Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016080/002.

Names and composition

"MANNITOL 10%" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MANNITOL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016080/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016269/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016472/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
005620/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
013684/001 OSMITROL 5% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
013684/002 OSMITROL 10% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
013684/003 OSMITROL 20% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
013684/004 OSMITROL 15% IN WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
013684/005 OSMITROL 5% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
013684/006 OSMITROL 10% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
013684/007 OSMITROL 20% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
013684/008 OSMITROL 15% IN WATER IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
014738/001 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016080/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016080/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016080/003 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016080/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016080/005 MANNITOL 15% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN SODIUM CHLORIDE 0.45% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016080/006 MANNITOL 10% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN DISTILLED WATER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016080/007 MANNITOL 5% W/ DEXTROSE 5% IN SODIUM CHLORIDE 0.12% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016269/001 MANNITOL 5% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
016269/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016269/003 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016269/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016269/005 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
016269/006 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
016472/002 MANNITOL 10% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
016472/004 MANNITOL 20% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
016472/005 MANNITOL 15% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
016704/002 RESECTISOL MANNITOL SOLUTION/IRRIGATION 5GM per 100ML
016772/002 RESECTISOL IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL SOLUTION/IRRIGATION 5GM per 100ML
019603/001 MANNITOL 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
019603/002 MANNITOL 10% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
019603/003 MANNITOL 15% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
019603/004 MANNITOL 20% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
020006/001 MANNITOL 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per 100ML
020006/002 MANNITOL 10% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per 100ML
020006/003 MANNITOL 15% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15GM per 100ML
020006/004 MANNITOL 20% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 100ML
022368/001 ARIDOL KIT MANNITOL POWDER/INHALATION N per A,5MG,10MG,20MG,40MG
022368/002 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 10MG
022368/003 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 20MG
022368/004 ARIDOL MANNITOL POWDER/ INHALATION 40MG
080677/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
083051/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
086754/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
087409/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
087460/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
089239/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML
089240/001 MANNITOL 25% MANNITOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5GM per 50ML

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Answered questions

What are the ingredients of mannitol salt agar?
what is the composition of mannitol salt agar Asked by Karie Altsisi 12 months ago.

Typically Peptone ........................................... 10.0 g Beef Extract ....................................... 1.0 g D-Mannitol ........................................ 10.0 g Sodium Chloride ................................ 75.0 g Agar ........................................... 15.0 g Phenol Red ....................................... 25.0 mg per litre of water,which is then sterilised in an autoclave and poured in to plates before setting Answered by Estella Latiolais 12 months ago.

Composition Of Mannitol Salt Agar Answered by Ursula Spyies 12 months ago.


Help, Chemistry. 10 points.?
What functional group does Mannitol have? Asked by Lurline Reinkemeyer 12 months ago.

Since mannitol ends in "ol", I would suspect an alcohol. Do a google search for Mannitol. I'm sure you'll find an answer. Answered by Fabian Sigrist 12 months ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Yuonne Linda 12 months ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Su Ruffer 12 months ago.


What medium would you use to isolate S. aureus the quickest?
Blood agar?? PEA?? MSA?? Not sure which is the fastest, am I right in thinking blood agar is the best way to test staph? Asked by Margart Truglia 12 months ago.

blood agar is the quickest, just look for pinpoint colonies that are catalase positive. HUGO has staph selective agar ( I dont have a link for this, its in the catalogue) Staph Selective Agar is an agar medium used for the selective isolation and differentiation of pathogenic staphylococci. The formulation contains a lower concentration of salt (4.0%) than Mannitol Salt Agar (7.5%). The lower salt concentration enhances the growth of most staphylococci. However the addition of selective agents is required to inhibit gram-negative and non-pathogenic staphylococci. The medium also contains bromcresol purple indicator which imparts a violet color to the prepared medium. Pathogenic staphylococci produce yellow colonies surrounded by yellow zones in a violet background. FORMULA Gram weight per liter: 101.0gm/L Sodium Chloride 40.0gm Selective Agents 14.0gm Pancreatic Digest of Casein 10.0gm Peptic Digest of Animal Tissue 10.0gm Mannitol 10.0gm Beef Extract 2.0gm Bromcresol Purple 2.0mg Agar 15.0gm Final pH 7.4 +/- 0.2 at 25 degrees C. Answered by Blossom Osvaldo 12 months ago.

