the effect of mefloquine in malaria caused by P. ovale or P. malariae. SIDE EFFECTS ; depressed mood, feeling restless or anxious; confusion, extreme fear, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior; severe or uncontrolled vomiting or diarrhea; fever; cough, wheezing, feeling short of breath; nausea, stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urination (kidney diseases) ONLY MALARIA PATIENT SHOULD USE LARIUM Answered by Clorinda Zeise 1 year ago.

Either one is considered adequate for prevention of malaria. The choice is made on the basis of cost, convenince, and medical factors. Malaria prophylaxis is not needed for the Galapagos Islands and for any areas above 1500 meters altitude, so unless she is going back and forth to the Amazon, she will likely not need it for the full 10 weeks. Only the travel time to the malaria risk area is counted in determining the length of treatment (plus the required number of days before and after). Despite its bad rap, mefloquine (Lariam) is well tolerated in most people who take it, but some do not like the vivid dreams that can occur. Serious side effects (hallucinations, seizures) are rare but obviously problematic when they occur. Lariam should not be given to anyone with any kind of psychiatric illness or seizures/epilepsy. Its main advantage is ease of administration (weekly rather than daily). This is especially nice for someone who has to take it for months or years. Most often, the intolerable side effects show up in the first several weeks on the medicine so it is a good idea to start it 2-3 weeks before travel, so a different antimalarial can be substituted before the trip if necessary. The advantages of doxycycline are cost and avoiding the side effects of mefloquine. Doxycycline must be taken daily, starting a day or two before travel to the area with malaria, during the stay, and for 4 weeks after. It can cause nausea and irritation of the esophagus which can usually be avoided by taking it with food and not taking it right before lying down. It can cause sensitivity to the sun, so liberal use of sunscreen and long sleeves are recommended while taking it. And women who are prone to yeast infections find it a good idea to take along a yeast infection treatment just in case, and/or take probiotics as it is an antibiotic and can disrupt normal bacterial flora. This all may sound cumbersome but remember adolescents often take doxycycline for months or years for acne treatment. It's also dirt cheap- where I live you could get enough for $10-20. Read up on altitude illness too. Looks like you have got everything else covered. Answered by Arleen Maiden 1 year ago.

Larium is generally thought to be more effective on the most deadly strains of malaria - falsiparum. I lived in Nigeria where malaria was rampant - locals would get it 2-3 times a yr. Of all the expats i know that took Larium, I didn't know anyone who had a very bad reaction. If you read the insert on any OTC drug you buy, you would think you were going to die on the first dose lol, it is just the way the drug companies are made to disclose all reactions. I really would consider using insect repellent. Dengue is very prevalent in South America, and is as dangerous as malaria, and there is no vaccine or other prevention for it. If you are going into the wilds, take your Deep Woods Off with you, as you might have a hard time getting repellent in the countryside, Answered by Sharonda Anagnost 1 year ago.


Taking Malaria pills?
Soon i will be going to south africa and i have been told i will soon have to start taking malaria pills to prevent getting malaria. Ive heard though that there are some side effects and wanted to know what they are eg, making you sick. If this is the case is it just at the start of you taking the pills or through... Asked by Thanh Middents 1 year ago.

Soon i will be going to south africa and i have been told i will soon have to start taking malaria pills to prevent getting malaria. Ive heard though that there are some side effects and wanted to know what they are eg, making you sick. If this is the case is it just at the start of you taking the pills or through the whole treatment? I will have to be away for a month so it would suck to be sick that long. Ive also heard some types give you nightmares. I wouldnt mind that so what are those called. Answered by Pok Bridgers 1 year ago.

