Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016080/001.

Names and composition

"MANNITOL 5%" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MANNITOL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016080/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016269/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
005620/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
013684/001 OSMITROL 5% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
013684/002 OSMITROL 10% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
013684/003 OSMITROL 20% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
013684/004 OSMITROL 15% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
013684/005 OSMITROL 5% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
013684/006 OSMITROL 10% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
013684/007 OSMITROL 20% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
013684/008 OSMITROL 15% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
014738/001 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016080/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016080/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016080/003 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016080/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016080/005 MANNITOL 15% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN SODIUM CHLORIDE 0.45% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016080/006 MANNITOL 10% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN DISTILLED WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016080/007 MANNITOL 5% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN SODIUM CHLORIDE 0.12% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016269/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016269/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016269/003 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016269/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016269/005 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
016269/006 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
016472/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016472/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016472/005 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016704/002 RESECTISOL MANNITOL SOLUTION/IRRIGATION 5GM per 100ML
016772/002 RESECTISOL IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL SOLUTION/IRRIGATION 5GM per 100ML
019603/001 MANNITOL 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
019603/002 MANNITOL 10% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
019603/003 MANNITOL 15% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
019603/004 MANNITOL 20% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
020006/001 MANNITOL 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
020006/002 MANNITOL 10% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
020006/003 MANNITOL 15% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
020006/004 MANNITOL 20% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
022368/001 ARIDOL KIT MANNITOL POWDER/INHALATION N per A,5MG,10MG,20MG,40MG
022368/002 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 10MG
022368/003 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 20MG
022368/004 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 40MG
080677/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
083051/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
086754/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
087409/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
087460/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
089239/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
089240/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML

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Answered questions

The IV dose of mannitol is 1.5 g/kg, administered as a 15% solution. How many mls of the solution should be ?
administered to a 150 pound patient? Asked by France Leyton 1 year ago.

15% = 15gm / 100ml Convert the weight to Kg 150lb * (1Kg / 2.2lb) = 68.2Kg Setup (always include units!) (68.2Kg) * (1.5gm/1Kg) * (100ml/15gm) cancel out the Kg and gm, you are left with ml, the units you want Do the math (68,2 * 1.5 * 100) / (1 * 15) 10230 / 15 Answer = 682ml Email me if you have any questions or problems EDIT: Agreed, John. From a practical view that's how I would do it, but these instructors just see it as a math problem. Answered by Shaquana Montroy 1 year ago.

Sometimes, there's actually sense in things. In this case, the mannitol comes as 1.5 grams per 10 ml, so you only need round off the weight (70 kg is only four pounds off), multiply by ten, and give 700 ml. Answered by Darin Arriaga 1 year ago.

Mannitol Dose Answered by Isiah Vandehei 1 year ago.


The IV dose of mannitol is 1.5/kg,administred as a 15% solution.How many mls of the solution should be adminis?
administered toa 150 pound patiend? Asked by Jerri Rolla 1 year ago.

Round off your patient's weight to 70 kg and it works itself out. By the way, you left out an important part: 1.5 grams per kg would be a very high dose (700 ml), and 1.5 ml/kg (15 grams) a conservative dose. Answered by Alexis Paulhus 1 year ago.


What makes mannitol salt agar selective?
Asked by Danilo Baisch 1 year ago.

Ans: 7.5% Sodium Chloride Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA) is a selective (7.5 % soduim chloride) and differential (mannitol) medium. MSA is selective because it contains 7.5% NaCl (salt) which inhibits most organisms other than Staphylococci. Organisms that cannot tolerate high salt concentration will not grow on the plate. Most media contain about 0.5% NaCl. Therefore, MSA is said to be a selective medium for Staphylococci. MSA is differential beause it contains Mannitol. Mannitol fermentation is indicated by a change in the colour of the phenol red indicator which aids in the differentiation of Staphylococcal species. Mannitol fermenters produce acid and the colour of the medium around the colony changes to yellow while non-mannitol fermenters do not produce acid and the colour of the medium around the colony changes to red. Answered by Jasmine Thier 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What makes mannitol salt agar selective? Answered by Rikki Fleischman 1 year ago.

