Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 014738/001.

Names and composition

"MANNITOL 20%" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MANNITOL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014738/001 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016080/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016269/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016472/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
005620/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
013684/001 OSMITROL 5% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
013684/002 OSMITROL 10% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
013684/003 OSMITROL 20% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
013684/004 OSMITROL 15% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
013684/005 OSMITROL 5% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
013684/006 OSMITROL 10% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
013684/007 OSMITROL 20% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
013684/008 OSMITROL 15% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
014738/001 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016080/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016080/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016080/003 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016080/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016080/005 MANNITOL 15% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN SODIUM CHLORIDE 0.45% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016080/006 MANNITOL 10% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN DISTILLED WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016080/007 MANNITOL 5% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN SODIUM CHLORIDE 0.12% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016269/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016269/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016269/003 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016269/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016269/005 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
016269/006 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
016472/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016472/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016472/005 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016704/002 RESECTISOL MANNITOL SOLUTION/IRRIGATION 5GM per 100ML
016772/002 RESECTISOL IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL SOLUTION/IRRIGATION 5GM per 100ML
019603/001 MANNITOL 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
019603/002 MANNITOL 10% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
019603/003 MANNITOL 15% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
019603/004 MANNITOL 20% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
020006/001 MANNITOL 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
020006/002 MANNITOL 10% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
020006/003 MANNITOL 15% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
020006/004 MANNITOL 20% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
022368/001 ARIDOL KIT MANNITOL POWDER/INHALATION N per A,5MG,10MG,20MG,40MG
022368/002 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 10MG
022368/003 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 20MG
022368/004 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 40MG
080677/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
083051/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
086754/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
087409/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
087460/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
089239/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
089240/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML

Ask a doctor

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Answered questions

If an injectabel contains 20%of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide?
100 gm of mannitol? Asked by Paula Mihaly 1 year ago.

20% is 20gm / 100ml setup (20gm) / (100ml) = (100gm) / (xml) solve for x ((100ml) * (100gm)) / 20gm = x 500ml = x If you have any questions or problems, email me. Answered by Trisha Wertenberger 1 year ago.

your medical school or nursing school homework: I dont want to do it for you. Answered by Mildred Hellweg 1 year ago.


A patient receives 100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour.?
1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour? 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours? Express your answer using two significant figures. Asked by Stephine Umana 1 year ago.

100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution has 20. grams of mannitol in 100. ml of solution so 1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour?.... 20. grams 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours... 480 grams Answered by Leatrice Petrizzo 1 year ago.


If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection be administrate to prove 100gm of mann?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100 gm of mannitol Asked by Carolin Schuchmann 1 year ago.

There is not any information provided on how many grams of mannitol would be in one milliliter. Answered by Jospeh Delea 1 year ago.

20 Mannitol Answered by Rick Kennin 1 year ago.

daddyrx is correct. In medicine, when you see these things labelled as a percent, it isn't the proportional percentage that you're used to thinking about, but a shorthand for "grams per deciliter." 20 grams per 100 ml is 100 grams in 500 ml. Answered by Lindsay Buescher 1 year ago.

20% means 20gm/100ml set up a ratio: (20gm/100ml) = (100gm/xml) 100ml * 100gm = 20gm * xml xml = (100ml * 100gm) / 20gm xml = 500ml Answered by Jaclyn Schweder 1 year ago.

forgive me, but you question makes no sense to me. please reword and rephrase or redo, using complete sentences and common english language structure. thanks. Answered by Lore Stephan 1 year ago.


How many mls of the injection?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? please show ur work Asked by Leslee Lambie 1 year ago.

Percentages are grams/100ml So, 20% solution= 20grams/100mls 100gm/ X mls = 20 grams/100 mls solving for X mls yields: (100 gm)100mls/20grams = X mls X mls = 500 mls Answered by Shan Oxman 1 year ago.

You gotta work this out yourself!! 20% = 20g in 100ml so 100gm is 5 times this.. It's not rocket science. Answered by Rebecca Cambric 1 year ago.

You will not succeed if you do not do your own homework. Answered by Dallas Umscheid 1 year ago.


Need help on these problems and a chemistry concept?
And is this true: Whenever I multiply two numbers I would cross out L And whenever I divide two numbers I would cross out mol? Asked by Natasha Muffoletto 1 year ago.

