Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017525/001.

Names and composition

"LOXITANE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LOXAPINE SUCCINATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017525/001 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/002 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/003 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/004 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE *Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/006 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was discontinued or withdrawn for s or e reasons**
017525/007 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/008 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017525/001 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/002 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/003 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/004 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE *Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/006 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was discontinued or withdrawn for s or e reasons**
017525/007 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017525/008 LOXITANE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
072062/001 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
072204/001 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
072205/001 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
072206/001 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
076762/001 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076762/002 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076762/003 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
076762/004 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
076868/001 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
076868/002 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076868/003 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
076868/004 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
090695/001 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
090695/002 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
090695/003 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
090695/004 LOXAPINE SUCCINATE LOXAPINE SUCCINATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE

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Answered questions

What was that anti psychotic drug that side effect was twitching sometimes severe?
used to treat skitzophrenia Asked by Le Hogon 2 years ago.

All antipsychotics block dopamine, and all antipsychotics can cause twitching. Answered by Stacy Buquo 2 years ago.


What are the best bipolar medicines when nothing else works?
I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at... Asked by Jayme Tillberg 2 years ago.

I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at different times at well and that didn't work either I was wondering if there are any weird old or new or any medicines that i haven't heard of that may help when nothing else helps Answered by Corliss Yeamans 2 years ago.

If you have been jumping from shrink to shrink this is dangerous. Stick with one treatment plan. Other than this, my advice would be to get yourself slowly weaned off these medicines, if you are on more than one or two. They can be addictive in and of themselves. Try more natural therapies like meditation, deep breathiing, counseling, talk therapy, and get an endocrinologist to check for any abnormalities in your adrenals or thyroid, as well as your hormonal levels. You could do well with some natural products at health food stores. There could be something lacking in your system, or working overtime. (By the way, they are using you as an end user for the pharmaceutical companies.) Some of the drugs you mentioned are highly dangerous and can have really bad side effects. You think somebody isn't making money off of you? Think again. Been there, done that. Answered by Letha Karlstad 2 years ago.

I have heard that some foods can trigger the symptoms, so if you reverse that and look into foods which can help. man made chemicals are not good for you as you probably know. I dont know much about your condition but I do hope that you can find a way to help yourself experiment for one week on fresh. local foods only and see what happens best of luck : ) Answered by Francesca Carlile 2 years ago.


Antipsychotic Medication Suggestions?
I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped... Asked by Sherrill Lorenzetti 2 years ago.

I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped you please let me know your experience with the medication and the name of it. Thanks so much. Answered by Oretha Natale 2 years ago.

There is a list of atypical psychotic medications at the link below. A family member has tried several medications but always end up back on Zyprexa. There are the typical medications, the older drugs, which you could try. From our experience I would say it is trial and error. I know that is not much help but it is an honest answer. Good luck. Be safe, be sage Answered by Felipa Santacruce 2 years ago.

Ghost isn't precisely suitable suited; Seroquel has a greater advantageous risk of advertising diabetes in spite of the incontrovertible fact that it particularly is not any longer specific which you will get it. I took this drug for 6 months and that i replaced into recommended by utilising my rfile to workout and devour remarkable and attempt my blood sugar generally and the possibility could be slender. 500mg is a marginally super dose and if it particularly is not any longer assisting you at this dose, it would desire to no longer be the suitable suited drug for you. Going too a great way previous a generally recognised healing threshold would make issues worse. Answered by Ferdinand Kennady 2 years ago.

What diagnosis are they treating? Bipolar? Sometimes it takes trial and error on medications. The oldest in the book for bipolar is Lithium and Lithium works well with risperdal. Answered by Zoe Brazington 2 years ago.

Have you thought about Clozaril (clozapine)? Clozaril is one of the more potent antipsychotic medications that can be used when others fail. Answered by Alma Wydra 2 years ago.


Will these meds help me ?
I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder"They put me on:ThorazineCompazineStellazineMellarilNavaneTrilafonHaldolLoxitaneProlixinRisperdalElavilTofranil... Asked by Sherice Funicello 2 years ago.

I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder" They put me on: Thorazine Compazine Stellazine Mellaril Navane Trilafon Haldol Loxitane Prolixin Risperdal Elavil Tofranil (Imipramine) Desipramine Ludiomil Desyrel(Trazadone) Parnate Norpramine Sinequan Lithium Seroquel Effexor They kept me in the hospital for eight months. I still have anxiety. And I am still not sure what "split personality disorder" is. Answered by Jimmy Raelson 2 years ago.

You ask the same dam question everyday. What a waste. Answered by Mathilde Flore 2 years ago.

Ok, you are on a lot of meds my friend. maybe they are causing some of your problems.Anyways here is the new term for Split Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder. Look it up on the net, there is a specific web site for this disorder. It`s a very controversial topic, some believe it exist, other`s don`t. But to give you some insight, I peeked into my chart while I was hospitalized and that diagnosis was in bold print along with my bipolar disorder. You can`t help it. You didn`t ask for it. Find a buddy that you can talk to about it, only someone who is suffering with it can relate to you. If you`re hospitalized right now, it would be a good time to get more info and coping skills while you`re there..I wish you the best of luck. But look it up on the net, and see for yourself. Answered by Ozell Morn 2 years ago.

OK seems like that much meds in a day could kill someone, I find it hard to believe any Dr. would prescribe that many meds. All you need is an Anti-depressant and some Xanax for anxiety attacks. Get off all the sh*t and see a new Dr. Answered by Vesta Barges 2 years ago.

Sounds like a pharmacy nightmare. I can't understand taking that much medication. I would get a second opinion. Answered by Chase Scaglione 2 years ago.

i would not take any of that stuff man, youll get suicidal if you quit taking them after a while. Xanax is all you should need for anxiety. P>S your doc is a QUAK Answered by Lupe Brandow 2 years ago.

this is the same loser that comes on here as gm Answered by Dorla Ikehara 2 years ago.

You do know that some of those drugs react badly with others. Answered by Jeraldine Hyche 2 years ago.

all you need is lexapro and a new doctor Answered by Lorean Kashani 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Albertha Bustad 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Lakeshia Rohn 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Corina Howzell 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Enedina Chapple 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Lashawna Brothern 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Micki Eskin 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Johnsie Sundby 2 years ago.


Does anyone know if ativan helps anxeity attacks?
ive been taking them for 3years now they are just prn, i also take zoloft every day iought to be a zombie but im not. oh yeah, also take trazodone to sleep(which i dont. Asked by Faustino Delamora 2 years ago.

Yes, This is what MedicineNet.com has to say about ativan: GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Chantal Marchessault 2 years ago.

I am diagnosed and a self affirmed person with generalized anxiety with anxiety attacks on a regular basis. I too take an antidepressant with lorazepam. I take 300mg of effexor daily which also helps with anxiety and at night i have to take benedryl (same ingredient as unisom) and later right before bed i take 2mg of the lorazepam (ativan). I cant sleep otherwise. I have tried trazedone and OH MY GOD!! I was almost a hung over zombie the next day and luckily my mom lived by so she could help me care for my son who was 2 at the time. I only took it that one time because of that. My sister had the same side effect with trazedone as well. ( i come from a family with lots of mental issues) Also, the only other thing i know from experience is that these antidepresants stop working on you after a while. I was on Zoloft, wellbutrin-sr, lexapro, prozac (8 weeks only then became suicidal) and now on effexor. the two that have really helped me to get on my feet and become "myself" again was the lexapro and effexor. zoloft and wellbutrin were ok but had side effects and prozac just did not help me at all. Answered by Joyce Drewel 2 years ago.

Ativan(lorazepam) can help with anxiety, but also has many drawbacks. Is the same Dr. prescribing Ativan, Zoloft and trazadone? If not, get with a Dr. and go over all your meds with him. You can also get more detailed info from Drugs.com, but your best source is always your Dr. Answered by Libbie Pitch 2 years ago.

hmmm... i have anxiety attacks as well, but i take lexapro and xanax. I have heard of zoloft though. Maybe it's time for a med change. Talk to your PDoc. Answered by Reita Priester 2 years ago.

yes, ativan is supposed to work on anxiety. that's what it is for. but please use sparingly. it could be habit forming. and with the other things on board, i wonder if you wouldn't benefit from some kind of counseling. sounds like you have a lot going on! Answered by Jackelyn Reineck 2 years ago.

I used to have terrible panic attacks I think medicine is not good for you but I tried inositol and it worked for me, you can get it at the health food store, also diet sodas cause panic attacks because I started getting panic attacks when I started drinking diet sodas then when I stopped for a few months and took inositol they went away Answered by Johnette Swiger 2 years ago.

YEAH IT DOES BUT I RECOMMEND XANAX TRY LOW DOSE FIRST AND DON'T GET ADDICTED VERY ADDICTING. Answered by Vasiliki Brozyna 2 years ago.

thanks for bringing ativan up.i'm addicted to that and now the stupid doctor wont give me anymore.I went back to drinking. Answered by Phillip Yanko 2 years ago.


Do you know if lorazepam is good for anxiety?and what are the side effects?
I have tried it once and it worked well for anxiety,but I don't know if its good. Asked by Annabelle Kiser 2 years ago.

You need to be under a doctor's care if using this drug and should only use it short-term since it is addicting. GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Elvina Boisen 2 years ago.

Hi there! I'm sure others have told you that lorazepam is prescribed for people who have a hard time dealing with anxiety. Lorazepam comes from a family of benzodiazepines that also are given to people with epilepsy to help them control their seizures. In moderation, lorzapam is fine. However, benzodiazepines in general are very addictive. They should not be used if you are a recovering addict or alcoholic. The real problem is that people suffering from depression and/or anxiety can self medicate with other drugs or alcohol. There is a real danger of accidental overdose if you tend to drink or take other drugs (legal or illegal) with lorzapam. You may want to ask your doctor for a non addictive sedative instead. Hope this helps you. I will include a couple of websites for you to look at. Cheers, Answered by Jaime Dornbos 2 years ago.

If ativan worked well for you in the past it should work well for you in the future. As far as side effects, I attached a link below. Best of luck :) Answered by Mary Polle 2 years ago.

Well, it's GREAT for the anxiety, BUT< BUT< IT IS HORRIBLY ADDICTING. Answered by Cheryl Farrens 2 years ago.

No any tranquilizer is good if you take it for long time Answered by Latarsha Bazzanella 2 years ago.


What drug/drugs do you think should never have been approved for use on humans?
Another two drugs that never should have been approved for use on humans are : Loxitane Ascendin Asked by Sheldon Dimler 2 years ago.

