Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020309/001.

Names and composition

"MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MAGNESIUM SULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020309/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 100ML (40MG per ML)
020309/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 50ML (80MG per ML)
020309/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 50ML (40MG per ML)
020309/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 500ML (40MG per ML)
020309/005 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40GM per 1000ML(40MG per ML)
206485/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 100ML (40MG per ML)
206485/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 50ML (80MG per ML)
206485/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 50ML (40MG per ML)
206485/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 500ML (40MG per ML)
206485/005 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40GM per 1000ML (40MG per ML)

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019316/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
019316/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 10GM per 20ML (500MG per ML)
019316/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 25GM per 50ML (500MG per ML)
020309/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 100ML (40MG per ML)
020309/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 50ML (80MG per ML)
020309/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 50ML (40MG per ML)
020309/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 500ML (40MG per ML)
020309/005 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40GM per 1000ML(40MG per ML)
020488/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per 100ML
020488/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 100ML
075151/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
202411/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 10GM per 20ML (500MG per ML)
206039/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
206485/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 100ML (40MG per ML)
206485/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 50ML (80MG per ML)
206485/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 50ML (40MG per ML)
206485/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 500ML (40MG per ML)
206485/005 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40GM per 1000ML (40MG per ML)
206486/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per 100ML
207349/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per 100ML

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Answered questions

How to get Magnesium Sulfate crystals out of container?
I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed.Also i would like to put a layer of something on the... Asked by Marcelina Morneau 1 year ago.

I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed. Also i would like to put a layer of something on the crystals to prevent corrosion from water moisture and to strengthen it. I was thinking of something like polyurethane so protect it. Answered by Charlsie Baldinger 1 year ago.

Having made MgSO4 crystals with classes for over 30 years, it would appear that you have just crystallised too much and it has jammed in the container. They are unlikely to be removed without damage! My classes have always been able to get the long needle shaped crystals without such problems. My advice is redissolve the crystals in the minimum of luke warm water (not hot, nor boiling) in a glass container then allow to cool slowly then let evaporate slowly eg cloth or filter paper over the top. When you get some nice crystals, filter them off. Do not wait until you have a big solid chunk. Since the crystals are neither deliquescent nor hygroscopic, there is no need to treat them further. Just store in eg a stoppered test tube. Answered by Harmony Soukup 1 year ago.

placed salt in a pitcher of water then stir it up. Tie a paper clip on the tip of a string- then on a pencil to hold the clip purely severe enuff interior the saltwater so it does not touch the backside of the glass, then enable it dry out.dries swifter if close to a heater , yet no longer on one. Answered by Ilona Francios 1 year ago.


HELP!! Can hermit crabs live in iron containers? PLEASE!!!?
I have one medium sized hermit crab and i was wondering if i could put it in a soft iron container? I heard somewhere that its poisonous for them but i'm not sure! I wanted to do this because right now, the plastic container that shes in is small and the iron container is a bit bigger. Asked by Francoise Locantore 1 year ago.

in this section from my research on hermit crab care I cover in brief a Harmits sensitivity to metal and metalic objects,the container you are suggesting would be harmful, but if you cannot afford a glass tank right now get a storage tub of adeguate sise, ten gallons is about right, cut holes in it for air circulation and to allow some excess humidity escape so the hermit does not get shell rot, do not wash out with chemicals or soap, but declorinated water, but this should help you, 4..The Importance of Clean Dechlorinated Water The water needs to be dechlorinated. The chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals in most tap, well or spring water can kill hermit crabs by causing the gills to blister (causing eventual suffocation). Aging the water will remove the chlorine, but not the chloramines, so dechlorinator is a must if you use tap water, If you don't want to dechlorinate tap water, you can use spring water if you know it's treatment instead. However, make sure nothing has been added at the water source. For example, Dasani and other bottled water contains magnesium sulfate "for taste"that chemical is bad for crab. Fresh dechlorinated water in a non metallic bowl shallow enough for the smallest crab to safely escape is ideal,some use a natural sea sponge placed in the bowl so all can can exit safely. While the "Caribbean" or "Purple Pincher" (Coenobita clypeatus) do perfectly fine with only fresh water, but it is nice to have a bowl of salt water for them to choose from.The Eastern Pacific Land Hermit come from areas that have little fresh water available and have become acostumed to drink only salt water.Ecuadorian Hermit Crabs require both brackish and salt water. Salt used for salt water aquariums does not contain harmful Iodine added to table salt and has beneficial minerals needed for goood health and shell growth The use of a specific gravity meter to measure salinity will make mixing water for different species of crabs a breeze, they are not expensive and are made of heavy plastic or glass. Pet bowls for crabs must be non metallic, it is best to play it safe with either cermaic or plastic bowls for use with either fresh and salt water too.For safety many put a natural sea sponge in the water bowl to aid in escape so they do not drown. Hermit Crabs started out as free swimming zoo plankton but as adults they will drown if left submerged. Allow enough standing water so hermits can fill their shells with water. Only wash their food and water dishes with dechlorinated water, never use soap. Answered by Pa Hodgen 1 year ago.

Indeed, metal can be harmful for you hermit. You should get a 10 gallon aquarium and at least 1 more hermit crab. Make sure the substrate is deep enough to bury your largest crab twice. Please keep the temperature between 72 and 82 degrees and the humidity at least 70%. If you need anymore info, please look at the link listed under my sources. Answered by Karren Kriebel 1 year ago.

No, You shouldnt keep it in an iron container. You should get it a ten gal aquarium with a lid, heater, and enough playsand for him to completly burrow himself. He needs fresh water, and salt water. He needs to be kept humid, he needs things to climb on and to hide in. He needs extra shells. Google hermit crab care. Answered by Kim Blackgoat 1 year ago.


Acid-corrosiveness?
Could anyone plz give me the chemical reaction(equation) for the reaction of Nitric/sulfuric acids with materials such as rubber, plastic, wood, glass, iron, steel...etc...like common building materials, thank you very much Asked by Carlo Naschke 1 year ago.

Concentrated acids can be kept in plastic and glass containers. However they will react with rubber, wood and most common metals except gold and platinium. Conc sulphuric acid is a very strong dehydrating agent. It extracts water molecules from anything that has water, like your flesh, sugar, hydrated crystals, etc. In the laboratory, normally dilute acids (2M solutions) are used. Dilute Hydrochloric and sulphuric acids reacts with metals (Groups 2, 3 and transition metals) with the evolution of hydrogen gas. But these dilute acids have no effect on copper onwards in the metal reactivity series. However dilute nitric acid react with the above metals to give water (instead of hydrogen), in addition to that , brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Typical reactions: Dil hydrochloric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium chloride salt + hydrogen Dil sulphuric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium sulphate salt + hydrogen Dil nitric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium nitrate salt + water + brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Also gold and platinium are not affected by any concentrated acid. However gold can react with aqua regia, which is a mixture of 1 part conc nitric acid and 3 parts conc hydrochloric acid to give a yellow solution of gold (III) nitrate and gold (III) chloride + water + brown nitrogen dioxide. Come typical equations are: H2S04 + Mg -----> MgSO4 + H2 4HNO3 + Mg -----> Mg(NO3)2 + 2H2O + 2NO2 A point of interest here: Although copper does not react with dilute hydrochloric acid or sulphuric acid, it can react with dilute nitric acid. This fact is seldom stressed by teachers in the class room. You need to warm the mixture slightly to activate the reaction, to produce copper (II) nitrate solution, water and brown nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Answered by Catherine Ziebol 1 year ago.


What are fireworks made out of?
i was kind of wondering what the specific things were that made the color. out of curiosity. i wish i remembered from high school Asked by Melia Leider 1 year ago.

Gunpowder (sulpher, charcoal,nitrate) fuses, cardboard or plastic containers and dividers. Colors are made by various chemicals added to the gunpowder like iron oxide for red, copper sulfate for blue or magnesium for bright white. Answered by Vikki Schardt 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Made Of Answered by Jules Chiffriller 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Answered by Bradley Mahnke 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what are fireworks made out of? i was wondering this and asked a friend who claimed he was a chemistry major. his response? cardboard a wick and some other stuff. i remember back in high school chem we burned certain metals to make colors. is this what makes fireworks? Answered by Stephanie Coore 1 year ago.

Fireworks are generally made of packaging (some kind of cardboard), a mechanical mixture of fuel and oxidizer (similar in function to gunpowder), a binder (paste to hold the chemicals together), and some metallic substance that burns brightly and a characteristic color (aluminum for white, calcium for orange, strontium for red, barium for green, potassium for purple, etc). Answered by Lore Ucha 1 year ago.

Fireworks are made of gunpowder and paper. Answered by Joycelyn Holsopple 1 year ago.

Fireworks are mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter (potassium nitrate) make up the gunpowder and then other additives similar to what you used in chemistry clas provide the color. Answered by Sharron Twigg 1 year ago.

They contain gun powder and creamy alfredo sauce..-wendy Answered by Jonathan Dula 1 year ago.

gun powder would be quite important too. Answered by Porsha Helscher 1 year ago.


What is media used for invitro propagation of tumeric and whatare the applications for tumeric?
what are the application for tumeric and what are the details for invtro propagation of tumeric. Asked by Latesha Yanuaria 1 year ago.

Plant tissue culture involves the growing of plant tissue from plant material taken from a source plant.It has been found that plants can reproduce whole plants from fragments of plant material when given a nutrient media capable of supporting growth and appropriate hormone control. The nutrient media used in plant tissue culture is an agar media with macro and micro nutrients dissolved in it.Unlike plants growing from a seed, tissue cultures require a supply of carbon in an organic form such as sugars.They also require amino acids,B vitamins and growth hormones .The constituents of the media will vary with the plant material being cultured. Plant tissue culture can be used to clone plants and produce many identical plants for a particular market.This can be used when a new variety is grown and other methods of cultivation are too slow for the desired market.It can also be used if a stock plant has been infected and material taken from the plant that is not infected.The excised plant material can be grown on and any disease free plants grown on for propagation.Plant tissue culture is also of use in research for biochemists,geniticists,plant breeders and plant pathologists.Plant tissue culture has also proved more efficient in the production of secondary metabolites than the use of the parent plants in various instances and has been used in the commercial production of the napthoquinone pigment Shikonin.Plant tissue caulture has also been used in the production of flavours,sweeteners,natural colourants and pharmaceuticals.With the advent of gene insertion plant cells with gene material inserted can be regenerated using tissue culture to produce a whole new plant. Methods and Materials When taking plant material to grow on using plant tissue culture it is important to get the most appropriate material for the end product you are aiming for.Plant tissue has been shown to be totipotent,but different tissues will require different treatment to produce whole plants if that is the aim.Tissue that is dividing such as at the nodes and leaf axils,leaf peiole material are often used. Sharp cuts will decrease the amount of decaying material present,and decrease the possibility of infection.The use of a sharp scalpel is advised.Forceps are necessary to move the plant material to the growing media.The cutting should take place in a sterile environment and the growing media only exposed when the plant material is placed in it,after which it should be sealed. Forceps Scalpel Disinfectants-for surfaces,implements and plant material. Laminar Flow Cabinet Bunsen burner Containers-petri dishes,small clear plastic containers,glass jars. Growth media-appropriate to plant material being cultured Murashige Skoog Constituents Media mg/Litre Inorganic Ammonium Nitrate NH4NO3 1650 Potassium Nitrate KNO3 1900 Calcium Chloride CaCl2.2H2O 440 Magnesium Sulphate MgSO4.7H2O 370 KH2PO4 170 Potassium Iodide 0.83 H3BO3 6.2 Manganese Sulphate MnSO4.4H2O 22.3 Zinc Sulphate ZnSO4.7H2O 8.6 Na2Mo4.H2O 0.25 Copper Sulphate CuSO4.5H2O 0.025 Iron Sulphate FeSO4.7H2O 27.8 Na2EDTA.2H2O 37.3 Organic Inositol 100 Nicitinic Acid 0.5 Pyridoxine HCl 0.5 Thiamine HCl 0.1 Glycine 2 Sucrose 3% BVitamins Nicitinic acid Thiamine HCl Pyridoxine HCl Growth Hormones-Auxins, Benzyl Amino Purine Auxin-Indoleacetic acid Inositol Cytokinins Kinetin For growing plant tissue cultures on a suitable site is required which is clean,warm (20deg C) and there is adequate light. The source of the plant material is important as some plant tissue is better suited to tissue culture than others,the ability of plant material to grow and divide in vitro is known as totipotency,but different plant material will need different control to form new plant material.The plant material may form a new embryo,callous tissue or a whole plant depending on how it is looked after. Turmeric (Curcuma longa, also called tumeric or kunyit in some Asian countries[1]) is a spice commonly used in curries and other South Asian cuisine. Its active ingredient is curcumin. It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broth, and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron). It makes a poor fabric dye as it is not very lightfast. Turmeric, a representative of plant genus Curcuma, is a member of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. In Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is thought to have many healthful properties. It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease, cancer and liver disorders. Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian state of Maharashtra, is the largest and most important trading centre for turmeric in Asia or perhaps in the entire world Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) is used in product systems that are packaged to protect them from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water containing products. Over-colouring, such as in pickles, relishes and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading. Turmeric has found application in canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurts, yellow cakes, biscuits, popcorn-color, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatines, direct compression tablets, etc. In combination with Annatto (E160b) it has been used to colour cheeses, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. The medicinal properties of the turmeric have for millennia been known to the ancient Indians and have been expounded in the Ayurvedic texts. It is only in recent years that Western scientists have increasingly recognised the medicinal properties of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, "Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope," research activity into curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, is exploding. Two hundred and fifty-six curcumin papers were published in the past year according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Supplement sales have increased 35% from 2004, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health has four clinical trials underway to study curcumin treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer's, and colorectal cancer. A 2004 UCLA-Veterans Affairs study involving genetically altered mice suggests that curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, might inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients and also break up existing plaques. "Curcumin has been used for thousands of years as a safe anti-inflammatory in a variety of ailments as part of Indian traditional medicine," Gregory Cole, Professor of medicine and neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA said. Recent studies have shown that turmeric can be effective in fighting a number of STDs including chlamydia and gonorrhea. Investigations into the low incidence of colorectal cancer amongst ethnic groups with a large intake of curries compared with the indigenous population have suggested that some active ingredients of turmeric may have anti-cancer properties. Anti-tumoral effects against melanoma cells have been demonstrated [1]. Second-stage trials of a turmeric-based drug as a possible treatment for cancer are currently underway. However, according to recent research results [2], the component curcumin causes degradation of the human protein p53. p53 is responsible for removing damaged cells that are likely to become tumors, suggesting curcumin could accelerate tumor development. Consuming large doses is not recommended in cases of gallstones, obstructive jaundice, acute bilious colic and toxic liver disorders. Curry Pharmaceuticals, based in North Carolina, is studying the use of a curcumin cream for psoriasis treatment. Another company is already selling a cream based on curcumin called "Psoria-Gold," which shows anecdotal promise of treating the disease. A recent study involving mice has shown that turmeric slows the spread of breast cancer into lungs and other body parts, but also enhances the effect of taxol in reducing metastasis of breast cancer [3]. It is also said that turmeric can strengthen the blood-brain barrier against attacks that result from auto-immune diseases (such as Multiple sclerosis Turmeric is currently used in the formulation of some sun screens. Turmeric paste is used by Indian women to keep them free of superfluous hair. The Government of Thailand is funding a project to extract and isolate tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) from turmeric. THCs are colorless compounds that might have antioxidant and skin lightening properties and might be used to treat skin inflammations, making these compounds useful in cosmetics formulations. Answered by Julee Barndt 1 year ago.