I can not understand these two problems at all: 1. In a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution. How many L of a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution would you need to obtain 55g of glucose? 2. A patient receives 100 ml of a 20% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour. How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 15 hours? 3. Also I solved a problem. But the units are NOT adding up. M is not the same thing as moles. I don't understand what I did exactly: What volume of 3.00 M KCL will contain 15.3 g of KCL? first I converted grams of KCL to moles. then I did 0.205 mol KCL divided by 3.00 M KCL. . I got liters and converted it to ml and got the right answer apparently. But how does mol and M cancel? I don't understand that. And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided. However in this problem I did not divide: How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? 0.045 M= x divided by 0.125 L. I multiplied 0.045 and 0.125 and got moles and converted it to grams and I got the right answer. But I cross multiplied, I didn't divide. Answered by Aliza Toussand 1 year ago.

5% (m/v) means in 100 mL, 5 g is glucose. If you need 55 g of glucose, you need 55 g / 0.05 = 1100 mL or 1.1 L. You can also work it out from 100 mL contains 5 g of glucose. 55 g is 11x greater so you need 11 * 100 mL = 1100 mL = 1.1 L 2. 100 mL * 0.2 = 20 g of mannitol. Since the 100 mL is per hour, the 20 g of mannitol is per water. In 15 hours, they get 20 g mannitol/hr * 15 hours = 300 g 3. M is not moles. M is mole/L. If you have 10 moles of something disolved in 2 L, the concentration is 10 moles / 2 L = 5 mole/L = 5 M. < first I converted grams of KCL to moles > Correct. And 0.205 moles is correct. 0.205 mol KCL / 3.00 M KCL is the same as 0.205 mol KCl / 3.00 mole/L = 0.0684 L Why does mole / mole/L = L? mole / (mole/L). now, multiply top and bottom by L giving you mole * L / (mole/L * L). The moles cancel out and the two L terms in the bottom cancel out leaving you with L. < And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided > I'm not sure what you are asking. Watch your units and make sure they cancel out correctly, that will catch a lot of mistakes if you multiply when you should have divided. < How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? > So I have mL of NaCl solution and I have concentration in M which we know is mole/L. In this case we want to multiply because that will cancel out the volume terms, mL and L (with some conversion). 125 mL * 0.045 mole/L * 1 L / 1000 mL = 0.005625 mole of NaCl. The molar mass of NaCl is 58.44 g/mole so 0.005625 mole * 58.44 g/mole = 0.328 g NaCl. Notice how again the moles cancel out leaving you with grams, what you want when trying to find mass. If you don't include numbers, you just get 125 * 0.045 / 1000 and it's really easy to get confused 'should I multiply, should I divide?" and if you get it wrong, it's anything but obvious when you try to check your math. If you include your units, you have a built in check. An example 0.125 L / 0.2 mole/L = 0.625 L^2 / mole versus 0.125 L * 0.2 mole/L = 0.025 moles. If you are trying to find the moles of something, which set of units look correct? If you don't include units, you get 0.125 / 0.2 versus 0.125 * 0.2. Which one is right? How do you know? That's why you always include your units and make sure they cancel correctly. If they don't cancel correctly, you've likely made a mistake. Answered by Dominique Lacharite 1 year ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Jolanda Tayler 1 year ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Gita Baronne 1 year ago.


Chemical Aqueous Solution Problem...HELP!!!!!?
If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate.M=molarmM=millimolarμM=microMolarI have no idea PLEASE HELP and if... Asked by Deanne Kenne 1 year ago.

If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate. M=molar mM=millimolar μM=microMolar I have no idea PLEASE HELP and if you can show how to do it thats awesome....I'm Sure its hard but I really appreciate it Answered by Kareen Orem 1 year ago.

For each substance, use the relationship M1V1 = M2V2 Mannitol 500 mL (0.2 M) = V2(1 M) V2 = 100 mL Cetyl alcohol 500 mL X 20 mM = V2 ( 250 mM) V2 = 40 mL Sodium acetate 500 mL (0.1 uM) = V2 ( 1 uM) V2 = 50 mL So, you will combine 100 mL of the original mannitol stock, 40 mL of the cetyl alcohol stock and 50 mL of the sodium acetate stock, and add water until the total volume of the solution is 500 mL. Answered by Nicky Stolarski 1 year ago.

using fact many components/compounds are soluble whilst dissolved in H20, meaning that as quickly as blended with H2O, the compounds dissociate one hundred% and ruin aside into thier unmarried aspects as loose ions. those loose ions, cations (+ can charge) and anions(- can charge), are left to react with different ions/compounds of opposite quotes. to that end, using fact that many components/compounds are soluble in water (i.e. all compunds containing alkali metallic ions, nitrates, bicarbonates, cholrates), many chemical reactions ensue in those aqueous recommendations. Answered by Jacob Jaminet 1 year ago.


