Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018297/001.

Names and composition

"LOPURIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ALLOPURINOL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018297/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018297/002 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071586/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071587/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016084/001 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
016084/002 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018241/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018241/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018297/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018297/002 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018659/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018659/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018785/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018785/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018832/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018877/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070147/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070150/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070268/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070269/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070466/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070579/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070580/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070950/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070951/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071449/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071450/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071586/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071587/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075798/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075798/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077353/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077353/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078253/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078253/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078390/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078390/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
090637/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
090637/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
203154/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203154/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
204467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
204467/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG

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Answered questions

Medication for kidney stones..?
The doc gave me Percocet 10/325. Are these strong? What is the strongest dose they have available for these pills? Asked by Deangelo Dowery 1 year ago.

Kidney Stones - Medications Medicine you can buy without a prescription, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), may relieve your pain. Your doctor can give you stronger pain medicine if needed. NSAIDs include aspirin and ibuprofen (such as Motrin and Advil). Your doctor may prescribe medicine to help your body pass the stone. Alpha-blockers have been shown to help kidney stones pass more quickly with very few side effects.5 Ask your doctor if these medicines can help you. If you get more kidney stones despite drinking more fluids and making changes to your diet, your doctor may give you medicine to help dissolve your stones or to prevent new ones from forming. You may also receive prescription medicine if you have a disease that increases your risk of forming kidney stones. Which medicine you take depends on the type of stones you have. Medication Choices Medicine to prevent calcium stones About 80% of kidney stones are calcium stones.1 Calcium stones cannot be dissolved by changing your diet or taking medicines. These medicines may keep calcium stones from getting bigger or may prevent new calcium stones from forming: Thiazides (such as hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone) and potassium citrate (Urocit-K) are commonly used to prevent calcium stones. Orthophosphate (Neutra-Phos) is sometimes used. It has more side effects than thiazides or potassium citrate. Medicine to prevent uric acid stones About 5% to 10% of kidney stones are made of uric acid, a waste product that normally exits the body in the urine.1 Uric acid stones can sometimes be dissolved with medicine. Potassium citrate (Urocit-K) and sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) prevent the urine from becoming too acidic, which helps prevent uric acid stones. Allopurinol (Lopurin, Zyloprim) makes it more difficult for your body to make uric acid. Medicine to prevent cystine stones Less than 1% of kidney stones are made of a chemical called cystine.1 Cystine stones are more likely to occur in families with a disease that results in too much cystine in the urine (cystinuria). Potassium citrate (Urocit-K) prevents the urine from becoming too acidic, which helps prevent cystine kidney stones from forming. Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen), tiopronin, and captopril (Capoten) all help keep cystine dissolved in the urine, which makes cystine-type kidney stones less likely to form. Medicine to prevent struvite stones About 10% to 15% of kidney stones are struvite stones.1 They can also be called infection stones if they occur with kidney or urinary tract infections (UTIs). These types of kidney stones sometimes are also called staghorn calculi if they grow large enough. Urease inhibitors (Lithostat) are rarely used because of their side effects and poor results. What To Think About If you have uric acid stones or cystine stones and are taking medicine to prevent more stones from forming, you will most likely have to continue taking that medicine for the rest of your life. Some struvite stones (staghorn calculi) form because of frequent kidney infections. If you have a struvite stone, you will most likely need antibiotics to cure the infection and help prevent new stones from forming, and you will most likely need surgery to remove the stone. Answered by Bryanna Noviello 1 year ago.

Kidney stones can be either large or small and consist of usually Ca/Mg Phosphate or Uric acid. The smaller stones pass into the ureter and then into the bladder and from there exit the body on urination. The pain occurs when the stone is moving down the ureter. Some times the ureter will swell around the stone and obstruct the passage of urine. The build up of pressure in the obstructed collecting system can cause pain and a place for infection to start. So, take your pain killers as needed (percocet is good) and drink plenty of fluid (beer is good). If the pain continues or gets worse go back to the doctor for an ultrasound or IVP (Intravenous pyelogram) Sorry for your pain. Good Luck Answered by Sharell Massenberg 1 year ago.

