Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016785/001.

Names and composition

"MATULANE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROCARBAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016785/001 MATULANE PROCARBAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016785/001 MATULANE PROCARBAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE

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Answered questions

Matulane useful to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas?
my brother is diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas which it's aggressive one recently. he is from china. the condition of treatment there is far less than the united state. i'm thinking to mail back some drugs for Chemotherapy. my question is 1: heard of there is a kind of medicine called ... Asked by Ardath Ruedas 1 year ago.

i became not one that prayed for you, i did not see the question. Sorry! yet compliment God to the optimal. share your testimony with all people which you will. you will be waiting to grant wish and peace to those that are nevertheless scuffling with this ailment! Answered by Milissa Knoch 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Kieth Prosise 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Man Clark 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Cuc Mathern 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Deangelo Exel 1 year ago.


Just diagnosed withADHD?
Thanks Tash for your detailed response. I have only just gotten the results from a psychologist who was testing me for a math disability, for a waiver for college math requirements and realized that I have ADHD. As I don't have any health insurance, (the testing cost me an arm and a leg already) I can't... Asked by Heath Bruff 1 year ago.

I have just been diagnosed with ADHD. I suspected so a long time ago but figured so what! they'll give me some speed/amphetamine like medication and how can that really benifit me in the long run. I'm not sure what to do, has anyone had any success with meds for this? I currently take fluxotine for major anxiety. I wonder if the anxiety is possibly related to the ADHD and if it would be wise to combine medications? Anyone out there with a clue? Please respond only if you know what your talking about! Thanks:) Answered by Mittie Coombs 1 year ago.

Thanks Tash for your detailed response. I have only just gotten the results from a psychologist who was testing me for a math disability, for a waiver for college math requirements and realized that I have ADHD. As I don't have any health insurance, (the testing cost me an arm and a leg already) I can't afford therapy, and numerous doctor bills. I haven't seen a doctor yet for the ADHD. I was hoping for one pill to "cure all" My priority is the anxiety as it has a profound, crippling effect on my life. I'm wondering if adorol or whatever they subscribe helps with the anxiety? I don't want to have to rely on tons of medications! just feel "normal" not nervous and fidgety and distracted and anxious all the time!!! Answered by Faye Powell 1 year ago.

Is this the same doctor that Dx you that is giving you the Prozac? Because in the references say it does say to stop before taking a MAOIs should be separated by 14 days. From this other medication? GENERIC NAME: fluoxetine BRAND NAME: Prozac DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Fluoxetine is an oral drug that is used for treating depression. It is in a class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a class that also contains citalopram (Celexa), paroxetine (Paxil) and sertraline (Zoloft). Fluoxetine affects neurotransmitters, the chemicals that nerves within the brain use to communicate with each other. Neurotransmitters are manufactured and released by nerves and then travel and attach to nearby nerves. Thus, neurotransmitters can be thought of as the communication system of the brain. Serotonin is one neurotransmitter that is released by nerves in the brain. The serotonin either travels across the space between nerves and attaches to receptors on the surface of nearby nerves or it attaches to receptors on the surface of the nerve that produced it, to be taken up by the nerve and released again (a process referred to as re-uptake). GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Capsules: 10, 20, and 40 mg. Capsules (delayed release): 90 mg. Tablets: 10, 15, and 20 mg. Oral suspension: 20mg/5ml PRESCRIBED FOR: Fluoxetine is used for treating depression, bulimia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). DOSING: Depression in adults is treated with 20-80 mg of fluoxetine daily. After 13 weeks of daily administration, once weekly dosing may be effective in some patients. Obsessive-compulsive disorder in adults and children is treated with 20-60 mg daily and ......................................... panic disorder is managed with 10-60 mg daily. ****DRUG INTERACTIONS: Fluoxetine should not be taken with any of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) class of antidepressants [for example, isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), selegiline (Eldepryl), and procarbazine (Matulane)] or other drugs that inhibit monoamine oxidase [for example, linezolid (Zyvox)]. Such combinations may lead to confusion, high blood pressure, tremor, hyperactivity, coma, and death. **************************************... Administration of fluoxetine and MAOIs should be separated by 14 days. Similar reactions occur when fluoxetine is combined with other drugs [for example, tryptophan, St. John's wort, meperidine (Demerol), tramadol (Ultram)] that increase serotonin in the brain. **************************************... Fluoxetine may increase the effect of warfarin (Coumadin), leading to excessive bleeding. Warfarin therapy should be monitored more frequently in patients who are also taking fluoxetine. Combining SSRIs with aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or other drugs that affect bleeding may increase the likelihood of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Symptoms of withdrawal include anxiety, nausea, nervousness, and insomnia. TAPER-TITRATE++++++++If you do stop taking it! The dose of fluoxetine should be gradually reduced when therapy is discontinued. >>>What you didn't say was what the new medication was going to be? Do you know yet? Both my kids took medications for ADHD and I have anxiety and take medications for it. If it isn't the same doctor prescribing them both to you THE "NO" it is not wise! Have one fax op-notes to the other and let them decide which medications are best, or more helpful to you as the patient, everyone is different, but if you saw 2 doctors with tow Dx, then there is definitely a conflict! Also which is more important to you control the anxiety of the ADHD if you do have them both>? You may not be able to treat them simultaneously, if you have to choose, then it is something to think about, there are medications that help, OCD, PTSD, and anxiety, and depression all at once, maybe that is a better bet? As long as you are not Bi-polar, that is a whole other ball park of medications that other meds can make worse! Good Luck, or expand your question to which medication if any was in line to replace the Prozac? God Bless!>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>... No, adderall and concerta is what they give for adhd, and it will highten your anxiety! causes heart palpations, dizzy, restlessness, overstimulation, rapid heartbeat and increased blood pressure! NO-NOT HELP with anxiety! So, if that is priority Number #1 no adderall or concerta, looked it up in the medication desk reference! Answered by Myrle Temoney 1 year ago.