Pharmacy math questions...?
I cannot figure these out, can anyone help?1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol?2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the... Asked by Estell Krause 1 year ago.

I cannot figure these out, can anyone help? 1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? 2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the dextrose in the solution? 3. You have a 70% dextrose solution. How many grams of dextrose are in 400ml? If anyone could help with any of these that would be GREAT! Answered by Saran Pittmon 1 year ago.

% solution = gm/100mL all of these can be solved by cross multiplying 1. 20% = 20gm/100mL; if you cross multiply, you get 500mL (or 100/0.2 = 500mL) 2. 500gm/1000mL x 100mL = 50% 3. 70gm/100mL x 400mL = 280gm Answered by Enid Hoppa 1 year ago.

1. Depend on how much (gms) of mannitol present in the solution. 2. 50% (water is quantity sufficient) 3. 280 gm Answered by Leigh Lucksom 1 year ago.


If an injectabel contains 20%of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide?
100 gm of mannitol? Asked by Janet Bardeen 1 year ago.

20% is 20gm / 100ml setup (20gm) / (100ml) = (100gm) / (xml) solve for x ((100ml) * (100gm)) / 20gm = x 500ml = x If you have any questions or problems, email me. Answered by Roselle Hagelgans 1 year ago.

your medical school or nursing school homework: I dont want to do it for you. Answered by Keith Hanegan 1 year ago.


A patient receives 100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour.?
1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour? 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours? Express your answer using two significant figures. Asked by Van Kuhle 1 year ago.

100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution has 20. grams of mannitol in 100. ml of solution so 1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour?.... 20. grams 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours... 480 grams Answered by Javier Jenks 1 year ago.


If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection be administrate to prove 100gm of mann?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100 gm of mannitol Asked by Lynetta Bansbach 1 year ago.

There is not any information provided on how many grams of mannitol would be in one milliliter. Answered by Laverna Lot 1 year ago.

20 Mannitol Answered by Kiera Corbeil 1 year ago.

daddyrx is correct. In medicine, when you see these things labelled as a percent, it isn't the proportional percentage that you're used to thinking about, but a shorthand for "grams per deciliter." 20 grams per 100 ml is 100 grams in 500 ml. Answered by Young Stuckert 1 year ago.

20% means 20gm/100ml set up a ratio: (20gm/100ml) = (100gm/xml) 100ml * 100gm = 20gm * xml xml = (100ml * 100gm) / 20gm xml = 500ml Answered by Zula Har 1 year ago.

forgive me, but you question makes no sense to me. please reword and rephrase or redo, using complete sentences and common english language structure. thanks. Answered by Tresa Dou 1 year ago.


How many mls of the injection?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? please show ur work Asked by Carman Heusley 1 year ago.

Percentages are grams/100ml So, 20% solution= 20grams/100mls 100gm/ X mls = 20 grams/100 mls solving for X mls yields: (100 gm)100mls/20grams = X mls X mls = 500 mls Answered by Barney Gorovitz 1 year ago.

You gotta work this out yourself!! 20% = 20g in 100ml so 100gm is 5 times this.. It's not rocket science. Answered by Dalene Teti 1 year ago.

You will not succeed if you do not do your own homework. Answered by Etsuko Hoffee 1 year ago.


Need help on these problems and a chemistry concept?
And is this true: Whenever I multiply two numbers I would cross out L And whenever I divide two numbers I would cross out mol? Asked by Ilene Vetrano 1 year ago.

I can not understand these two problems at all: 1. In a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution. How many L of a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution would you need to obtain 55g of glucose? 2. A patient receives 100 ml of a 20% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour. How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 15 hours? 3. Also I solved a problem. But the units are NOT adding up. M is not the same thing as moles. I don't understand what I did exactly: What volume of 3.00 M KCL will contain 15.3 g of KCL? first I converted grams of KCL to moles. then I did 0.205 mol KCL divided by 3.00 M KCL. . I got liters and converted it to ml and got the right answer apparently. But how does mol and M cancel? I don't understand that. And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided. However in this problem I did not divide: How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? 0.045 M= x divided by 0.125 L. I multiplied 0.045 and 0.125 and got moles and converted it to grams and I got the right answer. But I cross multiplied, I didn't divide. Answered by Kenyatta Hessling 1 year ago.