That is the strongest level of percocet, you need a script for it and it is one of the tightest controlled pain meds believe it or not. I think because of abuse of use not because of addiction. It will help with the pain of passing the stone. Just drink lots of water also. Answered by Meri Aliaga 1 year ago.

I can not support you with medicinal drugs, rather then herbs like parsley, celery seed & root, cornsilk, oatstraw, dandelion (leaf & root) and burdock. Make a well robust tea and drink copious quantities. I CAN support you with a few recommendation for preserving them from returning. A nutrition including plant situated entire meals will make sure quality wellbeing throughout all principal frame services. prohibit (or bigger) do away with processed meals, like bread, delicate cereals, & as a substitute decide upon entire grains, like rice(brown), oats, beans & legumes. Eat tons of end result & vegetables, and prohibit or do away with animal fats & protein (no, I'm now not kidding, you will not want it if you're getting a kind of usual meals. Ounce according to ounce, crops have approach better protein content material - and better pleasant for that subject.) a few well studying fabric at the field, The China Study. Here's on your wellbeing! Answered by Rhonda Heminger 1 year ago.


Side efects of cyclosporine?
Asked by Janine Feuss 1 year ago.

Cyclosporine is a very strong medicine. It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. You and your doctor should talk about the good this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop fever or chills, a sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, mouth sores, abdominal pain, pale stools, or darkened urine. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects. If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking cyclosporine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusual tiredness or weakness; cough or hoarseness, fever, or chills; painful or difficult urination; severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; unusual bleeding or bruising; seizures; or a sudden unusual feeling of discomfort or illness. Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take cyclosporine and notify your doctor if you experience tremor (shaking); increased bodily hair growth; gum problems; high blood pressure; numbness or tingling; or decreased appetite. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporine increase your risk of certain types of cancer, such as lymphomas or skin cancer. Ask you doctor about the risks and benefits of cyclosporine in your treatment. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect cyclosporine? There are many drug/drug interactions with cyclosporine and you should tell your doctor of any drugs you are on and any new drugs, including herbal products, you start. The interactions could alter cyclosporine levels causing a decrease in effectiveness or an increase in side effects. The side effects or effectiveness of the other drugs may also be altered. The following are some examples of medicatoins that may result in a drug/drug interaction when taken with cyclosporine: trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, others), gentamicin (Garamycin, others), and vancomycin (Vancocin); ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Naprosyn, Anaprox, Aleve, others), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), fenoprofen (Nalfon), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), and tolmetin (Tolectin); amphotericin B (Fungizone) and ketoconazole (Nizoral); tacrolimus (Prograf); melphalan (Alkeran); cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB) and ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) and verapamil (Calan, Verelan); ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), and fluconazole (Diflucan); danazol (Danocrine) and methylprednisolone (Medrol, others); erythromycin (Ery-Tab, E-Mycin, E.E.S., P.C.E., others), clarithromycin (Biaxin); bromocriptine (Parlodel); colchicine and allopurinol (Aloprim, Lopurin, Zyloprim); indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), lopinavir-ritonavir(Kaletra) and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase); metoclopramide (Reglan); prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, others); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); lovastatin (Mevacor), fluvastatin (Lescol), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), or atorvastatin (Lipitor); PUVA or UVB therapy; and potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone, Spironol), or triamterene (Dyrenium); and any type of vaccination. Answered by Rosemary Apodace 1 year ago.

Hi -- "It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. " Answered by Amparo Schroder 1 year ago.


Can anyone tell me ,is there any traditional medicine to help cure Gout or at least reduce the pain?
Asked by Kara Neidig 1 year ago.