A selective medium only allows certain types of bacteria to grow on it, for example, just gram negatives can grow on some agars, and just Staph can grown on others. A differential medium is one which allows you to distinguish between bacteria which can grow on it. You should be able to find what those two agars are useful for... Answered by Evalyn Kirn 1 year ago.

agar agar.io Answered by Sherill Yngsdal 1 year ago.

Few organisms can use mannitol. Answered by Letisha Sjulstad 1 year ago.


If an intravenous solution contains 2 percent mannitol?
How many milliliters of the solution should be administered to provide a patient with 30 grams of mannitol? Asked by Vonda Rutz 1 year ago.

Density of water = 1 gram per cm3 2% is 2 g per 100g of water or solution (unspecified in the question). However, it doesn't matter at all for the accuracy required. Let us assume that in each 100 g of solution there are 2 g of Mannitol, and that the density of the solution is 1 g per litre. Accurate enough for this dilute solution. We need 15 times more solution therefore we need 100X15 g of water = 1,500g of water giving 1.5 litres of water and 1.5 litres of solution to the accuracy required. Answered by Ollie Kallenberg 1 year ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Elmira Dirksen 1 year ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Caroll Scherff 1 year ago.


What are the risks of lactulose and mannitol?
My doc gave me a take home urine test for malabsorbtion. I have to drink a solution of 5 grams lactulose and 1 gram mannitol. I'm paranoid about anything I put in my body. Are these ingredients known to be dangerous. Has anyone done this test? What does it feel like? Asked by Christinia Kapiloff 1 year ago.

Relax. He's given you a mild sugar and a mild diuretic. Nothing sinister there. Answered by Genny Oktavec 1 year ago.


Vapor Pressure Lowering?
The vapor pressure of water at 40.0 degrees celsius is 55.5 mmHg. A portion of mannitol (C6H14O6) is added to make a 3.50M (molarity) solution. The solution has a density of 1.048 g/mL, what is the new vapor pressure of the solution? Can someone please show me how you do this step-by-step? Thanks. Asked by Tessa Mizzelle 1 year ago.

the mass of 1 liter of your solution is 1.048*1000=1048g in this solution the mass of mannitol is 3.5*molar weight = 3.5*(6*12+14*1+6*16)=637g the number of moles of water is 1048-435=411g/18=22.83 so the relative fraction of water is x = 22.83/(22.83+3.5)=0.867 The vapor pressure is 0.867*55.5=48.13mmHg Answered by Rossana Rocquemore 1 year ago.


Microbiology question: What metabolisms are test on 5 different media PLEASE HELP!!!?
1.Mannitol Salt Agar 2. Blood agar (I think its beta and alpha hemolysis for this one but im not sure) 3. APT agar 4. Mineral lactate medium 5. minimal medium Asked by Polly Hellings 1 year ago.

dude, you can't ask this question. It has to do with a lab that we weren't at......you either have to give more information or figure it out yourself. Answered by Almeda Coronado 1 year ago.


Need help on these problems and a chemistry concept?
And is this true: Whenever I multiply two numbers I would cross out L And whenever I divide two numbers I would cross out mol? Asked by Jamar Despard 1 year ago.

I can not understand these two problems at all: 1. In a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution. How many L of a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution would you need to obtain 55g of glucose? 2. A patient receives 100 ml of a 20% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour. How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 15 hours? 3. Also I solved a problem. But the units are NOT adding up. M is not the same thing as moles. I don't understand what I did exactly: What volume of 3.00 M KCL will contain 15.3 g of KCL? first I converted grams of KCL to moles. then I did 0.205 mol KCL divided by 3.00 M KCL. . I got liters and converted it to ml and got the right answer apparently. But how does mol and M cancel? I don't understand that. And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided. However in this problem I did not divide: How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? 0.045 M= x divided by 0.125 L. I multiplied 0.045 and 0.125 and got moles and converted it to grams and I got the right answer. But I cross multiplied, I didn't divide. Answered by Krissy Bulloch 1 year ago.