5% (m/v) means in 100 mL, 5 g is glucose. If you need 55 g of glucose, you need 55 g / 0.05 = 1100 mL or 1.1 L. You can also work it out from 100 mL contains 5 g of glucose. 55 g is 11x greater so you need 11 * 100 mL = 1100 mL = 1.1 L 2. 100 mL * 0.2 = 20 g of mannitol. Since the 100 mL is per hour, the 20 g of mannitol is per water. In 15 hours, they get 20 g mannitol/hr * 15 hours = 300 g 3. M is not moles. M is mole/L. If you have 10 moles of something disolved in 2 L, the concentration is 10 moles / 2 L = 5 mole/L = 5 M. < first I converted grams of KCL to moles > Correct. And 0.205 moles is correct. 0.205 mol KCL / 3.00 M KCL is the same as 0.205 mol KCl / 3.00 mole/L = 0.0684 L Why does mole / mole/L = L? mole / (mole/L). now, multiply top and bottom by L giving you mole * L / (mole/L * L). The moles cancel out and the two L terms in the bottom cancel out leaving you with L. < And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided > I'm not sure what you are asking. Watch your units and make sure they cancel out correctly, that will catch a lot of mistakes if you multiply when you should have divided. < How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? > So I have mL of NaCl solution and I have concentration in M which we know is mole/L. In this case we want to multiply because that will cancel out the volume terms, mL and L (with some conversion). 125 mL * 0.045 mole/L * 1 L / 1000 mL = 0.005625 mole of NaCl. The molar mass of NaCl is 58.44 g/mole so 0.005625 mole * 58.44 g/mole = 0.328 g NaCl. Notice how again the moles cancel out leaving you with grams, what you want when trying to find mass. If you don't include numbers, you just get 125 * 0.045 / 1000 and it's really easy to get confused 'should I multiply, should I divide?" and if you get it wrong, it's anything but obvious when you try to check your math. If you include your units, you have a built in check. An example 0.125 L / 0.2 mole/L = 0.625 L^2 / mole versus 0.125 L * 0.2 mole/L = 0.025 moles. If you are trying to find the moles of something, which set of units look correct? If you don't include units, you get 0.125 / 0.2 versus 0.125 * 0.2. Which one is right? How do you know? That's why you always include your units and make sure they cancel correctly. If they don't cancel correctly, you've likely made a mistake. Answered by Desiree Gildea 1 year ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Bunny Dunkelberger 1 year ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Paola Cockerhan 1 year ago.


Chemical Aqueous Solution Problem...HELP!!!!!?
If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate.M=molarmM=millimolarμM=microMolarI have no idea PLEASE HELP and if... Asked by Holley Hendrics 1 year ago.

If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate. M=molar mM=millimolar μM=microMolar I have no idea PLEASE HELP and if you can show how to do it thats awesome....I'm Sure its hard but I really appreciate it Answered by Weston Katnik 1 year ago.

For each substance, use the relationship M1V1 = M2V2 Mannitol 500 mL (0.2 M) = V2(1 M) V2 = 100 mL Cetyl alcohol 500 mL X 20 mM = V2 ( 250 mM) V2 = 40 mL Sodium acetate 500 mL (0.1 uM) = V2 ( 1 uM) V2 = 50 mL So, you will combine 100 mL of the original mannitol stock, 40 mL of the cetyl alcohol stock and 50 mL of the sodium acetate stock, and add water until the total volume of the solution is 500 mL. Answered by Hans Robledo 1 year ago.

using fact many components/compounds are soluble whilst dissolved in H20, meaning that as quickly as blended with H2O, the compounds dissociate one hundred% and ruin aside into thier unmarried aspects as loose ions. those loose ions, cations (+ can charge) and anions(- can charge), are left to react with different ions/compounds of opposite quotes. to that end, using fact that many components/compounds are soluble in water (i.e. all compunds containing alkali metallic ions, nitrates, bicarbonates, cholrates), many chemical reactions ensue in those aqueous recommendations. Answered by Twanna Tagupa 1 year ago.


Pharmacy math questions...?
I cannot figure these out, can anyone help?1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol?2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the... Asked by Yolando Reinard 1 year ago.

I cannot figure these out, can anyone help? 1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? 2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the dextrose in the solution? 3. You have a 70% dextrose solution. How many grams of dextrose are in 400ml? If anyone could help with any of these that would be GREAT! Answered by Crystle Moynihan 1 year ago.

