Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019316/001.

Names and composition

"MAGNESIUM SULFATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MAGNESIUM SULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019316/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
019316/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 1GM per 2ML (500MG per ML)
019316/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 10GM per 20ML (500MG per ML)
019316/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 25GM per 50ML (500MG per ML)
075151/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
202411/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 10GM per 20ML (500MG per ML)
206039/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019316/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
019316/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 10GM per 20ML (500MG per ML)
019316/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 25GM per 50ML (500MG per ML)
020309/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 100ML (40MG per ML)
020309/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 50ML (80MG per ML)
020309/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 50ML (40MG per ML)
020309/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 500ML (40MG per ML)
020309/005 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40GM per 1000ML(40MG per ML)
020488/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per 100ML
020488/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 100ML
075151/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
202411/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 10GM per 20ML (500MG per ML)
206039/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE MAGNESIUM SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5GM per 10ML (500MG per ML)
206485/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 100ML (40MG per ML)
206485/002 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4GM per 50ML (80MG per ML)
206485/003 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per 50ML (40MG per ML)
206485/004 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20GM per 500ML (40MG per ML)
206485/005 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40GM per 1000ML (40MG per ML)
206486/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per 100ML
207349/001 MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE 5% IN PLASTIC CONTAINER MAGNESIUM SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per 100ML

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Answered questions

What is magnesium sulfate?
Asked by Precious Mirabile 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulphate is MgSO4. One molecule of magnesium (Mg) is bound to one sulphate molecule (SO4). S is sulfur and O is oxygen. Four oxygen atoms and one sulfur atom make up the sulphate molecule (SO4). Magnesium sulphate is also known as Epsom's Salt and that is a common laxative. Answered by Burl Steigerwalt 2 years ago.

it may be a laxitive but it is not safe to take in large quantities - small controlled quanties is possibly okay Answered by Rana Mcentire 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulfate?
Magnesium sulfate, MgSO4, is added to 445 mL of 0.050 M sodium hydroxide, NaOH, until a precipitate just forms. How many grams of magnesium sulfate were added? Assume that the volume of the solution is not changed significantly by the addition of magnesium sulfate. Asked by Leila Mckinzie 2 years ago.

I don't know the answer I just know that Magnesium sulfate is the main ingredient in Milk of Magnesia- did you know that? Its also is Epsom's salts- I think they should just call it Magnesium salts instead! And one more thing.... you probably didn't know... people can get an injection of Magnesium sulfate (in a clear liquid vile form) for many illnesses. Most specifically it can reverse a heart attack and it is sometimes given to heart attack victims. But when injected they have to mix it with Lidocaine cause it burns without it! Jeez! ... I never realized I knew so much about Magnesium Sulfate until i swung by to answer this question. I guess if you like knowing why a chemical is used it helps to make the math more interesting. Well sorry I don't have the calculation. I sucked at chemistry in college and its why I got out of the Pre med! Just hated the math! Good Luck! I am sure there's a math geek out there whose got the answer for you but its not me! Answered by Bennie Hevey 2 years ago.

1.32g MgSO4 + 2NaOH --> Mg(OH)2 + Na2SO4 1)means that 1 mol of MgSO4 reacts with 2 moles of NaOH 2)find the mole no. of NaOH, n=MV/1000 3)n = 0.022 mol 4)this means that 0.022 mol of NaOH reacts with 0.011 mol of MgSO4 5)find the molar mass of MgSO4, 0.011x(24+32+64) = 1.32g Answered by Shavon Venuto 2 years ago.


Percent of water in ferrous sulfate heptahydrate?
Asked by Lynette Plessner 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulfate (or magnesium sulphate) is a chemical compound containing magnesium, sulfur and oxygen, with the formula MgSO4. It is often encountered as the heptahydrate epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O), commonly called Epsom salt, from the town of Epsom in Surrey, England, where the salt was distilled from the springs that arise where the porous chalk of the North Downs meets non-porous London clay. Another hydrate form is kieserite. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is used as a drying agent. Since the anhydrous form is hygroscopic (readily absorbs water from the air) and is therefore difficult to weigh accurately, the hydrate is often preferred when preparing solutions, for example in medical preparations. Epsom salt has been traditionally used as a component of bath salts. Contents [hide] 1 Properties 2 Hydrates 3 Occurrence 4 Applications 4.1 Medical use 5 See also 6 References [edit] Properties Magnesium sulfate is the primary substance that causes the absorption of sound in seawater.[1] Absorption, in this case, means the conversion of acoustic energy to heat energy. The conversion is a strong function of frequency. Lower frequencies are less affected by the salt, so that the acoustic energy travels much farther in the ocean. Boric acid also contributes to absorption; but the most abundant salt in seawater, sodium chloride, has no known effect on sound absorption. [edit] Hydrates Almost all known mineralogical forms of MgSO4 occur as hydrates. Epsomite is the natural analogue of "Epsom salt". Another heptahydrate, the copper-containing mineral alpersite (Mg,Cu)SO4·7H2O,[2] was also recently recognized. Both are however not the highest known hydrates of MgSO4, due to the recent terrestrial find of meridianiite, MgSO4·11H2O, which is thought to also occur on Mars. Hexahydrite is the next lower (6) hydrate. Three next lower hydrates - pentahydrite (5), starkeyite (4) and especially sanderite (2) are more rarely found. Kieserite is a monohydrate and is common among evaporitic deposits. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate was reported from some burning coal dumps, but never treated as a mineral. The pH of hydrates is average 6.0 (5.5 to 6.5). Magnesium hydrates have, like Copper(II) sulfate, coordinated water.[3] [edit] Occurrence Magnesium sulfates are common minerals in geological environments. Their occurrence is mostly connected with supergene processes. Some of them are also important constituents of evaporitic potassium-magnesium (K-Mg) salts deposits. [edit] Applications In agriculture and gardening, magnesium sulfate is used to correct magnesium deficiency in soil, since magnesium is an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule. It is most commonly applied to potted plants, or to magnesium-hungry crops, such as potatoes, roses, tomatoes, peppers and cannabis. The advantage of magnesium sulfate over other magnesium soil amendments (such as dolomitic lime) is its high solubility. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is commonly used as a desiccant in organic synthesis due to its affinity for water. During work-up, an organic phase is saturated with magnesium sulfate until it no longer forms clumps. The hydrated solid is then removed with filtration or decantation. Other inorganic sulfate salts such as sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate may also be used in the same way. Magnesium sulfate is used in bath salts, particularly in flotation therapy where high concentrations raise the bath water's specific gravity, effectively making the body more buoyant. Traditionally, it is also used to prepare foot baths, intended to soothe sore feet. The reason for the inclusion of the salt is partially cosmetic: the increase in ionic strength prevents some of the temporary skin wrinkling ("pruning" – partial maceration) which is caused by prolonged immersion of extremities in pure water. However, magnesium sulfate can also be absorbed into the skin, reducing inflammation. It is also sometimes found in bottled mineral water, and accordingly is sometimes listed in the contents thereof.[citation needed] It may also be used as a coagulant for making tofu.[4] Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate is also used to maintain the magnesium concentration in marine Answered by Cassey Cardinali 2 years ago.