I think the FDA should never have approved Midazolam aka Versed for use on humans...or animals for that matter. That is one evil, creepy, mild altering drug. Doesn't give any pain relief...just makes the person into a compliant zombie that will have no memory of what happened to them when they wake up (IF they wake up.) In some people it causes permanent brain damage....whoever approved this drug to be distributed should be boiled in oil! Answered by Camila Ulery 2 years ago.

Well, Thalidomide, obviously. But I also think that Seroxat should never have been approved. That's the trouble with animal-testing! It's just not reliable - and you don't need to be an animal-lover to know that - the evidence speaks for itself in the number of drugs that have been wrongly approved over the years. *gets off soapbox* Answered by George Sullenger 2 years ago.

Versed (midazolam) is a great drug for use as a sedative and amnesiac. It's supposed to sedate you and keep you from remembering painful medical procedures. It is not supposed to relieve pain -- it's not an analgesic. As far as thalidomide is concerned, it is a great drug also, but because of side effects its use is limited. It can be a wonderful therapy for certain cancers but the doctor, patient, and dispensing pharmacy must all be registered in a national registry. Answered by Linn Muno 2 years ago.

Not everyone has those reactions to versed. Only those allergic or overdosed. Its a benzodiazpine, close to the same thing as xanax and ativan and valium, ect. Its not supposed to relieve pain. It IS supposed to make you not remember what happened. Thats its point. Some of those porceedures arent worth the risk of anesthesia, but are quite painful even with pain meds. I would go towards some of the meds that were used in our parents day or earlier to treat things like depression, alcoholism, and other psychological disorders. The side effects some of those meds had occured in a majority of the patients and were worse than the original symptoms. Answered by Gilbert Visnosky 2 years ago.


What was that anti psychotic drug that side effect was twitching sometimes severe?
used to treat skitzophrenia Asked by Merrie Kutzer 2 years ago.

All antipsychotics block dopamine, and all antipsychotics can cause twitching. Answered by Maribel Mariscal 2 years ago.


What are the best bipolar medicines when nothing else works?
I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at... Asked by Justine Curtice 2 years ago.

I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at different times at well and that didn't work either I was wondering if there are any weird old or new or any medicines that i haven't heard of that may help when nothing else helps Answered by Shad Barries 2 years ago.

If you have been jumping from shrink to shrink this is dangerous. Stick with one treatment plan. Other than this, my advice would be to get yourself slowly weaned off these medicines, if you are on more than one or two. They can be addictive in and of themselves. Try more natural therapies like meditation, deep breathiing, counseling, talk therapy, and get an endocrinologist to check for any abnormalities in your adrenals or thyroid, as well as your hormonal levels. You could do well with some natural products at health food stores. There could be something lacking in your system, or working overtime. (By the way, they are using you as an end user for the pharmaceutical companies.) Some of the drugs you mentioned are highly dangerous and can have really bad side effects. You think somebody isn't making money off of you? Think again. Been there, done that. Answered by Lady Angland 2 years ago.

I have heard that some foods can trigger the symptoms, so if you reverse that and look into foods which can help. man made chemicals are not good for you as you probably know. I dont know much about your condition but I do hope that you can find a way to help yourself experiment for one week on fresh. local foods only and see what happens best of luck : ) Answered by Cher Flaggs 2 years ago.


Antipsychotic Medication Suggestions?
I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped... Asked by Melany Mcwhorter 2 years ago.

I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped you please let me know your experience with the medication and the name of it. Thanks so much. Answered by Stefania Wildeboer 2 years ago.

There is a list of atypical psychotic medications at the link below. A family member has tried several medications but always end up back on Zyprexa. There are the typical medications, the older drugs, which you could try. From our experience I would say it is trial and error. I know that is not much help but it is an honest answer. Good luck. Be safe, be sage Answered by Goldie Langeveld 2 years ago.

Ghost isn't precisely suitable suited; Seroquel has a greater advantageous risk of advertising diabetes in spite of the incontrovertible fact that it particularly is not any longer specific which you will get it. I took this drug for 6 months and that i replaced into recommended by utilising my rfile to workout and devour remarkable and attempt my blood sugar generally and the possibility could be slender. 500mg is a marginally super dose and if it particularly is not any longer assisting you at this dose, it would desire to no longer be the suitable suited drug for you. Going too a great way previous a generally recognised healing threshold would make issues worse. Answered by Loretta Bakes 2 years ago.

What diagnosis are they treating? Bipolar? Sometimes it takes trial and error on medications. The oldest in the book for bipolar is Lithium and Lithium works well with risperdal. Answered by Dorian Favilla 2 years ago.

Have you thought about Clozaril (clozapine)? Clozaril is one of the more potent antipsychotic medications that can be used when others fail. Answered by Barry Tur 2 years ago.


Will these meds help me ?
I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder"They put me on:ThorazineCompazineStellazineMellarilNavaneTrilafonHaldolLoxitaneProlixinRisperdalElavilTofranil... Asked by Marlon Hoy 2 years ago.

I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder" They put me on: Thorazine Compazine Stellazine Mellaril Navane Trilafon Haldol Loxitane Prolixin Risperdal Elavil Tofranil (Imipramine) Desipramine Ludiomil Desyrel(Trazadone) Parnate Norpramine Sinequan Lithium Seroquel Effexor They kept me in the hospital for eight months. I still have anxiety. And I am still not sure what "split personality disorder" is. Answered by Bob Isip 2 years ago.

You ask the same dam question everyday. What a waste. Answered by Xenia Wasser 2 years ago.

Ok, you are on a lot of meds my friend. maybe they are causing some of your problems.Anyways here is the new term for Split Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder. Look it up on the net, there is a specific web site for this disorder. It`s a very controversial topic, some believe it exist, other`s don`t. But to give you some insight, I peeked into my chart while I was hospitalized and that diagnosis was in bold print along with my bipolar disorder. You can`t help it. You didn`t ask for it. Find a buddy that you can talk to about it, only someone who is suffering with it can relate to you. If you`re hospitalized right now, it would be a good time to get more info and coping skills while you`re there..I wish you the best of luck. But look it up on the net, and see for yourself. Answered by Renay Broadfoot 2 years ago.

OK seems like that much meds in a day could kill someone, I find it hard to believe any Dr. would prescribe that many meds. All you need is an Anti-depressant and some Xanax for anxiety attacks. Get off all the sh*t and see a new Dr. Answered by Izola Mcmain 2 years ago.

Sounds like a pharmacy nightmare. I can't understand taking that much medication. I would get a second opinion. Answered by Gala Klepac 2 years ago.

i would not take any of that stuff man, youll get suicidal if you quit taking them after a while. Xanax is all you should need for anxiety. P>S your doc is a QUAK Answered by Jewell Silmon 2 years ago.

this is the same loser that comes on here as gm Answered by Trinidad Hudach 2 years ago.

You do know that some of those drugs react badly with others. Answered by Rufus Overgaard 2 years ago.

all you need is lexapro and a new doctor Answered by Jo Riebeling 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Annett Hoffmann 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Fumiko Lecea 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Augustine Lahman 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Scarlett Famageltto 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Stefania Peard 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Carey America 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Galen Kisor 2 years ago.


Does anyone know if ativan helps anxeity attacks?
ive been taking them for 3years now they are just prn, i also take zoloft every day iought to be a zombie but im not. oh yeah, also take trazodone to sleep(which i dont. Asked by Nannette Witherite 2 years ago.

Yes, This is what MedicineNet.com has to say about ativan: GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Diann Izard 2 years ago.

I am diagnosed and a self affirmed person with generalized anxiety with anxiety attacks on a regular basis. I too take an antidepressant with lorazepam. I take 300mg of effexor daily which also helps with anxiety and at night i have to take benedryl (same ingredient as unisom) and later right before bed i take 2mg of the lorazepam (ativan). I cant sleep otherwise. I have tried trazedone and OH MY GOD!! I was almost a hung over zombie the next day and luckily my mom lived by so she could help me care for my son who was 2 at the time. I only took it that one time because of that. My sister had the same side effect with trazedone as well. ( i come from a family with lots of mental issues) Also, the only other thing i know from experience is that these antidepresants stop working on you after a while. I was on Zoloft, wellbutrin-sr, lexapro, prozac (8 weeks only then became suicidal) and now on effexor. the two that have really helped me to get on my feet and become "myself" again was the lexapro and effexor. zoloft and wellbutrin were ok but had side effects and prozac just did not help me at all. Answered by Sherice Magid 2 years ago.

Ativan(lorazepam) can help with anxiety, but also has many drawbacks. Is the same Dr. prescribing Ativan, Zoloft and trazadone? If not, get with a Dr. and go over all your meds with him. You can also get more detailed info from Drugs.com, but your best source is always your Dr. Answered by Tuan Tayag 2 years ago.

hmmm... i have anxiety attacks as well, but i take lexapro and xanax. I have heard of zoloft though. Maybe it's time for a med change. Talk to your PDoc. Answered by Shawn Venturino 2 years ago.

yes, ativan is supposed to work on anxiety. that's what it is for. but please use sparingly. it could be habit forming. and with the other things on board, i wonder if you wouldn't benefit from some kind of counseling. sounds like you have a lot going on! Answered by Clarita Relph 2 years ago.

I used to have terrible panic attacks I think medicine is not good for you but I tried inositol and it worked for me, you can get it at the health food store, also diet sodas cause panic attacks because I started getting panic attacks when I started drinking diet sodas then when I stopped for a few months and took inositol they went away Answered by Chrissy Mcateer 2 years ago.

YEAH IT DOES BUT I RECOMMEND XANAX TRY LOW DOSE FIRST AND DON'T GET ADDICTED VERY ADDICTING. Answered by Tamra Guthridge 2 years ago.

thanks for bringing ativan up.i'm addicted to that and now the stupid doctor wont give me anymore.I went back to drinking. Answered by Annabell Pennington 2 years ago.


Do you know if lorazepam is good for anxiety?and what are the side effects?
I have tried it once and it worked well for anxiety,but I don't know if its good. Asked by Burton Dukes 2 years ago.

You need to be under a doctor's care if using this drug and should only use it short-term since it is addicting. GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Sherry Coxe 2 years ago.