% solution = gm/100mL all of these can be solved by cross multiplying 1. 20% = 20gm/100mL; if you cross multiply, you get 500mL (or 100/0.2 = 500mL) 2. 500gm/1000mL x 100mL = 50% 3. 70gm/100mL x 400mL = 280gm Answered by Donita Ameling 1 year ago.

1. Depend on how much (gms) of mannitol present in the solution. 2. 50% (water is quantity sufficient) 3. 280 gm Answered by Georgianne Varanda 1 year ago.


If an injectabel contains 20%of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide?
100 gm of mannitol? Asked by Emily Fayson 1 year ago.

20% is 20gm / 100ml setup (20gm) / (100ml) = (100gm) / (xml) solve for x ((100ml) * (100gm)) / 20gm = x 500ml = x If you have any questions or problems, email me. Answered by Nelida Pedigo 1 year ago.

your medical school or nursing school homework: I dont want to do it for you. Answered by Pinkie Tiede 1 year ago.


A patient receives 100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour.?
1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour? 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours? Express your answer using two significant figures. Asked by Lincoln Zagami 1 year ago.

100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution has 20. grams of mannitol in 100. ml of solution so 1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour?.... 20. grams 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours... 480 grams Answered by Augustus Chern 1 year ago.


If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection be administrate to prove 100gm of mann?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100 gm of mannitol Asked by Annetta Magallanez 1 year ago.

There is not any information provided on how many grams of mannitol would be in one milliliter. Answered by Cecil Spalter 1 year ago.

20 Mannitol Answered by Ramonita Fishbein 1 year ago.

daddyrx is correct. In medicine, when you see these things labelled as a percent, it isn't the proportional percentage that you're used to thinking about, but a shorthand for "grams per deciliter." 20 grams per 100 ml is 100 grams in 500 ml. Answered by Darci Silleman 1 year ago.

20% means 20gm/100ml set up a ratio: (20gm/100ml) = (100gm/xml) 100ml * 100gm = 20gm * xml xml = (100ml * 100gm) / 20gm xml = 500ml Answered by Dann Cathell 1 year ago.

forgive me, but you question makes no sense to me. please reword and rephrase or redo, using complete sentences and common english language structure. thanks. Answered by Ileana Soffer 1 year ago.


How many mls of the injection?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? please show ur work Asked by Chu Hamic 1 year ago.

Percentages are grams/100ml So, 20% solution= 20grams/100mls 100gm/ X mls = 20 grams/100 mls solving for X mls yields: (100 gm)100mls/20grams = X mls X mls = 500 mls Answered by Kala Dundee 1 year ago.

You gotta work this out yourself!! 20% = 20g in 100ml so 100gm is 5 times this.. It's not rocket science. Answered by Elvera Hereford 1 year ago.

You will not succeed if you do not do your own homework. Answered by Doug Chillemi 1 year ago.


Need help on these problems and a chemistry concept?
And is this true: Whenever I multiply two numbers I would cross out L And whenever I divide two numbers I would cross out mol? Asked by Adriane Ameduri 1 year ago.

I can not understand these two problems at all: 1. In a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution. How many L of a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution would you need to obtain 55g of glucose? 2. A patient receives 100 ml of a 20% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour. How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 15 hours? 3. Also I solved a problem. But the units are NOT adding up. M is not the same thing as moles. I don't understand what I did exactly: What volume of 3.00 M KCL will contain 15.3 g of KCL? first I converted grams of KCL to moles. then I did 0.205 mol KCL divided by 3.00 M KCL. . I got liters and converted it to ml and got the right answer apparently. But how does mol and M cancel? I don't understand that. And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided. However in this problem I did not divide: How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? 0.045 M= x divided by 0.125 L. I multiplied 0.045 and 0.125 and got moles and converted it to grams and I got the right answer. But I cross multiplied, I didn't divide. Answered by Kay Mazzarella 1 year ago.