Gout is caused by an accumulation of uric acid in the joint tissues. Currently, there is no cure for gout, but through proper diet, a healthy lifestyle and medications, the symptoms of gout can be relieved and further episodes eliminated. *Proper diet Avoid or restrict foods high in purine (a substance that produces uric acid when broken down). These foods include: sardines, anchovies, brains, liver, kidneys, tripe, sweetbreads, tongue, shellfish (mussels and oysters), fish roe, scallops, peas, lentils, beans and an excessive amount of red meat. Drink 10 to 12 eight-ounce glasses of non-alcoholic fluids daily. *Healthy lifestyle Reduce alcohol consumption Lose weight *Medications Using medications for gout can be complicated, because the treatment needs to be tailored for each person and may need to be changed from time to time. To relieve the pain and swelling of an acute attack, the doctor may prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, corticosteroid drugs, and/or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). To prevent future attacks, the doctor may recommend colchicine, probenecid (Benemid, Parbenem or Probalan), sulfinpyrazone (Anturane), or allopurinol (Lopurin, Zurinol or Zyloprim). All of these drugs are powerful, so the patient needs to understand why they are taking them, what side effects may occur and what to do if they have problems with the medication. *Prevention of Gout -To lower risk factors, consider: supervised weight-loss program with exercise (if the patient is overweight) avoiding a purine-rich diet avoiding alcohol consumption, especially binge drinking changing to another drug, if taking diuretics for hypertension Answered by Arnetta Charter 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Celine Simpkin 1 year ago.

Gout can also be managed through lifestyle and diet changes. Weight loss, staying hydrated, limiting alcohol consumption, and restricting intake of foods high in purines (which the human body converts into uric acid) can all prevent a gout outbreak. Food extremely high in purines include: Organ meats like hearts and brains Herring Mussels Sardines Yeast Foods moderately high in purines include: Anchovies Bacon Liver Salmon Turkey Scallops Haddock Kidneys Goose Vegetables like peas, beans, spinach, cauliflower, and mushrooms are all high in purines; however, studies have shown that gout sufferers don’t experience an increased risk of outbreaks if they consume these foods. Additionally, though most foods associated with gout have a high protein content, studies have shown that a high-protein diet like Atkins or South Beach has no effect on gout outbreaks. Ultimately, the diet associated with the development of gout is the same diet associated with heart disease. Answered by Latonia Moehn 1 year ago.

No, I dont believe this is a miracle. I have had leukemia, twice. And there are several things that could show bad lab results, but nothing be wrong once you do the biopsy. I have actually been in that position before. A lab showed outragously high white blood cell counts and a lot of blast cells, but when they did the biopsy to double check and some more lab work, I just has a really bad infection. No cancer. Answered by Aleida Skeets 1 year ago.


Gout,causes,cures,remeades?
Asked by Carrol Toppa 1 year ago.

Gout can be hereditary and it can be triggered by all sorts of foods and drinks. My husband takes a daily dose of allopurinol, and as long as he takes it faithfully, the gout stays away. When it hits, it's horrible. It's so painful that he can't stand even the weight of a sheet over the affected area. My sympathies are with anyone who suffers from gout. It can be treated, but relief isn't instant. This is one of the few types of arthritis where the cause is known. It results from deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in the connective tissue, joint spaces, or both. Normally this is a byproduct of the breakdown of purines or waste products in the body. Normally uric acid breaks down in the blood and is eliminated in urine. When the body increases its production of uric acid or if the kidneys do not eliminate enough of it from the body, levels build up. This is called hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is not a disease and is not dangerous. However, if excess uric acid crystals form as a result of hyperuricemia, gout can develop. Foods that may trigger gout include beer and other alcoholic beverages, anchovies, sardines (in oil), fish roes, herring, yeast, organ meats (e.g., liver, kidneys), legumes (e.g., dried beans, peas, and soybeans), meat extracts, consommé, gravies, mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, and poultry. Weight loss can help reduce uric acid levels in those people that are overweight. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) block prostaglandins, the substances that dilate blood vessels and cause inflammation and pain. They are taken orally at their highest safe dosage as long as symptoms persist and for three or four days after. There are dozens of NSAIDs. Indomethacin (Indocin) is the usual choice. Colchicine, a derivative of the autumn crocus, has been used to treat gout for thousands of years. This drug relieves the pain and swelling and can help prevent future attacks. Although highly effective, it is no longer the first treatment choice due to the potential for unpleasant side effects. Corticosteroids may be used if NSAIDs are not tolerated. Allopurinol (Lopurin, Zyloprim) blocks uric acid production and is the drug most often used in long-term treatment for older patients and those with high levels of excreted uric acid. Answered by Marylynn Silvestre 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Kellee Chancellor 1 year ago.