Atomic Weights: Fe=55.8, S=32, O=16, H=1, FeSO4=151.8, H2O=18, FeSO4*7H2O=263.8, 7H2O=126 126/263.8 x 100% = 44.8% Answered by Yolando Matusz 2 years ago.

FeSO4-7H2O The molar mass is (55.85 + 32.06 + 4(16.00) + 7(2 + 16)) = 151.9 + 126 = 277.9 g/mol The % H2O is (mass of water) / (molar mass of FeSO4-7H2O) x 100 % = (126 / 277.9) x 100 = 45.3 % Answered by Minta Mcnulty 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulphate for zits?
Could i use magnesium sulphate (a drawing agent) on my spots? there is a massive one on my chin which won't go away! Asked by Franklin Mcknight 2 years ago.

Magnesium Citrate may clear acne on the skin. Magnesium citrate works by drawing water from your skin and tissues. If you have oily skin, magnesium citrate helps clear away the excess moisture and give you a more balanced tone. You could try taking magnesium citrate as a supplement. Answered by Lewis Shirey 2 years ago.


What reacts with magnesium sulfate?
I need this for a science project Asked by Elidia Jaurigui 2 years ago.

dissolve the magnesium sulfate in water these are some magnesium compounds that should form easily Magnesium ammonium phosphate MgNH4PO4 , by adding some household ammonia & a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span Magnesium carbonate MgCO3 , by adding baking soda Magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH)2 , by adding an oven or drain cleaner Magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO4)2 , by adding a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span wear rubber glove & goggles, especially when working with an oven or drain cleaner Answered by Nidia Granda 2 years ago.


Why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate?
Asked by Charlesetta Offenberger 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate: Magnesium sulfate is a great drying agent. It has a high capacity, is complete in its drying and is rapid. Capacity refers to how much water per gram the drying agent holds and complete means that drying equilibrium favors the hydrate. The only disadvantages to using magnesium sulfate is that it is normally available in a powder form and must be filtered out. More importantly, magnesium is a very strong Lewis acid and as such, is not inert to all functional groups. For example, epoxides are sensitive to magnesium. Sodium Sulfate: Sodium Sulfate is the most widely used drying agent. It is very similar to magnesium sulfate in its capacity, but it is less complete (will leave more water in solution) and it is slower in terms of its rate. Sodium sulfate has the advantage in that it is less reactive and in granular form, is very easy to remove from liquids. The liquid can often be decanted off the drying agent without filtration. Hope this helps!! Answered by Leanora Feehly 2 years ago.

Sodium Sulfate Drying Answered by Flora Soley 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate? Answered by Catherina Woelke 2 years ago.

Lancenigo di Villorba (TV), Italy Yes, you get reason! SODIUM SULPHATE (e.g. Na2SO4) is known like GLAUBERITE once a XVI century alkemist (R. J. GLAUBER) discussed it in his treatises. MAGNESIUM SULPHATE (e.g. MgSO4) is known like EPSOMITE once XVIII century chemists remarked it in a English Town, nearby Epsom Lake. In effects, Glauberite AND Epsomite BELONG TO SULPHATE SALTs. Indeed, those SULPHATE SALTs HAVE CRYSTAL FEATURE LIKE YOU MAY REMARK BY ITS NATIVE CONSTITUTION IN OREs. By other hand, Epsomite RESULTS A CHEMICAL MORE INTERESTED BY WATER THAN Glauberite DOES. MAGNESIUM IS A METAL BELONGING TO Group II-A WHILST SODIUM BELONGS TO Group I-A. CONCLUSIONs THIS MEANS Magnesium EXERTs ELECTRICAL DENSITY of Coulomb Forces TWICE TIMES SODIUM DOES. THIS LEADS Epsomite TO REACH HYDRATATED FORM IN A MORE STABLE CONDITION THAN Glauberite DOES. Finally, YOU MAY COMPARE THOSE SULPHATEs IN MOIST AIR : -Glauberite will begin to form very small water droplets onto its crystals, toward final large droplets ; -Epsomite delays water droplets since it is soaking moisture to give hydratated crystal despite wet crystals. I hope this helps you. Answered by Delinda Wible 2 years ago.


Is Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate USP poisonous?
i heard that if you mix epsom salts with water and drink it you can relieve constipation. BUT, i hear that the formula for the drinkable epsom salts is just Magnesium Sulfate. the salts that i have are Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate, should i drink the mixture with the salts i have? Asked by Marianne Sleeth 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate is not poisonous. However, you really need pharmaceutical grade of purity. If you are getting it from a college lab you need to check two things i] that you are 100% certain that some idiot doing a lab hasn't dipped into it with a dirty spatula and contaminated it ii] that it is not the cheapest grade .. ideally analytical grade AR quality would be ideal. Having said all that, magnesium sulfate crystals will do the job, but do you know the dose? do you want to end up sat in the bathroom for hours as you've taken too much? When you take it, as a solution of course, it tastes pretty awful. Effervescent salt remedies cover this up as do tablets. Personally, as it is hardly an expensive medication, I'd advise sticking to the stuff from the pharmacy. Answered by Ellyn Emig 2 years ago.


Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants?
Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Asked by See Principato 2 years ago.

MgSO4 can be hugely beneficial to plants. The magnesium is: -A critical mineral for seed germination. -Vital to the production of chlorophyll, which plants use to transform sunlight into food. -An aid in the absorption of phosphorus and nitrogen, two of the most important fertilizer components. Sulfur, the other major component of Epsom Salt, is also an important plant nutrient. Sulfer may: -Contribute to chlorophyll production. -Make the primary nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) found in most fertilizers more effective. Although magnesium and sulfur occur naturally in soil, they can be depleted by various conditions, including heavy agricultural use over time. But unlike most commercial fertilizers, which build up in the soil over time, Epsom Salt is not persistent so you can't overuse it. Tests by the National Gardening Association confirm - roses fertilized with Epsom Salt grow bushier and produce more flowers, while the compound makes pepper plants grow larger than those treated with commercial fertilizer alone. Garden Usage Tips Houseplants: 2 tablespoons per gallon of water; feed plants monthly. Tomatoes: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Roses: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Also scratch 1/2 cup into soil at base to encourage flowering canes and healthy new basal cane growth. Soak unplanted bushes in 1/2 cup of Epsom Salt per gallon of water to help roots recover. Add a tablespoon of Epsom Salt to each hole at planting time. Spray with Epsom Salt solution weekly to discourage pests. Shrubs (evergreens, azaleas, rhododendron): 1 tablespoon per 9 square feet. Apply over root zone every 2-4 weeks. Lawns: Apply 3 pounds for every 1,250 square feet with a spreader, or dilute in water and apply with a sprayer. Trees: Apply 2 tablespoons per 9 square feet. Apply over the root zone 3 times annually. Garden Startup: Sprinkle 1 cup per 100 square feet. Mix into soil before planting. Sage: Do not apply! This herb is one of the few plants that doesn't like Epsom Salt. Answered by Sharolyn Cienfuegos 2 years ago.