APPLICATIONS ARE as a condiment on hotdogs at weeny roasts...and tumeric has great anti oxident properties...its what makes those terrible yellow stains on a white tee shirt...etc etc Answered by Madie Vannice 1 year ago.

Repeated question Answered by Henry Lenon 1 year ago.


Help my water smells like sulfur!?
I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and... Asked by Fabiola Grabowsky 1 year ago.

I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and all the faucets except the drinking water that comes from the fridge (assuming this is because of the filter). Also the neighbor mentioned they did work on the water lines recently but his water is fine. Answered by Coretta Skowronski 1 year ago.

I'd check with your neighbors to see if they have the same problems, and what remediation if any has been successful. The homeowners' association should be able to help too. If the problem seems to be limited to your house then the plumbing system is likely the problem. The source could be biological. There are bacteria that use sulfur for energy by changing sulfates (which are not particularly noticeable) into hydrogen sulfide (which smells like rotten eggs.) The source could be electrochemical involving the hot water heater. Most water heater tanks are made of metal which rusts, kind of an unfortunate characteristic for water container. To keep the tank from rusting a rod(s) of aluminum, zinc, or magnesium (or some alloy thereof) is put in the tank. It rusts in the place of the tank. Unfortunately, as the water heater ages, the process also starts to liberate hydrogen sulfide gas. I think some electric water heaters have plastic tanks, but generally the recovery time and operating cost are greater than for gas heaters. Since you mentioned the odor in both the hot and cold water this will only be a partial solution. There are a number of other options like special filtration, reverse osmosis. Plumbers in your area are probably familiar with the problem and how to deal with it. Answered by Theda Fleet 1 year ago.

You hit the respond on the top: it truly is sulfur in the water. First i might have it checked for any contaminates. as quickly as you have the outcomes you could extra advantageous than possibly have a plumber deploy a filtration gadget that treats the water before attending to the faucets and can be self cleansing. this might on no account be a type of diverse spun nylon complete abode filters or maybe the committed under sink clear out. the value will on no account be low value yet I even have showered in properties like that, and it truly stinks at an identical time as showering or flushing the bathroom. Answered by Clarine Bartunek 1 year ago.

Contact the city again and tell them all of this (the neighbor thing etc) and if they still refuse help then contact a professional to check things out and see what they think. If it's all clear ask what you can do to reduce the smell. If it's not have them fix it and/or bring the city to court if it's something real bad. Also try to put filters on your faucets. Answered by Jasmine Purdum 1 year ago.


What is glass made out of?
What is glass made out of? Asked by Luis Aamodt 1 year ago.

Common raw materials used for making glass consist of the following: •Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). •Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. •Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. •Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). •Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. •Other materials may be used as colorants, refining agents or to adjust the physical and chemical properties of the glass. There are many different types of glass. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. In the scientific sense, the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (as well as melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. An amorphous solid is a solid material in which there is no long-range order of the positions of the atoms. Conversely, solids in which long-range atomic order is present are called crystalline solids or morphous. Many glasses contain silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2) as their main component and glass former. Besides common silica-based glasses, many other inorganic and organic materials may also form glasses, including plastics (e.g., acrylic glass), carbon, metals, carbon dioxide (amorphous carbonia: a-CO2), phosphates, borates, chalcogenides, fluorides, germanates (glasses based on GeO2), tellurites (glasses based on TeO2), antimonates (glasses based on Sb2O3), arsenates (glasses based on As2O3), titanates (glasses based on TiO2), tantalates (glasses based on Ta2O5), nitrates, carbonates and many other substances. Besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. The following is a list of chemical compositions (with weight percentage values for each chemical) of various types of common glass: •Soda-lime glass (for containers): 74 SiO2, 13 Na2O, 10.5 CaO, 1.3 Al2O3, 0.3 K2O, 0.2 SO3, 0.2 MgO, 0.01 TiO2, 0.04 Fe2O3 •Borosilicate (low expansion, similar to Pyrex, Duran): 81 SiO2, 12.5 B2O3, 4 Na2O, 2.2 Al2O3, 0.02 CaO, 0.06 K2O •Glass wool (for thermal insulation): 63 SiO2, 16 Na2O, 8 CaO, 3.3 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 3.5 MgO, 0.8 K2O, 0.3 Fe2O3, 0.2 SO3 •Special optical glass (similar to Lead crystal): 41.2 SiO2, 34.1 PbO, 12.4 BaO, 6.3 ZnO, 3.0 K2O, 2.5 CaO, 0.35 Sb2O3, 0.2 As2O3 •Fused silica: SiO2 •Germania glass: GeO2 •Germanium selenide glass: GeSe2 Answered by Dominque Winnen 1 year ago.

What Is Glass Made Of Answered by Carolin Churan 1 year ago.

Sand At 1500 degrees the sand will melt. At 2500 degrees it will change to glass, but very hot glass that is considered a liquid still. If you let it sit then it will harden to glass Answered by Trent Billo 1 year ago.

Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). # Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. # Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. # Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). # Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. Answered by Yasuko Durnell 1 year ago.

Sand, soda ash, slats, dolomite, colorants Answered by Jared Parlin 1 year ago.

sand, recycled glass and sometimes soda ash Answered by Helga Youngkin 1 year ago.

Silicon and oxygen. SiO2 Answered by Rosaria Wittel 1 year ago.

complex issue. research with google or bing. just that can help! Answered by Clifford Schrager 1 year ago.


How to get Magnesium Sulfate crystals out of container?
I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed.Also i would like to put a layer of something on the... Asked by Deena Mccusker 1 year ago.

I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed. Also i would like to put a layer of something on the crystals to prevent corrosion from water moisture and to strengthen it. I was thinking of something like polyurethane so protect it. Answered by Ceola Harms 1 year ago.

Having made MgSO4 crystals with classes for over 30 years, it would appear that you have just crystallised too much and it has jammed in the container. They are unlikely to be removed without damage! My classes have always been able to get the long needle shaped crystals without such problems. My advice is redissolve the crystals in the minimum of luke warm water (not hot, nor boiling) in a glass container then allow to cool slowly then let evaporate slowly eg cloth or filter paper over the top. When you get some nice crystals, filter them off. Do not wait until you have a big solid chunk. Since the crystals are neither deliquescent nor hygroscopic, there is no need to treat them further. Just store in eg a stoppered test tube. Answered by Wm Sangha 1 year ago.

placed salt in a pitcher of water then stir it up. Tie a paper clip on the tip of a string- then on a pencil to hold the clip purely severe enuff interior the saltwater so it does not touch the backside of the glass, then enable it dry out.dries swifter if close to a heater , yet no longer on one. Answered by Stephine Anna 1 year ago.


HELP!! Can hermit crabs live in iron containers? PLEASE!!!?
I have one medium sized hermit crab and i was wondering if i could put it in a soft iron container? I heard somewhere that its poisonous for them but i'm not sure! I wanted to do this because right now, the plastic container that shes in is small and the iron container is a bit bigger. Asked by Janis Lade 1 year ago.

in this section from my research on hermit crab care I cover in brief a Harmits sensitivity to metal and metalic objects,the container you are suggesting would be harmful, but if you cannot afford a glass tank right now get a storage tub of adeguate sise, ten gallons is about right, cut holes in it for air circulation and to allow some excess humidity escape so the hermit does not get shell rot, do not wash out with chemicals or soap, but declorinated water, but this should help you, 4..The Importance of Clean Dechlorinated Water The water needs to be dechlorinated. The chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals in most tap, well or spring water can kill hermit crabs by causing the gills to blister (causing eventual suffocation). Aging the water will remove the chlorine, but not the chloramines, so dechlorinator is a must if you use tap water, If you don't want to dechlorinate tap water, you can use spring water if you know it's treatment instead. However, make sure nothing has been added at the water source. For example, Dasani and other bottled water contains magnesium sulfate "for taste"that chemical is bad for crab. Fresh dechlorinated water in a non metallic bowl shallow enough for the smallest crab to safely escape is ideal,some use a natural sea sponge placed in the bowl so all can can exit safely. While the "Caribbean" or "Purple Pincher" (Coenobita clypeatus) do perfectly fine with only fresh water, but it is nice to have a bowl of salt water for them to choose from.The Eastern Pacific Land Hermit come from areas that have little fresh water available and have become acostumed to drink only salt water.Ecuadorian Hermit Crabs require both brackish and salt water. Salt used for salt water aquariums does not contain harmful Iodine added to table salt and has beneficial minerals needed for goood health and shell growth The use of a specific gravity meter to measure salinity will make mixing water for different species of crabs a breeze, they are not expensive and are made of heavy plastic or glass. Pet bowls for crabs must be non metallic, it is best to play it safe with either cermaic or plastic bowls for use with either fresh and salt water too.For safety many put a natural sea sponge in the water bowl to aid in escape so they do not drown. Hermit Crabs started out as free swimming zoo plankton but as adults they will drown if left submerged. Allow enough standing water so hermits can fill their shells with water. Only wash their food and water dishes with dechlorinated water, never use soap. Answered by Erin Pernesky 1 year ago.

Indeed, metal can be harmful for you hermit. You should get a 10 gallon aquarium and at least 1 more hermit crab. Make sure the substrate is deep enough to bury your largest crab twice. Please keep the temperature between 72 and 82 degrees and the humidity at least 70%. If you need anymore info, please look at the link listed under my sources. Answered by Aurelio Hatter 1 year ago.

No, You shouldnt keep it in an iron container. You should get it a ten gal aquarium with a lid, heater, and enough playsand for him to completly burrow himself. He needs fresh water, and salt water. He needs to be kept humid, he needs things to climb on and to hide in. He needs extra shells. Google hermit crab care. Answered by Anya Bedocs 1 year ago.


