Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016885/001.

Names and composition

"LYSODREN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MITOTANE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016885/001 LYSODREN MITOTANE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016885/001 LYSODREN MITOTANE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

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Answered questions

How effective is Lysodren in helping dogs with Cushings Disease?
My dog Cookie was recently diagnosed with Cushings and she also has a heart murmur. I first noticed she was ill when she had a seizure/episode. After being hospitalized, getting treatment and now on Lysodren and Enalapril she seemed to be her old self (she's 11 yrs). A week after starting the Lysodren she... Asked by Eleanor Genous 1 year ago.

My dog Cookie was recently diagnosed with Cushings and she also has a heart murmur. I first noticed she was ill when she had a seizure/episode. After being hospitalized, getting treatment and now on Lysodren and Enalapril she seemed to be her old self (she's 11 yrs). A week after starting the Lysodren she had another episode (she collapses backward, her legs go straight, and she howls in pain), they usually last less than a minute and she seems to recover quickly, however after her last one she wont eat, drink just sleeps, seems very weak. I've noticed that the last 2 episodes which came almost 24 hrs apart, came almost 2 hrs after I gave her the Lysodren. After almost 3 wks, and $3,000 later, I still dont know what's causing these episodes and I'm very concerned. Could the Lysodren be making her worse instead of better? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks. Answered by Casey Basehore 1 year ago.

Believe it or ont, there isn't much evidence that treatment prolongs the life span of patients with Cushing's disease, if you don't count euthanasia due to problems like increased urination. So the major benefit of treatment is not prolonged life but comfort of your pup in the remaining life span. With this in mind, if there were no symptoms beforehand, there seems to be no strong reason to treat the disorder at all. On the other hand, since you did notice symptoms, there is good evidence that it makes patients with clinical signs feel better and some evidence that starting treatment early helps to control symptoms long-term. So perhaps treatment IS a good option in your case. There is an alternative approved treatment for Cushing's disease, which is the use of selegiline (Anipryl Rx), a medication that works well in about 40% of Cushing's disease cases and has less potential for harmful side effects and for causing hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease). It may be worth considering the use of this medication, but you'll have to consult with your vet first, of course. At the present time, most vets still favor the use of mitotane (Lysodren Rx) for the treatment of Cushing's disease, primarily because it is effective more often than selegiline but also because some veterinary endocrinologists question whether selegiline works at all, because it doesn't improve the results of standard tests used to assess the treatment of Cushing's, even though it DOES appear to alleviate symptoms in many patients. So your vet's choice of this medication is not really unusual. It is important to monitor for signs of hypoadrenocorticism and to know that it may occur when using Lysodren! It should not bother your vet much if you opted to discontinue treatment for this condition and see what happens. However, you must realize that you would have to repeat the initial stages of medicating (in which regular lab work (ACTH response tests) would have to be done to ensure that we have the correct dosages) when/if you decided to start the medication again due to the occurrence of clinical signs. I know of no evidence that suggests that stopping treatment and then restarting it is any more likely to cause problems. It would be best if you can schedule some time to discuss all this with your vet. I'm sure the choice to use Lydodren was made in good faith based on your vet's experiences with Cushing's, and this medication. However, it's not always right for every case ... talk to your vet about different options because, like I said, the medication is meant to help with your dog's comfort. If she's not any more comfortable ON the medication, you may want to consider switching it, or taking her off it completely. Good luck! Answered by Micheal Wittenburg 1 year ago.

You are not bound to one vet. If you have concerns about your pet and your vet is not addressing them, seek a second opinion. If you want the test done, tell the vet you would rather be safe than sorry and have the test done. And if the test comes back positive, ask for a referral to a vet who deals with diseases such as this on a regular basis. There are veterinary specialists. Make sure that your dog is getting enough nutrients on the reduced calorie diet too. Ask your vet about a multivitamin. My vet believes that all dogs should be on one because the AFCO standard feeding guidelines are not always good for every pet and some may gain weight on the amount of food needed to get all their nutrients. If your dog's behavior changes, especially painful yelping, see a vet immediately! Answered by Chandra Reimold 1 year ago.

pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/CanineCushin... This is the yahoo support group for owners of Cushings dogs. Treating cushings is ticklish - its caused by excess cortisol. The lysoderm tries to suppress the amount of cortisol produced - unfortunately if it overachieves you can cause the opposite problem - too little cortisol which is Addisons disease. A addisons episode can be fatal but is easily treated with predisone so if she stays not eating & drinking get her to the vet quickly. Answered by Clarine Matzen 1 year ago.