I'd go with the blood agar, but it's been quite a few years since I saw the inside of a clinical lab. S. aureus does have a pretty characterisic appearance on blood agar, so it's relatively easy to know when you've got it. Answered by Donn Widerski 12 months ago.


Biology question(general)?
1. Mannitol is sugar (small) that cannot enter cells but can be filtered into the renaltubules. What would happen to urine volume if mannitol were injected into thebloodstream and why?2. The kidney can regulate the glomerular filtration rate by alteringconstriction/dilation of the afferent and/or efferent... Asked by Ignacia Galustian 12 months ago.

1. Mannitol is sugar (small) that cannot enter cells but can be filtered into the renal tubules. What would happen to urine volume if mannitol were injected into the bloodstream and why? 2. The kidney can regulate the glomerular filtration rate by altering constriction/dilation of the afferent and/or efferent arterioles. Each arteriole can be altered independently. If overall blood pressure in the body decreased, how might the kidney adjust the diameters of the afferent and efferent arterioles to maintain normal glomerular filtration and why? 10 Points for correct answer. Thanks. Answered by Melonie Hilderbrandt 12 months ago.

1 The volume would increase because of the osmotic properties of mannitol which makes it so there is a higher concentration of particles inside the renal tubules which brings water from the cells into the tubule and keeps the water from the tubule into the tubule itself until excretion. 2 The kidney should increase the diameter of afferent arterioles and slightly decrease the ones of efferent arterioles to have a local increase of the blood pressure to compensate the decrease of the blood pressure in the body. By increasing the diameter of afferent arterioles the blood will find less resistance and will pass in a greater amount. By decreasing the efferent arterioles, the blood would find a higher resistance and this will increase the pressure. To regulate arterioles, the nervous system innervates the precapillary sphincters and that regulates the amount of blood that gets into the capillary and out from the capillary. In order to have a correct glomerular filtration the pressure of blood must be maintained constant at about 50 mmHg. This pressure is contrasted by 10 mmHg of pressure coming from Bowman's capsule and by 30 mmHg coming from the blood's oncotic pressure in the capillary, that would then to make water enter the blood stream. The difference between these strengths results in a 10 mmHg of pressure for the filtration of plasma. That is how 180 L of liquids are filtered every day in the kidney. Although there is immediately after that a reabsorption of liquids in the renal tubule of about 70% in the first trait, 15% in the second and a final reabsorption in the last part of the tubule, which makes it so that just a small quantity of urine is excreted. Answered by Charmain Porter 12 months ago.


Why cant streptococcus grow on MSA (mannitol Salt agar)?
I know that streptococcus cannot grow on MSA plates, but I dont know why. Can anyone please explain? Asked by Edwina Cruickshank 12 months ago.

MSA is a selective and differential media. It is selective because only certain microorganisms can grow on it due to its high NaCl content, in which this concentration - near 10% in MSA - has an inhibitory effect on most bacteria, such as Streptococci. Answered by Dianne Dagrella 12 months ago.


10 points!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I need ur help about health?
Are "sugar alcohols" bad for health? Are "nutritive sweeteners" bad for health? Thank you Asked by Shantay Cloe 12 months ago.

