Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018538/001.

Names and composition

"LOZOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of INDAPAMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018538/001 LOZOL INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018538/002 LOZOL INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018538/001 LOZOL INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018538/002 LOZOL INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
074299/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
074299/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074461/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
074461/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074498/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
074498/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074585/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074585/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
074594/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074594/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
074665/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074665/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
074722/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
074722/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
075105/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
075105/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
075201/001 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
075201/002 INDAPAMIDE INDAPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Will using lozol help get rid of water weight?
I'm a man wanting to lose some weight the quickest way possible. I read somewhere fighters sometime use lozol as an aid to lose weight to make weight. Does anyone know if it actually work. Asked by Jena Scheve 1 year ago.

I dont know what that is, but everyone uses Lasix, boxers, fighters, bodybuilders, everyone. Its prescription only and very dangerous to mess with if you dont know what your doing Answered by Lupe Zywiec 1 year ago.


Which of the following products manufactured by smithkline beecham?
keflex, dyazide , lozol, xanax Asked by Basil Brynestad 1 year ago.

SmithKline Beecham manufactures the drug Dyazide, which they now said they would produce a generic of. Nice of them :) Answered by Anthony Dufour 1 year ago.


Looking for patient assistance program for 3 specific meds, any ideas?
I know that each manufacturer is SUPPOSED to have a patient assistance program, but on the web, I can't seem to turn up a link for that, especially for Klonopin. Any exact URL would be helpful, or maybe a phone number for the company (companies)? thanks Asked by Mandi Guarriello 1 year ago.

Clonazepam (Klonopin), zolpidem (Ambien), and indapamide (Lozol) are all available as relatively inexpensive generics but they may be available from the manufacturers if you quality. Each manufacturer is allowed to set the financial criteria for qualifying but they tend to be fairly consistent. Each manufacturer has a website for this purpose. The physician will need to give you a prescription as the brand name and must specify that brand name is required or necessary. Some companies send the pills directly to you although most send them to the physician's office where you pick them up. Klonopin is made by Roche, Ambien is made by Sanofi-Aventis, and Lozol is made by Sanofi-Aventis as well. Good luck. Answered by Tricia Eakin 1 year ago.

i don't know where you live but in Louisville KY we have a community hospital and clinics do you have that in your area for my klopin i go to the community hospital and i am on a sliding scale fee hope it helps also if you don't have these kind of clinics and hospitals call the food stamp office in your area see if they can refer you to local agency that helps good luck I know how important those meds are they keep me from killing my oldest son seriously Answered by Sumiko Hepper 1 year ago.


How do you pronounce demadex, lasix and bumex?
how do you pronounce hydrodiuril, lozol, zaroxolyn, diuril, aldactone, dyazide??? Asked by Pura Euler 1 year ago.

dem uh dex lay six buu mex' hydro die ur il die ur il zuh rox e lyn al daac tone die uh zide Answered by Maire Staschke 1 year ago.


Which thiazide diuretics and related diuretics are the most prescribed??? i am a pharmacy tech student...?
I know that HCTZ is prescribed a lot... But are diuril, Lozol and zaroxolyn prescribed a lot???? Asked by Nicol Tattersall 1 year ago.

Most often in our clinic pt's are on Lasix, HCTZ,or spironolactone. Or a combination of some sorts. Answered by Neda Spragins 1 year ago.

I know that dyazide is often prescribed Answered by Carmen Keihl 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Pennie Pehl 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Magan Verlinden 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Coletta Ambers 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Marie Waterford 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Christia Sondheimer 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Rick Kipple 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Alvera Blacker 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Tam Soto 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Myrna Maione 1 year ago.


What is a common hypertension medication?
Asked by Olin Dallis 1 year ago.

Diuretics ("water pills") examples: Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Furosemide (Lasix®) Indapamide (Lozol®) Metolazone (Zaroxolyn®) Spirnolactone (Aldactone®) Torsemide (Demadex®) Triamterene (Dyrenium®) Beta blockers examples: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Zebeta®) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Metoprolol (iLopressor®, Toprol SL®) Timolol (Blockadren®) Calcium channel blockers examples: Amlodipine (Norvasc®) Felodipine (Plendil®) Idradipine (DynaCirc®) Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nisoldipine (Sular®) ACE inhibitors examples: Benazepril (Lotensin®) Captopril (Capoten®) Enalapril (Vasotec®) Fosinopril (Monopril®) Lisinopril (Prinivil®, Zestril®) Quinapril (Accupril®) Ramipril (Altace®) Trandolapril (Mavik®) Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) examples: Candesartan (Atacand®) Irbesartin (Avapro®) Losartin (Cozaar®) Telmisartin (Micardis®) Valsartan (Diovan®) Answered by Roscoe Hoerig 1 year ago.

A very common hypertension medicine is hydrochlorathiazide(HCTZ). It's a diuertic. It's what I've had to take for the last 6 months. It's well tolerated. Others are; Norvasc, Lopressor, Cozaar, and the list goes on and on. Yes, like all medications, they have side effects. Natural medicines also have side effects or do nothing at all. HCTZ-diuretic Norvasc-calcium channel blocker Cozaar-ACE inhibitor are all very well tolerated. Their cautions and side effects are well known, and they have been around forever. Lopressor is a beta blocker. I wouldn't take those as first line treatment unless a few other conditions were being address. Beta blockers have well established uses, but the side effects can be a bit more than some other groups of hypertension medications. Answered by Marline Ameling 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Kecia Primus 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Tricia Sobania 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Ima Ablin 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Dierdre Schegetz 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Jesica Shonts 1 year ago.