My 9 year black lab has cushings disease. we are giving him lysodren which he can't tolerate too well. help
our black lab was given a loading dose of lysodren for 10 days. at the end of this period he started getting listless , lost appetite & had trouble moving around. gave him the antidote prednisone which perked him up. started him on maintenance dose of lysodren of 2.5 pills once a week. 2 days later he again was not... Asked by Priscila Pent 1 year ago.

our black lab was given a loading dose of lysodren for 10 days. at the end of this period he started getting listless , lost appetite & had trouble moving around. gave him the antidote prednisone which perked him up. started him on maintenance dose of lysodren of 2.5 pills once a week. 2 days later he again was not doing well. any suggestions? we are afraid to overmedicate our beloved dog , scout. we have been told by our vet that if the cushings disease progresses too far that he may start urinating in the house but we don"t want a drugged up dog either. Answered by Anjelica Gorovitz 1 year ago.

Hi Fred, There are other drugs that can be used besides lysodren, though it depends a little on why he has Cushing's. You probably know that it can be due to a pituitary (part of the brain) tumour -this is the most common cause in dogs- or a tumour on the adrenal gland. It can also be caused by long-term steroid treatment, but evidently that is not the problem your dog has. If he has got pituitary dependent Cushing's, you may want to talk to your vet about a drug called ketoconazole- it's used relatively commonly in Cushing's dogs that cannot tolerate lysodren...that is actually the main indication for its use in treatment of Cushing's. Basically it interferes with the enzymes needed for production of cortisol. (Though it can also be used in dogs with an adrenal tumour). Another drug is Anipryl, which reduces pituitary ACTH secretion (the hormone responsible for cortisol release). I'm not sure of its availability though, as I think it's still being trialled. Please feel free to email me also. Bassetmom- good luck with your first dog spay! I did my first one in March this year- kind of scary, but you feel brilliant afterwards! Answered by Leatrice Stoesser 1 year ago.

Know nothing about cushing desease in dogs but do know that the dog should get better after he is off steroids for a while. In humans it takes about as long to get rid of it than it took to develope it. If you want the dog and are willing to tolerate some problems he might have than just take good care of him Answered by Darren Deturenne 1 year ago.

Ask your vet for a different treatment, if he refuses or just can't be bothered trying, find a different vet. Hope your dog is OK =) Answered by Larraine Ortuno 1 year ago.

Put it down!!! Stop torturing the dog because you can't let go of it!!! Answered by Xiomara Madine 1 year ago.


Dog on Lysodren and phenobarbital (possible drug interaction)?
I have an 11 Labrador retriever. He developed a cough a few months ago and it was determined by our veterinarian that the cause was most likely some type of infectious bacterial bronchitis.(Because of his age, he was checked for heart and lung conditions that may be the cause of the cough, but those were ruled... Asked by Nicholle Pennella 1 year ago.

I have an 11 Labrador retriever. He developed a cough a few months ago and it was determined by our veterinarian that the cause was most likely some type of infectious bacterial bronchitis.(Because of his age, he was checked for heart and lung conditions that may be the cause of the cough, but those were ruled out.) Our vet prescribed Clavamox and Sulfa, to be given twice daily for ten days. The cough was almost completely eliminated. However, when we stopped the antibiotics, the cough slowly returned. After another visit to the vet, he is now taking another round of antibiotics. This time, he is on Amoxicillin and Sulfa, to be taken twice daily for three weeks. The cough is going away. I have been doing other things like a placing a humidifier near him while he sleeps, taking him in the bathroom while a hot shower is on (for the steam), softening his food with warm water (so it would be less irritating for his throat) and also putting some honey on his food, to help eliminate the cough. My question is about his other medication. He currently takes Lysodren, which is to help treat his Cushing's disease. He also takes Phenobarbital, because he has had seizures in the past. Like I said, the cough is going away, but it seems that the only time he is continuing to cough is on the days that he take his Lysodren (every Tuesday and Friday). I wondering if the cough could be caused by some sort of drug interaction between the Lysodren and the Phenobarbital? I have read that you have to be careful when giving a dog these two medications. But, I cannot find anything about the possible interactions. Does anyone have experience with any of this? Other than the medications that he takes to control his issues. He is otherwise in good shape for 11 years old. He is not overweight and he is very active still. He eats well, and loves to go for walks. This cough is just getting very frustrating and I would appreciate any feedback that anyone has to offer. Thanks Answered by Yong Hagley 1 year ago.

Lysodren may decrease the efficacy of phenobarbital. That is the nature of the drug interaction possible between those two. Using those two in conjunction should not cause coughing. Answered by Corey Lefrancois 1 year ago.