Sugar alcohol does not contain ethanol, which is found in alcoholic beverages Common sugar alcohols are mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, isomalt, maltitol and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates (HSH Sugar alcohols, also know as polyols, are ingredients used as sweeteners and bulking agents. They occur naturally in foods and come from plant products such as fruits and berries. As a sugar substitute, they provide fewer calories (about a half to one-third less calories) than regular sugar. This is because they are converted to glucose more slowly, require little or no insulin to be metabolized and don't cause sudden increases in blood sugar. This makes them popular among individuals with diabetes; however, their use is becoming more common. Sugar alcohols vs. artificial sweeteners Sugar alcohols and artificial sweeteners, such as saccharin (Sweet & Low®) and aspartame (Equal® or Nutrasweet®), are not one and the same. One difference between the two types of sugar substitutes is that the artificial sweeteners contain zero calories whereas sugar alcohols contain about 2.6 calories per gram. Another issue is diabetes management. Artificial sweeteners do not contain carbohydrates so they do not cause blood sugar to elevate, whereas, sugar alcohols have some effect on blood sugar. Overall, both can be useful in diabetes management when used properly. Nutritive sweeteners (eg, sucrose, fructose) Nutritive sweeteners increase risk of dental caries. High fructose intakes may cause hypertriglyceridemia and gastrointestinal symptoms in susceptible individuals. Thus, it is the position of The American Dietetic Association that consumers can safely enjoy a range of nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners when consumed in a diet that is guided by current federal nutrition recommendations, such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Dietary References Intakes, as well as individual health goals. There are two kinds of sweeteners: Nutritive sweeteners supply calories and energy to the body. Like sugar, they have 4 calories per gram. Examples include honey and corn syrup Non-nutritive sweeteners are called sugar substitutes. They have no calories and provide no energy to the body. Most do not break down in the body as sugar does. They simply leave the body in the urine. Examples include aspartame and saccharin INcluded under the nutritive sweetners is Sugar alcohols. This type, which includes sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol, is used in candy, chewing gum, and in some baked goods. Sugar alcohols have about half the calories of other nutritive sweeteners. They are called sugar alcohols because of their chemical structure. They do not contain alcohol. Unlike sugar, they do not contribute to dental cavities. The real benefit of using sugar alcohols is that they do not contribute to dental caries. Bacteria in the mouth can't metabolize sugar alcohols as rapidly as sugar Sugar alcohols don't break down completely in the body, so they do not affect blood sugars. Answered by Mike Glasscock 12 months ago.

ask a doctor but to be sure don't eat/drink anything with those things in it Answered by Deandra Berrong 12 months ago.


I have to construct a dichotomous key for 10 bacterias-What info should I use to describe the bacterias?
Asked by Andreas Barcik 12 months ago.

1. Gram (+) or (-) 2. Catalase (+) or (-) 3. Oxidase (+) or (-) 4. TSI Test 5. Salt Mannitol Test 6. Bile Test 7. Indol (+) or (-) 8. VP (+) or (-) 9. Citrate (+) or (-) 10. Antibiotic Test Answered by Minh Hulitt 12 months ago.


What are the ingredients of mannitol salt agar?
what is the composition of mannitol salt agar Asked by Micaela Comly 12 months ago.

Typically Peptone ........................................... 10.0 g Beef Extract ....................................... 1.0 g D-Mannitol ........................................ 10.0 g Sodium Chloride ................................ 75.0 g Agar ........................................... 15.0 g Phenol Red ....................................... 25.0 mg per litre of water,which is then sterilised in an autoclave and poured in to plates before setting Answered by Bryce Corcoran 12 months ago.

Composition Of Mannitol Salt Agar Answered by Lucio Waler 12 months ago.


Help, Chemistry. 10 points.?
What functional group does Mannitol have? Asked by Darby Oram 12 months ago.

Since mannitol ends in "ol", I would suspect an alcohol. Do a google search for Mannitol. I'm sure you'll find an answer. Answered by Jani Magwood 12 months ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Maryanna Kazda 12 months ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Nohemi Hamara 12 months ago.