Acid-corrosiveness?
Could anyone plz give me the chemical reaction(equation) for the reaction of Nitric/sulfuric acids with materials such as rubber, plastic, wood, glass, iron, steel...etc...like common building materials, thank you very much Asked by Kandra Schumer 1 year ago.

Concentrated acids can be kept in plastic and glass containers. However they will react with rubber, wood and most common metals except gold and platinium. Conc sulphuric acid is a very strong dehydrating agent. It extracts water molecules from anything that has water, like your flesh, sugar, hydrated crystals, etc. In the laboratory, normally dilute acids (2M solutions) are used. Dilute Hydrochloric and sulphuric acids reacts with metals (Groups 2, 3 and transition metals) with the evolution of hydrogen gas. But these dilute acids have no effect on copper onwards in the metal reactivity series. However dilute nitric acid react with the above metals to give water (instead of hydrogen), in addition to that , brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Typical reactions: Dil hydrochloric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium chloride salt + hydrogen Dil sulphuric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium sulphate salt + hydrogen Dil nitric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium nitrate salt + water + brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Also gold and platinium are not affected by any concentrated acid. However gold can react with aqua regia, which is a mixture of 1 part conc nitric acid and 3 parts conc hydrochloric acid to give a yellow solution of gold (III) nitrate and gold (III) chloride + water + brown nitrogen dioxide. Come typical equations are: H2S04 + Mg -----> MgSO4 + H2 4HNO3 + Mg -----> Mg(NO3)2 + 2H2O + 2NO2 A point of interest here: Although copper does not react with dilute hydrochloric acid or sulphuric acid, it can react with dilute nitric acid. This fact is seldom stressed by teachers in the class room. You need to warm the mixture slightly to activate the reaction, to produce copper (II) nitrate solution, water and brown nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Answered by Dan Krutsch 1 year ago.


What are fireworks made out of?
i was kind of wondering what the specific things were that made the color. out of curiosity. i wish i remembered from high school Asked by Andra Marchitto 1 year ago.

Gunpowder (sulpher, charcoal,nitrate) fuses, cardboard or plastic containers and dividers. Colors are made by various chemicals added to the gunpowder like iron oxide for red, copper sulfate for blue or magnesium for bright white. Answered by Ashanti Voglund 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Made Of Answered by Joe Vandergrift 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Answered by Colene Servedio 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what are fireworks made out of? i was wondering this and asked a friend who claimed he was a chemistry major. his response? cardboard a wick and some other stuff. i remember back in high school chem we burned certain metals to make colors. is this what makes fireworks? Answered by Drew Asta 1 year ago.

Fireworks are generally made of packaging (some kind of cardboard), a mechanical mixture of fuel and oxidizer (similar in function to gunpowder), a binder (paste to hold the chemicals together), and some metallic substance that burns brightly and a characteristic color (aluminum for white, calcium for orange, strontium for red, barium for green, potassium for purple, etc). Answered by Yanira Gieselman 1 year ago.

Fireworks are made of gunpowder and paper. Answered by Magdalene Hoelter 1 year ago.

Fireworks are mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter (potassium nitrate) make up the gunpowder and then other additives similar to what you used in chemistry clas provide the color. Answered by Ligia Kerwood 1 year ago.

They contain gun powder and creamy alfredo sauce..-wendy Answered by Pa Sybert 1 year ago.

gun powder would be quite important too. Answered by Bradly Blackstone 1 year ago.


What is media used for invitro propagation of tumeric and whatare the applications for tumeric?
what are the application for tumeric and what are the details for invtro propagation of tumeric. Asked by Arden Bungard 1 year ago.

Plant tissue culture involves the growing of plant tissue from plant material taken from a source plant.It has been found that plants can reproduce whole plants from fragments of plant material when given a nutrient media capable of supporting growth and appropriate hormone control. The nutrient media used in plant tissue culture is an agar media with macro and micro nutrients dissolved in it.Unlike plants growing from a seed, tissue cultures require a supply of carbon in an organic form such as sugars.They also require amino acids,B vitamins and growth hormones .The constituents of the media will vary with the plant material being cultured. Plant tissue culture can be used to clone plants and produce many identical plants for a particular market.This can be used when a new variety is grown and other methods of cultivation are too slow for the desired market.It can also be used if a stock plant has been infected and material taken from the plant that is not infected.The excised plant material can be grown on and any disease free plants grown on for propagation.Plant tissue culture is also of use in research for biochemists,geniticists,plant breeders and plant pathologists.Plant tissue culture has also proved more efficient in the production of secondary metabolites than the use of the parent plants in various instances and has been used in the commercial production of the napthoquinone pigment Shikonin.Plant tissue caulture has also been used in the production of flavours,sweeteners,natural colourants and pharmaceuticals.With the advent of gene insertion plant cells with gene material inserted can be regenerated using tissue culture to produce a whole new plant. Methods and Materials When taking plant material to grow on using plant tissue culture it is important to get the most appropriate material for the end product you are aiming for.Plant tissue has been shown to be totipotent,but different tissues will require different treatment to produce whole plants if that is the aim.Tissue that is dividing such as at the nodes and leaf axils,leaf peiole material are often used. Sharp cuts will decrease the amount of decaying material present,and decrease the possibility of infection.The use of a sharp scalpel is advised.Forceps are necessary to move the plant material to the growing media.The cutting should take place in a sterile environment and the growing media only exposed when the plant material is placed in it,after which it should be sealed. Forceps Scalpel Disinfectants-for surfaces,implements and plant material. Laminar Flow Cabinet Bunsen burner Containers-petri dishes,small clear plastic containers,glass jars. Growth media-appropriate to plant material being cultured Murashige Skoog Constituents Media mg/Litre Inorganic Ammonium Nitrate NH4NO3 1650 Potassium Nitrate KNO3 1900 Calcium Chloride CaCl2.2H2O 440 Magnesium Sulphate MgSO4.7H2O 370 KH2PO4 170 Potassium Iodide 0.83 H3BO3 6.2 Manganese Sulphate MnSO4.4H2O 22.3 Zinc Sulphate ZnSO4.7H2O 8.6 Na2Mo4.H2O 0.25 Copper Sulphate CuSO4.5H2O 0.025 Iron Sulphate FeSO4.7H2O 27.8 Na2EDTA.2H2O 37.3 Organic Inositol 100 Nicitinic Acid 0.5 Pyridoxine HCl 0.5 Thiamine HCl 0.1 Glycine 2 Sucrose 3% BVitamins Nicitinic acid Thiamine HCl Pyridoxine HCl Growth Hormones-Auxins, Benzyl Amino Purine Auxin-Indoleacetic acid Inositol Cytokinins Kinetin For growing plant tissue cultures on a suitable site is required which is clean,warm (20deg C) and there is adequate light. The source of the plant material is important as some plant tissue is better suited to tissue culture than others,the ability of plant material to grow and divide in vitro is known as totipotency,but different plant material will need different control to form new plant material.The plant material may form a new embryo,callous tissue or a whole plant depending on how it is looked after. Turmeric (Curcuma longa, also called tumeric or kunyit in some Asian countries[1]) is a spice commonly used in curries and other South Asian cuisine. Its active ingredient is curcumin. It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broth, and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron). It makes a poor fabric dye as it is not very lightfast. Turmeric, a representative of plant genus Curcuma, is a member of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. In Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is thought to have many healthful properties. It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease, cancer and liver disorders. Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian state of Maharashtra, is the largest and most important trading centre for turmeric in Asia or perhaps in the entire world Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) is used in product systems that are packaged to protect them from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water containing products. Over-colouring, such as in pickles, relishes and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading. Turmeric has found application in canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurts, yellow cakes, biscuits, popcorn-color, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatines, direct compression tablets, etc. In combination with Annatto (E160b) it has been used to colour cheeses, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. The medicinal properties of the turmeric have for millennia been known to the ancient Indians and have been expounded in the Ayurvedic texts. It is only in recent years that Western scientists have increasingly recognised the medicinal properties of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, "Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope," research activity into curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, is exploding. Two hundred and fifty-six curcumin papers were published in the past year according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Supplement sales have increased 35% from 2004, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health has four clinical trials underway to study curcumin treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer's, and colorectal cancer. A 2004 UCLA-Veterans Affairs study involving genetically altered mice suggests that curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, might inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients and also break up existing plaques. "Curcumin has been used for thousands of years as a safe anti-inflammatory in a variety of ailments as part of Indian traditional medicine," Gregory Cole, Professor of medicine and neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA said. Recent studies have shown that turmeric can be effective in fighting a number of STDs including chlamydia and gonorrhea. Investigations into the low incidence of colorectal cancer amongst ethnic groups with a large intake of curries compared with the indigenous population have suggested that some active ingredients of turmeric may have anti-cancer properties. Anti-tumoral effects against melanoma cells have been demonstrated [1]. Second-stage trials of a turmeric-based drug as a possible treatment for cancer are currently underway. However, according to recent research results [2], the component curcumin causes degradation of the human protein p53. p53 is responsible for removing damaged cells that are likely to become tumors, suggesting curcumin could accelerate tumor development. Consuming large doses is not recommended in cases of gallstones, obstructive jaundice, acute bilious colic and toxic liver disorders. Curry Pharmaceuticals, based in North Carolina, is studying the use of a curcumin cream for psoriasis treatment. Another company is already selling a cream based on curcumin called "Psoria-Gold," which shows anecdotal promise of treating the disease. A recent study involving mice has shown that turmeric slows the spread of breast cancer into lungs and other body parts, but also enhances the effect of taxol in reducing metastasis of breast cancer [3]. It is also said that turmeric can strengthen the blood-brain barrier against attacks that result from auto-immune diseases (such as Multiple sclerosis Turmeric is currently used in the formulation of some sun screens. Turmeric paste is used by Indian women to keep them free of superfluous hair. The Government of Thailand is funding a project to extract and isolate tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) from turmeric. THCs are colorless compounds that might have antioxidant and skin lightening properties and might be used to treat skin inflammations, making these compounds useful in cosmetics formulations. Answered by Carleen Elms 1 year ago.

APPLICATIONS ARE as a condiment on hotdogs at weeny roasts...and tumeric has great anti oxident properties...its what makes those terrible yellow stains on a white tee shirt...etc etc Answered by Charline Leth 1 year ago.

Repeated question Answered by Providencia Latunski 1 year ago.


Help my water smells like sulfur!?
I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and... Asked by Teena Kloeck 1 year ago.

I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and all the faucets except the drinking water that comes from the fridge (assuming this is because of the filter). Also the neighbor mentioned they did work on the water lines recently but his water is fine. Answered by Octavio Piccoli 1 year ago.

I'd check with your neighbors to see if they have the same problems, and what remediation if any has been successful. The homeowners' association should be able to help too. If the problem seems to be limited to your house then the plumbing system is likely the problem. The source could be biological. There are bacteria that use sulfur for energy by changing sulfates (which are not particularly noticeable) into hydrogen sulfide (which smells like rotten eggs.) The source could be electrochemical involving the hot water heater. Most water heater tanks are made of metal which rusts, kind of an unfortunate characteristic for water container. To keep the tank from rusting a rod(s) of aluminum, zinc, or magnesium (or some alloy thereof) is put in the tank. It rusts in the place of the tank. Unfortunately, as the water heater ages, the process also starts to liberate hydrogen sulfide gas. I think some electric water heaters have plastic tanks, but generally the recovery time and operating cost are greater than for gas heaters. Since you mentioned the odor in both the hot and cold water this will only be a partial solution. There are a number of other options like special filtration, reverse osmosis. Plumbers in your area are probably familiar with the problem and how to deal with it. Answered by Jordan Johengen 1 year ago.

You hit the respond on the top: it truly is sulfur in the water. First i might have it checked for any contaminates. as quickly as you have the outcomes you could extra advantageous than possibly have a plumber deploy a filtration gadget that treats the water before attending to the faucets and can be self cleansing. this might on no account be a type of diverse spun nylon complete abode filters or maybe the committed under sink clear out. the value will on no account be low value yet I even have showered in properties like that, and it truly stinks at an identical time as showering or flushing the bathroom. Answered by Minh Lovering 1 year ago.

Contact the city again and tell them all of this (the neighbor thing etc) and if they still refuse help then contact a professional to check things out and see what they think. If it's all clear ask what you can do to reduce the smell. If it's not have them fix it and/or bring the city to court if it's something real bad. Also try to put filters on your faucets. Answered by Irena Mccade 1 year ago.