5% (m/v) means in 100 mL, 5 g is glucose. If you need 55 g of glucose, you need 55 g / 0.05 = 1100 mL or 1.1 L. You can also work it out from 100 mL contains 5 g of glucose. 55 g is 11x greater so you need 11 * 100 mL = 1100 mL = 1.1 L 2. 100 mL * 0.2 = 20 g of mannitol. Since the 100 mL is per hour, the 20 g of mannitol is per water. In 15 hours, they get 20 g mannitol/hr * 15 hours = 300 g 3. M is not moles. M is mole/L. If you have 10 moles of something disolved in 2 L, the concentration is 10 moles / 2 L = 5 mole/L = 5 M. < first I converted grams of KCL to moles > Correct. And 0.205 moles is correct. 0.205 mol KCL / 3.00 M KCL is the same as 0.205 mol KCl / 3.00 mole/L = 0.0684 L Why does mole / mole/L = L? mole / (mole/L). now, multiply top and bottom by L giving you mole * L / (mole/L * L). The moles cancel out and the two L terms in the bottom cancel out leaving you with L. < And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided > I'm not sure what you are asking. Watch your units and make sure they cancel out correctly, that will catch a lot of mistakes if you multiply when you should have divided. < How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? > So I have mL of NaCl solution and I have concentration in M which we know is mole/L. In this case we want to multiply because that will cancel out the volume terms, mL and L (with some conversion). 125 mL * 0.045 mole/L * 1 L / 1000 mL = 0.005625 mole of NaCl. The molar mass of NaCl is 58.44 g/mole so 0.005625 mole * 58.44 g/mole = 0.328 g NaCl. Notice how again the moles cancel out leaving you with grams, what you want when trying to find mass. If you don't include numbers, you just get 125 * 0.045 / 1000 and it's really easy to get confused 'should I multiply, should I divide?" and if you get it wrong, it's anything but obvious when you try to check your math. If you include your units, you have a built in check. An example 0.125 L / 0.2 mole/L = 0.625 L^2 / mole versus 0.125 L * 0.2 mole/L = 0.025 moles. If you are trying to find the moles of something, which set of units look correct? If you don't include units, you get 0.125 / 0.2 versus 0.125 * 0.2. Which one is right? How do you know? That's why you always include your units and make sure they cancel correctly. If they don't cancel correctly, you've likely made a mistake. Answered by Danita Bohnet 1 year ago.


The IV dose of mannitol is 1.5 g/kg, administered as a 15% solution. How many mls of the solution should be ?
administered to a 150 pound patient? Asked by Marlana Snoderly 1 year ago.

15% = 15gm / 100ml Convert the weight to Kg 150lb * (1Kg / 2.2lb) = 68.2Kg Setup (always include units!) (68.2Kg) * (1.5gm/1Kg) * (100ml/15gm) cancel out the Kg and gm, you are left with ml, the units you want Do the math (68,2 * 1.5 * 100) / (1 * 15) 10230 / 15 Answer = 682ml Email me if you have any questions or problems EDIT: Agreed, John. From a practical view that's how I would do it, but these instructors just see it as a math problem. Answered by Millicent Sandman 1 year ago.

Sometimes, there's actually sense in things. In this case, the mannitol comes as 1.5 grams per 10 ml, so you only need round off the weight (70 kg is only four pounds off), multiply by ten, and give 700 ml. Answered by Fatimah Mehler 1 year ago.

Mannitol Dose Answered by Janella Grimme 1 year ago.