RE: Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants? Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Answered by Mariel Tamer 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulphate Uses In Agriculture Answered by Andre Chobot 2 years ago.


Give the chemical formulas for the following compounds:?
magnesium sulfate______________ calcium phosphate__________ copper(II) bromide____________ Asked by Wilber Soard 2 years ago.

magnesium sulfate - MgSO4 calcium phosphate - Ca3(PO4)2 copper(II) bromide - CuBr2 Answered by Stan Constable 2 years ago.

Mg has a 2+ charge and SO4 has a 2- charge. Cross over Rule: Mg2(SO4)2 but you can see that the 2's cancel: MgSO4 Calcium phosphate: (Ca)3(PO4)2 Copper (II) Bromide : CuBr2 Answered by Fredric Hoeppner 2 years ago.

MgSo4 ClPo4 CuBr2 iam not sure Answered by Gracie Malen 2 years ago.


What is magnesium sulfate?
Asked by Edris Binegar 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulphate is MgSO4. One molecule of magnesium (Mg) is bound to one sulphate molecule (SO4). S is sulfur and O is oxygen. Four oxygen atoms and one sulfur atom make up the sulphate molecule (SO4). Magnesium sulphate is also known as Epsom's Salt and that is a common laxative. Answered by Syreeta Pengra 2 years ago.

it may be a laxitive but it is not safe to take in large quantities - small controlled quanties is possibly okay Answered by Dawn Pollman 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulfate?
Magnesium sulfate, MgSO4, is added to 445 mL of 0.050 M sodium hydroxide, NaOH, until a precipitate just forms. How many grams of magnesium sulfate were added? Assume that the volume of the solution is not changed significantly by the addition of magnesium sulfate. Asked by Anita Winger 2 years ago.

I don't know the answer I just know that Magnesium sulfate is the main ingredient in Milk of Magnesia- did you know that? Its also is Epsom's salts- I think they should just call it Magnesium salts instead! And one more thing.... you probably didn't know... people can get an injection of Magnesium sulfate (in a clear liquid vile form) for many illnesses. Most specifically it can reverse a heart attack and it is sometimes given to heart attack victims. But when injected they have to mix it with Lidocaine cause it burns without it! Jeez! ... I never realized I knew so much about Magnesium Sulfate until i swung by to answer this question. I guess if you like knowing why a chemical is used it helps to make the math more interesting. Well sorry I don't have the calculation. I sucked at chemistry in college and its why I got out of the Pre med! Just hated the math! Good Luck! I am sure there's a math geek out there whose got the answer for you but its not me! Answered by Jimmy Vignovich 2 years ago.

1.32g MgSO4 + 2NaOH --> Mg(OH)2 + Na2SO4 1)means that 1 mol of MgSO4 reacts with 2 moles of NaOH 2)find the mole no. of NaOH, n=MV/1000 3)n = 0.022 mol 4)this means that 0.022 mol of NaOH reacts with 0.011 mol of MgSO4 5)find the molar mass of MgSO4, 0.011x(24+32+64) = 1.32g Answered by Jerri Quittner 2 years ago.


Percent of water in ferrous sulfate heptahydrate?
Asked by Erminia Febbraio 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulfate (or magnesium sulphate) is a chemical compound containing magnesium, sulfur and oxygen, with the formula MgSO4. It is often encountered as the heptahydrate epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O), commonly called Epsom salt, from the town of Epsom in Surrey, England, where the salt was distilled from the springs that arise where the porous chalk of the North Downs meets non-porous London clay. Another hydrate form is kieserite. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is used as a drying agent. Since the anhydrous form is hygroscopic (readily absorbs water from the air) and is therefore difficult to weigh accurately, the hydrate is often preferred when preparing solutions, for example in medical preparations. Epsom salt has been traditionally used as a component of bath salts. Contents [hide] 1 Properties 2 Hydrates 3 Occurrence 4 Applications 4.1 Medical use 5 See also 6 References [edit] Properties Magnesium sulfate is the primary substance that causes the absorption of sound in seawater.[1] Absorption, in this case, means the conversion of acoustic energy to heat energy. The conversion is a strong function of frequency. Lower frequencies are less affected by the salt, so that the acoustic energy travels much farther in the ocean. Boric acid also contributes to absorption; but the most abundant salt in seawater, sodium chloride, has no known effect on sound absorption. [edit] Hydrates Almost all known mineralogical forms of MgSO4 occur as hydrates. Epsomite is the natural analogue of "Epsom salt". Another heptahydrate, the copper-containing mineral alpersite (Mg,Cu)SO4·7H2O,[2] was also recently recognized. Both are however not the highest known hydrates of MgSO4, due to the recent terrestrial find of meridianiite, MgSO4·11H2O, which is thought to also occur on Mars. Hexahydrite is the next lower (6) hydrate. Three next lower hydrates - pentahydrite (5), starkeyite (4) and especially sanderite (2) are more rarely found. Kieserite is a monohydrate and is common among evaporitic deposits. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate was reported from some burning coal dumps, but never treated as a mineral. The pH of hydrates is average 6.0 (5.5 to 6.5). Magnesium hydrates have, like Copper(II) sulfate, coordinated water.[3] [edit] Occurrence Magnesium sulfates are common minerals in geological environments. Their occurrence is mostly connected with supergene processes. Some of them are also important constituents of evaporitic potassium-magnesium (K-Mg) salts deposits. [edit] Applications In agriculture and gardening, magnesium sulfate is used to correct magnesium deficiency in soil, since magnesium is an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule. It is most commonly applied to potted plants, or to magnesium-hungry crops, such as potatoes, roses, tomatoes, peppers and cannabis. The advantage of magnesium sulfate over other magnesium soil amendments (such as dolomitic lime) is its high solubility. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is commonly used as a desiccant in organic synthesis due to its affinity for water. During work-up, an organic phase is saturated with magnesium sulfate until it no longer forms clumps. The hydrated solid is then removed with filtration or decantation. Other inorganic sulfate salts such as sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate may also be used in the same way. Magnesium sulfate is used in bath salts, particularly in flotation therapy where high concentrations raise the bath water's specific gravity, effectively making the body more buoyant. Traditionally, it is also used to prepare foot baths, intended to soothe sore feet. The reason for the inclusion of the salt is partially cosmetic: the increase in ionic strength prevents some of the temporary skin wrinkling ("pruning" – partial maceration) which is caused by prolonged immersion of extremities in pure water. However, magnesium sulfate can also be absorbed into the skin, reducing inflammation. It is also sometimes found in bottled mineral water, and accordingly is sometimes listed in the contents thereof.[citation needed] It may also be used as a coagulant for making tofu.[4] Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate is also used to maintain the magnesium concentration in marine Answered by Valrie Twigg 2 years ago.

Atomic Weights: Fe=55.8, S=32, O=16, H=1, FeSO4=151.8, H2O=18, FeSO4*7H2O=263.8, 7H2O=126 126/263.8 x 100% = 44.8% Answered by Brittni Kocka 2 years ago.