I have started my 11 yr old lab mix on lysodren today for Cushings. Has anyone had experience with this?
My main question is how long did it take for you to see results, like appetite back to normal as in not wanting to eat all the time and water intake-she drinks incessantly.If you had an experience with Lysodren what was the outcome? was the dog better or were there further issues? My dog has seen the specialist and... Asked by Michell Foerschler 1 year ago.

My main question is how long did it take for you to see results, like appetite back to normal as in not wanting to eat all the time and water intake-she drinks incessantly.If you had an experience with Lysodren what was the outcome? was the dog better or were there further issues? My dog has seen the specialist and he said to treat for Cushings even though the tests were inconclusive all the signs are there for the disease. She does not have diabetes or anything else that it might be. She is still pretty active-the main issue is the appetite and drinking. minor hair loss but not the norm for Cushings patients, so I'm guessing her disease is not as advanced. Answered by Phillip Weiler 1 year ago.

I have an elderly dog with PDH Cushings. She has just been diagnosed and the vet and I have decided to put her on Trilostane rather than Lysodren. Trilostane has less side effects than Lysodren. Sorry, I have no experience with Lysodren and just wanted to mention the Trilostane to you in case you want to discuss it with your vet. Answered by Lucie Adelson 1 year ago.

I had to put down a dog for Cushings last summer. However, we first noticed the problems (drinking a lot and loss of bladder control at night). It took around a week for the medication to really get going, and for her to seem better, and to stop wetting her bed at night. But with the first signs caught early, we were able to get her back to normal for a year, and then the next year she slowly kept declining, but not as bad as she was when we first noticed it. When she slowed down enough and looked like she wasn't happy anymore, we decided to put her down because we didn't want her to suffer, money wasn't an issue at all. It's not the end of her life yet, and you can still get a lot more out of her. I'm so sorry that you have to go with this, but just love the heck out of her, she's had a good life. Answered by Lenora Manteca 1 year ago.

Im sorry to hear about that My friends dog was just put down because of Cushings, but it was because of financial issues. DONT GIVE UP HOPE. go through with treatment. Good luck, and tell your pup that i said hi Answered by Dylan Sagel 1 year ago.

im sorry we had to put are dog down in october she had cushings she kept on having fits but then they found a tumor in the eye which was getting big so we had to have her out down she was a border collie im not quite sure wat medication she had tho soz hope shes ok Answered by Ambrose Gabri 1 year ago.


My dog has cushings and was taking lysodren, now prednisone. He doesn't look too good...?
PS: My dog is only 4 years old. It isn't common for a dog as young as he is to have cushing's. Asked by Mariah Fuemmeler 1 year ago.

We started him off with Lysodren. He started showing signs of overdose so we stopped immediatly. He's been on Prednisone for the past week. Half the time I feel like he's doing better and then the other half I feel like he is suffering and not doing well at all. While lying down he has the shakes pretty bad and sometimes won't get up for quite a while. I am worried about him. Any experience with this? Any words of wisdom you can share would be appreciated. Answered by Shonna Bayles 1 year ago.

they tried my dog on different medicines for this unfortunately nothing worked and she died, i tried two different vets, hopefully you can find one in your area who knows what they are doing Answered by Branden Baragar 1 year ago.

If he overdosed on Lysodren he may now be addisons (the opposite of cushings). He may recover back to cushings or stay addisoian. I would ask about his blood Potassium and sodium - if the Lysodren did enough damage his potassium may be high (which can cause shakes) adn he would need florineif as was as the pred. I have an addisoian (he went strait to addisons without the cushings) and after a miserable period of dose adjustment hes been thriving on pred & DOCP (injectible florineif) for over 7 years now) Try the addisons support lists www.addisondogs.com or www.k9addisons.com several members have dogs that went from cushings so know your experince well....there is also a cushings list (search yahoo groups) Answered by Faye Dokka 1 year ago.

It didn't work for my beloved Test the Rott, he went thru the whole thing, and then the diarrea and everything. Talk to your vet about his situation, and aske him to be honest. Otherwise the vet is going to get you thru all these tests and everything and your dog won't be better. We had to let my dog go, and I think you should do too if he is old. You should not "strech" his pain to save up a few months; that would be selfish. Answered by Edmund Wangler 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, Prednisone really is a last resort to keep them comfortable. It can sometimes get rid of swelling, but it really just delays the inevitable. My cocker spaniel is slowly dying of cancer, and that's what they gave me to keep her happy in her last weeks. Good luck, and take care Answered by Risa Poovey 1 year ago.


My dog has cushings & needs lysodren. vet w/not write rx due 2 bill owed~can this b aval. online w/o rx?
not blowing off vet bill~just cant afford it yet . my dog has already been taking the med & needs a refill Asked by Eliana Bussman 1 year ago.