The IV dose of mannitol is 1.5/kg,administred as a 15% solution.How many mls of the solution should be adminis?
administered toa 150 pound patiend? Asked by Susie Tisor 1 year ago.

Round off your patient's weight to 70 kg and it works itself out. By the way, you left out an important part: 1.5 grams per kg would be a very high dose (700 ml), and 1.5 ml/kg (15 grams) a conservative dose. Answered by Palmer Jasmin 1 year ago.


What makes mannitol salt agar selective?
Asked by Augustine Ramento 1 year ago.

Ans: 7.5% Sodium Chloride Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA) is a selective (7.5 % soduim chloride) and differential (mannitol) medium. MSA is selective because it contains 7.5% NaCl (salt) which inhibits most organisms other than Staphylococci. Organisms that cannot tolerate high salt concentration will not grow on the plate. Most media contain about 0.5% NaCl. Therefore, MSA is said to be a selective medium for Staphylococci. MSA is differential beause it contains Mannitol. Mannitol fermentation is indicated by a change in the colour of the phenol red indicator which aids in the differentiation of Staphylococcal species. Mannitol fermenters produce acid and the colour of the medium around the colony changes to yellow while non-mannitol fermenters do not produce acid and the colour of the medium around the colony changes to red. Answered by Aretha Mcquain 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What makes mannitol salt agar selective? Answered by Harry Packham 1 year ago.

A selective medium only allows certain types of bacteria to grow on it, for example, just gram negatives can grow on some agars, and just Staph can grown on others. A differential medium is one which allows you to distinguish between bacteria which can grow on it. You should be able to find what those two agars are useful for... Answered by Irma Balsam 1 year ago.

agar agar.io Answered by Linn Ramez 1 year ago.

Few organisms can use mannitol. Answered by Judi Howley 1 year ago.


If an intravenous solution contains 2 percent mannitol?
How many milliliters of the solution should be administered to provide a patient with 30 grams of mannitol? Asked by Gil Schlager 1 year ago.

Density of water = 1 gram per cm3 2% is 2 g per 100g of water or solution (unspecified in the question). However, it doesn't matter at all for the accuracy required. Let us assume that in each 100 g of solution there are 2 g of Mannitol, and that the density of the solution is 1 g per litre. Accurate enough for this dilute solution. We need 15 times more solution therefore we need 100X15 g of water = 1,500g of water giving 1.5 litres of water and 1.5 litres of solution to the accuracy required. Answered by Dianna Casuat 1 year ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Robbyn Ildefonso 1 year ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Jay Longnecker 1 year ago.


What are the risks of lactulose and mannitol?
My doc gave me a take home urine test for malabsorbtion. I have to drink a solution of 5 grams lactulose and 1 gram mannitol. I'm paranoid about anything I put in my body. Are these ingredients known to be dangerous. Has anyone done this test? What does it feel like? Asked by Del Stan 1 year ago.

Relax. He's given you a mild sugar and a mild diuretic. Nothing sinister there. Answered by Ray Koyama 1 year ago.


Vapor Pressure Lowering?
The vapor pressure of water at 40.0 degrees celsius is 55.5 mmHg. A portion of mannitol (C6H14O6) is added to make a 3.50M (molarity) solution. The solution has a density of 1.048 g/mL, what is the new vapor pressure of the solution? Can someone please show me how you do this step-by-step? Thanks. Asked by Britt Sirmon 1 year ago.

the mass of 1 liter of your solution is 1.048*1000=1048g in this solution the mass of mannitol is 3.5*molar weight = 3.5*(6*12+14*1+6*16)=637g the number of moles of water is 1048-435=411g/18=22.83 so the relative fraction of water is x = 22.83/(22.83+3.5)=0.867 The vapor pressure is 0.867*55.5=48.13mmHg Answered by Heriberto Dusen 1 year ago.