I went through all of this about a year ago. I knew something wasn't quite right. I have always had to struggle with concentration. I am over 40, and I wish I had been diagnosed YEARS ago! Now, things are easier to understand, and my concentration and memory are unbelievable. I was told that ADHD is usually related to several other conditions. I found out that I am bi-polar. I would have never guessed that. But, now I have been diagnosed and I feel completely like a different person. I did have anxiety. That is where the bi-polar comes in. I was never depressed, other than the occasional moods like everyone else. I do take a med for each. I had to try many to find the right combination. Hope this helps. Answered by Wilburn Mayers 1 year ago.

Lead a ordinary lifestyles, Shock the Monkey - Peter Gabriel The cure is dressed in off, Novocaine for the soul - The Eels She's misplaced manage, Dead Souls - Joy Division Francis Farmer could have her revenge on Seattle - Nirvana They're coming to take me away - Napoleon XIIV Psycho - The Sonics Psycho - Elvis Costello in The Mouth of Madness - Spock's Beard Can I play with Madness - Iron Maiden Lobotomy Gets 'em Home - The Men They Couldn't Hang Teenage Lobotomy - The Ramones Behind Grey Walls - Richard Thompson Behind Blue eyes - The Who Manic Depression - Jimi BA: that could violate surgeon/sufferer confidentiality Answered by Wes Musquiz 1 year ago.