FeSO4-7H2O The molar mass is (55.85 + 32.06 + 4(16.00) + 7(2 + 16)) = 151.9 + 126 = 277.9 g/mol The % H2O is (mass of water) / (molar mass of FeSO4-7H2O) x 100 % = (126 / 277.9) x 100 = 45.3 % Answered by Claribel Nommay 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulphate for zits?
Could i use magnesium sulphate (a drawing agent) on my spots? there is a massive one on my chin which won't go away! Asked by Catrice Hemp 2 years ago.

Magnesium Citrate may clear acne on the skin. Magnesium citrate works by drawing water from your skin and tissues. If you have oily skin, magnesium citrate helps clear away the excess moisture and give you a more balanced tone. You could try taking magnesium citrate as a supplement. Answered by Sharika Colicchio 2 years ago.


What reacts with magnesium sulfate?
I need this for a science project Asked by Muoi Brandauer 2 years ago.

dissolve the magnesium sulfate in water these are some magnesium compounds that should form easily Magnesium ammonium phosphate MgNH4PO4 , by adding some household ammonia & a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span Magnesium carbonate MgCO3 , by adding baking soda Magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH)2 , by adding an oven or drain cleaner Magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO4)2 , by adding a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span wear rubber glove & goggles, especially when working with an oven or drain cleaner Answered by Floy Offenbacker 2 years ago.


Why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate?
Asked by Rafael Siebenberg 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate: Magnesium sulfate is a great drying agent. It has a high capacity, is complete in its drying and is rapid. Capacity refers to how much water per gram the drying agent holds and complete means that drying equilibrium favors the hydrate. The only disadvantages to using magnesium sulfate is that it is normally available in a powder form and must be filtered out. More importantly, magnesium is a very strong Lewis acid and as such, is not inert to all functional groups. For example, epoxides are sensitive to magnesium. Sodium Sulfate: Sodium Sulfate is the most widely used drying agent. It is very similar to magnesium sulfate in its capacity, but it is less complete (will leave more water in solution) and it is slower in terms of its rate. Sodium sulfate has the advantage in that it is less reactive and in granular form, is very easy to remove from liquids. The liquid can often be decanted off the drying agent without filtration. Hope this helps!! Answered by Lavon Lyerla 2 years ago.

Sodium Sulfate Drying Answered by Gabriel Mcspedon 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate? Answered by Glinda Lucek 2 years ago.

Lancenigo di Villorba (TV), Italy Yes, you get reason! SODIUM SULPHATE (e.g. Na2SO4) is known like GLAUBERITE once a XVI century alkemist (R. J. GLAUBER) discussed it in his treatises. MAGNESIUM SULPHATE (e.g. MgSO4) is known like EPSOMITE once XVIII century chemists remarked it in a English Town, nearby Epsom Lake. In effects, Glauberite AND Epsomite BELONG TO SULPHATE SALTs. Indeed, those SULPHATE SALTs HAVE CRYSTAL FEATURE LIKE YOU MAY REMARK BY ITS NATIVE CONSTITUTION IN OREs. By other hand, Epsomite RESULTS A CHEMICAL MORE INTERESTED BY WATER THAN Glauberite DOES. MAGNESIUM IS A METAL BELONGING TO Group II-A WHILST SODIUM BELONGS TO Group I-A. CONCLUSIONs THIS MEANS Magnesium EXERTs ELECTRICAL DENSITY of Coulomb Forces TWICE TIMES SODIUM DOES. THIS LEADS Epsomite TO REACH HYDRATATED FORM IN A MORE STABLE CONDITION THAN Glauberite DOES. Finally, YOU MAY COMPARE THOSE SULPHATEs IN MOIST AIR : -Glauberite will begin to form very small water droplets onto its crystals, toward final large droplets ; -Epsomite delays water droplets since it is soaking moisture to give hydratated crystal despite wet crystals. I hope this helps you. Answered by Shayne Nurre 2 years ago.


Is Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate USP poisonous?
i heard that if you mix epsom salts with water and drink it you can relieve constipation. BUT, i hear that the formula for the drinkable epsom salts is just Magnesium Sulfate. the salts that i have are Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate, should i drink the mixture with the salts i have? Asked by Tamela Wickell 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate is not poisonous. However, you really need pharmaceutical grade of purity. If you are getting it from a college lab you need to check two things i] that you are 100% certain that some idiot doing a lab hasn't dipped into it with a dirty spatula and contaminated it ii] that it is not the cheapest grade .. ideally analytical grade AR quality would be ideal. Having said all that, magnesium sulfate crystals will do the job, but do you know the dose? do you want to end up sat in the bathroom for hours as you've taken too much? When you take it, as a solution of course, it tastes pretty awful. Effervescent salt remedies cover this up as do tablets. Personally, as it is hardly an expensive medication, I'd advise sticking to the stuff from the pharmacy. Answered by Lucien Bunetta 2 years ago.


Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants?
Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Asked by An Peeples 2 years ago.

MgSO4 can be hugely beneficial to plants. The magnesium is: -A critical mineral for seed germination. -Vital to the production of chlorophyll, which plants use to transform sunlight into food. -An aid in the absorption of phosphorus and nitrogen, two of the most important fertilizer components. Sulfur, the other major component of Epsom Salt, is also an important plant nutrient. Sulfer may: -Contribute to chlorophyll production. -Make the primary nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) found in most fertilizers more effective. Although magnesium and sulfur occur naturally in soil, they can be depleted by various conditions, including heavy agricultural use over time. But unlike most commercial fertilizers, which build up in the soil over time, Epsom Salt is not persistent so you can't overuse it. Tests by the National Gardening Association confirm - roses fertilized with Epsom Salt grow bushier and produce more flowers, while the compound makes pepper plants grow larger than those treated with commercial fertilizer alone. Garden Usage Tips Houseplants: 2 tablespoons per gallon of water; feed plants monthly. Tomatoes: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Roses: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Also scratch 1/2 cup into soil at base to encourage flowering canes and healthy new basal cane growth. Soak unplanted bushes in 1/2 cup of Epsom Salt per gallon of water to help roots recover. Add a tablespoon of Epsom Salt to each hole at planting time. Spray with Epsom Salt solution weekly to discourage pests. Shrubs (evergreens, azaleas, rhododendron): 1 tablespoon per 9 square feet. Apply over root zone every 2-4 weeks. Lawns: Apply 3 pounds for every 1,250 square feet with a spreader, or dilute in water and apply with a sprayer. Trees: Apply 2 tablespoons per 9 square feet. Apply over the root zone 3 times annually. Garden Startup: Sprinkle 1 cup per 100 square feet. Mix into soil before planting. Sage: Do not apply! This herb is one of the few plants that doesn't like Epsom Salt. Answered by Starla Bridendolph 2 years ago.

RE: Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants? Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Answered by Lesha Jensen 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulphate Uses In Agriculture Answered by Frederic Calton 2 years ago.


Give the chemical formulas for the following compounds:?
magnesium sulfate______________ calcium phosphate__________ copper(II) bromide____________ Asked by Jacki Medbery 2 years ago.

magnesium sulfate - MgSO4 calcium phosphate - Ca3(PO4)2 copper(II) bromide - CuBr2 Answered by Shirly Harrer 2 years ago.