Microbiology question: What metabolisms are test on 5 different media PLEASE HELP!!!?
1.Mannitol Salt Agar 2. Blood agar (I think its beta and alpha hemolysis for this one but im not sure) 3. APT agar 4. Mineral lactate medium 5. minimal medium Asked by Bee Hanafin 1 year ago.

dude, you can't ask this question. It has to do with a lab that we weren't at......you either have to give more information or figure it out yourself. Answered by Naoma Forson 1 year ago.


Need help on these problems and a chemistry concept?
And is this true: Whenever I multiply two numbers I would cross out L And whenever I divide two numbers I would cross out mol? Asked by Kyung Hemley 1 year ago.

I can not understand these two problems at all: 1. In a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution. How many L of a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution would you need to obtain 55g of glucose? 2. A patient receives 100 ml of a 20% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour. How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 15 hours? 3. Also I solved a problem. But the units are NOT adding up. M is not the same thing as moles. I don't understand what I did exactly: What volume of 3.00 M KCL will contain 15.3 g of KCL? first I converted grams of KCL to moles. then I did 0.205 mol KCL divided by 3.00 M KCL. . I got liters and converted it to ml and got the right answer apparently. But how does mol and M cancel? I don't understand that. And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided. However in this problem I did not divide: How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? 0.045 M= x divided by 0.125 L. I multiplied 0.045 and 0.125 and got moles and converted it to grams and I got the right answer. But I cross multiplied, I didn't divide. Answered by Annita Mirbaha 1 year ago.

5% (m/v) means in 100 mL, 5 g is glucose. If you need 55 g of glucose, you need 55 g / 0.05 = 1100 mL or 1.1 L. You can also work it out from 100 mL contains 5 g of glucose. 55 g is 11x greater so you need 11 * 100 mL = 1100 mL = 1.1 L 2. 100 mL * 0.2 = 20 g of mannitol. Since the 100 mL is per hour, the 20 g of mannitol is per water. In 15 hours, they get 20 g mannitol/hr * 15 hours = 300 g 3. M is not moles. M is mole/L. If you have 10 moles of something disolved in 2 L, the concentration is 10 moles / 2 L = 5 mole/L = 5 M. < first I converted grams of KCL to moles > Correct. And 0.205 moles is correct. 0.205 mol KCL / 3.00 M KCL is the same as 0.205 mol KCl / 3.00 mole/L = 0.0684 L Why does mole / mole/L = L? mole / (mole/L). now, multiply top and bottom by L giving you mole * L / (mole/L * L). The moles cancel out and the two L terms in the bottom cancel out leaving you with L. < And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided > I'm not sure what you are asking. Watch your units and make sure they cancel out correctly, that will catch a lot of mistakes if you multiply when you should have divided. < How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? > So I have mL of NaCl solution and I have concentration in M which we know is mole/L. In this case we want to multiply because that will cancel out the volume terms, mL and L (with some conversion). 125 mL * 0.045 mole/L * 1 L / 1000 mL = 0.005625 mole of NaCl. The molar mass of NaCl is 58.44 g/mole so 0.005625 mole * 58.44 g/mole = 0.328 g NaCl. Notice how again the moles cancel out leaving you with grams, what you want when trying to find mass. If you don't include numbers, you just get 125 * 0.045 / 1000 and it's really easy to get confused 'should I multiply, should I divide?" and if you get it wrong, it's anything but obvious when you try to check your math. If you include your units, you have a built in check. An example 0.125 L / 0.2 mole/L = 0.625 L^2 / mole versus 0.125 L * 0.2 mole/L = 0.025 moles. If you are trying to find the moles of something, which set of units look correct? If you don't include units, you get 0.125 / 0.2 versus 0.125 * 0.2. Which one is right? How do you know? That's why you always include your units and make sure they cancel correctly. If they don't cancel correctly, you've likely made a mistake. Answered by Harold Wenig 1 year ago.


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