Hi there! I'm sure others have told you that lorazepam is prescribed for people who have a hard time dealing with anxiety. Lorazepam comes from a family of benzodiazepines that also are given to people with epilepsy to help them control their seizures. In moderation, lorzapam is fine. However, benzodiazepines in general are very addictive. They should not be used if you are a recovering addict or alcoholic. The real problem is that people suffering from depression and/or anxiety can self medicate with other drugs or alcohol. There is a real danger of accidental overdose if you tend to drink or take other drugs (legal or illegal) with lorzapam. You may want to ask your doctor for a non addictive sedative instead. Hope this helps you. I will include a couple of websites for you to look at. Cheers, Answered by Emilee Instasi 2 years ago.

If ativan worked well for you in the past it should work well for you in the future. As far as side effects, I attached a link below. Best of luck :) Answered by Isiah Feist 2 years ago.

Well, it's GREAT for the anxiety, BUT< BUT< IT IS HORRIBLY ADDICTING. Answered by Lakeshia Detrolio 2 years ago.

No any tranquilizer is good if you take it for long time Answered by Candyce Beyrer 2 years ago.


What drug/drugs do you think should never have been approved for use on humans?
Another two drugs that never should have been approved for use on humans are : Loxitane Ascendin Asked by Renay Vacek 2 years ago.

I think the FDA should never have approved Midazolam aka Versed for use on humans...or animals for that matter. That is one evil, creepy, mild altering drug. Doesn't give any pain relief...just makes the person into a compliant zombie that will have no memory of what happened to them when they wake up (IF they wake up.) In some people it causes permanent brain damage....whoever approved this drug to be distributed should be boiled in oil! Answered by Francine Horton 2 years ago.

Well, Thalidomide, obviously. But I also think that Seroxat should never have been approved. That's the trouble with animal-testing! It's just not reliable - and you don't need to be an animal-lover to know that - the evidence speaks for itself in the number of drugs that have been wrongly approved over the years. *gets off soapbox* Answered by Danica Fuselier 2 years ago.

Versed (midazolam) is a great drug for use as a sedative and amnesiac. It's supposed to sedate you and keep you from remembering painful medical procedures. It is not supposed to relieve pain -- it's not an analgesic. As far as thalidomide is concerned, it is a great drug also, but because of side effects its use is limited. It can be a wonderful therapy for certain cancers but the doctor, patient, and dispensing pharmacy must all be registered in a national registry. Answered by Ilene Gudinas 2 years ago.

Not everyone has those reactions to versed. Only those allergic or overdosed. Its a benzodiazpine, close to the same thing as xanax and ativan and valium, ect. Its not supposed to relieve pain. It IS supposed to make you not remember what happened. Thats its point. Some of those porceedures arent worth the risk of anesthesia, but are quite painful even with pain meds. I would go towards some of the meds that were used in our parents day or earlier to treat things like depression, alcoholism, and other psychological disorders. The side effects some of those meds had occured in a majority of the patients and were worse than the original symptoms. Answered by Deloras Bellingtier 2 years ago.


What was that anti psychotic drug that side effect was twitching sometimes severe?
used to treat skitzophrenia Asked by Jacklyn Montalto 2 years ago.

All antipsychotics block dopamine, and all antipsychotics can cause twitching. Answered by Stephani Delosrios 2 years ago.


What are the best bipolar medicines when nothing else works?
I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at... Asked by Yessenia Prich 2 years ago.

I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at different times at well and that didn't work either I was wondering if there are any weird old or new or any medicines that i haven't heard of that may help when nothing else helps Answered by Karmen Castros 2 years ago.

If you have been jumping from shrink to shrink this is dangerous. Stick with one treatment plan. Other than this, my advice would be to get yourself slowly weaned off these medicines, if you are on more than one or two. They can be addictive in and of themselves. Try more natural therapies like meditation, deep breathiing, counseling, talk therapy, and get an endocrinologist to check for any abnormalities in your adrenals or thyroid, as well as your hormonal levels. You could do well with some natural products at health food stores. There could be something lacking in your system, or working overtime. (By the way, they are using you as an end user for the pharmaceutical companies.) Some of the drugs you mentioned are highly dangerous and can have really bad side effects. You think somebody isn't making money off of you? Think again. Been there, done that. Answered by Joanie Espenshade 2 years ago.

I have heard that some foods can trigger the symptoms, so if you reverse that and look into foods which can help. man made chemicals are not good for you as you probably know. I dont know much about your condition but I do hope that you can find a way to help yourself experiment for one week on fresh. local foods only and see what happens best of luck : ) Answered by Gertha Heldman 2 years ago.


Antipsychotic Medication Suggestions?
I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped... Asked by Larue Mirabal 2 years ago.

I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped you please let me know your experience with the medication and the name of it. Thanks so much. Answered by Damon Twiss 2 years ago.

There is a list of atypical psychotic medications at the link below. A family member has tried several medications but always end up back on Zyprexa. There are the typical medications, the older drugs, which you could try. From our experience I would say it is trial and error. I know that is not much help but it is an honest answer. Good luck. Be safe, be sage Answered by Regina Gaiters 2 years ago.

Ghost isn't precisely suitable suited; Seroquel has a greater advantageous risk of advertising diabetes in spite of the incontrovertible fact that it particularly is not any longer specific which you will get it. I took this drug for 6 months and that i replaced into recommended by utilising my rfile to workout and devour remarkable and attempt my blood sugar generally and the possibility could be slender. 500mg is a marginally super dose and if it particularly is not any longer assisting you at this dose, it would desire to no longer be the suitable suited drug for you. Going too a great way previous a generally recognised healing threshold would make issues worse. Answered by Anamaria Lubelski 2 years ago.

What diagnosis are they treating? Bipolar? Sometimes it takes trial and error on medications. The oldest in the book for bipolar is Lithium and Lithium works well with risperdal. Answered by Eleanore Gaudioso 2 years ago.

Have you thought about Clozaril (clozapine)? Clozaril is one of the more potent antipsychotic medications that can be used when others fail. Answered by Mitzie Danforth 2 years ago.


Will these meds help me ?
I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder"They put me on:ThorazineCompazineStellazineMellarilNavaneTrilafonHaldolLoxitaneProlixinRisperdalElavilTofranil... Asked by Rick Hoeller 2 years ago.

I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder" They put me on: Thorazine Compazine Stellazine Mellaril Navane Trilafon Haldol Loxitane Prolixin Risperdal Elavil Tofranil (Imipramine) Desipramine Ludiomil Desyrel(Trazadone) Parnate Norpramine Sinequan Lithium Seroquel Effexor They kept me in the hospital for eight months. I still have anxiety. And I am still not sure what "split personality disorder" is. Answered by Mazie Borgese 2 years ago.

You ask the same dam question everyday. What a waste. Answered by Alaina Lyden 2 years ago.

Ok, you are on a lot of meds my friend. maybe they are causing some of your problems.Anyways here is the new term for Split Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder. Look it up on the net, there is a specific web site for this disorder. It`s a very controversial topic, some believe it exist, other`s don`t. But to give you some insight, I peeked into my chart while I was hospitalized and that diagnosis was in bold print along with my bipolar disorder. You can`t help it. You didn`t ask for it. Find a buddy that you can talk to about it, only someone who is suffering with it can relate to you. If you`re hospitalized right now, it would be a good time to get more info and coping skills while you`re there..I wish you the best of luck. But look it up on the net, and see for yourself. Answered by Jeffrey Thiessen 2 years ago.

OK seems like that much meds in a day could kill someone, I find it hard to believe any Dr. would prescribe that many meds. All you need is an Anti-depressant and some Xanax for anxiety attacks. Get off all the sh*t and see a new Dr. Answered by Bradly Takeda 2 years ago.

Sounds like a pharmacy nightmare. I can't understand taking that much medication. I would get a second opinion. Answered by Clorinda Blommer 2 years ago.

i would not take any of that stuff man, youll get suicidal if you quit taking them after a while. Xanax is all you should need for anxiety. P>S your doc is a QUAK Answered by Lesia Stoa 2 years ago.

this is the same loser that comes on here as gm Answered by Evelyn Tinkham 2 years ago.

You do know that some of those drugs react badly with others. Answered by Buena Colclasure 2 years ago.

all you need is lexapro and a new doctor Answered by Sharee Stowe 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Petrina Pacey 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Georgianne Benimadho 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Anton Billot 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Allie Lebeda 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Hoyt Moen 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Jonathon Schlesner 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Joe Guldemond 2 years ago.


Does anyone know if ativan helps anxeity attacks?
ive been taking them for 3years now they are just prn, i also take zoloft every day iought to be a zombie but im not. oh yeah, also take trazodone to sleep(which i dont. Asked by Nisha Mink 2 years ago.

Yes, This is what MedicineNet.com has to say about ativan: GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Ebonie Diclaudio 2 years ago.

I am diagnosed and a self affirmed person with generalized anxiety with anxiety attacks on a regular basis. I too take an antidepressant with lorazepam. I take 300mg of effexor daily which also helps with anxiety and at night i have to take benedryl (same ingredient as unisom) and later right before bed i take 2mg of the lorazepam (ativan). I cant sleep otherwise. I have tried trazedone and OH MY GOD!! I was almost a hung over zombie the next day and luckily my mom lived by so she could help me care for my son who was 2 at the time. I only took it that one time because of that. My sister had the same side effect with trazedone as well. ( i come from a family with lots of mental issues) Also, the only other thing i know from experience is that these antidepresants stop working on you after a while. I was on Zoloft, wellbutrin-sr, lexapro, prozac (8 weeks only then became suicidal) and now on effexor. the two that have really helped me to get on my feet and become "myself" again was the lexapro and effexor. zoloft and wellbutrin were ok but had side effects and prozac just did not help me at all. Answered by Marlys Perey 2 years ago.

Ativan(lorazepam) can help with anxiety, but also has many drawbacks. Is the same Dr. prescribing Ativan, Zoloft and trazadone? If not, get with a Dr. and go over all your meds with him. You can also get more detailed info from Drugs.com, but your best source is always your Dr. Answered by Brynn Cardani 2 years ago.

hmmm... i have anxiety attacks as well, but i take lexapro and xanax. I have heard of zoloft though. Maybe it's time for a med change. Talk to your PDoc. Answered by Jesica Thistle 2 years ago.

yes, ativan is supposed to work on anxiety. that's what it is for. but please use sparingly. it could be habit forming. and with the other things on board, i wonder if you wouldn't benefit from some kind of counseling. sounds like you have a lot going on! Answered by Melodie Kusnic 2 years ago.

I used to have terrible panic attacks I think medicine is not good for you but I tried inositol and it worked for me, you can get it at the health food store, also diet sodas cause panic attacks because I started getting panic attacks when I started drinking diet sodas then when I stopped for a few months and took inositol they went away Answered by Ashlyn Dummermuth 2 years ago.