What medium would you use to isolate S. aureus the quickest?
Blood agar?? PEA?? MSA?? Not sure which is the fastest, am I right in thinking blood agar is the best way to test staph? Asked by Herschel Brockmann 12 months ago.

blood agar is the quickest, just look for pinpoint colonies that are catalase positive. HUGO has staph selective agar ( I dont have a link for this, its in the catalogue) Staph Selective Agar is an agar medium used for the selective isolation and differentiation of pathogenic staphylococci. The formulation contains a lower concentration of salt (4.0%) than Mannitol Salt Agar (7.5%). The lower salt concentration enhances the growth of most staphylococci. However the addition of selective agents is required to inhibit gram-negative and non-pathogenic staphylococci. The medium also contains bromcresol purple indicator which imparts a violet color to the prepared medium. Pathogenic staphylococci produce yellow colonies surrounded by yellow zones in a violet background. FORMULA Gram weight per liter: 101.0gm/L Sodium Chloride 40.0gm Selective Agents 14.0gm Pancreatic Digest of Casein 10.0gm Peptic Digest of Animal Tissue 10.0gm Mannitol 10.0gm Beef Extract 2.0gm Bromcresol Purple 2.0mg Agar 15.0gm Final pH 7.4 +/- 0.2 at 25 degrees C. Answered by Nadia Hillyer 12 months ago.

I'd go with the blood agar, but it's been quite a few years since I saw the inside of a clinical lab. S. aureus does have a pretty characterisic appearance on blood agar, so it's relatively easy to know when you've got it. Answered by Scot Lechelt 12 months ago.


Biology question(general)?
1. Mannitol is sugar (small) that cannot enter cells but can be filtered into the renaltubules. What would happen to urine volume if mannitol were injected into thebloodstream and why?2. The kidney can regulate the glomerular filtration rate by alteringconstriction/dilation of the afferent and/or efferent... Asked by Jami Husson 12 months ago.

1. Mannitol is sugar (small) that cannot enter cells but can be filtered into the renal tubules. What would happen to urine volume if mannitol were injected into the bloodstream and why? 2. The kidney can regulate the glomerular filtration rate by altering constriction/dilation of the afferent and/or efferent arterioles. Each arteriole can be altered independently. If overall blood pressure in the body decreased, how might the kidney adjust the diameters of the afferent and efferent arterioles to maintain normal glomerular filtration and why? 10 Points for correct answer. Thanks. Answered by Jack Schauer 12 months ago.

1 The volume would increase because of the osmotic properties of mannitol which makes it so there is a higher concentration of particles inside the renal tubules which brings water from the cells into the tubule and keeps the water from the tubule into the tubule itself until excretion. 2 The kidney should increase the diameter of afferent arterioles and slightly decrease the ones of efferent arterioles to have a local increase of the blood pressure to compensate the decrease of the blood pressure in the body. By increasing the diameter of afferent arterioles the blood will find less resistance and will pass in a greater amount. By decreasing the efferent arterioles, the blood would find a higher resistance and this will increase the pressure. To regulate arterioles, the nervous system innervates the precapillary sphincters and that regulates the amount of blood that gets into the capillary and out from the capillary. In order to have a correct glomerular filtration the pressure of blood must be maintained constant at about 50 mmHg. This pressure is contrasted by 10 mmHg of pressure coming from Bowman's capsule and by 30 mmHg coming from the blood's oncotic pressure in the capillary, that would then to make water enter the blood stream. The difference between these strengths results in a 10 mmHg of pressure for the filtration of plasma. That is how 180 L of liquids are filtered every day in the kidney. Although there is immediately after that a reabsorption of liquids in the renal tubule of about 70% in the first trait, 15% in the second and a final reabsorption in the last part of the tubule, which makes it so that just a small quantity of urine is excreted. Answered by Elvia Deglow 12 months ago.


Why cant streptococcus grow on MSA (mannitol Salt agar)?
I know that streptococcus cannot grow on MSA plates, but I dont know why. Can anyone please explain? Asked by Maren Schuck 12 months ago.

MSA is a selective and differential media. It is selective because only certain microorganisms can grow on it due to its high NaCl content, in which this concentration - near 10% in MSA - has an inhibitory effect on most bacteria, such as Streptococci. Answered by Hedwig Casamento 12 months ago.