5% (m/v) means in 100 mL, 5 g is glucose. If you need 55 g of glucose, you need 55 g / 0.05 = 1100 mL or 1.1 L. You can also work it out from 100 mL contains 5 g of glucose. 55 g is 11x greater so you need 11 * 100 mL = 1100 mL = 1.1 L 2. 100 mL * 0.2 = 20 g of mannitol. Since the 100 mL is per hour, the 20 g of mannitol is per water. In 15 hours, they get 20 g mannitol/hr * 15 hours = 300 g 3. M is not moles. M is mole/L. If you have 10 moles of something disolved in 2 L, the concentration is 10 moles / 2 L = 5 mole/L = 5 M. < first I converted grams of KCL to moles > Correct. And 0.205 moles is correct. 0.205 mol KCL / 3.00 M KCL is the same as 0.205 mol KCl / 3.00 mole/L = 0.0684 L Why does mole / mole/L = L? mole / (mole/L). now, multiply top and bottom by L giving you mole * L / (mole/L * L). The moles cancel out and the two L terms in the bottom cancel out leaving you with L. < And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided > I'm not sure what you are asking. Watch your units and make sure they cancel out correctly, that will catch a lot of mistakes if you multiply when you should have divided. < How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? > So I have mL of NaCl solution and I have concentration in M which we know is mole/L. In this case we want to multiply because that will cancel out the volume terms, mL and L (with some conversion). 125 mL * 0.045 mole/L * 1 L / 1000 mL = 0.005625 mole of NaCl. The molar mass of NaCl is 58.44 g/mole so 0.005625 mole * 58.44 g/mole = 0.328 g NaCl. Notice how again the moles cancel out leaving you with grams, what you want when trying to find mass. If you don't include numbers, you just get 125 * 0.045 / 1000 and it's really easy to get confused 'should I multiply, should I divide?" and if you get it wrong, it's anything but obvious when you try to check your math. If you include your units, you have a built in check. An example 0.125 L / 0.2 mole/L = 0.625 L^2 / mole versus 0.125 L * 0.2 mole/L = 0.025 moles. If you are trying to find the moles of something, which set of units look correct? If you don't include units, you get 0.125 / 0.2 versus 0.125 * 0.2. Which one is right? How do you know? That's why you always include your units and make sure they cancel correctly. If they don't cancel correctly, you've likely made a mistake. Answered by Autumn Wiebusch 1 year ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Son Sciarretta 1 year ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Tobie Geddings 1 year ago.


Chemical Aqueous Solution Problem...HELP!!!!!?
If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate.M=molarmM=millimolarμM=microMolarI have no idea PLEASE HELP and if... Asked by Leigha Aguero 1 year ago.

If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate. M=molar mM=millimolar μM=microMolar I have no idea PLEASE HELP and if you can show how to do it thats awesome....I'm Sure its hard but I really appreciate it Answered by Roxann Bochek 1 year ago.

For each substance, use the relationship M1V1 = M2V2 Mannitol 500 mL (0.2 M) = V2(1 M) V2 = 100 mL Cetyl alcohol 500 mL X 20 mM = V2 ( 250 mM) V2 = 40 mL Sodium acetate 500 mL (0.1 uM) = V2 ( 1 uM) V2 = 50 mL So, you will combine 100 mL of the original mannitol stock, 40 mL of the cetyl alcohol stock and 50 mL of the sodium acetate stock, and add water until the total volume of the solution is 500 mL. Answered by Lorita Gorgone 1 year ago.

using fact many components/compounds are soluble whilst dissolved in H20, meaning that as quickly as blended with H2O, the compounds dissociate one hundred% and ruin aside into thier unmarried aspects as loose ions. those loose ions, cations (+ can charge) and anions(- can charge), are left to react with different ions/compounds of opposite quotes. to that end, using fact that many components/compounds are soluble in water (i.e. all compunds containing alkali metallic ions, nitrates, bicarbonates, cholrates), many chemical reactions ensue in those aqueous recommendations. Answered by Maya Learman 1 year ago.


Pharmacy math questions...?
I cannot figure these out, can anyone help?1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol?2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the... Asked by Martin Spalinger 1 year ago.

I cannot figure these out, can anyone help? 1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? 2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the dextrose in the solution? 3. You have a 70% dextrose solution. How many grams of dextrose are in 400ml? If anyone could help with any of these that would be GREAT! Answered by Lucio Bjorkman 1 year ago.

% solution = gm/100mL all of these can be solved by cross multiplying 1. 20% = 20gm/100mL; if you cross multiply, you get 500mL (or 100/0.2 = 500mL) 2. 500gm/1000mL x 100mL = 50% 3. 70gm/100mL x 400mL = 280gm Answered by Kanesha Bodon 1 year ago.

1. Depend on how much (gms) of mannitol present in the solution. 2. 50% (water is quantity sufficient) 3. 280 gm Answered by Terra Posthumus 1 year ago.


If an injectabel contains 20%of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide?
100 gm of mannitol? Asked by Ned Moreles 1 year ago.