YEAH IT DOES BUT I RECOMMEND XANAX TRY LOW DOSE FIRST AND DON'T GET ADDICTED VERY ADDICTING. Answered by Franklin Halechko 2 years ago.

thanks for bringing ativan up.i'm addicted to that and now the stupid doctor wont give me anymore.I went back to drinking. Answered by Yvette Keomany 2 years ago.


Do you know if lorazepam is good for anxiety?and what are the side effects?
I have tried it once and it worked well for anxiety,but I don't know if its good. Asked by Felisha Laudato 2 years ago.

You need to be under a doctor's care if using this drug and should only use it short-term since it is addicting. GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Lahoma Hanagami 2 years ago.

Hi there! I'm sure others have told you that lorazepam is prescribed for people who have a hard time dealing with anxiety. Lorazepam comes from a family of benzodiazepines that also are given to people with epilepsy to help them control their seizures. In moderation, lorzapam is fine. However, benzodiazepines in general are very addictive. They should not be used if you are a recovering addict or alcoholic. The real problem is that people suffering from depression and/or anxiety can self medicate with other drugs or alcohol. There is a real danger of accidental overdose if you tend to drink or take other drugs (legal or illegal) with lorzapam. You may want to ask your doctor for a non addictive sedative instead. Hope this helps you. I will include a couple of websites for you to look at. Cheers, Answered by Sharie Najarro 2 years ago.

If ativan worked well for you in the past it should work well for you in the future. As far as side effects, I attached a link below. Best of luck :) Answered by Raymundo Faville 2 years ago.

Well, it's GREAT for the anxiety, BUT< BUT< IT IS HORRIBLY ADDICTING. Answered by Kathleen Heuangvilay 2 years ago.

No any tranquilizer is good if you take it for long time Answered by Libbie Snell 2 years ago.


What drug/drugs do you think should never have been approved for use on humans?
Another two drugs that never should have been approved for use on humans are : Loxitane Ascendin Asked by Antonia Cawthorn 2 years ago.

I think the FDA should never have approved Midazolam aka Versed for use on humans...or animals for that matter. That is one evil, creepy, mild altering drug. Doesn't give any pain relief...just makes the person into a compliant zombie that will have no memory of what happened to them when they wake up (IF they wake up.) In some people it causes permanent brain damage....whoever approved this drug to be distributed should be boiled in oil! Answered by Shaun Mayette 2 years ago.

Well, Thalidomide, obviously. But I also think that Seroxat should never have been approved. That's the trouble with animal-testing! It's just not reliable - and you don't need to be an animal-lover to know that - the evidence speaks for itself in the number of drugs that have been wrongly approved over the years. *gets off soapbox* Answered by Adelle Topness 2 years ago.

Versed (midazolam) is a great drug for use as a sedative and amnesiac. It's supposed to sedate you and keep you from remembering painful medical procedures. It is not supposed to relieve pain -- it's not an analgesic. As far as thalidomide is concerned, it is a great drug also, but because of side effects its use is limited. It can be a wonderful therapy for certain cancers but the doctor, patient, and dispensing pharmacy must all be registered in a national registry. Answered by Lindsay Tillou 2 years ago.

Not everyone has those reactions to versed. Only those allergic or overdosed. Its a benzodiazpine, close to the same thing as xanax and ativan and valium, ect. Its not supposed to relieve pain. It IS supposed to make you not remember what happened. Thats its point. Some of those porceedures arent worth the risk of anesthesia, but are quite painful even with pain meds. I would go towards some of the meds that were used in our parents day or earlier to treat things like depression, alcoholism, and other psychological disorders. The side effects some of those meds had occured in a majority of the patients and were worse than the original symptoms. Answered by Tennie Morissette 2 years ago.


What was that anti psychotic drug that side effect was twitching sometimes severe?
used to treat skitzophrenia Asked by Dominique Rulli 2 years ago.

All antipsychotics block dopamine, and all antipsychotics can cause twitching. Answered by Amparo Zeiders 2 years ago.


What are the best bipolar medicines when nothing else works?
I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at... Asked by Kyung Zmijewski 2 years ago.

I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at different times at well and that didn't work either I was wondering if there are any weird old or new or any medicines that i haven't heard of that may help when nothing else helps Answered by Cecelia Elek 2 years ago.

If you have been jumping from shrink to shrink this is dangerous. Stick with one treatment plan. Other than this, my advice would be to get yourself slowly weaned off these medicines, if you are on more than one or two. They can be addictive in and of themselves. Try more natural therapies like meditation, deep breathiing, counseling, talk therapy, and get an endocrinologist to check for any abnormalities in your adrenals or thyroid, as well as your hormonal levels. You could do well with some natural products at health food stores. There could be something lacking in your system, or working overtime. (By the way, they are using you as an end user for the pharmaceutical companies.) Some of the drugs you mentioned are highly dangerous and can have really bad side effects. You think somebody isn't making money off of you? Think again. Been there, done that. Answered by Cleta Skolfield 2 years ago.

I have heard that some foods can trigger the symptoms, so if you reverse that and look into foods which can help. man made chemicals are not good for you as you probably know. I dont know much about your condition but I do hope that you can find a way to help yourself experiment for one week on fresh. local foods only and see what happens best of luck : ) Answered by Brianne Cedillos 2 years ago.


Antipsychotic Medication Suggestions?
I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped... Asked by Hae Sibel 2 years ago.

I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped you please let me know your experience with the medication and the name of it. Thanks so much. Answered by Creola Acal 2 years ago.

There is a list of atypical psychotic medications at the link below. A family member has tried several medications but always end up back on Zyprexa. There are the typical medications, the older drugs, which you could try. From our experience I would say it is trial and error. I know that is not much help but it is an honest answer. Good luck. Be safe, be sage Answered by Delia Mccooey 2 years ago.

Ghost isn't precisely suitable suited; Seroquel has a greater advantageous risk of advertising diabetes in spite of the incontrovertible fact that it particularly is not any longer specific which you will get it. I took this drug for 6 months and that i replaced into recommended by utilising my rfile to workout and devour remarkable and attempt my blood sugar generally and the possibility could be slender. 500mg is a marginally super dose and if it particularly is not any longer assisting you at this dose, it would desire to no longer be the suitable suited drug for you. Going too a great way previous a generally recognised healing threshold would make issues worse. Answered by Nella Kuhnen 2 years ago.

What diagnosis are they treating? Bipolar? Sometimes it takes trial and error on medications. The oldest in the book for bipolar is Lithium and Lithium works well with risperdal. Answered by Rosena Luckey 2 years ago.

Have you thought about Clozaril (clozapine)? Clozaril is one of the more potent antipsychotic medications that can be used when others fail. Answered by Elana Mccaine 2 years ago.


Will these meds help me ?
I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder"They put me on:ThorazineCompazineStellazineMellarilNavaneTrilafonHaldolLoxitaneProlixinRisperdalElavilTofranil... Asked by Lon Gressman 2 years ago.

I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder" They put me on: Thorazine Compazine Stellazine Mellaril Navane Trilafon Haldol Loxitane Prolixin Risperdal Elavil Tofranil (Imipramine) Desipramine Ludiomil Desyrel(Trazadone) Parnate Norpramine Sinequan Lithium Seroquel Effexor They kept me in the hospital for eight months. I still have anxiety. And I am still not sure what "split personality disorder" is. Answered by Pa Whisonant 2 years ago.

You ask the same dam question everyday. What a waste. Answered by Keven Carro 2 years ago.

Ok, you are on a lot of meds my friend. maybe they are causing some of your problems.Anyways here is the new term for Split Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder. Look it up on the net, there is a specific web site for this disorder. It`s a very controversial topic, some believe it exist, other`s don`t. But to give you some insight, I peeked into my chart while I was hospitalized and that diagnosis was in bold print along with my bipolar disorder. You can`t help it. You didn`t ask for it. Find a buddy that you can talk to about it, only someone who is suffering with it can relate to you. If you`re hospitalized right now, it would be a good time to get more info and coping skills while you`re there..I wish you the best of luck. But look it up on the net, and see for yourself. Answered by Brynn Duroseau 2 years ago.

OK seems like that much meds in a day could kill someone, I find it hard to believe any Dr. would prescribe that many meds. All you need is an Anti-depressant and some Xanax for anxiety attacks. Get off all the sh*t and see a new Dr. Answered by Delana Salz 2 years ago.

Sounds like a pharmacy nightmare. I can't understand taking that much medication. I would get a second opinion. Answered by Tennie Wilby 2 years ago.

i would not take any of that stuff man, youll get suicidal if you quit taking them after a while. Xanax is all you should need for anxiety. P>S your doc is a QUAK Answered by Katina Cureau 2 years ago.

this is the same loser that comes on here as gm Answered by Willis Toyn 2 years ago.

You do know that some of those drugs react badly with others. Answered by Bennett Prevet 2 years ago.

all you need is lexapro and a new doctor Answered by Garth Yalon 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Leonel Gennusa 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Luba Bondi 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Slyvia Mezey 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Wesley Proscia 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Delora Vilar 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Kala Springe 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Odette Gottdenger 2 years ago.


Does anyone know if ativan helps anxeity attacks?
ive been taking them for 3years now they are just prn, i also take zoloft every day iought to be a zombie but im not. oh yeah, also take trazodone to sleep(which i dont. Asked by Sang Oslin 2 years ago.

Yes, This is what MedicineNet.com has to say about ativan: GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Margie Aberson 2 years ago.

I am diagnosed and a self affirmed person with generalized anxiety with anxiety attacks on a regular basis. I too take an antidepressant with lorazepam. I take 300mg of effexor daily which also helps with anxiety and at night i have to take benedryl (same ingredient as unisom) and later right before bed i take 2mg of the lorazepam (ativan). I cant sleep otherwise. I have tried trazedone and OH MY GOD!! I was almost a hung over zombie the next day and luckily my mom lived by so she could help me care for my son who was 2 at the time. I only took it that one time because of that. My sister had the same side effect with trazedone as well. ( i come from a family with lots of mental issues) Also, the only other thing i know from experience is that these antidepresants stop working on you after a while. I was on Zoloft, wellbutrin-sr, lexapro, prozac (8 weeks only then became suicidal) and now on effexor. the two that have really helped me to get on my feet and become "myself" again was the lexapro and effexor. zoloft and wellbutrin were ok but had side effects and prozac just did not help me at all. Answered by Alica Kozinski 2 years ago.