What is glass made out of?
What is glass made out of? Asked by Nelle Tepley 1 year ago.

Common raw materials used for making glass consist of the following: •Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). •Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. •Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. •Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). •Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. •Other materials may be used as colorants, refining agents or to adjust the physical and chemical properties of the glass. There are many different types of glass. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. In the scientific sense, the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (as well as melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. An amorphous solid is a solid material in which there is no long-range order of the positions of the atoms. Conversely, solids in which long-range atomic order is present are called crystalline solids or morphous. Many glasses contain silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2) as their main component and glass former. Besides common silica-based glasses, many other inorganic and organic materials may also form glasses, including plastics (e.g., acrylic glass), carbon, metals, carbon dioxide (amorphous carbonia: a-CO2), phosphates, borates, chalcogenides, fluorides, germanates (glasses based on GeO2), tellurites (glasses based on TeO2), antimonates (glasses based on Sb2O3), arsenates (glasses based on As2O3), titanates (glasses based on TiO2), tantalates (glasses based on Ta2O5), nitrates, carbonates and many other substances. Besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. The following is a list of chemical compositions (with weight percentage values for each chemical) of various types of common glass: •Soda-lime glass (for containers): 74 SiO2, 13 Na2O, 10.5 CaO, 1.3 Al2O3, 0.3 K2O, 0.2 SO3, 0.2 MgO, 0.01 TiO2, 0.04 Fe2O3 •Borosilicate (low expansion, similar to Pyrex, Duran): 81 SiO2, 12.5 B2O3, 4 Na2O, 2.2 Al2O3, 0.02 CaO, 0.06 K2O •Glass wool (for thermal insulation): 63 SiO2, 16 Na2O, 8 CaO, 3.3 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 3.5 MgO, 0.8 K2O, 0.3 Fe2O3, 0.2 SO3 •Special optical glass (similar to Lead crystal): 41.2 SiO2, 34.1 PbO, 12.4 BaO, 6.3 ZnO, 3.0 K2O, 2.5 CaO, 0.35 Sb2O3, 0.2 As2O3 •Fused silica: SiO2 •Germania glass: GeO2 •Germanium selenide glass: GeSe2 Answered by Moises Pelnar 1 year ago.

What Is Glass Made Of Answered by Marlene Hudlin 1 year ago.

Sand At 1500 degrees the sand will melt. At 2500 degrees it will change to glass, but very hot glass that is considered a liquid still. If you let it sit then it will harden to glass Answered by Antone Sweetser 1 year ago.

Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). # Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. # Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. # Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). # Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. Answered by Garland Maroney 1 year ago.

Sand, soda ash, slats, dolomite, colorants Answered by Myrtie Weston 1 year ago.

sand, recycled glass and sometimes soda ash Answered by Maren Studwell 1 year ago.

Silicon and oxygen. SiO2 Answered by Collette Diers 1 year ago.

complex issue. research with google or bing. just that can help! Answered by Ryan Whinery 1 year ago.


How to get Magnesium Sulfate crystals out of container?
I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed.Also i would like to put a layer of something on the... Asked by Sandee Iyengar 1 year ago.

I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed. Also i would like to put a layer of something on the crystals to prevent corrosion from water moisture and to strengthen it. I was thinking of something like polyurethane so protect it. Answered by Carli Autin 1 year ago.

Having made MgSO4 crystals with classes for over 30 years, it would appear that you have just crystallised too much and it has jammed in the container. They are unlikely to be removed without damage! My classes have always been able to get the long needle shaped crystals without such problems. My advice is redissolve the crystals in the minimum of luke warm water (not hot, nor boiling) in a glass container then allow to cool slowly then let evaporate slowly eg cloth or filter paper over the top. When you get some nice crystals, filter them off. Do not wait until you have a big solid chunk. Since the crystals are neither deliquescent nor hygroscopic, there is no need to treat them further. Just store in eg a stoppered test tube. Answered by Anjelica Raposo 1 year ago.

placed salt in a pitcher of water then stir it up. Tie a paper clip on the tip of a string- then on a pencil to hold the clip purely severe enuff interior the saltwater so it does not touch the backside of the glass, then enable it dry out.dries swifter if close to a heater , yet no longer on one. Answered by Bernie Harston 1 year ago.


HELP!! Can hermit crabs live in iron containers? PLEASE!!!?
I have one medium sized hermit crab and i was wondering if i could put it in a soft iron container? I heard somewhere that its poisonous for them but i'm not sure! I wanted to do this because right now, the plastic container that shes in is small and the iron container is a bit bigger. Asked by Pamella Faught 1 year ago.

in this section from my research on hermit crab care I cover in brief a Harmits sensitivity to metal and metalic objects,the container you are suggesting would be harmful, but if you cannot afford a glass tank right now get a storage tub of adeguate sise, ten gallons is about right, cut holes in it for air circulation and to allow some excess humidity escape so the hermit does not get shell rot, do not wash out with chemicals or soap, but declorinated water, but this should help you, 4..The Importance of Clean Dechlorinated Water The water needs to be dechlorinated. The chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals in most tap, well or spring water can kill hermit crabs by causing the gills to blister (causing eventual suffocation). Aging the water will remove the chlorine, but not the chloramines, so dechlorinator is a must if you use tap water, If you don't want to dechlorinate tap water, you can use spring water if you know it's treatment instead. However, make sure nothing has been added at the water source. For example, Dasani and other bottled water contains magnesium sulfate "for taste"that chemical is bad for crab. Fresh dechlorinated water in a non metallic bowl shallow enough for the smallest crab to safely escape is ideal,some use a natural sea sponge placed in the bowl so all can can exit safely. While the "Caribbean" or "Purple Pincher" (Coenobita clypeatus) do perfectly fine with only fresh water, but it is nice to have a bowl of salt water for them to choose from.The Eastern Pacific Land Hermit come from areas that have little fresh water available and have become acostumed to drink only salt water.Ecuadorian Hermit Crabs require both brackish and salt water. Salt used for salt water aquariums does not contain harmful Iodine added to table salt and has beneficial minerals needed for goood health and shell growth The use of a specific gravity meter to measure salinity will make mixing water for different species of crabs a breeze, they are not expensive and are made of heavy plastic or glass. Pet bowls for crabs must be non metallic, it is best to play it safe with either cermaic or plastic bowls for use with either fresh and salt water too.For safety many put a natural sea sponge in the water bowl to aid in escape so they do not drown. Hermit Crabs started out as free swimming zoo plankton but as adults they will drown if left submerged. Allow enough standing water so hermits can fill their shells with water. Only wash their food and water dishes with dechlorinated water, never use soap. Answered by Zana Ruano 1 year ago.

Indeed, metal can be harmful for you hermit. You should get a 10 gallon aquarium and at least 1 more hermit crab. Make sure the substrate is deep enough to bury your largest crab twice. Please keep the temperature between 72 and 82 degrees and the humidity at least 70%. If you need anymore info, please look at the link listed under my sources. Answered by Nana Kleinfeld 1 year ago.

No, You shouldnt keep it in an iron container. You should get it a ten gal aquarium with a lid, heater, and enough playsand for him to completly burrow himself. He needs fresh water, and salt water. He needs to be kept humid, he needs things to climb on and to hide in. He needs extra shells. Google hermit crab care. Answered by Yong Borrego 1 year ago.


Acid-corrosiveness?
Could anyone plz give me the chemical reaction(equation) for the reaction of Nitric/sulfuric acids with materials such as rubber, plastic, wood, glass, iron, steel...etc...like common building materials, thank you very much Asked by Carylon Senta 1 year ago.

Concentrated acids can be kept in plastic and glass containers. However they will react with rubber, wood and most common metals except gold and platinium. Conc sulphuric acid is a very strong dehydrating agent. It extracts water molecules from anything that has water, like your flesh, sugar, hydrated crystals, etc. In the laboratory, normally dilute acids (2M solutions) are used. Dilute Hydrochloric and sulphuric acids reacts with metals (Groups 2, 3 and transition metals) with the evolution of hydrogen gas. But these dilute acids have no effect on copper onwards in the metal reactivity series. However dilute nitric acid react with the above metals to give water (instead of hydrogen), in addition to that , brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Typical reactions: Dil hydrochloric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium chloride salt + hydrogen Dil sulphuric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium sulphate salt + hydrogen Dil nitric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium nitrate salt + water + brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Also gold and platinium are not affected by any concentrated acid. However gold can react with aqua regia, which is a mixture of 1 part conc nitric acid and 3 parts conc hydrochloric acid to give a yellow solution of gold (III) nitrate and gold (III) chloride + water + brown nitrogen dioxide. Come typical equations are: H2S04 + Mg -----> MgSO4 + H2 4HNO3 + Mg -----> Mg(NO3)2 + 2H2O + 2NO2 A point of interest here: Although copper does not react with dilute hydrochloric acid or sulphuric acid, it can react with dilute nitric acid. This fact is seldom stressed by teachers in the class room. You need to warm the mixture slightly to activate the reaction, to produce copper (II) nitrate solution, water and brown nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Answered by Belva Borruso 1 year ago.


What are fireworks made out of?
i was kind of wondering what the specific things were that made the color. out of curiosity. i wish i remembered from high school Asked by Emogene Mackedanz 1 year ago.

Gunpowder (sulpher, charcoal,nitrate) fuses, cardboard or plastic containers and dividers. Colors are made by various chemicals added to the gunpowder like iron oxide for red, copper sulfate for blue or magnesium for bright white. Answered by April Velarde 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Made Of Answered by Lucille Woullard 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Answered by Scarlet Bern 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what are fireworks made out of? i was wondering this and asked a friend who claimed he was a chemistry major. his response? cardboard a wick and some other stuff. i remember back in high school chem we burned certain metals to make colors. is this what makes fireworks? Answered by Julietta Theam 1 year ago.

Fireworks are generally made of packaging (some kind of cardboard), a mechanical mixture of fuel and oxidizer (similar in function to gunpowder), a binder (paste to hold the chemicals together), and some metallic substance that burns brightly and a characteristic color (aluminum for white, calcium for orange, strontium for red, barium for green, potassium for purple, etc). Answered by Yvone Teissedre 1 year ago.

Fireworks are made of gunpowder and paper. Answered by Barney Mehring 1 year ago.

Fireworks are mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter (potassium nitrate) make up the gunpowder and then other additives similar to what you used in chemistry clas provide the color. Answered by Carletta Mcgoon 1 year ago.

They contain gun powder and creamy alfredo sauce..-wendy Answered by Angelina Gherman 1 year ago.

gun powder would be quite important too. Answered by Consuela Hotalen 1 year ago.


What is media used for invitro propagation of tumeric and whatare the applications for tumeric?
what are the application for tumeric and what are the details for invtro propagation of tumeric. Asked by Brinda Mcclard 1 year ago.