Is there a generic alternative to Lexapro?
Asked by Fred Chadwell 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: escitalopram BRAND NAME: Lexapro DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Escitalopram is an oral drug that is used for treating depression and generalized anxiety disorder. It works by affecting neurotransmitters in the brain, the chemical messengers that nerves use to communicate with one another. Neurotransmitters are made and released by nerves and then travel to other nearby nerves where they attach to receptors on the nerves. Some neurotransmitters that are released do not bind to receptors and are taken up by the nerves that produced them. This is referred to as "reuptake." Many experts believe that an imbalance of neurotransmitters is the cause of depression. Escitalopram prevents the reuptake of one neurotransmitter, serotonin, by nerves, an action which results in more serotonin in the brain to attach to receptors. Chemically, escitalopram is very similar to citalopram (Celexa). Both are in the class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a class that also includes fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil) and sertraline (Zoloft). Escitalopram was approved by the food and drug administration in August 2002. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: No PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 5, 10, and 20 mg. Solution: 5 mg/5 ml STORAGE: Escitalopram tablets should be stored at room temperature, 15-30°C (59-86°F) PRESCRIBED FOR: Escitalopram is approved for the treatment of depression and generalized anxiety disorder. Drugs in the SSRI class also have been studied in persons with obsessive-compulsive disorders and panic disorders. DOSING: The usual starting dose of escitalopram is 10 mg once daily. The dose may be increased to 20 mg once daily. Benefit may not be seen until treatment has been given for up to 4 weeks. Escitalopram can be taken with or without food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: All SSRIs, including escitalopram, should not be taken together with any drugs of the MAO (mono-amine oxidase) inhibitor-class of antidepressants, for example, isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and procarbazine (Matulane). Such combinations may lead to confusion, high blood pressure, high fevers, tremor or muscle rigidity, and increased activity. At least 14 days should elapse after discontinuing escitalopram before starting an MAO inhibitor. This same type of interaction also may occur with selegiline (Eldepryl), fenfluramine (Pondimin), and dexfenfluramine (Redux). Tryptophan can cause headaches, nausea, sweating, and dizziness when taken with any SSRI. Use of selective serotonin inhibitors may increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and other drugs that cause bleeding. PREGNANCY: The safety of escitalopram during pregnancy and lactation has not been established. Therefore, escitalopram should not be used during pregnancy unless, in the opinion of the physician, the expected benefits to the patient outweigh unknown hazards to the fetus. NURSING MOTHERS: Escitalopram is excreted in human milk. Escitalopram should not be given to nursing mothers unless, in the opinion of the physician, the expected benefits to the patient outweigh the possible hazards to the child. SIDE EFFECTS: The most common side effects associated with escitalopram are agitation or restlessness, blurred vision, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, fever, frequent urination, headache, indigestion, nausea, increased or decreased appetite, increased sweating, sexual difficulties (decreased sexual ability or desire, ejaculatory delay), taste alterations, tremor (shaking), weight changes. Although changes in sexual desire, sexual performance and sexual satisfaction often occur as a result of depression itself, they also may be a consequence of the drugs used to treat depression. In particular, about one in 11 men given escitalopram report difficulties experiencing ejaculation. Some patients may experience withdrawal reactions upon stopping SSRI therapy. Symptoms may include dizziness, tingling, tiredness, vivid dreams, irritability, or poor mood. In order to avoid these symptoms, the dose of SSRI can be slowly reduced instead of abruptly stopped. Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in short-term studies in children and adolescents with depression and other psychiatric disorders. Anyone considering the use of escitalopram or any other antidepressant in a child or adolescent must balance this risk with the clinical need. Patients who are started on therapy should be closely observed for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. Answered by Rima Reichart 1 year ago.

Lexapro is (S-Citalopram) the pure enantiomer of Citalopram (Celexa). Generally you need 2x-3x more Celexa to match a dose of Lexapro, because of the inactive component. However, Celexa's dirt cheap, and has been generic for quite a while. Lexapro should be going generic in under a year, barring any spectacular evergreening lawsuits. Answered by Jannette Vaubel 1 year ago.


Citalopram 10mg?
1) what is the side effect 2) withdraw effect any webside have full informations?? For court using, thanks so much for your help Asked by Debi Kruzewski 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: citalopram BRAND NAME: Celexa DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Citalopram is an antidepressant medication that affects neurotransmitters, the chemical transmitters within the brain. Neurotransmitters manufactured and released by nerves attach to adjacent nerves and alter their activities. Thus, neurotransmitters can be thought of as the communication system of the brain. Many experts believe that an imbalance among neurotransmitters is the cause of depression. Citalopram works by preventing the uptake of one neurotransmitter, serotonin, by nerve cells after it has been released. Such uptake is an important mechanism for removing released neurotransmitters and terminating their actions on adjacent nerves. The reduced uptake caused by citalopram results in more free serotonin in the brain to stimulate nerve cells. Citalopram is in the class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a class that also contains fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil) and sertraline (Zoloft). Citalopram was approved by the FDA in July 1998. GENERIC AVAILABLE: No PRESCRIPTION: Yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (oval): 20mg, 40mg. STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature, 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Citalopram is used for the management of depression. It also has been tested in persons with obsessive- compulsive disorders and panic disorders. DOSING: Citalopram is given as a single daily dose, usually in the morning. As with all antidepressants, it may take several weeks of treatment before maximum effects are seen. Doses are often adjusted slowly upwards to find the most effective dose. Elderly patients, debilitated persons, and patients with certain kidney or liver diseases may need lower doses. DRUG INTERACTIONS: All SSRIs, including citalopram, should not be taken with any of the mono-amine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor-class of antidepressants, for example, isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and procarbazine (Matulane). Such combinations may lead to confusion, high blood pressure, tremor, and hyperactivity. This same type of interaction also may occur with selegiline (Eldepryl), fenfluramine (Pondimin), and dexfenfluramine (Redux). Tryptophan can cause headaches, nausea, sweating, and dizziness when taken with any SSRI. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of citalopram in pregnant women. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if citalopram is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly-noted side effects associated with citalopram are nausea, vomiting, excessive sweating, headache, tremor, and inability to sleep. Overall, between 1 in 6 and 1 in 5 persons experience a side effect. Some patients may experience withdrawal reactions upon stopping some SSRIs such as paroxetine, and such symptoms also may occur with citalopram. Symptoms of withdrawal include dizziness, tingling sensations , tiredness, vivid dreams, irritability or poor mood. It has been suggested that SSRIs may cause depression to worsen and even lead to suicide in a small number of patients. These potential side effects are difficult to evaluate in depressed patients because depression can progress with or without treatment, and suicide is itself a consequence of depression. Moreover, the evidence supporting these potential side effects is weak. Therefore, no conclusions can yet be drawn about the relationship between SSRIs and worsening depression and suicide. Until better information is available, patients receiving SSRIs should be monitored for worsening depression and suicidal tendencies. Answered by Guillermina Orwig 1 year ago.