10 points!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I need ur help about health?
Are "sugar alcohols" bad for health? Are "nutritive sweeteners" bad for health? Thank you Asked by Michell Uccello 12 months ago.

Sugar alcohol does not contain ethanol, which is found in alcoholic beverages Common sugar alcohols are mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, isomalt, maltitol and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates (HSH Sugar alcohols, also know as polyols, are ingredients used as sweeteners and bulking agents. They occur naturally in foods and come from plant products such as fruits and berries. As a sugar substitute, they provide fewer calories (about a half to one-third less calories) than regular sugar. This is because they are converted to glucose more slowly, require little or no insulin to be metabolized and don't cause sudden increases in blood sugar. This makes them popular among individuals with diabetes; however, their use is becoming more common. Sugar alcohols vs. artificial sweeteners Sugar alcohols and artificial sweeteners, such as saccharin (Sweet & Low®) and aspartame (Equal® or Nutrasweet®), are not one and the same. One difference between the two types of sugar substitutes is that the artificial sweeteners contain zero calories whereas sugar alcohols contain about 2.6 calories per gram. Another issue is diabetes management. Artificial sweeteners do not contain carbohydrates so they do not cause blood sugar to elevate, whereas, sugar alcohols have some effect on blood sugar. Overall, both can be useful in diabetes management when used properly. Nutritive sweeteners (eg, sucrose, fructose) Nutritive sweeteners increase risk of dental caries. High fructose intakes may cause hypertriglyceridemia and gastrointestinal symptoms in susceptible individuals. Thus, it is the position of The American Dietetic Association that consumers can safely enjoy a range of nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners when consumed in a diet that is guided by current federal nutrition recommendations, such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Dietary References Intakes, as well as individual health goals. There are two kinds of sweeteners: Nutritive sweeteners supply calories and energy to the body. Like sugar, they have 4 calories per gram. Examples include honey and corn syrup Non-nutritive sweeteners are called sugar substitutes. They have no calories and provide no energy to the body. Most do not break down in the body as sugar does. They simply leave the body in the urine. Examples include aspartame and saccharin INcluded under the nutritive sweetners is Sugar alcohols. This type, which includes sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol, is used in candy, chewing gum, and in some baked goods. Sugar alcohols have about half the calories of other nutritive sweeteners. They are called sugar alcohols because of their chemical structure. They do not contain alcohol. Unlike sugar, they do not contribute to dental cavities. The real benefit of using sugar alcohols is that they do not contribute to dental caries. Bacteria in the mouth can't metabolize sugar alcohols as rapidly as sugar Sugar alcohols don't break down completely in the body, so they do not affect blood sugars. Answered by Dorine Brazzell 12 months ago.

ask a doctor but to be sure don't eat/drink anything with those things in it Answered by Karolyn Dembinski 12 months ago.


I have to construct a dichotomous key for 10 bacterias-What info should I use to describe the bacterias?
Asked by Alexandria Byard 12 months ago.

1. Gram (+) or (-) 2. Catalase (+) or (-) 3. Oxidase (+) or (-) 4. TSI Test 5. Salt Mannitol Test 6. Bile Test 7. Indol (+) or (-) 8. VP (+) or (-) 9. Citrate (+) or (-) 10. Antibiotic Test Answered by Dylan Ripke 12 months ago.


What are the ingredients of mannitol salt agar?
what is the composition of mannitol salt agar Asked by Gilma Maxim 12 months ago.

Typically Peptone ........................................... 10.0 g Beef Extract ....................................... 1.0 g D-Mannitol ........................................ 10.0 g Sodium Chloride ................................ 75.0 g Agar ........................................... 15.0 g Phenol Red ....................................... 25.0 mg per litre of water,which is then sterilised in an autoclave and poured in to plates before setting Answered by Rachal Fairfax 12 months ago.

Composition Of Mannitol Salt Agar Answered by Mariam Wakeman 12 months ago.


Help, Chemistry. 10 points.?
What functional group does Mannitol have? Asked by Hayley Deely 12 months ago.