Plant tissue culture involves the growing of plant tissue from plant material taken from a source plant.It has been found that plants can reproduce whole plants from fragments of plant material when given a nutrient media capable of supporting growth and appropriate hormone control. The nutrient media used in plant tissue culture is an agar media with macro and micro nutrients dissolved in it.Unlike plants growing from a seed, tissue cultures require a supply of carbon in an organic form such as sugars.They also require amino acids,B vitamins and growth hormones .The constituents of the media will vary with the plant material being cultured. Plant tissue culture can be used to clone plants and produce many identical plants for a particular market.This can be used when a new variety is grown and other methods of cultivation are too slow for the desired market.It can also be used if a stock plant has been infected and material taken from the plant that is not infected.The excised plant material can be grown on and any disease free plants grown on for propagation.Plant tissue culture is also of use in research for biochemists,geniticists,plant breeders and plant pathologists.Plant tissue culture has also proved more efficient in the production of secondary metabolites than the use of the parent plants in various instances and has been used in the commercial production of the napthoquinone pigment Shikonin.Plant tissue caulture has also been used in the production of flavours,sweeteners,natural colourants and pharmaceuticals.With the advent of gene insertion plant cells with gene material inserted can be regenerated using tissue culture to produce a whole new plant. Methods and Materials When taking plant material to grow on using plant tissue culture it is important to get the most appropriate material for the end product you are aiming for.Plant tissue has been shown to be totipotent,but different tissues will require different treatment to produce whole plants if that is the aim.Tissue that is dividing such as at the nodes and leaf axils,leaf peiole material are often used. Sharp cuts will decrease the amount of decaying material present,and decrease the possibility of infection.The use of a sharp scalpel is advised.Forceps are necessary to move the plant material to the growing media.The cutting should take place in a sterile environment and the growing media only exposed when the plant material is placed in it,after which it should be sealed. Forceps Scalpel Disinfectants-for surfaces,implements and plant material. Laminar Flow Cabinet Bunsen burner Containers-petri dishes,small clear plastic containers,glass jars. Growth media-appropriate to plant material being cultured Murashige Skoog Constituents Media mg/Litre Inorganic Ammonium Nitrate NH4NO3 1650 Potassium Nitrate KNO3 1900 Calcium Chloride CaCl2.2H2O 440 Magnesium Sulphate MgSO4.7H2O 370 KH2PO4 170 Potassium Iodide 0.83 H3BO3 6.2 Manganese Sulphate MnSO4.4H2O 22.3 Zinc Sulphate ZnSO4.7H2O 8.6 Na2Mo4.H2O 0.25 Copper Sulphate CuSO4.5H2O 0.025 Iron Sulphate FeSO4.7H2O 27.8 Na2EDTA.2H2O 37.3 Organic Inositol 100 Nicitinic Acid 0.5 Pyridoxine HCl 0.5 Thiamine HCl 0.1 Glycine 2 Sucrose 3% BVitamins Nicitinic acid Thiamine HCl Pyridoxine HCl Growth Hormones-Auxins, Benzyl Amino Purine Auxin-Indoleacetic acid Inositol Cytokinins Kinetin For growing plant tissue cultures on a suitable site is required which is clean,warm (20deg C) and there is adequate light. The source of the plant material is important as some plant tissue is better suited to tissue culture than others,the ability of plant material to grow and divide in vitro is known as totipotency,but different plant material will need different control to form new plant material.The plant material may form a new embryo,callous tissue or a whole plant depending on how it is looked after. Turmeric (Curcuma longa, also called tumeric or kunyit in some Asian countries[1]) is a spice commonly used in curries and other South Asian cuisine. Its active ingredient is curcumin. It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broth, and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron). It makes a poor fabric dye as it is not very lightfast. Turmeric, a representative of plant genus Curcuma, is a member of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. In Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is thought to have many healthful properties. It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease, cancer and liver disorders. Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian state of Maharashtra, is the largest and most important trading centre for turmeric in Asia or perhaps in the entire world Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) is used in product systems that are packaged to protect them from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water containing products. Over-colouring, such as in pickles, relishes and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading. Turmeric has found application in canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurts, yellow cakes, biscuits, popcorn-color, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatines, direct compression tablets, etc. In combination with Annatto (E160b) it has been used to colour cheeses, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. The medicinal properties of the turmeric have for millennia been known to the ancient Indians and have been expounded in the Ayurvedic texts. It is only in recent years that Western scientists have increasingly recognised the medicinal properties of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, "Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope," research activity into curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, is exploding. Two hundred and fifty-six curcumin papers were published in the past year according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Supplement sales have increased 35% from 2004, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health has four clinical trials underway to study curcumin treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer's, and colorectal cancer. A 2004 UCLA-Veterans Affairs study involving genetically altered mice suggests that curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, might inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients and also break up existing plaques. "Curcumin has been used for thousands of years as a safe anti-inflammatory in a variety of ailments as part of Indian traditional medicine," Gregory Cole, Professor of medicine and neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA said. Recent studies have shown that turmeric can be effective in fighting a number of STDs including chlamydia and gonorrhea. Investigations into the low incidence of colorectal cancer amongst ethnic groups with a large intake of curries compared with the indigenous population have suggested that some active ingredients of turmeric may have anti-cancer properties. Anti-tumoral effects against melanoma cells have been demonstrated [1]. Second-stage trials of a turmeric-based drug as a possible treatment for cancer are currently underway. However, according to recent research results [2], the component curcumin causes degradation of the human protein p53. p53 is responsible for removing damaged cells that are likely to become tumors, suggesting curcumin could accelerate tumor development. Consuming large doses is not recommended in cases of gallstones, obstructive jaundice, acute bilious colic and toxic liver disorders. Curry Pharmaceuticals, based in North Carolina, is studying the use of a curcumin cream for psoriasis treatment. Another company is already selling a cream based on curcumin called "Psoria-Gold," which shows anecdotal promise of treating the disease. A recent study involving mice has shown that turmeric slows the spread of breast cancer into lungs and other body parts, but also enhances the effect of taxol in reducing metastasis of breast cancer [3]. It is also said that turmeric can strengthen the blood-brain barrier against attacks that result from auto-immune diseases (such as Multiple sclerosis Turmeric is currently used in the formulation of some sun screens. Turmeric paste is used by Indian women to keep them free of superfluous hair. The Government of Thailand is funding a project to extract and isolate tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) from turmeric. THCs are colorless compounds that might have antioxidant and skin lightening properties and might be used to treat skin inflammations, making these compounds useful in cosmetics formulations. Answered by Bell Ashraf 1 year ago.

APPLICATIONS ARE as a condiment on hotdogs at weeny roasts...and tumeric has great anti oxident properties...its what makes those terrible yellow stains on a white tee shirt...etc etc Answered by Deanne Lasure 1 year ago.

Repeated question Answered by Ressie Landgren 1 year ago.


Help my water smells like sulfur!?
I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and... Asked by Elvina Leiper 1 year ago.

I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and all the faucets except the drinking water that comes from the fridge (assuming this is because of the filter). Also the neighbor mentioned they did work on the water lines recently but his water is fine. Answered by Taren Podaras 1 year ago.

I'd check with your neighbors to see if they have the same problems, and what remediation if any has been successful. The homeowners' association should be able to help too. If the problem seems to be limited to your house then the plumbing system is likely the problem. The source could be biological. There are bacteria that use sulfur for energy by changing sulfates (which are not particularly noticeable) into hydrogen sulfide (which smells like rotten eggs.) The source could be electrochemical involving the hot water heater. Most water heater tanks are made of metal which rusts, kind of an unfortunate characteristic for water container. To keep the tank from rusting a rod(s) of aluminum, zinc, or magnesium (or some alloy thereof) is put in the tank. It rusts in the place of the tank. Unfortunately, as the water heater ages, the process also starts to liberate hydrogen sulfide gas. I think some electric water heaters have plastic tanks, but generally the recovery time and operating cost are greater than for gas heaters. Since you mentioned the odor in both the hot and cold water this will only be a partial solution. There are a number of other options like special filtration, reverse osmosis. Plumbers in your area are probably familiar with the problem and how to deal with it. Answered by Rivka Riede 1 year ago.

You hit the respond on the top: it truly is sulfur in the water. First i might have it checked for any contaminates. as quickly as you have the outcomes you could extra advantageous than possibly have a plumber deploy a filtration gadget that treats the water before attending to the faucets and can be self cleansing. this might on no account be a type of diverse spun nylon complete abode filters or maybe the committed under sink clear out. the value will on no account be low value yet I even have showered in properties like that, and it truly stinks at an identical time as showering or flushing the bathroom. Answered by Vergie Vanzile 1 year ago.

Contact the city again and tell them all of this (the neighbor thing etc) and if they still refuse help then contact a professional to check things out and see what they think. If it's all clear ask what you can do to reduce the smell. If it's not have them fix it and/or bring the city to court if it's something real bad. Also try to put filters on your faucets. Answered by Deandra Dewing 1 year ago.


What is glass made out of?
What is glass made out of? Asked by Angelo Bielecki 1 year ago.

Common raw materials used for making glass consist of the following: •Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). •Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. •Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. •Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). •Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. •Other materials may be used as colorants, refining agents or to adjust the physical and chemical properties of the glass. There are many different types of glass. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. In the scientific sense, the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (as well as melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. An amorphous solid is a solid material in which there is no long-range order of the positions of the atoms. Conversely, solids in which long-range atomic order is present are called crystalline solids or morphous. Many glasses contain silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2) as their main component and glass former. Besides common silica-based glasses, many other inorganic and organic materials may also form glasses, including plastics (e.g., acrylic glass), carbon, metals, carbon dioxide (amorphous carbonia: a-CO2), phosphates, borates, chalcogenides, fluorides, germanates (glasses based on GeO2), tellurites (glasses based on TeO2), antimonates (glasses based on Sb2O3), arsenates (glasses based on As2O3), titanates (glasses based on TiO2), tantalates (glasses based on Ta2O5), nitrates, carbonates and many other substances. Besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. The following is a list of chemical compositions (with weight percentage values for each chemical) of various types of common glass: •Soda-lime glass (for containers): 74 SiO2, 13 Na2O, 10.5 CaO, 1.3 Al2O3, 0.3 K2O, 0.2 SO3, 0.2 MgO, 0.01 TiO2, 0.04 Fe2O3 •Borosilicate (low expansion, similar to Pyrex, Duran): 81 SiO2, 12.5 B2O3, 4 Na2O, 2.2 Al2O3, 0.02 CaO, 0.06 K2O •Glass wool (for thermal insulation): 63 SiO2, 16 Na2O, 8 CaO, 3.3 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 3.5 MgO, 0.8 K2O, 0.3 Fe2O3, 0.2 SO3 •Special optical glass (similar to Lead crystal): 41.2 SiO2, 34.1 PbO, 12.4 BaO, 6.3 ZnO, 3.0 K2O, 2.5 CaO, 0.35 Sb2O3, 0.2 As2O3 •Fused silica: SiO2 •Germania glass: GeO2 •Germanium selenide glass: GeSe2 Answered by Brett Arrick 1 year ago.

What Is Glass Made Of Answered by Lance Vantrease 1 year ago.

Sand At 1500 degrees the sand will melt. At 2500 degrees it will change to glass, but very hot glass that is considered a liquid still. If you let it sit then it will harden to glass Answered by Latonya Quartaro 1 year ago.

Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). # Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. # Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. # Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). # Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. Answered by Stefan Pascanik 1 year ago.

Sand, soda ash, slats, dolomite, colorants Answered by Marcella Thorington 1 year ago.

sand, recycled glass and sometimes soda ash Answered by Tiesha Cosmo 1 year ago.

Silicon and oxygen. SiO2 Answered by Ryan Koepke 1 year ago.

complex issue. research with google or bing. just that can help! Answered by Thalia Riggan 1 year ago.


How to get Magnesium Sulfate crystals out of container?
I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed.Also i would like to put a layer of something on the... Asked by Torrie Littlehale 1 year ago.

I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed. Also i would like to put a layer of something on the crystals to prevent corrosion from water moisture and to strengthen it. I was thinking of something like polyurethane so protect it. Answered by Micah Gray 1 year ago.

Having made MgSO4 crystals with classes for over 30 years, it would appear that you have just crystallised too much and it has jammed in the container. They are unlikely to be removed without damage! My classes have always been able to get the long needle shaped crystals without such problems. My advice is redissolve the crystals in the minimum of luke warm water (not hot, nor boiling) in a glass container then allow to cool slowly then let evaporate slowly eg cloth or filter paper over the top. When you get some nice crystals, filter them off. Do not wait until you have a big solid chunk. Since the crystals are neither deliquescent nor hygroscopic, there is no need to treat them further. Just store in eg a stoppered test tube. Answered by Rossie Kennell 1 year ago.

placed salt in a pitcher of water then stir it up. Tie a paper clip on the tip of a string- then on a pencil to hold the clip purely severe enuff interior the saltwater so it does not touch the backside of the glass, then enable it dry out.dries swifter if close to a heater , yet no longer on one. Answered by Kris Yeskey 1 year ago.


HELP!! Can hermit crabs live in iron containers? PLEASE!!!?
I have one medium sized hermit crab and i was wondering if i could put it in a soft iron container? I heard somewhere that its poisonous for them but i'm not sure! I wanted to do this because right now, the plastic container that shes in is small and the iron container is a bit bigger. Asked by Francesca Saeler 1 year ago.

in this section from my research on hermit crab care I cover in brief a Harmits sensitivity to metal and metalic objects,the container you are suggesting would be harmful, but if you cannot afford a glass tank right now get a storage tub of adeguate sise, ten gallons is about right, cut holes in it for air circulation and to allow some excess humidity escape so the hermit does not get shell rot, do not wash out with chemicals or soap, but declorinated water, but this should help you, 4..The Importance of Clean Dechlorinated Water The water needs to be dechlorinated. The chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals in most tap, well or spring water can kill hermit crabs by causing the gills to blister (causing eventual suffocation). Aging the water will remove the chlorine, but not the chloramines, so dechlorinator is a must if you use tap water, If you don't want to dechlorinate tap water, you can use spring water if you know it's treatment instead. However, make sure nothing has been added at the water source. For example, Dasani and other bottled water contains magnesium sulfate "for taste"that chemical is bad for crab. Fresh dechlorinated water in a non metallic bowl shallow enough for the smallest crab to safely escape is ideal,some use a natural sea sponge placed in the bowl so all can can exit safely. While the "Caribbean" or "Purple Pincher" (Coenobita clypeatus) do perfectly fine with only fresh water, but it is nice to have a bowl of salt water for them to choose from.The Eastern Pacific Land Hermit come from areas that have little fresh water available and have become acostumed to drink only salt water.Ecuadorian Hermit Crabs require both brackish and salt water. Salt used for salt water aquariums does not contain harmful Iodine added to table salt and has beneficial minerals needed for goood health and shell growth The use of a specific gravity meter to measure salinity will make mixing water for different species of crabs a breeze, they are not expensive and are made of heavy plastic or glass. Pet bowls for crabs must be non metallic, it is best to play it safe with either cermaic or plastic bowls for use with either fresh and salt water too.For safety many put a natural sea sponge in the water bowl to aid in escape so they do not drown. Hermit Crabs started out as free swimming zoo plankton but as adults they will drown if left submerged. Allow enough standing water so hermits can fill their shells with water. Only wash their food and water dishes with dechlorinated water, never use soap. Answered by Betsy Honkanen 1 year ago.