20% is 20gm / 100ml setup (20gm) / (100ml) = (100gm) / (xml) solve for x ((100ml) * (100gm)) / 20gm = x 500ml = x If you have any questions or problems, email me. Answered by Yukiko Hollaway 1 year ago.

your medical school or nursing school homework: I dont want to do it for you. Answered by Dion Leibold 1 year ago.


A patient receives 100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour.?
1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour? 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours? Express your answer using two significant figures. Asked by Jacob Swogger 1 year ago.

100. mL of a 20.% (m/v) mannitol solution has 20. grams of mannitol in 100. ml of solution so 1.How many grams of mannitol are given in 1 hour?.... 20. grams 2.How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 24 hours... 480 grams Answered by Randi Vaneps 1 year ago.


If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection be administrate to prove 100gm of mann?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol,how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100 gm of mannitol Asked by Amberly Leyva 1 year ago.

There is not any information provided on how many grams of mannitol would be in one milliliter. Answered by Lurlene Kriete 1 year ago.

20 Mannitol Answered by Lynn Heverley 1 year ago.

daddyrx is correct. In medicine, when you see these things labelled as a percent, it isn't the proportional percentage that you're used to thinking about, but a shorthand for "grams per deciliter." 20 grams per 100 ml is 100 grams in 500 ml. Answered by Lynnette Hairell 1 year ago.

20% means 20gm/100ml set up a ratio: (20gm/100ml) = (100gm/xml) 100ml * 100gm = 20gm * xml xml = (100ml * 100gm) / 20gm xml = 500ml Answered by Glady Prudom 1 year ago.

forgive me, but you question makes no sense to me. please reword and rephrase or redo, using complete sentences and common english language structure. thanks. Answered by Shaunta Liverance 1 year ago.


How many mls of the injection?
if an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? please show ur work Asked by Teressa Konecni 1 year ago.

Percentages are grams/100ml So, 20% solution= 20grams/100mls 100gm/ X mls = 20 grams/100 mls solving for X mls yields: (100 gm)100mls/20grams = X mls X mls = 500 mls Answered by Jamel Oberholtzer 1 year ago.

You gotta work this out yourself!! 20% = 20g in 100ml so 100gm is 5 times this.. It's not rocket science. Answered by Deneen Egure 1 year ago.

You will not succeed if you do not do your own homework. Answered by Leda Strauss 1 year ago.


Need help on these problems and a chemistry concept?
And is this true: Whenever I multiply two numbers I would cross out L And whenever I divide two numbers I would cross out mol? Asked by Elizabeth Prendes 1 year ago.

I can not understand these two problems at all: 1. In a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution. How many L of a 5.0% (m/v) glucose solution would you need to obtain 55g of glucose? 2. A patient receives 100 ml of a 20% (m/v) mannitol solution every hour. How many grams of mannitol does the patient receive in 15 hours? 3. Also I solved a problem. But the units are NOT adding up. M is not the same thing as moles. I don't understand what I did exactly: What volume of 3.00 M KCL will contain 15.3 g of KCL? first I converted grams of KCL to moles. then I did 0.205 mol KCL divided by 3.00 M KCL. . I got liters and converted it to ml and got the right answer apparently. But how does mol and M cancel? I don't understand that. And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided. However in this problem I did not divide: How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? 0.045 M= x divided by 0.125 L. I multiplied 0.045 and 0.125 and got moles and converted it to grams and I got the right answer. But I cross multiplied, I didn't divide. Answered by Donetta Sjoberg 1 year ago.