Ativan(lorazepam) can help with anxiety, but also has many drawbacks. Is the same Dr. prescribing Ativan, Zoloft and trazadone? If not, get with a Dr. and go over all your meds with him. You can also get more detailed info from Drugs.com, but your best source is always your Dr. Answered by Hilde Delafontaine 2 years ago.

hmmm... i have anxiety attacks as well, but i take lexapro and xanax. I have heard of zoloft though. Maybe it's time for a med change. Talk to your PDoc. Answered by Tracey Saler 2 years ago.

yes, ativan is supposed to work on anxiety. that's what it is for. but please use sparingly. it could be habit forming. and with the other things on board, i wonder if you wouldn't benefit from some kind of counseling. sounds like you have a lot going on! Answered by Iliana Old 2 years ago.

I used to have terrible panic attacks I think medicine is not good for you but I tried inositol and it worked for me, you can get it at the health food store, also diet sodas cause panic attacks because I started getting panic attacks when I started drinking diet sodas then when I stopped for a few months and took inositol they went away Answered by Lera Hirezi 2 years ago.

YEAH IT DOES BUT I RECOMMEND XANAX TRY LOW DOSE FIRST AND DON'T GET ADDICTED VERY ADDICTING. Answered by Nikole Mcbee 2 years ago.

thanks for bringing ativan up.i'm addicted to that and now the stupid doctor wont give me anymore.I went back to drinking. Answered by Deloise Alatosse 2 years ago.


Do you know if lorazepam is good for anxiety?and what are the side effects?
I have tried it once and it worked well for anxiety,but I don't know if its good. Asked by Tennie Barbe 2 years ago.

You need to be under a doctor's care if using this drug and should only use it short-term since it is addicting. GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Alishia Peevey 2 years ago.

Hi there! I'm sure others have told you that lorazepam is prescribed for people who have a hard time dealing with anxiety. Lorazepam comes from a family of benzodiazepines that also are given to people with epilepsy to help them control their seizures. In moderation, lorzapam is fine. However, benzodiazepines in general are very addictive. They should not be used if you are a recovering addict or alcoholic. The real problem is that people suffering from depression and/or anxiety can self medicate with other drugs or alcohol. There is a real danger of accidental overdose if you tend to drink or take other drugs (legal or illegal) with lorzapam. You may want to ask your doctor for a non addictive sedative instead. Hope this helps you. I will include a couple of websites for you to look at. Cheers, Answered by Trina Gapinski 2 years ago.

If ativan worked well for you in the past it should work well for you in the future. As far as side effects, I attached a link below. Best of luck :) Answered by Roberto Gofton 2 years ago.

Well, it's GREAT for the anxiety, BUT< BUT< IT IS HORRIBLY ADDICTING. Answered by Kathrine Purifoy 2 years ago.

No any tranquilizer is good if you take it for long time Answered by Lashell Oceguera 2 years ago.


What drug/drugs do you think should never have been approved for use on humans?
Another two drugs that never should have been approved for use on humans are : Loxitane Ascendin Asked by Jazmin Hosfield 2 years ago.

I think the FDA should never have approved Midazolam aka Versed for use on humans...or animals for that matter. That is one evil, creepy, mild altering drug. Doesn't give any pain relief...just makes the person into a compliant zombie that will have no memory of what happened to them when they wake up (IF they wake up.) In some people it causes permanent brain damage....whoever approved this drug to be distributed should be boiled in oil! Answered by Millie Moesch 2 years ago.

Well, Thalidomide, obviously. But I also think that Seroxat should never have been approved. That's the trouble with animal-testing! It's just not reliable - and you don't need to be an animal-lover to know that - the evidence speaks for itself in the number of drugs that have been wrongly approved over the years. *gets off soapbox* Answered by Daphine Glasco 2 years ago.

Versed (midazolam) is a great drug for use as a sedative and amnesiac. It's supposed to sedate you and keep you from remembering painful medical procedures. It is not supposed to relieve pain -- it's not an analgesic. As far as thalidomide is concerned, it is a great drug also, but because of side effects its use is limited. It can be a wonderful therapy for certain cancers but the doctor, patient, and dispensing pharmacy must all be registered in a national registry. Answered by Arnetta Marcheski 2 years ago.

Not everyone has those reactions to versed. Only those allergic or overdosed. Its a benzodiazpine, close to the same thing as xanax and ativan and valium, ect. Its not supposed to relieve pain. It IS supposed to make you not remember what happened. Thats its point. Some of those porceedures arent worth the risk of anesthesia, but are quite painful even with pain meds. I would go towards some of the meds that were used in our parents day or earlier to treat things like depression, alcoholism, and other psychological disorders. The side effects some of those meds had occured in a majority of the patients and were worse than the original symptoms. Answered by Sharlene Helman 2 years ago.


What was that anti psychotic drug that side effect was twitching sometimes severe?
used to treat skitzophrenia Asked by Cathy Carlis 2 years ago.

All antipsychotics block dopamine, and all antipsychotics can cause twitching. Answered by Rhea Greb 2 years ago.


What are the best bipolar medicines when nothing else works?
I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at... Asked by Franklin Runquist 2 years ago.

I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at different times at well and that didn't work either I was wondering if there are any weird old or new or any medicines that i haven't heard of that may help when nothing else helps Answered by William Nasser 2 years ago.

If you have been jumping from shrink to shrink this is dangerous. Stick with one treatment plan. Other than this, my advice would be to get yourself slowly weaned off these medicines, if you are on more than one or two. They can be addictive in and of themselves. Try more natural therapies like meditation, deep breathiing, counseling, talk therapy, and get an endocrinologist to check for any abnormalities in your adrenals or thyroid, as well as your hormonal levels. You could do well with some natural products at health food stores. There could be something lacking in your system, or working overtime. (By the way, they are using you as an end user for the pharmaceutical companies.) Some of the drugs you mentioned are highly dangerous and can have really bad side effects. You think somebody isn't making money off of you? Think again. Been there, done that. Answered by Allison Commendatore 2 years ago.

I have heard that some foods can trigger the symptoms, so if you reverse that and look into foods which can help. man made chemicals are not good for you as you probably know. I dont know much about your condition but I do hope that you can find a way to help yourself experiment for one week on fresh. local foods only and see what happens best of luck : ) Answered by Shawanda Blase 2 years ago.


Antipsychotic Medication Suggestions?
I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped... Asked by Cornelia Dostie 2 years ago.

I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped you please let me know your experience with the medication and the name of it. Thanks so much. Answered by Danyelle Wittrup 2 years ago.

There is a list of atypical psychotic medications at the link below. A family member has tried several medications but always end up back on Zyprexa. There are the typical medications, the older drugs, which you could try. From our experience I would say it is trial and error. I know that is not much help but it is an honest answer. Good luck. Be safe, be sage Answered by Mayola Badgett 2 years ago.

Ghost isn't precisely suitable suited; Seroquel has a greater advantageous risk of advertising diabetes in spite of the incontrovertible fact that it particularly is not any longer specific which you will get it. I took this drug for 6 months and that i replaced into recommended by utilising my rfile to workout and devour remarkable and attempt my blood sugar generally and the possibility could be slender. 500mg is a marginally super dose and if it particularly is not any longer assisting you at this dose, it would desire to no longer be the suitable suited drug for you. Going too a great way previous a generally recognised healing threshold would make issues worse. Answered by Carley Tarshis 2 years ago.

What diagnosis are they treating? Bipolar? Sometimes it takes trial and error on medications. The oldest in the book for bipolar is Lithium and Lithium works well with risperdal. Answered by Dorotha Galon 2 years ago.

Have you thought about Clozaril (clozapine)? Clozaril is one of the more potent antipsychotic medications that can be used when others fail. Answered by Arron Boudinot 2 years ago.


Will these meds help me ?
I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder"They put me on:ThorazineCompazineStellazineMellarilNavaneTrilafonHaldolLoxitaneProlixinRisperdalElavilTofranil... Asked by Phil Vantrump 2 years ago.

I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder" They put me on: Thorazine Compazine Stellazine Mellaril Navane Trilafon Haldol Loxitane Prolixin Risperdal Elavil Tofranil (Imipramine) Desipramine Ludiomil Desyrel(Trazadone) Parnate Norpramine Sinequan Lithium Seroquel Effexor They kept me in the hospital for eight months. I still have anxiety. And I am still not sure what "split personality disorder" is. Answered by Maryanna Dent 2 years ago.

You ask the same dam question everyday. What a waste. Answered by Sha Ducksworth 2 years ago.

Ok, you are on a lot of meds my friend. maybe they are causing some of your problems.Anyways here is the new term for Split Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder. Look it up on the net, there is a specific web site for this disorder. It`s a very controversial topic, some believe it exist, other`s don`t. But to give you some insight, I peeked into my chart while I was hospitalized and that diagnosis was in bold print along with my bipolar disorder. You can`t help it. You didn`t ask for it. Find a buddy that you can talk to about it, only someone who is suffering with it can relate to you. If you`re hospitalized right now, it would be a good time to get more info and coping skills while you`re there..I wish you the best of luck. But look it up on the net, and see for yourself. Answered by Melony Boroff 2 years ago.

OK seems like that much meds in a day could kill someone, I find it hard to believe any Dr. would prescribe that many meds. All you need is an Anti-depressant and some Xanax for anxiety attacks. Get off all the sh*t and see a new Dr. Answered by Lawrence Irelan 2 years ago.

Sounds like a pharmacy nightmare. I can't understand taking that much medication. I would get a second opinion. Answered by Anisha Napoleon 2 years ago.

i would not take any of that stuff man, youll get suicidal if you quit taking them after a while. Xanax is all you should need for anxiety. P>S your doc is a QUAK Answered by Son Forden 2 years ago.

this is the same loser that comes on here as gm Answered by Earlean Imperial 2 years ago.

You do know that some of those drugs react badly with others. Answered by An Pasch 2 years ago.

all you need is lexapro and a new doctor Answered by Dee Repsher 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Rae Shulman 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Jean Mcgrue 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Oralee Huttman 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Deann Bojanowski 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Reta Nian 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Bruna Pereiro 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Janelle Mantilia 2 years ago.


Does anyone know if ativan helps anxeity attacks?
ive been taking them for 3years now they are just prn, i also take zoloft every day iought to be a zombie but im not. oh yeah, also take trazodone to sleep(which i dont. Asked by Lavette Dotie 2 years ago.

Yes, This is what MedicineNet.com has to say about ativan: GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Twila Able 2 years ago.