Indeed, metal can be harmful for you hermit. You should get a 10 gallon aquarium and at least 1 more hermit crab. Make sure the substrate is deep enough to bury your largest crab twice. Please keep the temperature between 72 and 82 degrees and the humidity at least 70%. If you need anymore info, please look at the link listed under my sources. Answered by Coletta Augustyniak 1 year ago.

No, You shouldnt keep it in an iron container. You should get it a ten gal aquarium with a lid, heater, and enough playsand for him to completly burrow himself. He needs fresh water, and salt water. He needs to be kept humid, he needs things to climb on and to hide in. He needs extra shells. Google hermit crab care. Answered by Kayla Waycaster 1 year ago.


Acid-corrosiveness?
Could anyone plz give me the chemical reaction(equation) for the reaction of Nitric/sulfuric acids with materials such as rubber, plastic, wood, glass, iron, steel...etc...like common building materials, thank you very much Asked by Linh Rasnic 1 year ago.

Concentrated acids can be kept in plastic and glass containers. However they will react with rubber, wood and most common metals except gold and platinium. Conc sulphuric acid is a very strong dehydrating agent. It extracts water molecules from anything that has water, like your flesh, sugar, hydrated crystals, etc. In the laboratory, normally dilute acids (2M solutions) are used. Dilute Hydrochloric and sulphuric acids reacts with metals (Groups 2, 3 and transition metals) with the evolution of hydrogen gas. But these dilute acids have no effect on copper onwards in the metal reactivity series. However dilute nitric acid react with the above metals to give water (instead of hydrogen), in addition to that , brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Typical reactions: Dil hydrochloric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium chloride salt + hydrogen Dil sulphuric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium sulphate salt + hydrogen Dil nitric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium nitrate salt + water + brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Also gold and platinium are not affected by any concentrated acid. However gold can react with aqua regia, which is a mixture of 1 part conc nitric acid and 3 parts conc hydrochloric acid to give a yellow solution of gold (III) nitrate and gold (III) chloride + water + brown nitrogen dioxide. Come typical equations are: H2S04 + Mg -----> MgSO4 + H2 4HNO3 + Mg -----> Mg(NO3)2 + 2H2O + 2NO2 A point of interest here: Although copper does not react with dilute hydrochloric acid or sulphuric acid, it can react with dilute nitric acid. This fact is seldom stressed by teachers in the class room. You need to warm the mixture slightly to activate the reaction, to produce copper (II) nitrate solution, water and brown nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Answered by Yun Peressini 1 year ago.


What are fireworks made out of?
i was kind of wondering what the specific things were that made the color. out of curiosity. i wish i remembered from high school Asked by Gricelda Gnerre 1 year ago.

Gunpowder (sulpher, charcoal,nitrate) fuses, cardboard or plastic containers and dividers. Colors are made by various chemicals added to the gunpowder like iron oxide for red, copper sulfate for blue or magnesium for bright white. Answered by Essie Honeck 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Made Of Answered by Tyron Demontigny 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Answered by Maida Redondo 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what are fireworks made out of? i was wondering this and asked a friend who claimed he was a chemistry major. his response? cardboard a wick and some other stuff. i remember back in high school chem we burned certain metals to make colors. is this what makes fireworks? Answered by Deborah Oxton 1 year ago.

Fireworks are generally made of packaging (some kind of cardboard), a mechanical mixture of fuel and oxidizer (similar in function to gunpowder), a binder (paste to hold the chemicals together), and some metallic substance that burns brightly and a characteristic color (aluminum for white, calcium for orange, strontium for red, barium for green, potassium for purple, etc). Answered by Lauren Rosacker 1 year ago.

Fireworks are made of gunpowder and paper. Answered by Laurene Villena 1 year ago.

Fireworks are mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter (potassium nitrate) make up the gunpowder and then other additives similar to what you used in chemistry clas provide the color. Answered by Jerrell Judd 1 year ago.

They contain gun powder and creamy alfredo sauce..-wendy Answered by Kori Rudzik 1 year ago.

gun powder would be quite important too. Answered by Ashley Ronfeldt 1 year ago.


What is media used for invitro propagation of tumeric and whatare the applications for tumeric?
what are the application for tumeric and what are the details for invtro propagation of tumeric. Asked by Lesli Leanard 1 year ago.

Plant tissue culture involves the growing of plant tissue from plant material taken from a source plant.It has been found that plants can reproduce whole plants from fragments of plant material when given a nutrient media capable of supporting growth and appropriate hormone control. The nutrient media used in plant tissue culture is an agar media with macro and micro nutrients dissolved in it.Unlike plants growing from a seed, tissue cultures require a supply of carbon in an organic form such as sugars.They also require amino acids,B vitamins and growth hormones .The constituents of the media will vary with the plant material being cultured. Plant tissue culture can be used to clone plants and produce many identical plants for a particular market.This can be used when a new variety is grown and other methods of cultivation are too slow for the desired market.It can also be used if a stock plant has been infected and material taken from the plant that is not infected.The excised plant material can be grown on and any disease free plants grown on for propagation.Plant tissue culture is also of use in research for biochemists,geniticists,plant breeders and plant pathologists.Plant tissue culture has also proved more efficient in the production of secondary metabolites than the use of the parent plants in various instances and has been used in the commercial production of the napthoquinone pigment Shikonin.Plant tissue caulture has also been used in the production of flavours,sweeteners,natural colourants and pharmaceuticals.With the advent of gene insertion plant cells with gene material inserted can be regenerated using tissue culture to produce a whole new plant. Methods and Materials When taking plant material to grow on using plant tissue culture it is important to get the most appropriate material for the end product you are aiming for.Plant tissue has been shown to be totipotent,but different tissues will require different treatment to produce whole plants if that is the aim.Tissue that is dividing such as at the nodes and leaf axils,leaf peiole material are often used. Sharp cuts will decrease the amount of decaying material present,and decrease the possibility of infection.The use of a sharp scalpel is advised.Forceps are necessary to move the plant material to the growing media.The cutting should take place in a sterile environment and the growing media only exposed when the plant material is placed in it,after which it should be sealed. Forceps Scalpel Disinfectants-for surfaces,implements and plant material. Laminar Flow Cabinet Bunsen burner Containers-petri dishes,small clear plastic containers,glass jars. Growth media-appropriate to plant material being cultured Murashige Skoog Constituents Media mg/Litre Inorganic Ammonium Nitrate NH4NO3 1650 Potassium Nitrate KNO3 1900 Calcium Chloride CaCl2.2H2O 440 Magnesium Sulphate MgSO4.7H2O 370 KH2PO4 170 Potassium Iodide 0.83 H3BO3 6.2 Manganese Sulphate MnSO4.4H2O 22.3 Zinc Sulphate ZnSO4.7H2O 8.6 Na2Mo4.H2O 0.25 Copper Sulphate CuSO4.5H2O 0.025 Iron Sulphate FeSO4.7H2O 27.8 Na2EDTA.2H2O 37.3 Organic Inositol 100 Nicitinic Acid 0.5 Pyridoxine HCl 0.5 Thiamine HCl 0.1 Glycine 2 Sucrose 3% BVitamins Nicitinic acid Thiamine HCl Pyridoxine HCl Growth Hormones-Auxins, Benzyl Amino Purine Auxin-Indoleacetic acid Inositol Cytokinins Kinetin For growing plant tissue cultures on a suitable site is required which is clean,warm (20deg C) and there is adequate light. The source of the plant material is important as some plant tissue is better suited to tissue culture than others,the ability of plant material to grow and divide in vitro is known as totipotency,but different plant material will need different control to form new plant material.The plant material may form a new embryo,callous tissue or a whole plant depending on how it is looked after. Turmeric (Curcuma longa, also called tumeric or kunyit in some Asian countries[1]) is a spice commonly used in curries and other South Asian cuisine. Its active ingredient is curcumin. It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broth, and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron). It makes a poor fabric dye as it is not very lightfast. Turmeric, a representative of plant genus Curcuma, is a member of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. In Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is thought to have many healthful properties. It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease, cancer and liver disorders. Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian state of Maharashtra, is the largest and most important trading centre for turmeric in Asia or perhaps in the entire world Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) is used in product systems that are packaged to protect them from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water containing products. Over-colouring, such as in pickles, relishes and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading. Turmeric has found application in canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurts, yellow cakes, biscuits, popcorn-color, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatines, direct compression tablets, etc. In combination with Annatto (E160b) it has been used to colour cheeses, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. The medicinal properties of the turmeric have for millennia been known to the ancient Indians and have been expounded in the Ayurvedic texts. It is only in recent years that Western scientists have increasingly recognised the medicinal properties of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, "Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope," research activity into curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, is exploding. Two hundred and fifty-six curcumin papers were published in the past year according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Supplement sales have increased 35% from 2004, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health has four clinical trials underway to study curcumin treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer's, and colorectal cancer. A 2004 UCLA-Veterans Affairs study involving genetically altered mice suggests that curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, might inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients and also break up existing plaques. "Curcumin has been used for thousands of years as a safe anti-inflammatory in a variety of ailments as part of Indian traditional medicine," Gregory Cole, Professor of medicine and neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA said. Recent studies have shown that turmeric can be effective in fighting a number of STDs including chlamydia and gonorrhea. Investigations into the low incidence of colorectal cancer amongst ethnic groups with a large intake of curries compared with the indigenous population have suggested that some active ingredients of turmeric may have anti-cancer properties. Anti-tumoral effects against melanoma cells have been demonstrated [1]. Second-stage trials of a turmeric-based drug as a possible treatment for cancer are currently underway. However, according to recent research results [2], the component curcumin causes degradation of the human protein p53. p53 is responsible for removing damaged cells that are likely to become tumors, suggesting curcumin could accelerate tumor development. Consuming large doses is not recommended in cases of gallstones, obstructive jaundice, acute bilious colic and toxic liver disorders. Curry Pharmaceuticals, based in North Carolina, is studying the use of a curcumin cream for psoriasis treatment. Another company is already selling a cream based on curcumin called "Psoria-Gold," which shows anecdotal promise of treating the disease. A recent study involving mice has shown that turmeric slows the spread of breast cancer into lungs and other body parts, but also enhances the effect of taxol in reducing metastasis of breast cancer [3]. It is also said that turmeric can strengthen the blood-brain barrier against attacks that result from auto-immune diseases (such as Multiple sclerosis Turmeric is currently used in the formulation of some sun screens. Turmeric paste is used by Indian women to keep them free of superfluous hair. The Government of Thailand is funding a project to extract and isolate tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) from turmeric. THCs are colorless compounds that might have antioxidant and skin lightening properties and might be used to treat skin inflammations, making these compounds useful in cosmetics formulations. Answered by Marcel Dake 1 year ago.

APPLICATIONS ARE as a condiment on hotdogs at weeny roasts...and tumeric has great anti oxident properties...its what makes those terrible yellow stains on a white tee shirt...etc etc Answered by Rheba Hutchison 1 year ago.

Repeated question Answered by Julianna Whelton 1 year ago.


Help my water smells like sulfur!?
I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and... Asked by Joesph Nahm 1 year ago.

I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and all the faucets except the drinking water that comes from the fridge (assuming this is because of the filter). Also the neighbor mentioned they did work on the water lines recently but his water is fine. Answered by Monte Waltersdorf 1 year ago.