Since mannitol ends in "ol", I would suspect an alcohol. Do a google search for Mannitol. I'm sure you'll find an answer. Answered by Chance Reber 12 months ago.


What is the differential and selective properties of mannitol salt agar (MSA)?
Asked by Whitney Alverest 12 months ago.

What Is Mannitol Answered by Yong Joerger 12 months ago.


What medium would you use to isolate S. aureus the quickest?
Blood agar?? PEA?? MSA?? Not sure which is the fastest, am I right in thinking blood agar is the best way to test staph? Asked by Tyrone Puliafico 12 months ago.

blood agar is the quickest, just look for pinpoint colonies that are catalase positive. HUGO has staph selective agar ( I dont have a link for this, its in the catalogue) Staph Selective Agar is an agar medium used for the selective isolation and differentiation of pathogenic staphylococci. The formulation contains a lower concentration of salt (4.0%) than Mannitol Salt Agar (7.5%). The lower salt concentration enhances the growth of most staphylococci. However the addition of selective agents is required to inhibit gram-negative and non-pathogenic staphylococci. The medium also contains bromcresol purple indicator which imparts a violet color to the prepared medium. Pathogenic staphylococci produce yellow colonies surrounded by yellow zones in a violet background. FORMULA Gram weight per liter: 101.0gm/L Sodium Chloride 40.0gm Selective Agents 14.0gm Pancreatic Digest of Casein 10.0gm Peptic Digest of Animal Tissue 10.0gm Mannitol 10.0gm Beef Extract 2.0gm Bromcresol Purple 2.0mg Agar 15.0gm Final pH 7.4 +/- 0.2 at 25 degrees C. Answered by Patty Gaspar 12 months ago.

I'd go with the blood agar, but it's been quite a few years since I saw the inside of a clinical lab. S. aureus does have a pretty characterisic appearance on blood agar, so it's relatively easy to know when you've got it. Answered by Abraham Blaylock 12 months ago.


Biology question(general)?
1. Mannitol is sugar (small) that cannot enter cells but can be filtered into the renaltubules. What would happen to urine volume if mannitol were injected into thebloodstream and why?2. The kidney can regulate the glomerular filtration rate by alteringconstriction/dilation of the afferent and/or efferent... Asked by Coleman Meager 12 months ago.

1. Mannitol is sugar (small) that cannot enter cells but can be filtered into the renal tubules. What would happen to urine volume if mannitol were injected into the bloodstream and why? 2. The kidney can regulate the glomerular filtration rate by altering constriction/dilation of the afferent and/or efferent arterioles. Each arteriole can be altered independently. If overall blood pressure in the body decreased, how might the kidney adjust the diameters of the afferent and efferent arterioles to maintain normal glomerular filtration and why? 10 Points for correct answer. Thanks. Answered by Jeanelle Bertschy 12 months ago.

1 The volume would increase because of the osmotic properties of mannitol which makes it so there is a higher concentration of particles inside the renal tubules which brings water from the cells into the tubule and keeps the water from the tubule into the tubule itself until excretion. 2 The kidney should increase the diameter of afferent arterioles and slightly decrease the ones of efferent arterioles to have a local increase of the blood pressure to compensate the decrease of the blood pressure in the body. By increasing the diameter of afferent arterioles the blood will find less resistance and will pass in a greater amount. By decreasing the efferent arterioles, the blood would find a higher resistance and this will increase the pressure. To regulate arterioles, the nervous system innervates the precapillary sphincters and that regulates the amount of blood that gets into the capillary and out from the capillary. In order to have a correct glomerular filtration the pressure of blood must be maintained constant at about 50 mmHg. This pressure is contrasted by 10 mmHg of pressure coming from Bowman's capsule and by 30 mmHg coming from the blood's oncotic pressure in the capillary, that would then to make water enter the blood stream. The difference between these strengths results in a 10 mmHg of pressure for the filtration of plasma. That is how 180 L of liquids are filtered every day in the kidney. Although there is immediately after that a reabsorption of liquids in the renal tubule of about 70% in the first trait, 15% in the second and a final reabsorption in the last part of the tubule, which makes it so that just a small quantity of urine is excreted. Answered by Juliann Dentino 12 months ago.