I am diagnosed and a self affirmed person with generalized anxiety with anxiety attacks on a regular basis. I too take an antidepressant with lorazepam. I take 300mg of effexor daily which also helps with anxiety and at night i have to take benedryl (same ingredient as unisom) and later right before bed i take 2mg of the lorazepam (ativan). I cant sleep otherwise. I have tried trazedone and OH MY GOD!! I was almost a hung over zombie the next day and luckily my mom lived by so she could help me care for my son who was 2 at the time. I only took it that one time because of that. My sister had the same side effect with trazedone as well. ( i come from a family with lots of mental issues) Also, the only other thing i know from experience is that these antidepresants stop working on you after a while. I was on Zoloft, wellbutrin-sr, lexapro, prozac (8 weeks only then became suicidal) and now on effexor. the two that have really helped me to get on my feet and become "myself" again was the lexapro and effexor. zoloft and wellbutrin were ok but had side effects and prozac just did not help me at all. Answered by Roselia Bruchey 2 years ago.

Ativan(lorazepam) can help with anxiety, but also has many drawbacks. Is the same Dr. prescribing Ativan, Zoloft and trazadone? If not, get with a Dr. and go over all your meds with him. You can also get more detailed info from Drugs.com, but your best source is always your Dr. Answered by Estella Looman 2 years ago.

hmmm... i have anxiety attacks as well, but i take lexapro and xanax. I have heard of zoloft though. Maybe it's time for a med change. Talk to your PDoc. Answered by Billy Frain 2 years ago.

yes, ativan is supposed to work on anxiety. that's what it is for. but please use sparingly. it could be habit forming. and with the other things on board, i wonder if you wouldn't benefit from some kind of counseling. sounds like you have a lot going on! Answered by Evette Fondow 2 years ago.

I used to have terrible panic attacks I think medicine is not good for you but I tried inositol and it worked for me, you can get it at the health food store, also diet sodas cause panic attacks because I started getting panic attacks when I started drinking diet sodas then when I stopped for a few months and took inositol they went away Answered by Dana Smolik 2 years ago.

YEAH IT DOES BUT I RECOMMEND XANAX TRY LOW DOSE FIRST AND DON'T GET ADDICTED VERY ADDICTING. Answered by Shala Amburn 2 years ago.

thanks for bringing ativan up.i'm addicted to that and now the stupid doctor wont give me anymore.I went back to drinking. Answered by Isabella Bisbee 2 years ago.


Do you know if lorazepam is good for anxiety?and what are the side effects?
I have tried it once and it worked well for anxiety,but I don't know if its good. Asked by Voncile Dallago 2 years ago.

You need to be under a doctor's care if using this drug and should only use it short-term since it is addicting. GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Buster Rheinhardt 2 years ago.

Hi there! I'm sure others have told you that lorazepam is prescribed for people who have a hard time dealing with anxiety. Lorazepam comes from a family of benzodiazepines that also are given to people with epilepsy to help them control their seizures. In moderation, lorzapam is fine. However, benzodiazepines in general are very addictive. They should not be used if you are a recovering addict or alcoholic. The real problem is that people suffering from depression and/or anxiety can self medicate with other drugs or alcohol. There is a real danger of accidental overdose if you tend to drink or take other drugs (legal or illegal) with lorzapam. You may want to ask your doctor for a non addictive sedative instead. Hope this helps you. I will include a couple of websites for you to look at. Cheers, Answered by Rebbeca Pentaris 2 years ago.

If ativan worked well for you in the past it should work well for you in the future. As far as side effects, I attached a link below. Best of luck :) Answered by Aurelia Labadie 2 years ago.

Well, it's GREAT for the anxiety, BUT< BUT< IT IS HORRIBLY ADDICTING. Answered by Argelia Schnebly 2 years ago.

No any tranquilizer is good if you take it for long time Answered by Luetta Telleria 2 years ago.


What drug/drugs do you think should never have been approved for use on humans?
Another two drugs that never should have been approved for use on humans are : Loxitane Ascendin Asked by Jed Froning 2 years ago.

I think the FDA should never have approved Midazolam aka Versed for use on humans...or animals for that matter. That is one evil, creepy, mild altering drug. Doesn't give any pain relief...just makes the person into a compliant zombie that will have no memory of what happened to them when they wake up (IF they wake up.) In some people it causes permanent brain damage....whoever approved this drug to be distributed should be boiled in oil! Answered by Corrine Hoepfner 2 years ago.

Well, Thalidomide, obviously. But I also think that Seroxat should never have been approved. That's the trouble with animal-testing! It's just not reliable - and you don't need to be an animal-lover to know that - the evidence speaks for itself in the number of drugs that have been wrongly approved over the years. *gets off soapbox* Answered by Kathline Dornfeld 2 years ago.

Versed (midazolam) is a great drug for use as a sedative and amnesiac. It's supposed to sedate you and keep you from remembering painful medical procedures. It is not supposed to relieve pain -- it's not an analgesic. As far as thalidomide is concerned, it is a great drug also, but because of side effects its use is limited. It can be a wonderful therapy for certain cancers but the doctor, patient, and dispensing pharmacy must all be registered in a national registry. Answered by Margarette Netzer 2 years ago.

Not everyone has those reactions to versed. Only those allergic or overdosed. Its a benzodiazpine, close to the same thing as xanax and ativan and valium, ect. Its not supposed to relieve pain. It IS supposed to make you not remember what happened. Thats its point. Some of those porceedures arent worth the risk of anesthesia, but are quite painful even with pain meds. I would go towards some of the meds that were used in our parents day or earlier to treat things like depression, alcoholism, and other psychological disorders. The side effects some of those meds had occured in a majority of the patients and were worse than the original symptoms. Answered by Alverta Cristelli 2 years ago.


What was that anti psychotic drug that side effect was twitching sometimes severe?
used to treat skitzophrenia Asked by Mertie Chalker 2 years ago.

All antipsychotics block dopamine, and all antipsychotics can cause twitching. Answered by Antonietta Bitzer 2 years ago.


What are the best bipolar medicines when nothing else works?
I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at... Asked by Camilla Willison 2 years ago.

I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at different times at well and that didn't work either I was wondering if there are any weird old or new or any medicines that i haven't heard of that may help when nothing else helps Answered by Jae Dehaemers 2 years ago.

If you have been jumping from shrink to shrink this is dangerous. Stick with one treatment plan. Other than this, my advice would be to get yourself slowly weaned off these medicines, if you are on more than one or two. They can be addictive in and of themselves. Try more natural therapies like meditation, deep breathiing, counseling, talk therapy, and get an endocrinologist to check for any abnormalities in your adrenals or thyroid, as well as your hormonal levels. You could do well with some natural products at health food stores. There could be something lacking in your system, or working overtime. (By the way, they are using you as an end user for the pharmaceutical companies.) Some of the drugs you mentioned are highly dangerous and can have really bad side effects. You think somebody isn't making money off of you? Think again. Been there, done that. Answered by Mila Shamp 2 years ago.

I have heard that some foods can trigger the symptoms, so if you reverse that and look into foods which can help. man made chemicals are not good for you as you probably know. I dont know much about your condition but I do hope that you can find a way to help yourself experiment for one week on fresh. local foods only and see what happens best of luck : ) Answered by Dorotha Santiago 2 years ago.


Antipsychotic Medication Suggestions?
I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped... Asked by Magdalen Fiegel 2 years ago.

I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped you please let me know your experience with the medication and the name of it. Thanks so much. Answered by Sam Kittinger 2 years ago.

There is a list of atypical psychotic medications at the link below. A family member has tried several medications but always end up back on Zyprexa. There are the typical medications, the older drugs, which you could try. From our experience I would say it is trial and error. I know that is not much help but it is an honest answer. Good luck. Be safe, be sage Answered by Lashay Bormet 2 years ago.

Ghost isn't precisely suitable suited; Seroquel has a greater advantageous risk of advertising diabetes in spite of the incontrovertible fact that it particularly is not any longer specific which you will get it. I took this drug for 6 months and that i replaced into recommended by utilising my rfile to workout and devour remarkable and attempt my blood sugar generally and the possibility could be slender. 500mg is a marginally super dose and if it particularly is not any longer assisting you at this dose, it would desire to no longer be the suitable suited drug for you. Going too a great way previous a generally recognised healing threshold would make issues worse. Answered by Gail Busch 2 years ago.

What diagnosis are they treating? Bipolar? Sometimes it takes trial and error on medications. The oldest in the book for bipolar is Lithium and Lithium works well with risperdal. Answered by Harvey Mania 2 years ago.

Have you thought about Clozaril (clozapine)? Clozaril is one of the more potent antipsychotic medications that can be used when others fail. Answered by Charisse Mizzell 2 years ago.


Will these meds help me ?
I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder"They put me on:ThorazineCompazineStellazineMellarilNavaneTrilafonHaldolLoxitaneProlixinRisperdalElavilTofranil... Asked by Dennis Mctague 2 years ago.

I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder" They put me on: Thorazine Compazine Stellazine Mellaril Navane Trilafon Haldol Loxitane Prolixin Risperdal Elavil Tofranil (Imipramine) Desipramine Ludiomil Desyrel(Trazadone) Parnate Norpramine Sinequan Lithium Seroquel Effexor They kept me in the hospital for eight months. I still have anxiety. And I am still not sure what "split personality disorder" is. Answered by Liberty Pipes 2 years ago.

You ask the same dam question everyday. What a waste. Answered by Fleta Hedinger 2 years ago.

Ok, you are on a lot of meds my friend. maybe they are causing some of your problems.Anyways here is the new term for Split Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder. Look it up on the net, there is a specific web site for this disorder. It`s a very controversial topic, some believe it exist, other`s don`t. But to give you some insight, I peeked into my chart while I was hospitalized and that diagnosis was in bold print along with my bipolar disorder. You can`t help it. You didn`t ask for it. Find a buddy that you can talk to about it, only someone who is suffering with it can relate to you. If you`re hospitalized right now, it would be a good time to get more info and coping skills while you`re there..I wish you the best of luck. But look it up on the net, and see for yourself. Answered by Versie Needam 2 years ago.

OK seems like that much meds in a day could kill someone, I find it hard to believe any Dr. would prescribe that many meds. All you need is an Anti-depressant and some Xanax for anxiety attacks. Get off all the sh*t and see a new Dr. Answered by Rolf Rolando 2 years ago.

Sounds like a pharmacy nightmare. I can't understand taking that much medication. I would get a second opinion. Answered by Amie Mcclafferty 2 years ago.

i would not take any of that stuff man, youll get suicidal if you quit taking them after a while. Xanax is all you should need for anxiety. P>S your doc is a QUAK Answered by Kim Brusseau 2 years ago.

this is the same loser that comes on here as gm Answered by Marcos Keitzer 2 years ago.