I'd check with your neighbors to see if they have the same problems, and what remediation if any has been successful. The homeowners' association should be able to help too. If the problem seems to be limited to your house then the plumbing system is likely the problem. The source could be biological. There are bacteria that use sulfur for energy by changing sulfates (which are not particularly noticeable) into hydrogen sulfide (which smells like rotten eggs.) The source could be electrochemical involving the hot water heater. Most water heater tanks are made of metal which rusts, kind of an unfortunate characteristic for water container. To keep the tank from rusting a rod(s) of aluminum, zinc, or magnesium (or some alloy thereof) is put in the tank. It rusts in the place of the tank. Unfortunately, as the water heater ages, the process also starts to liberate hydrogen sulfide gas. I think some electric water heaters have plastic tanks, but generally the recovery time and operating cost are greater than for gas heaters. Since you mentioned the odor in both the hot and cold water this will only be a partial solution. There are a number of other options like special filtration, reverse osmosis. Plumbers in your area are probably familiar with the problem and how to deal with it. Answered by Rene Knapik 1 year ago.

You hit the respond on the top: it truly is sulfur in the water. First i might have it checked for any contaminates. as quickly as you have the outcomes you could extra advantageous than possibly have a plumber deploy a filtration gadget that treats the water before attending to the faucets and can be self cleansing. this might on no account be a type of diverse spun nylon complete abode filters or maybe the committed under sink clear out. the value will on no account be low value yet I even have showered in properties like that, and it truly stinks at an identical time as showering or flushing the bathroom. Answered by Marica Loshbaugh 1 year ago.

Contact the city again and tell them all of this (the neighbor thing etc) and if they still refuse help then contact a professional to check things out and see what they think. If it's all clear ask what you can do to reduce the smell. If it's not have them fix it and/or bring the city to court if it's something real bad. Also try to put filters on your faucets. Answered by Clyde Tinnes 1 year ago.


What is glass made out of?
What is glass made out of? Asked by Ayako Brinkhaus 1 year ago.

Common raw materials used for making glass consist of the following: •Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). •Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. •Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. •Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). •Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. •Other materials may be used as colorants, refining agents or to adjust the physical and chemical properties of the glass. There are many different types of glass. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. In the scientific sense, the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (as well as melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. An amorphous solid is a solid material in which there is no long-range order of the positions of the atoms. Conversely, solids in which long-range atomic order is present are called crystalline solids or morphous. Many glasses contain silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2) as their main component and glass former. Besides common silica-based glasses, many other inorganic and organic materials may also form glasses, including plastics (e.g., acrylic glass), carbon, metals, carbon dioxide (amorphous carbonia: a-CO2), phosphates, borates, chalcogenides, fluorides, germanates (glasses based on GeO2), tellurites (glasses based on TeO2), antimonates (glasses based on Sb2O3), arsenates (glasses based on As2O3), titanates (glasses based on TiO2), tantalates (glasses based on Ta2O5), nitrates, carbonates and many other substances. Besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. The following is a list of chemical compositions (with weight percentage values for each chemical) of various types of common glass: •Soda-lime glass (for containers): 74 SiO2, 13 Na2O, 10.5 CaO, 1.3 Al2O3, 0.3 K2O, 0.2 SO3, 0.2 MgO, 0.01 TiO2, 0.04 Fe2O3 •Borosilicate (low expansion, similar to Pyrex, Duran): 81 SiO2, 12.5 B2O3, 4 Na2O, 2.2 Al2O3, 0.02 CaO, 0.06 K2O •Glass wool (for thermal insulation): 63 SiO2, 16 Na2O, 8 CaO, 3.3 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 3.5 MgO, 0.8 K2O, 0.3 Fe2O3, 0.2 SO3 •Special optical glass (similar to Lead crystal): 41.2 SiO2, 34.1 PbO, 12.4 BaO, 6.3 ZnO, 3.0 K2O, 2.5 CaO, 0.35 Sb2O3, 0.2 As2O3 •Fused silica: SiO2 •Germania glass: GeO2 •Germanium selenide glass: GeSe2 Answered by Alexis Longhi 1 year ago.

What Is Glass Made Of Answered by Alexander Dinis 1 year ago.

Sand At 1500 degrees the sand will melt. At 2500 degrees it will change to glass, but very hot glass that is considered a liquid still. If you let it sit then it will harden to glass Answered by Johnna Alesna 1 year ago.

Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). # Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. # Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. # Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). # Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. Answered by Maureen Norseworthy 1 year ago.

Sand, soda ash, slats, dolomite, colorants Answered by Malia Sisavath 1 year ago.

sand, recycled glass and sometimes soda ash Answered by Theda Fell 1 year ago.

Silicon and oxygen. SiO2 Answered by Shaunda Hulsizer 1 year ago.

complex issue. research with google or bing. just that can help! Answered by Gretta Karz 1 year ago.


How to get Magnesium Sulfate crystals out of container?
I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed.Also i would like to put a layer of something on the... Asked by Josef Mastine 1 year ago.

I made these magnesium sulfate crystals and i drained out the excess solution and now i just have it sitting in a plastic container. I need to find a way of getting it out without breaking the crystals. The container is disposable so i can destroy it if needed. Also i would like to put a layer of something on the crystals to prevent corrosion from water moisture and to strengthen it. I was thinking of something like polyurethane so protect it. Answered by Dann Beulah 1 year ago.

Having made MgSO4 crystals with classes for over 30 years, it would appear that you have just crystallised too much and it has jammed in the container. They are unlikely to be removed without damage! My classes have always been able to get the long needle shaped crystals without such problems. My advice is redissolve the crystals in the minimum of luke warm water (not hot, nor boiling) in a glass container then allow to cool slowly then let evaporate slowly eg cloth or filter paper over the top. When you get some nice crystals, filter them off. Do not wait until you have a big solid chunk. Since the crystals are neither deliquescent nor hygroscopic, there is no need to treat them further. Just store in eg a stoppered test tube. Answered by Estelle Bonucchi 1 year ago.

placed salt in a pitcher of water then stir it up. Tie a paper clip on the tip of a string- then on a pencil to hold the clip purely severe enuff interior the saltwater so it does not touch the backside of the glass, then enable it dry out.dries swifter if close to a heater , yet no longer on one. Answered by Temple Brohl 1 year ago.


HELP!! Can hermit crabs live in iron containers? PLEASE!!!?
I have one medium sized hermit crab and i was wondering if i could put it in a soft iron container? I heard somewhere that its poisonous for them but i'm not sure! I wanted to do this because right now, the plastic container that shes in is small and the iron container is a bit bigger. Asked by Lucie Moak 1 year ago.

in this section from my research on hermit crab care I cover in brief a Harmits sensitivity to metal and metalic objects,the container you are suggesting would be harmful, but if you cannot afford a glass tank right now get a storage tub of adeguate sise, ten gallons is about right, cut holes in it for air circulation and to allow some excess humidity escape so the hermit does not get shell rot, do not wash out with chemicals or soap, but declorinated water, but this should help you, 4..The Importance of Clean Dechlorinated Water The water needs to be dechlorinated. The chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals in most tap, well or spring water can kill hermit crabs by causing the gills to blister (causing eventual suffocation). Aging the water will remove the chlorine, but not the chloramines, so dechlorinator is a must if you use tap water, If you don't want to dechlorinate tap water, you can use spring water if you know it's treatment instead. However, make sure nothing has been added at the water source. For example, Dasani and other bottled water contains magnesium sulfate "for taste"that chemical is bad for crab. Fresh dechlorinated water in a non metallic bowl shallow enough for the smallest crab to safely escape is ideal,some use a natural sea sponge placed in the bowl so all can can exit safely. While the "Caribbean" or "Purple Pincher" (Coenobita clypeatus) do perfectly fine with only fresh water, but it is nice to have a bowl of salt water for them to choose from.The Eastern Pacific Land Hermit come from areas that have little fresh water available and have become acostumed to drink only salt water.Ecuadorian Hermit Crabs require both brackish and salt water. Salt used for salt water aquariums does not contain harmful Iodine added to table salt and has beneficial minerals needed for goood health and shell growth The use of a specific gravity meter to measure salinity will make mixing water for different species of crabs a breeze, they are not expensive and are made of heavy plastic or glass. Pet bowls for crabs must be non metallic, it is best to play it safe with either cermaic or plastic bowls for use with either fresh and salt water too.For safety many put a natural sea sponge in the water bowl to aid in escape so they do not drown. Hermit Crabs started out as free swimming zoo plankton but as adults they will drown if left submerged. Allow enough standing water so hermits can fill their shells with water. Only wash their food and water dishes with dechlorinated water, never use soap. Answered by Kasey Digrazia 1 year ago.

Indeed, metal can be harmful for you hermit. You should get a 10 gallon aquarium and at least 1 more hermit crab. Make sure the substrate is deep enough to bury your largest crab twice. Please keep the temperature between 72 and 82 degrees and the humidity at least 70%. If you need anymore info, please look at the link listed under my sources. Answered by Annemarie Sports 1 year ago.

No, You shouldnt keep it in an iron container. You should get it a ten gal aquarium with a lid, heater, and enough playsand for him to completly burrow himself. He needs fresh water, and salt water. He needs to be kept humid, he needs things to climb on and to hide in. He needs extra shells. Google hermit crab care. Answered by Kerri Rover 1 year ago.


Acid-corrosiveness?
Could anyone plz give me the chemical reaction(equation) for the reaction of Nitric/sulfuric acids with materials such as rubber, plastic, wood, glass, iron, steel...etc...like common building materials, thank you very much Asked by Maureen Barnette 1 year ago.

Concentrated acids can be kept in plastic and glass containers. However they will react with rubber, wood and most common metals except gold and platinium. Conc sulphuric acid is a very strong dehydrating agent. It extracts water molecules from anything that has water, like your flesh, sugar, hydrated crystals, etc. In the laboratory, normally dilute acids (2M solutions) are used. Dilute Hydrochloric and sulphuric acids reacts with metals (Groups 2, 3 and transition metals) with the evolution of hydrogen gas. But these dilute acids have no effect on copper onwards in the metal reactivity series. However dilute nitric acid react with the above metals to give water (instead of hydrogen), in addition to that , brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Typical reactions: Dil hydrochloric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium chloride salt + hydrogen Dil sulphuric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium sulphate salt + hydrogen Dil nitric acid + magnesium ----> magnesium nitrate salt + water + brown nitrogen dioxide gas. Also gold and platinium are not affected by any concentrated acid. However gold can react with aqua regia, which is a mixture of 1 part conc nitric acid and 3 parts conc hydrochloric acid to give a yellow solution of gold (III) nitrate and gold (III) chloride + water + brown nitrogen dioxide. Come typical equations are: H2S04 + Mg -----> MgSO4 + H2 4HNO3 + Mg -----> Mg(NO3)2 + 2H2O + 2NO2 A point of interest here: Although copper does not react with dilute hydrochloric acid or sulphuric acid, it can react with dilute nitric acid. This fact is seldom stressed by teachers in the class room. You need to warm the mixture slightly to activate the reaction, to produce copper (II) nitrate solution, water and brown nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Answered by Rebbeca Winsky 1 year ago.


What are fireworks made out of?
i was kind of wondering what the specific things were that made the color. out of curiosity. i wish i remembered from high school Asked by Quinton Aguayo 1 year ago.

Gunpowder (sulpher, charcoal,nitrate) fuses, cardboard or plastic containers and dividers. Colors are made by various chemicals added to the gunpowder like iron oxide for red, copper sulfate for blue or magnesium for bright white. Answered by Anastasia Ediger 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Made Of Answered by Hilton Mangione 1 year ago.

What Are Fireworks Answered by Dwight Klamn 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what are fireworks made out of? i was wondering this and asked a friend who claimed he was a chemistry major. his response? cardboard a wick and some other stuff. i remember back in high school chem we burned certain metals to make colors. is this what makes fireworks? Answered by Hanna Vanevery 1 year ago.

Fireworks are generally made of packaging (some kind of cardboard), a mechanical mixture of fuel and oxidizer (similar in function to gunpowder), a binder (paste to hold the chemicals together), and some metallic substance that burns brightly and a characteristic color (aluminum for white, calcium for orange, strontium for red, barium for green, potassium for purple, etc). Answered by Karyl Hunger 1 year ago.

Fireworks are made of gunpowder and paper. Answered by Dorthey Kleiboeker 1 year ago.

Fireworks are mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter (potassium nitrate) make up the gunpowder and then other additives similar to what you used in chemistry clas provide the color. Answered by Shawnee Winterroth 1 year ago.

They contain gun powder and creamy alfredo sauce..-wendy Answered by Nubia Mavity 1 year ago.

gun powder would be quite important too. Answered by Alice Grassano 1 year ago.