Mg has a 2+ charge and SO4 has a 2- charge. Cross over Rule: Mg2(SO4)2 but you can see that the 2's cancel: MgSO4 Calcium phosphate: (Ca)3(PO4)2 Copper (II) Bromide : CuBr2 Answered by Coletta Diddle 2 years ago.

MgSo4 ClPo4 CuBr2 iam not sure Answered by Warren Zarrillo 2 years ago.


What is magnesium sulfate?
Asked by Elvera Vashaw 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulphate is MgSO4. One molecule of magnesium (Mg) is bound to one sulphate molecule (SO4). S is sulfur and O is oxygen. Four oxygen atoms and one sulfur atom make up the sulphate molecule (SO4). Magnesium sulphate is also known as Epsom's Salt and that is a common laxative. Answered by Caridad Kulbeth 2 years ago.

it may be a laxitive but it is not safe to take in large quantities - small controlled quanties is possibly okay Answered by Aja Halk 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulfate?
Magnesium sulfate, MgSO4, is added to 445 mL of 0.050 M sodium hydroxide, NaOH, until a precipitate just forms. How many grams of magnesium sulfate were added? Assume that the volume of the solution is not changed significantly by the addition of magnesium sulfate. Asked by Sang Ruchti 2 years ago.

I don't know the answer I just know that Magnesium sulfate is the main ingredient in Milk of Magnesia- did you know that? Its also is Epsom's salts- I think they should just call it Magnesium salts instead! And one more thing.... you probably didn't know... people can get an injection of Magnesium sulfate (in a clear liquid vile form) for many illnesses. Most specifically it can reverse a heart attack and it is sometimes given to heart attack victims. But when injected they have to mix it with Lidocaine cause it burns without it! Jeez! ... I never realized I knew so much about Magnesium Sulfate until i swung by to answer this question. I guess if you like knowing why a chemical is used it helps to make the math more interesting. Well sorry I don't have the calculation. I sucked at chemistry in college and its why I got out of the Pre med! Just hated the math! Good Luck! I am sure there's a math geek out there whose got the answer for you but its not me! Answered by Dawna Engelmeyer 2 years ago.

1.32g MgSO4 + 2NaOH --> Mg(OH)2 + Na2SO4 1)means that 1 mol of MgSO4 reacts with 2 moles of NaOH 2)find the mole no. of NaOH, n=MV/1000 3)n = 0.022 mol 4)this means that 0.022 mol of NaOH reacts with 0.011 mol of MgSO4 5)find the molar mass of MgSO4, 0.011x(24+32+64) = 1.32g Answered by Donita Franty 2 years ago.


Percent of water in ferrous sulfate heptahydrate?
Asked by Denver Crosier 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulfate (or magnesium sulphate) is a chemical compound containing magnesium, sulfur and oxygen, with the formula MgSO4. It is often encountered as the heptahydrate epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O), commonly called Epsom salt, from the town of Epsom in Surrey, England, where the salt was distilled from the springs that arise where the porous chalk of the North Downs meets non-porous London clay. Another hydrate form is kieserite. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is used as a drying agent. Since the anhydrous form is hygroscopic (readily absorbs water from the air) and is therefore difficult to weigh accurately, the hydrate is often preferred when preparing solutions, for example in medical preparations. Epsom salt has been traditionally used as a component of bath salts. Contents [hide] 1 Properties 2 Hydrates 3 Occurrence 4 Applications 4.1 Medical use 5 See also 6 References [edit] Properties Magnesium sulfate is the primary substance that causes the absorption of sound in seawater.[1] Absorption, in this case, means the conversion of acoustic energy to heat energy. The conversion is a strong function of frequency. Lower frequencies are less affected by the salt, so that the acoustic energy travels much farther in the ocean. Boric acid also contributes to absorption; but the most abundant salt in seawater, sodium chloride, has no known effect on sound absorption. [edit] Hydrates Almost all known mineralogical forms of MgSO4 occur as hydrates. Epsomite is the natural analogue of "Epsom salt". Another heptahydrate, the copper-containing mineral alpersite (Mg,Cu)SO4·7H2O,[2] was also recently recognized. Both are however not the highest known hydrates of MgSO4, due to the recent terrestrial find of meridianiite, MgSO4·11H2O, which is thought to also occur on Mars. Hexahydrite is the next lower (6) hydrate. Three next lower hydrates - pentahydrite (5), starkeyite (4) and especially sanderite (2) are more rarely found. Kieserite is a monohydrate and is common among evaporitic deposits. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate was reported from some burning coal dumps, but never treated as a mineral. The pH of hydrates is average 6.0 (5.5 to 6.5). Magnesium hydrates have, like Copper(II) sulfate, coordinated water.[3] [edit] Occurrence Magnesium sulfates are common minerals in geological environments. Their occurrence is mostly connected with supergene processes. Some of them are also important constituents of evaporitic potassium-magnesium (K-Mg) salts deposits. [edit] Applications In agriculture and gardening, magnesium sulfate is used to correct magnesium deficiency in soil, since magnesium is an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule. It is most commonly applied to potted plants, or to magnesium-hungry crops, such as potatoes, roses, tomatoes, peppers and cannabis. The advantage of magnesium sulfate over other magnesium soil amendments (such as dolomitic lime) is its high solubility. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is commonly used as a desiccant in organic synthesis due to its affinity for water. During work-up, an organic phase is saturated with magnesium sulfate until it no longer forms clumps. The hydrated solid is then removed with filtration or decantation. Other inorganic sulfate salts such as sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate may also be used in the same way. Magnesium sulfate is used in bath salts, particularly in flotation therapy where high concentrations raise the bath water's specific gravity, effectively making the body more buoyant. Traditionally, it is also used to prepare foot baths, intended to soothe sore feet. The reason for the inclusion of the salt is partially cosmetic: the increase in ionic strength prevents some of the temporary skin wrinkling ("pruning" – partial maceration) which is caused by prolonged immersion of extremities in pure water. However, magnesium sulfate can also be absorbed into the skin, reducing inflammation. It is also sometimes found in bottled mineral water, and accordingly is sometimes listed in the contents thereof.[citation needed] It may also be used as a coagulant for making tofu.[4] Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate is also used to maintain the magnesium concentration in marine Answered by Yuette Murrey 2 years ago.

Atomic Weights: Fe=55.8, S=32, O=16, H=1, FeSO4=151.8, H2O=18, FeSO4*7H2O=263.8, 7H2O=126 126/263.8 x 100% = 44.8% Answered by Moriah Seyfert 2 years ago.

FeSO4-7H2O The molar mass is (55.85 + 32.06 + 4(16.00) + 7(2 + 16)) = 151.9 + 126 = 277.9 g/mol The % H2O is (mass of water) / (molar mass of FeSO4-7H2O) x 100 % = (126 / 277.9) x 100 = 45.3 % Answered by Anya Sartorelli 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulphate for zits?
Could i use magnesium sulphate (a drawing agent) on my spots? there is a massive one on my chin which won't go away! Asked by Rosalinda Gerdis 2 years ago.