You probably cannot get it for free online, so you should put the money toward paying off your debts first. If something else happens to you dog, you will be in better standing with your vet. Answered by Sandi Stromme 1 year ago.

Pay your bill to the Vet and get the meds your dog needs! Be responsible! Answered by Soo Bynun 1 year ago.

try going to another vet. do whatever you have to. the vet sounds like an ****** so you should get a new one anyway. do not know if it is available on line but i do know that you need to be careful when buying online due to counterfeit products that can be placebos or even harmful to those who take them. best wishes. oh and when you go to the new vet obviously don't mention the billing trouble. Answered by Chanda Cichonski 1 year ago.

Ummm...pay your bill...your going to have to eventually riiiiiight? Poor dog....it is possible to find it online....Good Luck! Answered by Benita South 1 year ago.

Ask this in dogs. They should be more helpful there :) Answered by Lettie Popple 1 year ago.

pay the bill Answered by Otto Seyfried 1 year ago.


My dog has cushings & needs refill. vet wont fill cause i cant pay bill yet. smwhre i can get lysodren w/o rx
Asked by Beau Okuna 1 year ago.

Call your local college research vet school. They will see your pup for free & treat him. Good luck. Answered by Floria Hesson 1 year ago.

If all you need is the medication refill...dog doesn't need to be seen or anything...he should give you the prescription and let you get it filled elsewhere. In fact, from what I've always heard and been told (concerning people & pets), he can't force you to fill it there. You have the right to fill it anywhere. Of course, if the dog needs to be seen first or you don't even have the money for the meds, that changes everything. If that is the case, would he do it if you made a partial payment or set up a payment schedule? Other than that...beg, borrow, sell something. You can also try looking for a program that helps, think I've heard of one...but know nothing about it. I hope it works out, good luck. Answered by Ardis Costlow 1 year ago.

You may also want to ask your current vet for a prescription that you can refill at a pharmacy. This way you don't create a larger bill with your vet and as a side benefit you may find that with a little calling around to different pharmacy's the same medication may cost a lot less to fill. Many people don't realize that Rx's don't have to be filled at the vet. You can have it filled at any pharmacy that carries the Rx. Answered by Pattie Shill 1 year ago.

With cushings, he needs the medication. Even going to another vet, they are going to want an exam and blood tests. Try asking for vet for a prescription that you can fill over the Internet, cost less, he should know it is not good for the dog to go without meds. Answered by Jessenia Nhep 1 year ago.

Don't order from any of the places online that offer medications w/o a prescription. You are risking your pet's life, either would be giving him medications that are out of date, substandard quality, or not even the actual medication you need.. You should try to reason with your vet. Even tho you aren't paying your bill, anyone with any compassion would think of the dog and would at very least refill the prescription... If not, then I would find a new vet. Be aware tho, if you get your old vet files transfered to a new vet, your file will be marked as someone who doesn't pay your bills.. That bad name will follow you no matter where you go. Answered by Moses Lemm 1 year ago.

Vet should refill the meds even if you can not pay for the bill just yet.. I would consider your vet cruel to animals by deny them necessary medicine. Answered by Nona Ory 1 year ago.

Vets who are purely in it for the money are shameful. I believe there are vets out there that do this for love of animals and would consider special circumstances as long as we don't abuse them. Contact local shelters or animal groups and they will be able to help you. I commend you for taking care of your pet even if it does cause a strain on the pocket. I'm sure things will work out eventually. Good luck Answered by Armida Riha 1 year ago.

Take your dog to another vet, obviously they don't care about your pet. Set up a payment plan with them so you can get them off your back. Unfortunately you will need a prescription from a vet for lysodren. Answered by Mohammed Garnes 1 year ago.

See if your vet will refill the meds if you make a payment on your account. Not to be snide but....you might consider canceling your internet for a few months until your vet bill is paid..... Answered by Hilda Beauchesne 1 year ago.

take him to a different vet and then dont pay the bill there. do whatever it takes for your dog. it sucks the world is always about money and not the living animal. Answered by Bryant Given 1 year ago.


My dog has cushings disease, they prescribed lysodren AND anipryl, but everything I have read says one or the?
other .. what should i do Asked by Marceline Kintopp 1 year ago.

look for another vet and get a second opinion. just to be safe. Answered by Principe 1 year ago.


My 12 yr old lab is on 500mg lysodren. should her hair be falling out all info i have read does not indicate?
Asked by Golda Mikowski 1 year ago.

In humans, hair loss is common during chemotherapy. Ask your vet. Answered by Leisa Towe 1 year ago.


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