What is media used for invitro propagation of tumeric and whatare the applications for tumeric?
what are the application for tumeric and what are the details for invtro propagation of tumeric. Asked by Eugene Schwartzkopf 1 year ago.

Plant tissue culture involves the growing of plant tissue from plant material taken from a source plant.It has been found that plants can reproduce whole plants from fragments of plant material when given a nutrient media capable of supporting growth and appropriate hormone control. The nutrient media used in plant tissue culture is an agar media with macro and micro nutrients dissolved in it.Unlike plants growing from a seed, tissue cultures require a supply of carbon in an organic form such as sugars.They also require amino acids,B vitamins and growth hormones .The constituents of the media will vary with the plant material being cultured. Plant tissue culture can be used to clone plants and produce many identical plants for a particular market.This can be used when a new variety is grown and other methods of cultivation are too slow for the desired market.It can also be used if a stock plant has been infected and material taken from the plant that is not infected.The excised plant material can be grown on and any disease free plants grown on for propagation.Plant tissue culture is also of use in research for biochemists,geniticists,plant breeders and plant pathologists.Plant tissue culture has also proved more efficient in the production of secondary metabolites than the use of the parent plants in various instances and has been used in the commercial production of the napthoquinone pigment Shikonin.Plant tissue caulture has also been used in the production of flavours,sweeteners,natural colourants and pharmaceuticals.With the advent of gene insertion plant cells with gene material inserted can be regenerated using tissue culture to produce a whole new plant. Methods and Materials When taking plant material to grow on using plant tissue culture it is important to get the most appropriate material for the end product you are aiming for.Plant tissue has been shown to be totipotent,but different tissues will require different treatment to produce whole plants if that is the aim.Tissue that is dividing such as at the nodes and leaf axils,leaf peiole material are often used. Sharp cuts will decrease the amount of decaying material present,and decrease the possibility of infection.The use of a sharp scalpel is advised.Forceps are necessary to move the plant material to the growing media.The cutting should take place in a sterile environment and the growing media only exposed when the plant material is placed in it,after which it should be sealed. Forceps Scalpel Disinfectants-for surfaces,implements and plant material. Laminar Flow Cabinet Bunsen burner Containers-petri dishes,small clear plastic containers,glass jars. Growth media-appropriate to plant material being cultured Murashige Skoog Constituents Media mg/Litre Inorganic Ammonium Nitrate NH4NO3 1650 Potassium Nitrate KNO3 1900 Calcium Chloride CaCl2.2H2O 440 Magnesium Sulphate MgSO4.7H2O 370 KH2PO4 170 Potassium Iodide 0.83 H3BO3 6.2 Manganese Sulphate MnSO4.4H2O 22.3 Zinc Sulphate ZnSO4.7H2O 8.6 Na2Mo4.H2O 0.25 Copper Sulphate CuSO4.5H2O 0.025 Iron Sulphate FeSO4.7H2O 27.8 Na2EDTA.2H2O 37.3 Organic Inositol 100 Nicitinic Acid 0.5 Pyridoxine HCl 0.5 Thiamine HCl 0.1 Glycine 2 Sucrose 3% BVitamins Nicitinic acid Thiamine HCl Pyridoxine HCl Growth Hormones-Auxins, Benzyl Amino Purine Auxin-Indoleacetic acid Inositol Cytokinins Kinetin For growing plant tissue cultures on a suitable site is required which is clean,warm (20deg C) and there is adequate light. The source of the plant material is important as some plant tissue is better suited to tissue culture than others,the ability of plant material to grow and divide in vitro is known as totipotency,but different plant material will need different control to form new plant material.The plant material may form a new embryo,callous tissue or a whole plant depending on how it is looked after. Turmeric (Curcuma longa, also called tumeric or kunyit in some Asian countries[1]) is a spice commonly used in curries and other South Asian cuisine. Its active ingredient is curcumin. It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broth, and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron). It makes a poor fabric dye as it is not very lightfast. Turmeric, a representative of plant genus Curcuma, is a member of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. In Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is thought to have many healthful properties. It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease, cancer and liver disorders. Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian state of Maharashtra, is the largest and most important trading centre for turmeric in Asia or perhaps in the entire world Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) is used in product systems that are packaged to protect them from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water containing products. Over-colouring, such as in pickles, relishes and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading. Turmeric has found application in canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurts, yellow cakes, biscuits, popcorn-color, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatines, direct compression tablets, etc. In combination with Annatto (E160b) it has been used to colour cheeses, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. The medicinal properties of the turmeric have for millennia been known to the ancient Indians and have been expounded in the Ayurvedic texts. It is only in recent years that Western scientists have increasingly recognised the medicinal properties of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, "Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope," research activity into curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, is exploding. Two hundred and fifty-six curcumin papers were published in the past year according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Supplement sales have increased 35% from 2004, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health has four clinical trials underway to study curcumin treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer's, and colorectal cancer. A 2004 UCLA-Veterans Affairs study involving genetically altered mice suggests that curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, might inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients and also break up existing plaques. "Curcumin has been used for thousands of years as a safe anti-inflammatory in a variety of ailments as part of Indian traditional medicine," Gregory Cole, Professor of medicine and neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA said. Recent studies have shown that turmeric can be effective in fighting a number of STDs including chlamydia and gonorrhea. Investigations into the low incidence of colorectal cancer amongst ethnic groups with a large intake of curries compared with the indigenous population have suggested that some active ingredients of turmeric may have anti-cancer properties. Anti-tumoral effects against melanoma cells have been demonstrated [1]. Second-stage trials of a turmeric-based drug as a possible treatment for cancer are currently underway. However, according to recent research results [2], the component curcumin causes degradation of the human protein p53. p53 is responsible for removing damaged cells that are likely to become tumors, suggesting curcumin could accelerate tumor development. Consuming large doses is not recommended in cases of gallstones, obstructive jaundice, acute bilious colic and toxic liver disorders. Curry Pharmaceuticals, based in North Carolina, is studying the use of a curcumin cream for psoriasis treatment. Another company is already selling a cream based on curcumin called "Psoria-Gold," which shows anecdotal promise of treating the disease. A recent study involving mice has shown that turmeric slows the spread of breast cancer into lungs and other body parts, but also enhances the effect of taxol in reducing metastasis of breast cancer [3]. It is also said that turmeric can strengthen the blood-brain barrier against attacks that result from auto-immune diseases (such as Multiple sclerosis Turmeric is currently used in the formulation of some sun screens. Turmeric paste is used by Indian women to keep them free of superfluous hair. The Government of Thailand is funding a project to extract and isolate tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) from turmeric. THCs are colorless compounds that might have antioxidant and skin lightening properties and might be used to treat skin inflammations, making these compounds useful in cosmetics formulations. Answered by Leandra Peres 1 year ago.

APPLICATIONS ARE as a condiment on hotdogs at weeny roasts...and tumeric has great anti oxident properties...its what makes those terrible yellow stains on a white tee shirt...etc etc Answered by Mika Bayle 1 year ago.

Repeated question Answered by Hertha Lutkins 1 year ago.


Help my water smells like sulfur!?
I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and... Asked by Annamarie Sandstrom 1 year ago.

I just moved into a new townhouse (about 3 maybe 4 years old) and there is an awful smell of sulfur from the water. We have city water but the city just says to run it. I have ran it for awhile now and it has made my whole house smell bad and I have to leave or I gag. Please help! it comes from the hot and cold and all the faucets except the drinking water that comes from the fridge (assuming this is because of the filter). Also the neighbor mentioned they did work on the water lines recently but his water is fine. Answered by Barb Novitski 1 year ago.

I'd check with your neighbors to see if they have the same problems, and what remediation if any has been successful. The homeowners' association should be able to help too. If the problem seems to be limited to your house then the plumbing system is likely the problem. The source could be biological. There are bacteria that use sulfur for energy by changing sulfates (which are not particularly noticeable) into hydrogen sulfide (which smells like rotten eggs.) The source could be electrochemical involving the hot water heater. Most water heater tanks are made of metal which rusts, kind of an unfortunate characteristic for water container. To keep the tank from rusting a rod(s) of aluminum, zinc, or magnesium (or some alloy thereof) is put in the tank. It rusts in the place of the tank. Unfortunately, as the water heater ages, the process also starts to liberate hydrogen sulfide gas. I think some electric water heaters have plastic tanks, but generally the recovery time and operating cost are greater than for gas heaters. Since you mentioned the odor in both the hot and cold water this will only be a partial solution. There are a number of other options like special filtration, reverse osmosis. Plumbers in your area are probably familiar with the problem and how to deal with it. Answered by Madeline Haughey 1 year ago.

You hit the respond on the top: it truly is sulfur in the water. First i might have it checked for any contaminates. as quickly as you have the outcomes you could extra advantageous than possibly have a plumber deploy a filtration gadget that treats the water before attending to the faucets and can be self cleansing. this might on no account be a type of diverse spun nylon complete abode filters or maybe the committed under sink clear out. the value will on no account be low value yet I even have showered in properties like that, and it truly stinks at an identical time as showering or flushing the bathroom. Answered by Porsche Hochstetler 1 year ago.

Contact the city again and tell them all of this (the neighbor thing etc) and if they still refuse help then contact a professional to check things out and see what they think. If it's all clear ask what you can do to reduce the smell. If it's not have them fix it and/or bring the city to court if it's something real bad. Also try to put filters on your faucets. Answered by Stefanie Civatte 1 year ago.


What is glass made out of?
What is glass made out of? Asked by Sang Kaleiwahea 1 year ago.

Common raw materials used for making glass consist of the following: •Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). •Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. •Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. •Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). •Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. •Other materials may be used as colorants, refining agents or to adjust the physical and chemical properties of the glass. There are many different types of glass. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. In the scientific sense, the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (as well as melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. An amorphous solid is a solid material in which there is no long-range order of the positions of the atoms. Conversely, solids in which long-range atomic order is present are called crystalline solids or morphous. Many glasses contain silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2) as their main component and glass former. Besides common silica-based glasses, many other inorganic and organic materials may also form glasses, including plastics (e.g., acrylic glass), carbon, metals, carbon dioxide (amorphous carbonia: a-CO2), phosphates, borates, chalcogenides, fluorides, germanates (glasses based on GeO2), tellurites (glasses based on TeO2), antimonates (glasses based on Sb2O3), arsenates (glasses based on As2O3), titanates (glasses based on TiO2), tantalates (glasses based on Ta2O5), nitrates, carbonates and many other substances. Besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. The following is a list of chemical compositions (with weight percentage values for each chemical) of various types of common glass: •Soda-lime glass (for containers): 74 SiO2, 13 Na2O, 10.5 CaO, 1.3 Al2O3, 0.3 K2O, 0.2 SO3, 0.2 MgO, 0.01 TiO2, 0.04 Fe2O3 •Borosilicate (low expansion, similar to Pyrex, Duran): 81 SiO2, 12.5 B2O3, 4 Na2O, 2.2 Al2O3, 0.02 CaO, 0.06 K2O •Glass wool (for thermal insulation): 63 SiO2, 16 Na2O, 8 CaO, 3.3 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 3.5 MgO, 0.8 K2O, 0.3 Fe2O3, 0.2 SO3 •Special optical glass (similar to Lead crystal): 41.2 SiO2, 34.1 PbO, 12.4 BaO, 6.3 ZnO, 3.0 K2O, 2.5 CaO, 0.35 Sb2O3, 0.2 As2O3 •Fused silica: SiO2 •Germania glass: GeO2 •Germanium selenide glass: GeSe2 Answered by Audra Dondlinger 1 year ago.

What Is Glass Made Of Answered by Francis Gamello 1 year ago.

Sand At 1500 degrees the sand will melt. At 2500 degrees it will change to glass, but very hot glass that is considered a liquid still. If you let it sit then it will harden to glass Answered by Lenna Vandenheuvel 1 year ago.

Sand: finely divided rock and mineral particles, typically high in silica (silicon dioxide: SiO2). # Soda ash: sodium carbonate: Na2CO3. # Dolomite: calcium magnesium carbonate: CaMg(CO3)2. # Limestone: a sedimentary rock composed largely of the mineral calcite (calcium carbonate: CaCO3). # Salt cake: sodium sulfate, the sodium salt of sulfuric acid: Na2SO4. Answered by Gwyn Peppard 1 year ago.

Sand, soda ash, slats, dolomite, colorants Answered by Kory Marsico 1 year ago.

sand, recycled glass and sometimes soda ash Answered by Micha Molleker 1 year ago.

Silicon and oxygen. SiO2 Answered by Stella Bocklund 1 year ago.

complex issue. research with google or bing. just that can help! Answered by Keshia Lueras 1 year ago.


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