Magnesium Citrate may clear acne on the skin. Magnesium citrate works by drawing water from your skin and tissues. If you have oily skin, magnesium citrate helps clear away the excess moisture and give you a more balanced tone. You could try taking magnesium citrate as a supplement. Answered by Lanny Galven 2 years ago.


What reacts with magnesium sulfate?
I need this for a science project Asked by Yee Sindoni 2 years ago.

dissolve the magnesium sulfate in water these are some magnesium compounds that should form easily Magnesium ammonium phosphate MgNH4PO4 , by adding some household ammonia & a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span Magnesium carbonate MgCO3 , by adding baking soda Magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH)2 , by adding an oven or drain cleaner Magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO4)2 , by adding a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span wear rubber glove & goggles, especially when working with an oven or drain cleaner Answered by Cleotilde Mizzell 2 years ago.


Why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate?
Asked by Johnette Nipple 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate: Magnesium sulfate is a great drying agent. It has a high capacity, is complete in its drying and is rapid. Capacity refers to how much water per gram the drying agent holds and complete means that drying equilibrium favors the hydrate. The only disadvantages to using magnesium sulfate is that it is normally available in a powder form and must be filtered out. More importantly, magnesium is a very strong Lewis acid and as such, is not inert to all functional groups. For example, epoxides are sensitive to magnesium. Sodium Sulfate: Sodium Sulfate is the most widely used drying agent. It is very similar to magnesium sulfate in its capacity, but it is less complete (will leave more water in solution) and it is slower in terms of its rate. Sodium sulfate has the advantage in that it is less reactive and in granular form, is very easy to remove from liquids. The liquid can often be decanted off the drying agent without filtration. Hope this helps!! Answered by Toni Biez 2 years ago.

Sodium Sulfate Drying Answered by Leatha Tointon 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate? Answered by Curtis Theiss 2 years ago.

Lancenigo di Villorba (TV), Italy Yes, you get reason! SODIUM SULPHATE (e.g. Na2SO4) is known like GLAUBERITE once a XVI century alkemist (R. J. GLAUBER) discussed it in his treatises. MAGNESIUM SULPHATE (e.g. MgSO4) is known like EPSOMITE once XVIII century chemists remarked it in a English Town, nearby Epsom Lake. In effects, Glauberite AND Epsomite BELONG TO SULPHATE SALTs. Indeed, those SULPHATE SALTs HAVE CRYSTAL FEATURE LIKE YOU MAY REMARK BY ITS NATIVE CONSTITUTION IN OREs. By other hand, Epsomite RESULTS A CHEMICAL MORE INTERESTED BY WATER THAN Glauberite DOES. MAGNESIUM IS A METAL BELONGING TO Group II-A WHILST SODIUM BELONGS TO Group I-A. CONCLUSIONs THIS MEANS Magnesium EXERTs ELECTRICAL DENSITY of Coulomb Forces TWICE TIMES SODIUM DOES. THIS LEADS Epsomite TO REACH HYDRATATED FORM IN A MORE STABLE CONDITION THAN Glauberite DOES. Finally, YOU MAY COMPARE THOSE SULPHATEs IN MOIST AIR : -Glauberite will begin to form very small water droplets onto its crystals, toward final large droplets ; -Epsomite delays water droplets since it is soaking moisture to give hydratated crystal despite wet crystals. I hope this helps you. Answered by Darren Mcveigh 2 years ago.


Is Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate USP poisonous?
i heard that if you mix epsom salts with water and drink it you can relieve constipation. BUT, i hear that the formula for the drinkable epsom salts is just Magnesium Sulfate. the salts that i have are Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate, should i drink the mixture with the salts i have? Asked by Kizzy Howman 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate is not poisonous. However, you really need pharmaceutical grade of purity. If you are getting it from a college lab you need to check two things i] that you are 100% certain that some idiot doing a lab hasn't dipped into it with a dirty spatula and contaminated it ii] that it is not the cheapest grade .. ideally analytical grade AR quality would be ideal. Having said all that, magnesium sulfate crystals will do the job, but do you know the dose? do you want to end up sat in the bathroom for hours as you've taken too much? When you take it, as a solution of course, it tastes pretty awful. Effervescent salt remedies cover this up as do tablets. Personally, as it is hardly an expensive medication, I'd advise sticking to the stuff from the pharmacy. Answered by Misti Swymer 2 years ago.


Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants?
Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Asked by Ada Gabrielli 2 years ago.

MgSO4 can be hugely beneficial to plants. The magnesium is: -A critical mineral for seed germination. -Vital to the production of chlorophyll, which plants use to transform sunlight into food. -An aid in the absorption of phosphorus and nitrogen, two of the most important fertilizer components. Sulfur, the other major component of Epsom Salt, is also an important plant nutrient. Sulfer may: -Contribute to chlorophyll production. -Make the primary nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) found in most fertilizers more effective. Although magnesium and sulfur occur naturally in soil, they can be depleted by various conditions, including heavy agricultural use over time. But unlike most commercial fertilizers, which build up in the soil over time, Epsom Salt is not persistent so you can't overuse it. Tests by the National Gardening Association confirm - roses fertilized with Epsom Salt grow bushier and produce more flowers, while the compound makes pepper plants grow larger than those treated with commercial fertilizer alone. Garden Usage Tips Houseplants: 2 tablespoons per gallon of water; feed plants monthly. Tomatoes: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Roses: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Also scratch 1/2 cup into soil at base to encourage flowering canes and healthy new basal cane growth. Soak unplanted bushes in 1/2 cup of Epsom Salt per gallon of water to help roots recover. Add a tablespoon of Epsom Salt to each hole at planting time. Spray with Epsom Salt solution weekly to discourage pests. Shrubs (evergreens, azaleas, rhododendron): 1 tablespoon per 9 square feet. Apply over root zone every 2-4 weeks. Lawns: Apply 3 pounds for every 1,250 square feet with a spreader, or dilute in water and apply with a sprayer. Trees: Apply 2 tablespoons per 9 square feet. Apply over the root zone 3 times annually. Garden Startup: Sprinkle 1 cup per 100 square feet. Mix into soil before planting. Sage: Do not apply! This herb is one of the few plants that doesn't like Epsom Salt. Answered by Season Deltufo 2 years ago.

RE: Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants? Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Answered by Kim Hesford 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulphate Uses In Agriculture Answered by Carl Haymer 2 years ago.


Give the chemical formulas for the following compounds:?
magnesium sulfate______________ calcium phosphate__________ copper(II) bromide____________ Asked by Devora Ilasin 2 years ago.

magnesium sulfate - MgSO4 calcium phosphate - Ca3(PO4)2 copper(II) bromide - CuBr2 Answered by Candra Belen 2 years ago.

Mg has a 2+ charge and SO4 has a 2- charge. Cross over Rule: Mg2(SO4)2 but you can see that the 2's cancel: MgSO4 Calcium phosphate: (Ca)3(PO4)2 Copper (II) Bromide : CuBr2 Answered by Mittie Falconeri 2 years ago.

MgSo4 ClPo4 CuBr2 iam not sure Answered by Avelina Ratley 2 years ago.