You do know that some of those drugs react badly with others. Answered by Toshia Siers 2 years ago.

all you need is lexapro and a new doctor Answered by Latrice Wisbey 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Kenda Huertes 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Avril Ciampanella 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Carli Krivanek 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Yoshie Kallenberger 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Maria Dotolo 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Donny Fairfield 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Frankie Scarth 2 years ago.


Does anyone know if ativan helps anxeity attacks?
ive been taking them for 3years now they are just prn, i also take zoloft every day iought to be a zombie but im not. oh yeah, also take trazodone to sleep(which i dont. Asked by Angela Staver 2 years ago.

Yes, This is what MedicineNet.com has to say about ativan: GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Marta Wallentine 2 years ago.

I am diagnosed and a self affirmed person with generalized anxiety with anxiety attacks on a regular basis. I too take an antidepressant with lorazepam. I take 300mg of effexor daily which also helps with anxiety and at night i have to take benedryl (same ingredient as unisom) and later right before bed i take 2mg of the lorazepam (ativan). I cant sleep otherwise. I have tried trazedone and OH MY GOD!! I was almost a hung over zombie the next day and luckily my mom lived by so she could help me care for my son who was 2 at the time. I only took it that one time because of that. My sister had the same side effect with trazedone as well. ( i come from a family with lots of mental issues) Also, the only other thing i know from experience is that these antidepresants stop working on you after a while. I was on Zoloft, wellbutrin-sr, lexapro, prozac (8 weeks only then became suicidal) and now on effexor. the two that have really helped me to get on my feet and become "myself" again was the lexapro and effexor. zoloft and wellbutrin were ok but had side effects and prozac just did not help me at all. Answered by Star Dancoes 2 years ago.

Ativan(lorazepam) can help with anxiety, but also has many drawbacks. Is the same Dr. prescribing Ativan, Zoloft and trazadone? If not, get with a Dr. and go over all your meds with him. You can also get more detailed info from Drugs.com, but your best source is always your Dr. Answered by Milford Lloyd 2 years ago.

hmmm... i have anxiety attacks as well, but i take lexapro and xanax. I have heard of zoloft though. Maybe it's time for a med change. Talk to your PDoc. Answered by Lyndsay Aubuchon 2 years ago.

yes, ativan is supposed to work on anxiety. that's what it is for. but please use sparingly. it could be habit forming. and with the other things on board, i wonder if you wouldn't benefit from some kind of counseling. sounds like you have a lot going on! Answered by Winifred Sobieraj 2 years ago.

I used to have terrible panic attacks I think medicine is not good for you but I tried inositol and it worked for me, you can get it at the health food store, also diet sodas cause panic attacks because I started getting panic attacks when I started drinking diet sodas then when I stopped for a few months and took inositol they went away Answered by Cody Landero 2 years ago.

YEAH IT DOES BUT I RECOMMEND XANAX TRY LOW DOSE FIRST AND DON'T GET ADDICTED VERY ADDICTING. Answered by Ginny Musacchia 2 years ago.

thanks for bringing ativan up.i'm addicted to that and now the stupid doctor wont give me anymore.I went back to drinking. Answered by Burl Leinhart 2 years ago.


Do you know if lorazepam is good for anxiety?and what are the side effects?
I have tried it once and it worked well for anxiety,but I don't know if its good. Asked by Jule Skursky 2 years ago.

You need to be under a doctor's care if using this drug and should only use it short-term since it is addicting. GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Jo Arvin 2 years ago.

Hi there! I'm sure others have told you that lorazepam is prescribed for people who have a hard time dealing with anxiety. Lorazepam comes from a family of benzodiazepines that also are given to people with epilepsy to help them control their seizures. In moderation, lorzapam is fine. However, benzodiazepines in general are very addictive. They should not be used if you are a recovering addict or alcoholic. The real problem is that people suffering from depression and/or anxiety can self medicate with other drugs or alcohol. There is a real danger of accidental overdose if you tend to drink or take other drugs (legal or illegal) with lorzapam. You may want to ask your doctor for a non addictive sedative instead. Hope this helps you. I will include a couple of websites for you to look at. Cheers, Answered by Ernie Paulauskas 2 years ago.

If ativan worked well for you in the past it should work well for you in the future. As far as side effects, I attached a link below. Best of luck :) Answered by Hye Mangham 2 years ago.

Well, it's GREAT for the anxiety, BUT< BUT< IT IS HORRIBLY ADDICTING. Answered by Pete Dresser 2 years ago.

No any tranquilizer is good if you take it for long time Answered by Tawna Stadick 2 years ago.


What drug/drugs do you think should never have been approved for use on humans?
Another two drugs that never should have been approved for use on humans are : Loxitane Ascendin Asked by Mindy Wilmeth 2 years ago.

I think the FDA should never have approved Midazolam aka Versed for use on humans...or animals for that matter. That is one evil, creepy, mild altering drug. Doesn't give any pain relief...just makes the person into a compliant zombie that will have no memory of what happened to them when they wake up (IF they wake up.) In some people it causes permanent brain damage....whoever approved this drug to be distributed should be boiled in oil! Answered by Hisako Allara 2 years ago.

Well, Thalidomide, obviously. But I also think that Seroxat should never have been approved. That's the trouble with animal-testing! It's just not reliable - and you don't need to be an animal-lover to know that - the evidence speaks for itself in the number of drugs that have been wrongly approved over the years. *gets off soapbox* Answered by Coralee Halaas 2 years ago.

Versed (midazolam) is a great drug for use as a sedative and amnesiac. It's supposed to sedate you and keep you from remembering painful medical procedures. It is not supposed to relieve pain -- it's not an analgesic. As far as thalidomide is concerned, it is a great drug also, but because of side effects its use is limited. It can be a wonderful therapy for certain cancers but the doctor, patient, and dispensing pharmacy must all be registered in a national registry. Answered by Brunilda Kreisel 2 years ago.

Not everyone has those reactions to versed. Only those allergic or overdosed. Its a benzodiazpine, close to the same thing as xanax and ativan and valium, ect. Its not supposed to relieve pain. It IS supposed to make you not remember what happened. Thats its point. Some of those porceedures arent worth the risk of anesthesia, but are quite painful even with pain meds. I would go towards some of the meds that were used in our parents day or earlier to treat things like depression, alcoholism, and other psychological disorders. The side effects some of those meds had occured in a majority of the patients and were worse than the original symptoms. Answered by Devorah Liebler 2 years ago.


What was that anti psychotic drug that side effect was twitching sometimes severe?
used to treat skitzophrenia Asked by Christine Orabuena 2 years ago.

All antipsychotics block dopamine, and all antipsychotics can cause twitching. Answered by Jodie Evanchalk 2 years ago.


What are the best bipolar medicines when nothing else works?
I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at... Asked by Felisha Colone 2 years ago.

I have been on everything Lithium, Depakote, Trileptal, Topamax, Tegretal, lamictal, abilify, risperal, geodon, zyprexa, seroquel, loxitane, and probably a few others i can't think of off the top of my head, but the main problem is mania plus some mixed episodes Im having every day I tried taking my medicine at different times at well and that didn't work either I was wondering if there are any weird old or new or any medicines that i haven't heard of that may help when nothing else helps Answered by Beaulah Huerto 2 years ago.

If you have been jumping from shrink to shrink this is dangerous. Stick with one treatment plan. Other than this, my advice would be to get yourself slowly weaned off these medicines, if you are on more than one or two. They can be addictive in and of themselves. Try more natural therapies like meditation, deep breathiing, counseling, talk therapy, and get an endocrinologist to check for any abnormalities in your adrenals or thyroid, as well as your hormonal levels. You could do well with some natural products at health food stores. There could be something lacking in your system, or working overtime. (By the way, they are using you as an end user for the pharmaceutical companies.) Some of the drugs you mentioned are highly dangerous and can have really bad side effects. You think somebody isn't making money off of you? Think again. Been there, done that. Answered by Kymberly Gaud 2 years ago.

I have heard that some foods can trigger the symptoms, so if you reverse that and look into foods which can help. man made chemicals are not good for you as you probably know. I dont know much about your condition but I do hope that you can find a way to help yourself experiment for one week on fresh. local foods only and see what happens best of luck : ) Answered by Addie Scherer 2 years ago.


Antipsychotic Medication Suggestions?
I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped... Asked by Myrna Altobelli 2 years ago.

I have tried close to everything! They have either not worked or I have had severe side effects. I have tried the following: Abilify Fanapt Geodon Invega Loxitane Risperdal Lamictal Saphris Zyprexa If anyone has tried medicines other than these and didn't have bad side effects and it helped you please let me know your experience with the medication and the name of it. Thanks so much. Answered by Carola Gump 2 years ago.

There is a list of atypical psychotic medications at the link below. A family member has tried several medications but always end up back on Zyprexa. There are the typical medications, the older drugs, which you could try. From our experience I would say it is trial and error. I know that is not much help but it is an honest answer. Good luck. Be safe, be sage Answered by Lilian Koerber 2 years ago.

Ghost isn't precisely suitable suited; Seroquel has a greater advantageous risk of advertising diabetes in spite of the incontrovertible fact that it particularly is not any longer specific which you will get it. I took this drug for 6 months and that i replaced into recommended by utilising my rfile to workout and devour remarkable and attempt my blood sugar generally and the possibility could be slender. 500mg is a marginally super dose and if it particularly is not any longer assisting you at this dose, it would desire to no longer be the suitable suited drug for you. Going too a great way previous a generally recognised healing threshold would make issues worse. Answered by Lakesha Pouge 2 years ago.

What diagnosis are they treating? Bipolar? Sometimes it takes trial and error on medications. The oldest in the book for bipolar is Lithium and Lithium works well with risperdal. Answered by Gema Hilser 2 years ago.

Have you thought about Clozaril (clozapine)? Clozaril is one of the more potent antipsychotic medications that can be used when others fail. Answered by Coleen Spurrier 2 years ago.


Will these meds help me ?
I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder"They put me on:ThorazineCompazineStellazineMellarilNavaneTrilafonHaldolLoxitaneProlixinRisperdalElavilTofranil... Asked by Sudie Hogle 2 years ago.

I went to see a psychiatrist for anxiety. He had me admitted to a mental hospital where they told me that I have "split personality disorder" They put me on: Thorazine Compazine Stellazine Mellaril Navane Trilafon Haldol Loxitane Prolixin Risperdal Elavil Tofranil (Imipramine) Desipramine Ludiomil Desyrel(Trazadone) Parnate Norpramine Sinequan Lithium Seroquel Effexor They kept me in the hospital for eight months. I still have anxiety. And I am still not sure what "split personality disorder" is. Answered by Rema Bossenbroek 2 years ago.