i just started on it last week, 10mg. i am a bit tired but over all i feel fine. i was experiencing hot flashes and night sweats and rages and melt downs, all from menopause. i hope it can control all these. i'm limited to what i can take, i have heart failure and have had a attack last year. Answered by Guillermo Guderian 1 year ago.

Citalopram 10mg Answered by Omega Pana 1 year ago.

I ve taken citalopram 20mg for pain reduction from abdominal surgery requiring a large part of my abdomen to be cut open.It was very painful but the citalopram has actually helped and improved my mood.It is a very subtle effect and I would think it effects people without them noticing the changes it does produce. Answered by Allena Harig 1 year ago.

I'm on Celexa (citalopram) 20 mg. I have not experienced any side effects or withraw symptoms. Answered by Niesha Greenmyer 1 year ago.

10mg is 1/6 recommended adult dose. It is a serotonin uptake inhibitor. You should have no trouble at that dosage. Answered by Sudie Gemmill 1 year ago.

will it replace advain Answered by Rueben Pietrzak 1 year ago.


Help with medicine?
can you get a high off of taking Citalopram ? how much would you have to take to get a high? Asked by Renato Ploude 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: citalopram BRAND NAME: Celexa DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Citalopram is an antidepressant medication that affects neurotransmitters, the chemical transmitters within the brain. Neurotransmitters manufactured and released by nerves attach to adjacent nerves and alter their activities. Thus, neurotransmitters can be thought of as the communication system of the brain. Many experts believe that an imbalance among neurotransmitters is the cause of depression. Citalopram works by preventing the uptake of one neurotransmitter, serotonin, by nerve cells after it has been released. Such uptake is an important mechanism for removing released neurotransmitters and terminating their actions on adjacent nerves. The reduced uptake caused by citalopram results in more free serotonin in the brain to stimulate nerve cells. Citalopram is in the class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a class that also contains fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil) and sertraline (Zoloft). Citalopram was approved by the FDA in July 1998. GENERIC AVAILABLE: No PRESCRIPTION: Yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (oval): 20mg, 40mg. STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature, 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Citalopram is used for the management of depression. It also has been tested in persons with obsessive- compulsive disorders and panic disorders. DOSING: Citalopram is given as a single daily dose, usually in the morning. As with all antidepressants, it may take several weeks of treatment before maximum effects are seen. Doses are often adjusted slowly upwards to find the most effective dose. Elderly patients, debilitated persons, and patients with certain kidney or liver diseases may need lower doses. DRUG INTERACTIONS: All SSRIs, including citalopram, should not be taken with any of the mono-amine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor-class of antidepressants, for example, isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and procarbazine (Matulane). Such combinations may lead to confusion, high blood pressure, tremor, and hyperactivity. This same type of interaction also may occur with selegiline (Eldepryl), fenfluramine (Pondimin), and dexfenfluramine (Redux). Tryptophan can cause headaches, nausea, sweating, and dizziness when taken with any SSRI. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of citalopram in pregnant women. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if citalopram is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly-noted side effects associated with citalopram are nausea, vomiting, excessive sweating, headache, tremor, and inability to sleep. Overall, between 1 in 6 and 1 in 5 persons experience a side effect. Some patients may experience withdrawal reactions upon stopping some SSRIs such as paroxetine, and such symptoms also may occur with citalopram. Symptoms of withdrawal include dizziness, tingling sensations , tiredness, vivid dreams, irritability or poor mood. It has been suggested that SSRIs may cause depression to worsen and even lead to suicide in a small number of patients. These potential side effects are difficult to evaluate in depressed patients because depression can progress with or without treatment, and suicide is itself a consequence of depression. Moreover, the evidence supporting these potential side effects is weak. Therefore, no conclusions can yet be drawn about the relationship between SSRIs and worsening depression and suicide. Until better information is available, patients receiving SSRIs should be monitored for worsening depression and suicidal tendencies. DONT MESS WITH IT.. Its not one of those feel buzzed drugs Answered by Robert Treider 1 year ago.