Will using lozol help get rid of water weight?
I'm a man wanting to lose some weight the quickest way possible. I read somewhere fighters sometime use lozol as an aid to lose weight to make weight. Does anyone know if it actually work. Asked by Muoi Doten 1 year ago.

I dont know what that is, but everyone uses Lasix, boxers, fighters, bodybuilders, everyone. Its prescription only and very dangerous to mess with if you dont know what your doing Answered by Marguerite Melgarejo 1 year ago.


Which of the following products manufactured by smithkline beecham?
keflex, dyazide , lozol, xanax Asked by Lydia Shigemitsu 1 year ago.

SmithKline Beecham manufactures the drug Dyazide, which they now said they would produce a generic of. Nice of them :) Answered by Kelsi Nigh 1 year ago.


Looking for patient assistance program for 3 specific meds, any ideas?
I know that each manufacturer is SUPPOSED to have a patient assistance program, but on the web, I can't seem to turn up a link for that, especially for Klonopin. Any exact URL would be helpful, or maybe a phone number for the company (companies)? thanks Asked by Terrilyn Reiher 1 year ago.

Clonazepam (Klonopin), zolpidem (Ambien), and indapamide (Lozol) are all available as relatively inexpensive generics but they may be available from the manufacturers if you quality. Each manufacturer is allowed to set the financial criteria for qualifying but they tend to be fairly consistent. Each manufacturer has a website for this purpose. The physician will need to give you a prescription as the brand name and must specify that brand name is required or necessary. Some companies send the pills directly to you although most send them to the physician's office where you pick them up. Klonopin is made by Roche, Ambien is made by Sanofi-Aventis, and Lozol is made by Sanofi-Aventis as well. Good luck. Answered by Raymond Cryan 1 year ago.

i don't know where you live but in Louisville KY we have a community hospital and clinics do you have that in your area for my klopin i go to the community hospital and i am on a sliding scale fee hope it helps also if you don't have these kind of clinics and hospitals call the food stamp office in your area see if they can refer you to local agency that helps good luck I know how important those meds are they keep me from killing my oldest son seriously Answered by America Duberry 1 year ago.


How do you pronounce demadex, lasix and bumex?
how do you pronounce hydrodiuril, lozol, zaroxolyn, diuril, aldactone, dyazide??? Asked by Kevin Mcgrade 1 year ago.

dem uh dex lay six buu mex' hydro die ur il die ur il zuh rox e lyn al daac tone die uh zide Answered by Carmina Stahlhut 1 year ago.


Which thiazide diuretics and related diuretics are the most prescribed??? i am a pharmacy tech student...?
I know that HCTZ is prescribed a lot... But are diuril, Lozol and zaroxolyn prescribed a lot???? Asked by Shelley Delmage 1 year ago.

Most often in our clinic pt's are on Lasix, HCTZ,or spironolactone. Or a combination of some sorts. Answered by Kelle Tables 1 year ago.

I know that dyazide is often prescribed Answered by Lucas Leilich 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Gwyneth Sartore 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Miss Prum 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Mathew Geiselman 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Palmira Born 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Sebastian Cabugos 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Jamey Baldos 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Kristal Colyar 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Lindsay Peick 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Adriane Coven 1 year ago.


What is a common hypertension medication?
Asked by German Yanik 1 year ago.

Diuretics ("water pills") examples: Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Furosemide (Lasix®) Indapamide (Lozol®) Metolazone (Zaroxolyn®) Spirnolactone (Aldactone®) Torsemide (Demadex®) Triamterene (Dyrenium®) Beta blockers examples: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Zebeta®) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Metoprolol (iLopressor®, Toprol SL®) Timolol (Blockadren®) Calcium channel blockers examples: Amlodipine (Norvasc®) Felodipine (Plendil®) Idradipine (DynaCirc®) Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nisoldipine (Sular®) ACE inhibitors examples: Benazepril (Lotensin®) Captopril (Capoten®) Enalapril (Vasotec®) Fosinopril (Monopril®) Lisinopril (Prinivil®, Zestril®) Quinapril (Accupril®) Ramipril (Altace®) Trandolapril (Mavik®) Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) examples: Candesartan (Atacand®) Irbesartin (Avapro®) Losartin (Cozaar®) Telmisartin (Micardis®) Valsartan (Diovan®) Answered by Fernande Negley 1 year ago.

A very common hypertension medicine is hydrochlorathiazide(HCTZ). It's a diuertic. It's what I've had to take for the last 6 months. It's well tolerated. Others are; Norvasc, Lopressor, Cozaar, and the list goes on and on. Yes, like all medications, they have side effects. Natural medicines also have side effects or do nothing at all. HCTZ-diuretic Norvasc-calcium channel blocker Cozaar-ACE inhibitor are all very well tolerated. Their cautions and side effects are well known, and they have been around forever. Lopressor is a beta blocker. I wouldn't take those as first line treatment unless a few other conditions were being address. Beta blockers have well established uses, but the side effects can be a bit more than some other groups of hypertension medications. Answered by Kimber Giacherio 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Jeremy Bertsch 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Adah Ram 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Sharyl Manning 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Trent Wirtzfeld 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Quinn Laforce 1 year ago.


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