Why cant streptococcus grow on MSA (mannitol Salt agar)?
I know that streptococcus cannot grow on MSA plates, but I dont know why. Can anyone please explain? Asked by Katelynn Mamoran 12 months ago.

MSA is a selective and differential media. It is selective because only certain microorganisms can grow on it due to its high NaCl content, in which this concentration - near 10% in MSA - has an inhibitory effect on most bacteria, such as Streptococci. Answered by Annita Mcdonel 12 months ago.


10 points!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I need ur help about health?
Are "sugar alcohols" bad for health? Are "nutritive sweeteners" bad for health? Thank you Asked by Vannesa Ridep 12 months ago.

Sugar alcohol does not contain ethanol, which is found in alcoholic beverages Common sugar alcohols are mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, isomalt, maltitol and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates (HSH Sugar alcohols, also know as polyols, are ingredients used as sweeteners and bulking agents. They occur naturally in foods and come from plant products such as fruits and berries. As a sugar substitute, they provide fewer calories (about a half to one-third less calories) than regular sugar. This is because they are converted to glucose more slowly, require little or no insulin to be metabolized and don't cause sudden increases in blood sugar. This makes them popular among individuals with diabetes; however, their use is becoming more common. Sugar alcohols vs. artificial sweeteners Sugar alcohols and artificial sweeteners, such as saccharin (Sweet & Low®) and aspartame (Equal® or Nutrasweet®), are not one and the same. One difference between the two types of sugar substitutes is that the artificial sweeteners contain zero calories whereas sugar alcohols contain about 2.6 calories per gram. Another issue is diabetes management. Artificial sweeteners do not contain carbohydrates so they do not cause blood sugar to elevate, whereas, sugar alcohols have some effect on blood sugar. Overall, both can be useful in diabetes management when used properly. Nutritive sweeteners (eg, sucrose, fructose) Nutritive sweeteners increase risk of dental caries. High fructose intakes may cause hypertriglyceridemia and gastrointestinal symptoms in susceptible individuals. Thus, it is the position of The American Dietetic Association that consumers can safely enjoy a range of nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners when consumed in a diet that is guided by current federal nutrition recommendations, such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Dietary References Intakes, as well as individual health goals. There are two kinds of sweeteners: Nutritive sweeteners supply calories and energy to the body. Like sugar, they have 4 calories per gram. Examples include honey and corn syrup Non-nutritive sweeteners are called sugar substitutes. They have no calories and provide no energy to the body. Most do not break down in the body as sugar does. They simply leave the body in the urine. Examples include aspartame and saccharin INcluded under the nutritive sweetners is Sugar alcohols. This type, which includes sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol, is used in candy, chewing gum, and in some baked goods. Sugar alcohols have about half the calories of other nutritive sweeteners. They are called sugar alcohols because of their chemical structure. They do not contain alcohol. Unlike sugar, they do not contribute to dental cavities. The real benefit of using sugar alcohols is that they do not contribute to dental caries. Bacteria in the mouth can't metabolize sugar alcohols as rapidly as sugar Sugar alcohols don't break down completely in the body, so they do not affect blood sugars. Answered by Cris Senters 12 months ago.

ask a doctor but to be sure don't eat/drink anything with those things in it Answered by Kristofer Zirk 12 months ago.


I have to construct a dichotomous key for 10 bacterias-What info should I use to describe the bacterias?
Asked by Cherie Pezzuto 12 months ago.

1. Gram (+) or (-) 2. Catalase (+) or (-) 3. Oxidase (+) or (-) 4. TSI Test 5. Salt Mannitol Test 6. Bile Test 7. Indol (+) or (-) 8. VP (+) or (-) 9. Citrate (+) or (-) 10. Antibiotic Test Answered by Jan Righetti 12 months ago.


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