5% (m/v) means in 100 mL, 5 g is glucose. If you need 55 g of glucose, you need 55 g / 0.05 = 1100 mL or 1.1 L. You can also work it out from 100 mL contains 5 g of glucose. 55 g is 11x greater so you need 11 * 100 mL = 1100 mL = 1.1 L 2. 100 mL * 0.2 = 20 g of mannitol. Since the 100 mL is per hour, the 20 g of mannitol is per water. In 15 hours, they get 20 g mannitol/hr * 15 hours = 300 g 3. M is not moles. M is mole/L. If you have 10 moles of something disolved in 2 L, the concentration is 10 moles / 2 L = 5 mole/L = 5 M. < first I converted grams of KCL to moles > Correct. And 0.205 moles is correct. 0.205 mol KCL / 3.00 M KCL is the same as 0.205 mol KCl / 3.00 mole/L = 0.0684 L Why does mole / mole/L = L? mole / (mole/L). now, multiply top and bottom by L giving you mole * L / (mole/L * L). The moles cancel out and the two L terms in the bottom cancel out leaving you with L. < And when I do these problems how do I know when I cross multiply or if I divide because in that problem I divided > I'm not sure what you are asking. Watch your units and make sure they cancel out correctly, that will catch a lot of mistakes if you multiply when you should have divided. < How many grams of sodium chloride are needed to prepare 125 ml of 0.045 M NaCl solution? > So I have mL of NaCl solution and I have concentration in M which we know is mole/L. In this case we want to multiply because that will cancel out the volume terms, mL and L (with some conversion). 125 mL * 0.045 mole/L * 1 L / 1000 mL = 0.005625 mole of NaCl. The molar mass of NaCl is 58.44 g/mole so 0.005625 mole * 58.44 g/mole = 0.328 g NaCl. Notice how again the moles cancel out leaving you with grams, what you want when trying to find mass. If you don't include numbers, you just get 125 * 0.045 / 1000 and it's really easy to get confused 'should I multiply, should I divide?" and if you get it wrong, it's anything but obvious when you try to check your math. If you include your units, you have a built in check. An example 0.125 L / 0.2 mole/L = 0.625 L^2 / mole versus 0.125 L * 0.2 mole/L = 0.025 moles. If you are trying to find the moles of something, which set of units look correct? If you don't include units, you get 0.125 / 0.2 versus 0.125 * 0.2. Which one is right? How do you know? That's why you always include your units and make sure they cancel correctly. If they don't cancel correctly, you've likely made a mistake. Answered by Xiomara Pathak 1 year ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Rhea Moustafa 1 year ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Alise Deeb 1 year ago.


Chemical Aqueous Solution Problem...HELP!!!!!?
If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate.M=molarmM=millimolarμM=microMolarI have no idea PLEASE HELP and if... Asked by Trinidad Maske 1 year ago.

If given stock solutions of 1M D-mannitol, 250mM cetyl alcohol, and 1μM sodium acetate. How much of each solution would be needed to prepare 500mL of a reagent that contains 0.2M D-mannitol, 20mM cetyl alcohol, and 0.1 μM sodium acetate. M=molar mM=millimolar μM=microMolar I have no idea PLEASE HELP and if you can show how to do it thats awesome....I'm Sure its hard but I really appreciate it Answered by Janita Stclaire 1 year ago.

For each substance, use the relationship M1V1 = M2V2 Mannitol 500 mL (0.2 M) = V2(1 M) V2 = 100 mL Cetyl alcohol 500 mL X 20 mM = V2 ( 250 mM) V2 = 40 mL Sodium acetate 500 mL (0.1 uM) = V2 ( 1 uM) V2 = 50 mL So, you will combine 100 mL of the original mannitol stock, 40 mL of the cetyl alcohol stock and 50 mL of the sodium acetate stock, and add water until the total volume of the solution is 500 mL. Answered by Laura Horseford 1 year ago.

using fact many components/compounds are soluble whilst dissolved in H20, meaning that as quickly as blended with H2O, the compounds dissociate one hundred% and ruin aside into thier unmarried aspects as loose ions. those loose ions, cations (+ can charge) and anions(- can charge), are left to react with different ions/compounds of opposite quotes. to that end, using fact that many components/compounds are soluble in water (i.e. all compunds containing alkali metallic ions, nitrates, bicarbonates, cholrates), many chemical reactions ensue in those aqueous recommendations. Answered by Arianne Gavidia 1 year ago.


Pharmacy math questions...?
I cannot figure these out, can anyone help?1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol?2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the... Asked by Nga Acal 1 year ago.

I cannot figure these out, can anyone help? 1. If an injectable contains 20% of mannitol, how many mls of the injection should be administered to provide 100gm of mannitol? 2.If 500 gm of dextrose are dissolved in 600ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the dextrose in the solution? 3. You have a 70% dextrose solution. How many grams of dextrose are in 400ml? If anyone could help with any of these that would be GREAT! Answered by Lanora Majeske 1 year ago.

% solution = gm/100mL all of these can be solved by cross multiplying 1. 20% = 20gm/100mL; if you cross multiply, you get 500mL (or 100/0.2 = 500mL) 2. 500gm/1000mL x 100mL = 50% 3. 70gm/100mL x 400mL = 280gm Answered by Maurine Slattery 1 year ago.

1. Depend on how much (gms) of mannitol present in the solution. 2. 50% (water is quantity sufficient) 3. 280 gm Answered by Eulah Sgueglia 1 year ago.


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