You ask the same dam question everyday. What a waste. Answered by Bobbie Mosmeyer 2 years ago.

Ok, you are on a lot of meds my friend. maybe they are causing some of your problems.Anyways here is the new term for Split Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder. Look it up on the net, there is a specific web site for this disorder. It`s a very controversial topic, some believe it exist, other`s don`t. But to give you some insight, I peeked into my chart while I was hospitalized and that diagnosis was in bold print along with my bipolar disorder. You can`t help it. You didn`t ask for it. Find a buddy that you can talk to about it, only someone who is suffering with it can relate to you. If you`re hospitalized right now, it would be a good time to get more info and coping skills while you`re there..I wish you the best of luck. But look it up on the net, and see for yourself. Answered by Edwardo Mulcahey 2 years ago.

OK seems like that much meds in a day could kill someone, I find it hard to believe any Dr. would prescribe that many meds. All you need is an Anti-depressant and some Xanax for anxiety attacks. Get off all the sh*t and see a new Dr. Answered by Effie Voedisch 2 years ago.

Sounds like a pharmacy nightmare. I can't understand taking that much medication. I would get a second opinion. Answered by Ellis Bierbrauer 2 years ago.

i would not take any of that stuff man, youll get suicidal if you quit taking them after a while. Xanax is all you should need for anxiety. P>S your doc is a QUAK Answered by Max Notoma 2 years ago.

this is the same loser that comes on here as gm Answered by Kristie Corless 2 years ago.

You do know that some of those drugs react badly with others. Answered by Tawana Levering 2 years ago.

all you need is lexapro and a new doctor Answered by Duncan Plateros 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Shanelle Feck 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Clair Costanzi 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Solange Fedewa 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Ta Macumber 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Myrta Shevlin 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Mildred Bourgoin 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Allen Rosato 2 years ago.


Does anyone know if ativan helps anxeity attacks?
ive been taking them for 3years now they are just prn, i also take zoloft every day iought to be a zombie but im not. oh yeah, also take trazodone to sleep(which i dont. Asked by Jackie Ruyz 2 years ago.

Yes, This is what MedicineNet.com has to say about ativan: GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Geri Whidby 2 years ago.

I am diagnosed and a self affirmed person with generalized anxiety with anxiety attacks on a regular basis. I too take an antidepressant with lorazepam. I take 300mg of effexor daily which also helps with anxiety and at night i have to take benedryl (same ingredient as unisom) and later right before bed i take 2mg of the lorazepam (ativan). I cant sleep otherwise. I have tried trazedone and OH MY GOD!! I was almost a hung over zombie the next day and luckily my mom lived by so she could help me care for my son who was 2 at the time. I only took it that one time because of that. My sister had the same side effect with trazedone as well. ( i come from a family with lots of mental issues) Also, the only other thing i know from experience is that these antidepresants stop working on you after a while. I was on Zoloft, wellbutrin-sr, lexapro, prozac (8 weeks only then became suicidal) and now on effexor. the two that have really helped me to get on my feet and become "myself" again was the lexapro and effexor. zoloft and wellbutrin were ok but had side effects and prozac just did not help me at all. Answered by Janessa Northway 2 years ago.

Ativan(lorazepam) can help with anxiety, but also has many drawbacks. Is the same Dr. prescribing Ativan, Zoloft and trazadone? If not, get with a Dr. and go over all your meds with him. You can also get more detailed info from Drugs.com, but your best source is always your Dr. Answered by Lesha Parara 2 years ago.

hmmm... i have anxiety attacks as well, but i take lexapro and xanax. I have heard of zoloft though. Maybe it's time for a med change. Talk to your PDoc. Answered by Gregory Leibfried 2 years ago.

yes, ativan is supposed to work on anxiety. that's what it is for. but please use sparingly. it could be habit forming. and with the other things on board, i wonder if you wouldn't benefit from some kind of counseling. sounds like you have a lot going on! Answered by Garfield Swentzel 2 years ago.

I used to have terrible panic attacks I think medicine is not good for you but I tried inositol and it worked for me, you can get it at the health food store, also diet sodas cause panic attacks because I started getting panic attacks when I started drinking diet sodas then when I stopped for a few months and took inositol they went away Answered by Season Christmau 2 years ago.

YEAH IT DOES BUT I RECOMMEND XANAX TRY LOW DOSE FIRST AND DON'T GET ADDICTED VERY ADDICTING. Answered by Almeta Delmundo 2 years ago.

thanks for bringing ativan up.i'm addicted to that and now the stupid doctor wont give me anymore.I went back to drinking. Answered by Marcelo Bartosiewicz 2 years ago.


Do you know if lorazepam is good for anxiety?and what are the side effects?
I have tried it once and it worked well for anxiety,but I don't know if its good. Asked by Sook Apollo 2 years ago.

You need to be under a doctor's care if using this drug and should only use it short-term since it is addicting. GENERIC NAME: lorazepam BRAND NAME: Ativan DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lorazepam is an antianxiety medication in the benzodiazepine family, the same family that includes diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), flurazepam (Dalmane), and others. Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines act by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that nerves in the brain use to send messages to one another. GABA inhibits activity in many of the nerves of the brain, and it is thought that this excessive activity is what causes anxiety or other psychological disorders. Because lorazepam is removed from the blood more rapidly than many other benzodiazepines, there is less chance that lorazepam concentrations in blood will reach high levels and become toxic. Lorazepam has fewer interactions with other medications than most of the other benzodiazepines. PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets (white): 0.5mg and 1mg, 2mg STORAGE: Tablets should be kept at room temperature. PRESCRIBED FOR: Lorazepam is used for the management of anxiety disorders, the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depression. The effectiveness of lorazepam, or other benzodiazepines , have not been adequately studied for treatment beyond 4 months. Lorazepam also has been shown to be effective for improving sleep in people with insomnia, for panic attacks, and as an adjunct (i.e., when added to other medications) to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: The dose of lorazepam is tailored to the patient's needs. Scheduled doses, given twice or three times daily, are sometimes used for persons with continuous anxiety or at bedtime for insomnia. Alternatively, lorazepam may be prescribed on as "as needed" basis, the physician instructing the patient to take lorazepam when he/she feels anxious. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lorazepam and all benzodiazepines, interact with other medications and drugs that slow the brain's processes such as alcohol, barbiturates, and narcotics. There have been cases of marked sedation when lorazepam was given to patients taking the tranquilizer loxapine (Loxitane); it is unclear if there is a drug interaction at all, but concern is warranted. PREGNANCY: Lorazepam and other benzodiazepines have been associated with fetal damage, including congenital malformations, when taken by pregnant women in their first trimester. Lorazepam is best avoided if at all possible in the first trimester and probably throughout pregnancy. NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if lorazepam is secreted in breast milk. SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with lorazepam are sedation (which is reported in approximately 1 in 6 people), dizziness (1 in 15), weakness, and unsteadiness. Other side effects include a feeling of depression, loss of orientation, headache, and sleep disturbance. Like all benzodiazepines, lorazepam can cause physical dependence. Suddenly stopping therapy after a few months of daily therapy may be associated with a feeling of loss of self-worth, agitation, and insomnia. If lorazepam is taken continuously longer than a few months, stopping therapy suddenly may produce seizures, tremors, muscle cramping, vomiting, and/or sweating. Answered by Judi Zadd 2 years ago.

Hi there! I'm sure others have told you that lorazepam is prescribed for people who have a hard time dealing with anxiety. Lorazepam comes from a family of benzodiazepines that also are given to people with epilepsy to help them control their seizures. In moderation, lorzapam is fine. However, benzodiazepines in general are very addictive. They should not be used if you are a recovering addict or alcoholic. The real problem is that people suffering from depression and/or anxiety can self medicate with other drugs or alcohol. There is a real danger of accidental overdose if you tend to drink or take other drugs (legal or illegal) with lorzapam. You may want to ask your doctor for a non addictive sedative instead. Hope this helps you. I will include a couple of websites for you to look at. Cheers, Answered by Barbra Goldberg 2 years ago.

If ativan worked well for you in the past it should work well for you in the future. As far as side effects, I attached a link below. Best of luck :) Answered by Kendall Ronning 2 years ago.

Well, it's GREAT for the anxiety, BUT< BUT< IT IS HORRIBLY ADDICTING. Answered by Alonso Gerdeman 2 years ago.

No any tranquilizer is good if you take it for long time Answered by Evonne Peregrino 2 years ago.


What drug/drugs do you think should never have been approved for use on humans?
Another two drugs that never should have been approved for use on humans are : Loxitane Ascendin Asked by Oliva Hemans 2 years ago.

I think the FDA should never have approved Midazolam aka Versed for use on humans...or animals for that matter. That is one evil, creepy, mild altering drug. Doesn't give any pain relief...just makes the person into a compliant zombie that will have no memory of what happened to them when they wake up (IF they wake up.) In some people it causes permanent brain damage....whoever approved this drug to be distributed should be boiled in oil! Answered by Man Steenhuis 2 years ago.

Well, Thalidomide, obviously. But I also think that Seroxat should never have been approved. That's the trouble with animal-testing! It's just not reliable - and you don't need to be an animal-lover to know that - the evidence speaks for itself in the number of drugs that have been wrongly approved over the years. *gets off soapbox* Answered by Rubi Tamminen 2 years ago.

Versed (midazolam) is a great drug for use as a sedative and amnesiac. It's supposed to sedate you and keep you from remembering painful medical procedures. It is not supposed to relieve pain -- it's not an analgesic. As far as thalidomide is concerned, it is a great drug also, but because of side effects its use is limited. It can be a wonderful therapy for certain cancers but the doctor, patient, and dispensing pharmacy must all be registered in a national registry. Answered by Fred Leash 2 years ago.

Not everyone has those reactions to versed. Only those allergic or overdosed. Its a benzodiazpine, close to the same thing as xanax and ativan and valium, ect. Its not supposed to relieve pain. It IS supposed to make you not remember what happened. Thats its point. Some of those porceedures arent worth the risk of anesthesia, but are quite painful even with pain meds. I would go towards some of the meds that were used in our parents day or earlier to treat things like depression, alcoholism, and other psychological disorders. The side effects some of those meds had occured in a majority of the patients and were worse than the original symptoms. Answered by Gerald Twisselman 2 years ago.


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