why would you want to do that? It's an antianxiety medication, therefore a depressant. I dont know if you would consider that a "high", I wouldn't. It is addictive, and would hopefully (if you took more than the prescribed amount), put you to sleep before killing you. If a person needs to take drugs to escape life or reality, they should speak to their doctor or counsellor immediately. They just might learn how to get high from life itself. Answered by Tory Doss 1 year ago.

Dude Celexa is where it's at man. **** Citalopram. It doesn't even work at an antidepressant. Answered by Georgiana Mier 1 year ago.

That is Celexa and it doesn't work that way. Answered by June Wieber 1 year ago.


If your on celexa (the medication)......?
is there anything that your not supposed to combine with it? (like vitamins, certain foods, caffeine, anything?!) Asked by Elvina Cavagnaro 1 year ago.

Medication (in alphabetical order); Major Interactions 5-HTP, 5-hydroxytryptophan, Actiq, Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Adapin, Adipex-P, Adipost, Alfenta, alfentanil, almotriptan, Amerge, amitriptyline, amoxapine, amphetamine, Anafranil, Anorex-SR, Aplenzin, Appecon, Asendin, Atapryl, Aventyl HCl, Axert, Azilect, Babee Cof, Balminil DM, Balminil DM Pour Enfants, Balminil DM Sans Sucrose, Benadryl for the Family Dry Forte, Benylin, Benylin Adult Formula, Benylin DM, Benylin DM Pediatric, Benylin Dry Coughs, Benylin Pediatric, benzphetamine, Bisolvon Dry, Bisolvon Dry Junior, Bontril PDM, Bontril Slow Release, Buckley's Mixture Cough Suppressant, Buckleys Mixture, Budeprion SR, Budeprion XL, buPROPion, buPROPion 24 hour extended release, buPROPion extended release, BuSpar, BuSpar Dividose, busPIRone, Calmylin, Carbex, Chem Mart Tramadol, clomiPRAMINE, Contac Cough, Control, Cough Relief, Cough Syrup DM, Covonia Bronchial Balsam, Creo-Terpin, Creomulsion, Creomulsion Children, Cymbalta, D.H.E. 45, Darvon, Darvon-N, Delsym, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief for Children & Adults, Demerol HCl, desipramine, Desoxyn, Desoxyn Gradumet, desvenlafaxine, Desyrel, Desyrel Dividose, DexAlone, Dexatrim, Dexatrim Caffeine Free, Dexedrine, Dexedrine Spansule, dexfenfluramine, Dexi-Tuss, dextroamphetamine, dextroamphetamine extended release, dextromethorphan, dextromethorphan extended release, Dextromethorphan HBr Adult Formula, Dextrostat, Didrex, diethylpropion, diethylpropion extended release, dihydroergotamine, dihydroergotamine nasal, Dimetapp Cold Cough & Flu Day & Night Liquid Caps, doxepin, doxepin topical, Dristan DM, Dromadol SR, Dromadol XL, Dry Cough, duloxetine, Duragesic, Duragesic-100, Duragesic-12, Duragesic-25, Duragesic-50, Duragesic-75, Effexor, Effexor XR, Elavil, Eldepryl, eletriptan, Elixsure Cough, Empro, Emsam, Endep, ephedra, Ergomar, ergotamine, Eskalith, Eskalith-CR, Fastin, fenfluramine, fentanyl, fentanyl topical, Fentora, Frova, frovatriptan, furazolidone, Furoxone, GenRx Tramadol, GHB, Hold DM, hypericum perforatum, imipramine, imipramine pamoate, Imitrex, Imitrex Nasal, Imitrex Statdose, Imitrex Statdose Refill, iohexol, Ionamin, Ionsys, iopamidol, Iopamidol-370, isocarboxazid, Isovue-128, Isovue-200, Isovue-250, Isovue-300, Isovue-370, Isovue-M-200, Isovue-M-300, Jack & Jill Thin Strips Cough, Jumex, l-tryptophan, Larapam SR, levomethadyl acetate, linezolid, lisdexamfetamine, lithium, lithium carbonate, lithium carbonate extended release, lithium citrate, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lloydspharmacy Dry Adult Cough, ma huang, Marplan, Matulane, Maxalt, Maxalt-MLT, Mazanor, mazindol, Mega-Trim, Melfiat, Mellaril, Mellaril-S, meperidine, Meridia, methamphetamine, methamphetamine extended release, metrizamide, Migranal, milnacipran, mirtazapine, Myelo-Kit, naratriptan, Nardil, nefazodone, Neocitran Thin Strips Cough, Norpramin, nortriptyline, Novahistine DM, Nucosef DM, Obephen, Obezine, Oby-Cap, Oby-Trim, Omnipaque 140, Omnipaque 180, Omnipaque 180 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 210, Omnipaque 240, Omnipaque 240 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 300, Omnipaque 350, Omnipaque Flexipak, Orap, Orlaam, Pamelor, Panshape M, Parnate, Pedia Relief, Pediacare, pentazocine, Pertussin CS Childrens, Pertussin DM, Pertussin ES, Phendiet, Phendiet-105, phendimetrazine, phendimetrazine extended release, phenelzine, Phentercot, phentermine, phentermine hydrochloride, phentermine hydrochloride extended release, phentermine resin extended release, Phentride, Phenyldrine, phenylpropanolamine, pimozide, Plegine, Pondimin, PP-Cap, Prelu-2, Pristiq, Pro-Fast HS, Pro-Fast SA, Pro-Fast SR, procarbazine, Propagest, Propan, propoxyphene, propoxyphene hydrochloride, propoxyphene napsylate, protriptyline, Prudoxin, rasagiline, Redux, Relpax, Remeron, Remeron SolTab, remifentanil, Rhindecon, rizatriptan, Robafen Cough Liquidgels, Robafen Pediatric Cough & Cold, Robitussin Cough Calmers, Robitussin CoughGels, Robitussin Dry Cough, Robitussin DX Cough Control, Robitussin DX Cough Control Forte, Robitussin DX Dry Cough Forte, Robitussin Honey Cough, Robitussin Junior Persistent Cough, Robitussin Maximum Strength, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Long-Acting, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Suppressant, Robitussin Soft Pastilles, Ryzolt, Sanorex, Savella, Scot-Tussin Diabetic, Scot-Tussin DM Cough Chasers, selegiline, Selgene, Serzone, sibutramine, Silphen DM, Sinequan, sodium biphosphate, sodium oxybate, St. John's wort, St. Joseph Cough Suppressant, Statobex, Strepsils Cough, Strepsils Cough Relief, Sublimaze, Sucrets DM Cough, Sufenta, sufentanil, sumatriptan, sumatriptan nasal, Surmontil, T-Diet, Talwin, Talwin Lactate, Tenuate, Tenuate Dospan, Teramine, Teramine ER, Terry White Chemists Tramadol, Theraflu Thin Strips Cough, thioridazine, Tofranil, Tofranil-PM, traMADOL, traMADOL extended release, Tramahexal, Tramahexal SR, Tramake, Tramake Insts, Tramal, Tramal SR, Tramedo, tranylcypromine Answered by Rolf Rannels 1 year ago.

There are no side effects at all. I have gone off of it several times and had no issues, although if you do decide to go back on, all that headache and stuff will come back. If the issue is not being able to pay for them I would like to suggest that i am taking a generic version of celexa called citralopram that only costs 20 dollars for 30 pills at 40mg. I hope i helped you, Answered by Myrl Kawamoto 1 year ago.