What is magnesium sulfate?
Asked by Donnette Fenny 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulphate is MgSO4. One molecule of magnesium (Mg) is bound to one sulphate molecule (SO4). S is sulfur and O is oxygen. Four oxygen atoms and one sulfur atom make up the sulphate molecule (SO4). Magnesium sulphate is also known as Epsom's Salt and that is a common laxative. Answered by Lorita Vigilo 2 years ago.

it may be a laxitive but it is not safe to take in large quantities - small controlled quanties is possibly okay Answered by Drucilla Sabio 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulfate?
Magnesium sulfate, MgSO4, is added to 445 mL of 0.050 M sodium hydroxide, NaOH, until a precipitate just forms. How many grams of magnesium sulfate were added? Assume that the volume of the solution is not changed significantly by the addition of magnesium sulfate. Asked by Richard Mcspadden 2 years ago.

I don't know the answer I just know that Magnesium sulfate is the main ingredient in Milk of Magnesia- did you know that? Its also is Epsom's salts- I think they should just call it Magnesium salts instead! And one more thing.... you probably didn't know... people can get an injection of Magnesium sulfate (in a clear liquid vile form) for many illnesses. Most specifically it can reverse a heart attack and it is sometimes given to heart attack victims. But when injected they have to mix it with Lidocaine cause it burns without it! Jeez! ... I never realized I knew so much about Magnesium Sulfate until i swung by to answer this question. I guess if you like knowing why a chemical is used it helps to make the math more interesting. Well sorry I don't have the calculation. I sucked at chemistry in college and its why I got out of the Pre med! Just hated the math! Good Luck! I am sure there's a math geek out there whose got the answer for you but its not me! Answered by Shayna Hoopii 2 years ago.

1.32g MgSO4 + 2NaOH --> Mg(OH)2 + Na2SO4 1)means that 1 mol of MgSO4 reacts with 2 moles of NaOH 2)find the mole no. of NaOH, n=MV/1000 3)n = 0.022 mol 4)this means that 0.022 mol of NaOH reacts with 0.011 mol of MgSO4 5)find the molar mass of MgSO4, 0.011x(24+32+64) = 1.32g Answered by Ellie Hoschander 2 years ago.


Percent of water in ferrous sulfate heptahydrate?
Asked by Terrell Prue 2 years ago.

Magnesium sulfate (or magnesium sulphate) is a chemical compound containing magnesium, sulfur and oxygen, with the formula MgSO4. It is often encountered as the heptahydrate epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O), commonly called Epsom salt, from the town of Epsom in Surrey, England, where the salt was distilled from the springs that arise where the porous chalk of the North Downs meets non-porous London clay. Another hydrate form is kieserite. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is used as a drying agent. Since the anhydrous form is hygroscopic (readily absorbs water from the air) and is therefore difficult to weigh accurately, the hydrate is often preferred when preparing solutions, for example in medical preparations. Epsom salt has been traditionally used as a component of bath salts. Contents [hide] 1 Properties 2 Hydrates 3 Occurrence 4 Applications 4.1 Medical use 5 See also 6 References [edit] Properties Magnesium sulfate is the primary substance that causes the absorption of sound in seawater.[1] Absorption, in this case, means the conversion of acoustic energy to heat energy. The conversion is a strong function of frequency. Lower frequencies are less affected by the salt, so that the acoustic energy travels much farther in the ocean. Boric acid also contributes to absorption; but the most abundant salt in seawater, sodium chloride, has no known effect on sound absorption. [edit] Hydrates Almost all known mineralogical forms of MgSO4 occur as hydrates. Epsomite is the natural analogue of "Epsom salt". Another heptahydrate, the copper-containing mineral alpersite (Mg,Cu)SO4·7H2O,[2] was also recently recognized. Both are however not the highest known hydrates of MgSO4, due to the recent terrestrial find of meridianiite, MgSO4·11H2O, which is thought to also occur on Mars. Hexahydrite is the next lower (6) hydrate. Three next lower hydrates - pentahydrite (5), starkeyite (4) and especially sanderite (2) are more rarely found. Kieserite is a monohydrate and is common among evaporitic deposits. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate was reported from some burning coal dumps, but never treated as a mineral. The pH of hydrates is average 6.0 (5.5 to 6.5). Magnesium hydrates have, like Copper(II) sulfate, coordinated water.[3] [edit] Occurrence Magnesium sulfates are common minerals in geological environments. Their occurrence is mostly connected with supergene processes. Some of them are also important constituents of evaporitic potassium-magnesium (K-Mg) salts deposits. [edit] Applications In agriculture and gardening, magnesium sulfate is used to correct magnesium deficiency in soil, since magnesium is an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule. It is most commonly applied to potted plants, or to magnesium-hungry crops, such as potatoes, roses, tomatoes, peppers and cannabis. The advantage of magnesium sulfate over other magnesium soil amendments (such as dolomitic lime) is its high solubility. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate is commonly used as a desiccant in organic synthesis due to its affinity for water. During work-up, an organic phase is saturated with magnesium sulfate until it no longer forms clumps. The hydrated solid is then removed with filtration or decantation. Other inorganic sulfate salts such as sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate may also be used in the same way. Magnesium sulfate is used in bath salts, particularly in flotation therapy where high concentrations raise the bath water's specific gravity, effectively making the body more buoyant. Traditionally, it is also used to prepare foot baths, intended to soothe sore feet. The reason for the inclusion of the salt is partially cosmetic: the increase in ionic strength prevents some of the temporary skin wrinkling ("pruning" – partial maceration) which is caused by prolonged immersion of extremities in pure water. However, magnesium sulfate can also be absorbed into the skin, reducing inflammation. It is also sometimes found in bottled mineral water, and accordingly is sometimes listed in the contents thereof.[citation needed] It may also be used as a coagulant for making tofu.[4] Magnesium sulfate heptahydrate is also used to maintain the magnesium concentration in marine Answered by Courtney Pregler 2 years ago.

Atomic Weights: Fe=55.8, S=32, O=16, H=1, FeSO4=151.8, H2O=18, FeSO4*7H2O=263.8, 7H2O=126 126/263.8 x 100% = 44.8% Answered by Katerine Hollberg 2 years ago.

FeSO4-7H2O The molar mass is (55.85 + 32.06 + 4(16.00) + 7(2 + 16)) = 151.9 + 126 = 277.9 g/mol The % H2O is (mass of water) / (molar mass of FeSO4-7H2O) x 100 % = (126 / 277.9) x 100 = 45.3 % Answered by Herminia Kouba 2 years ago.


Magnesium sulphate for zits?
Could i use magnesium sulphate (a drawing agent) on my spots? there is a massive one on my chin which won't go away! Asked by Ceola Marrs 2 years ago.

Magnesium Citrate may clear acne on the skin. Magnesium citrate works by drawing water from your skin and tissues. If you have oily skin, magnesium citrate helps clear away the excess moisture and give you a more balanced tone. You could try taking magnesium citrate as a supplement. Answered by Florencia Fullbright 2 years ago.