Several drugs, most of which are also used for treatment of malaria, can be taken preventively. Generally, these drugs are taken daily or weekly, at a lower dose than would be used for treatment of a person who had actually contracted the disease. Use of prophylactic drugs is seldom practical for full-time residents of malaria-endemic areas, and their use is usually restricted to short-term visitors and travelers to malarial regions. This is due to the potentially high cost of purchasing the drugs, because long-term use of some drugs may have negative side effects, and because some effective anti-malarial drugs are difficult to obtain outside of wealthy nations. Quinine was used starting in the seventeenth century as a prophylactic against malaria. The development of more effective alternatives such as quinacrine, chloroquine, and primaquine in the twentieth century reduced the reliance on quinine. Today, quinine is still used to treat chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum, as well as severe and cerebral stages of malaria, but is not generally for malaria prophylaxis. Modern drugs used preventively include mefloquine (Lariam®), doxycycline (available generically), and atovaquone proguanil hydrochloride (Malarone®). The choice of which drug to use is usually driven by what drugs the parasites in the area are resistant to, as well as side-effects and other considerations. The prophylactic effect does not begin immediately upon starting taking the drugs, so people temporarily visiting malaria-endemic areas usually begin taking the drugs one to two weeks before arriving and must continue taking them for 4 weeks after leaving (atovaquone proguanil only needs be started 2 days prior and continued for 7 days afterwards). Answered by Kristle Wolzen 1 year ago.

Combined pill to combat malaria Malaria is spread by mosquitoes A cheap and easy-to-use pill could help combat malaria - which kills nearly 2m people a year in poor countries. The pill combines a classic malaria drug amodiaquine with a newer medicine containing artemisinin, which comes from a Chinese plant. Developed by pharmaceutical company Sanofi-Aventis, patients need only take it twice a day - other regimes require as many as eight pills a day. The malaria parasite has developed growing resistance to current drugs. Malaria Malaria kills between up to 2m people a year, and affects 500m A child dies of malaria every 30 seconds in Africa An estimated 40% of the world population, mostly living in the world poorest countries, is at risk Malaria is the leading cause of death among the under-five children in sub-Saharan Africa It is thought that part of the reason for this is that current treatments require patients to take a large number of pills, so many often do not complete the course properly. This leaves them vulnerable to recurrences of the disease, but also allows the parasite, which often it not totally killed off, to modify, and develop resistance. Dr Allan Schapira, of the World Health Organization, said: "It seems to be a simple thing just to put two drugs together in one pill, but it really is an important step forward because it makes it much easier for people to take. "It's very good news. It could have a major impact on the effectiveness of treatment." Africa to benefit Four main malaria drugs are used around the world, and often one drug will work in one country, but not in another. The WHO recommends using those classic medications together with an artemisinin-based newer drug. The new drug, developed in collaboration with the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi), is likely to be most effective in parts of Africa - where a child dies of malaria every 30 seconds - and Indonesia. It is hoped the drug will cost less than $1 per three-day treatment for an adult, and 50 cents for a child. There is already a combination tablet for malaria, using another of the four classic malaria drugs - lumefantrine. However, that therapy still involves taking eight pills a day and is more than twice as expensive as the new combination pill. Dr Bernard Pecoul, DNDi Foundation Executive Director, said: "One of the key goals of the DNDi's development strategy was to create a drug that is simple to use, at a cost below a dollar." The World Health Organization estimates malaria affects up to 500m people world-wide each year. Answered by Isiah Trayler 1 year ago.

The anti-malaria pill I believe is called Atabrin. I suggest you check with the Center for Desease Control, Overseas Travel Section. They will advice you what precautions to take, if any, for travel overseas. One month is not too long. You may also check the website Medlineplus.com to get information about malaria. Answered by Divina Huxhold 1 year ago.

I posted the Centers for Disease Control website below. It shows what Vaccines are recommended for a trip to South Africa. They do not mention taking Malaria tabs. If you are still concered write them. They will have the answer Answered by Adah Meryman 1 year ago.

i'd go on the secure part and take them. "P. falciparum malaria is often replaced into once endemic (i.e., continuously happening) in rural parts of the Dominican Republic, with the utmost probability of transmission happening in parts bordering Haiti. regardless of the very incontrovertible actuality that hotel parts in the Dominican Republic are often not probability parts, small localized outbreaks have got here about in modern-day years in and round resorts in the province of l. a. Altagracia." be conscious: Punta Cana is placed in the province of l. a. Altagracia. As an aspect be conscious, you should also evaluate getting the Hepatitis A vaccine (the B one too, yet extremely a lot less proper on your holiday is my wager). Answered by Cara Olverson 1 year ago.

worry about alopatheic traet,go 4 homopatheicas it is natural &inc ur immune power. Answered by Julia Laub 1 year ago.

the CDC can help you. Answered by Cyrstal Krnach 1 year ago.


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