Tramahexal Sr 100 Answered by Clinton Glassburn 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Izetta Juarbe 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Keven Hammen 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Jude Chorlton 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Gregoria Bonin 1 year ago.


Is it safe to take these pills together.....?
20mg prozac Midol Hydroxy cut (weight loss pill) weight loss patch.. Asked by Drew Okeson 1 year ago.

First of all, any time someone takes a pill like Prozac, a doctor should be consulted before using any other medication, especially a diet pill. The following is the best advice I can find on the topic of Hydroxy and Prozac: There is no conclusive evidence on the interactions between these two specific drugs. There haven't been any clinical studies about these two products in specific, but there are several known aspects that might discourage such usage. First, Hydroxycut is not to be used for people diagnosed with depression or mental illness (1). Basically, this means that those suffering from the problems that Prozac is supposed to solve are not to take Hydroxycut. In several cases, the usage of the supplement has led to death or to development of a mental problem: "A 19-year-old female was taking Hydroxycut 2 pills twice a day to aid muscle definition and to speed metabolism. She reported dizziness and nausea two hours after use and began having violent outbursts, nightmares, poor mood, hot flashes, and fatigue. After a few days, she developed increased anger and rage and fought with boyfriend, mother, father, and sisters. She also tried to kill her boyfriend?s sister and herself. After eight days of use, she developed a migraine and went to the emergency room. She then went home and picked up a knife, with homicidal intent, but was convinced to return to the hospital voluntarily. She was admitted for 18 hours and was readmitted later that day for a 72-hour involuntary hospitalization. Symptoms abated four days after Hydroxycut was discontinued."(2) Hydroxycut contains two ingidients that might cause adverse effects with Prozac. Unless you use an ephedra-free version, it would contain Ephedra. In addition, it contains caffeine (1). There have been studies that linked ephedrine (the active igridient in Ephedra), as acting as monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhabitor(3) ["The researchers also found that common over-the-counter remedies for colds and obesity that contain ingredients such as pseudoephedrine (found in Sudafed), phenyl-propanolamine (found in Accutrim) and ephedrine also act as MAO inhibitors, although they are not labeled as such. This could be damaging to patients who also take antidepressants such as Prozac, Effexor, Zoloft or Paxil, which, like the fenfluramines, inhibit serotonin uptake, and whose labels state that they should never be taken with MAO inhibitors."]. MAO-inhabitors are stricktly forbidden in interaction with Prozac: "Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor activity (isocarboxazid [e.g., Marplan], phenelzine [e.g., Nardil], procarbazine [e.g., Matulane], selegiline [e.g., Eldepryl], tranylcypromine [e.g., Parnate])? Do not take fluoxetine while you are taking or within 2 weeks of taking an MAO inhibitor. If you do, you may develop confusion, agitation, restlessness, stomach or intestinal problems, sudden high body temperature, extremely high blood pressure, and severe convulsions. At least 14 days should be allowed between stopping treatment with an MAO inhibitor and starting treatment with fluoxetine. If you have been taking fluoxetine, at least 5 weeks should be allowed between stopping treatment with fluoxetine and starting treatment with an MAO inhibitor"(4) Because of the possible effects of fluoxetine (Prozac) on digestion and metabolism, further problems migth arise, causing nausea / vomiting /diarrhea. In combination with a drug, which is supposed to caused increased metabolism, this could be severed(5). Answered by Brunilda Truby 1 year ago.

Stop taking the hydroxy cut if you already have a weight loss patch. The rest of it you can keep taking Answered by Clemente Phariss 1 year ago.

The weight loss pill and patch probably have a lot of the same ingredients, so it will probably be best if you just choose one or the other. You don't want to OD on weightloss products (it's awful). Other than that, it's all fine. Answered by Terrell Kurcaba 1 year ago.

A panel of independent medical experts advised that calcium/magnesium-based antacids, such as Rennie® Peppermint, Spearmint, Rennie® Sugar Free and Rennie® Fruit, should be the recommended treatment for women who suffer from heartburn during pregnancy because of their good safety profile. However it is important to consult your doctor or pharmacist before using any remedies during pregnancy. Answered by Alexia Croswell 1 year ago.

you're better off asking a pharmacist that question... you might not be getting reliable answers on here. Answered by Kacie Hands 1 year ago.


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