What reacts with magnesium sulfate?
I need this for a science project Asked by Magan Outzen 2 years ago.

dissolve the magnesium sulfate in water these are some magnesium compounds that should form easily Magnesium ammonium phosphate MgNH4PO4 , by adding some household ammonia & a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span Magnesium carbonate MgCO3 , by adding baking soda Magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH)2 , by adding an oven or drain cleaner Magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO4)2 , by adding a phoshate cleaning stuff like **** & span wear rubber glove & goggles, especially when working with an oven or drain cleaner Answered by Concha Sheets 2 years ago.


Why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate?
Asked by Tammera Schones 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate: Magnesium sulfate is a great drying agent. It has a high capacity, is complete in its drying and is rapid. Capacity refers to how much water per gram the drying agent holds and complete means that drying equilibrium favors the hydrate. The only disadvantages to using magnesium sulfate is that it is normally available in a powder form and must be filtered out. More importantly, magnesium is a very strong Lewis acid and as such, is not inert to all functional groups. For example, epoxides are sensitive to magnesium. Sodium Sulfate: Sodium Sulfate is the most widely used drying agent. It is very similar to magnesium sulfate in its capacity, but it is less complete (will leave more water in solution) and it is slower in terms of its rate. Sodium sulfate has the advantage in that it is less reactive and in granular form, is very easy to remove from liquids. The liquid can often be decanted off the drying agent without filtration. Hope this helps!! Answered by Jasmine Wagenblast 2 years ago.

Sodium Sulfate Drying Answered by Lauretta Rebolloso 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why is magnesium sulfate a more effective drying agent than sodium sulfate? Answered by Lakisha Vanbeek 2 years ago.

Lancenigo di Villorba (TV), Italy Yes, you get reason! SODIUM SULPHATE (e.g. Na2SO4) is known like GLAUBERITE once a XVI century alkemist (R. J. GLAUBER) discussed it in his treatises. MAGNESIUM SULPHATE (e.g. MgSO4) is known like EPSOMITE once XVIII century chemists remarked it in a English Town, nearby Epsom Lake. In effects, Glauberite AND Epsomite BELONG TO SULPHATE SALTs. Indeed, those SULPHATE SALTs HAVE CRYSTAL FEATURE LIKE YOU MAY REMARK BY ITS NATIVE CONSTITUTION IN OREs. By other hand, Epsomite RESULTS A CHEMICAL MORE INTERESTED BY WATER THAN Glauberite DOES. MAGNESIUM IS A METAL BELONGING TO Group II-A WHILST SODIUM BELONGS TO Group I-A. CONCLUSIONs THIS MEANS Magnesium EXERTs ELECTRICAL DENSITY of Coulomb Forces TWICE TIMES SODIUM DOES. THIS LEADS Epsomite TO REACH HYDRATATED FORM IN A MORE STABLE CONDITION THAN Glauberite DOES. Finally, YOU MAY COMPARE THOSE SULPHATEs IN MOIST AIR : -Glauberite will begin to form very small water droplets onto its crystals, toward final large droplets ; -Epsomite delays water droplets since it is soaking moisture to give hydratated crystal despite wet crystals. I hope this helps you. Answered by Lindsy Humann 2 years ago.


Is Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate USP poisonous?
i heard that if you mix epsom salts with water and drink it you can relieve constipation. BUT, i hear that the formula for the drinkable epsom salts is just Magnesium Sulfate. the salts that i have are Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate, should i drink the mixture with the salts i have? Asked by Janyce Arter 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate is not poisonous. However, you really need pharmaceutical grade of purity. If you are getting it from a college lab you need to check two things i] that you are 100% certain that some idiot doing a lab hasn't dipped into it with a dirty spatula and contaminated it ii] that it is not the cheapest grade .. ideally analytical grade AR quality would be ideal. Having said all that, magnesium sulfate crystals will do the job, but do you know the dose? do you want to end up sat in the bathroom for hours as you've taken too much? When you take it, as a solution of course, it tastes pretty awful. Effervescent salt remedies cover this up as do tablets. Personally, as it is hardly an expensive medication, I'd advise sticking to the stuff from the pharmacy. Answered by Vance Pontbriand 2 years ago.


Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants?
Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Asked by Gwen Hoder 2 years ago.

MgSO4 can be hugely beneficial to plants. The magnesium is: -A critical mineral for seed germination. -Vital to the production of chlorophyll, which plants use to transform sunlight into food. -An aid in the absorption of phosphorus and nitrogen, two of the most important fertilizer components. Sulfur, the other major component of Epsom Salt, is also an important plant nutrient. Sulfer may: -Contribute to chlorophyll production. -Make the primary nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) found in most fertilizers more effective. Although magnesium and sulfur occur naturally in soil, they can be depleted by various conditions, including heavy agricultural use over time. But unlike most commercial fertilizers, which build up in the soil over time, Epsom Salt is not persistent so you can't overuse it. Tests by the National Gardening Association confirm - roses fertilized with Epsom Salt grow bushier and produce more flowers, while the compound makes pepper plants grow larger than those treated with commercial fertilizer alone. Garden Usage Tips Houseplants: 2 tablespoons per gallon of water; feed plants monthly. Tomatoes: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Roses: 1 tablespoon per foot of plant height per plant; apply every two weeks. Also scratch 1/2 cup into soil at base to encourage flowering canes and healthy new basal cane growth. Soak unplanted bushes in 1/2 cup of Epsom Salt per gallon of water to help roots recover. Add a tablespoon of Epsom Salt to each hole at planting time. Spray with Epsom Salt solution weekly to discourage pests. Shrubs (evergreens, azaleas, rhododendron): 1 tablespoon per 9 square feet. Apply over root zone every 2-4 weeks. Lawns: Apply 3 pounds for every 1,250 square feet with a spreader, or dilute in water and apply with a sprayer. Trees: Apply 2 tablespoons per 9 square feet. Apply over the root zone 3 times annually. Garden Startup: Sprinkle 1 cup per 100 square feet. Mix into soil before planting. Sage: Do not apply! This herb is one of the few plants that doesn't like Epsom Salt. Answered by Shamika Consigli 2 years ago.

RE: Is magnesium sulfate beneficial to growing plants? Also known as Epsom salts. If so how much should I use and in powder or liquid form? Answered by Ali Gusman 2 years ago.

Magnesium Sulphate Uses In Agriculture Answered by Kassie Witherbee 2 years ago.


Give the chemical formulas for the following compounds:?
magnesium sulfate______________ calcium phosphate__________ copper(II) bromide____________ Asked by Linda Tooze 2 years ago.

magnesium sulfate - MgSO4 calcium phosphate - Ca3(PO4)2 copper(II) bromide - CuBr2 Answered by Kyra Kostiv 2 years ago.

Mg has a 2+ charge and SO4 has a 2- charge. Cross over Rule: Mg2(SO4)2 but you can see that the 2's cancel: MgSO4 Calcium phosphate: (Ca)3(PO4)2 Copper (II) Bromide : CuBr2 Answered by Bryanna Bavard 2 years ago.

MgSo4 ClPo4 CuBr2 iam not sure Answered by Brent Warschaw 2 years ago.


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