elevated uric ucid level in the blood causes gout. it comes from meat and high protein diets. you see a doctor for correct diagnosis then the treatment is easy. Answered by Zane Demeza 1 year ago.

Allopurinol. Answered by Ariel Gwinner 1 year ago.


Medication for kidney stones..?
The doc gave me Percocet 10/325. Are these strong? What is the strongest dose they have available for these pills? Asked by Jolyn Hurtgen 1 year ago.

Kidney Stones - Medications Medicine you can buy without a prescription, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), may relieve your pain. Your doctor can give you stronger pain medicine if needed. NSAIDs include aspirin and ibuprofen (such as Motrin and Advil). Your doctor may prescribe medicine to help your body pass the stone. Alpha-blockers have been shown to help kidney stones pass more quickly with very few side effects.5 Ask your doctor if these medicines can help you. If you get more kidney stones despite drinking more fluids and making changes to your diet, your doctor may give you medicine to help dissolve your stones or to prevent new ones from forming. You may also receive prescription medicine if you have a disease that increases your risk of forming kidney stones. Which medicine you take depends on the type of stones you have. Medication Choices Medicine to prevent calcium stones About 80% of kidney stones are calcium stones.1 Calcium stones cannot be dissolved by changing your diet or taking medicines. These medicines may keep calcium stones from getting bigger or may prevent new calcium stones from forming: Thiazides (such as hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone) and potassium citrate (Urocit-K) are commonly used to prevent calcium stones. Orthophosphate (Neutra-Phos) is sometimes used. It has more side effects than thiazides or potassium citrate. Medicine to prevent uric acid stones About 5% to 10% of kidney stones are made of uric acid, a waste product that normally exits the body in the urine.1 Uric acid stones can sometimes be dissolved with medicine. Potassium citrate (Urocit-K) and sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) prevent the urine from becoming too acidic, which helps prevent uric acid stones. Allopurinol (Lopurin, Zyloprim) makes it more difficult for your body to make uric acid. Medicine to prevent cystine stones Less than 1% of kidney stones are made of a chemical called cystine.1 Cystine stones are more likely to occur in families with a disease that results in too much cystine in the urine (cystinuria). Potassium citrate (Urocit-K) prevents the urine from becoming too acidic, which helps prevent cystine kidney stones from forming. Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen), tiopronin, and captopril (Capoten) all help keep cystine dissolved in the urine, which makes cystine-type kidney stones less likely to form. Medicine to prevent struvite stones About 10% to 15% of kidney stones are struvite stones.1 They can also be called infection stones if they occur with kidney or urinary tract infections (UTIs). These types of kidney stones sometimes are also called staghorn calculi if they grow large enough. Urease inhibitors (Lithostat) are rarely used because of their side effects and poor results. What To Think About If you have uric acid stones or cystine stones and are taking medicine to prevent more stones from forming, you will most likely have to continue taking that medicine for the rest of your life. Some struvite stones (staghorn calculi) form because of frequent kidney infections. If you have a struvite stone, you will most likely need antibiotics to cure the infection and help prevent new stones from forming, and you will most likely need surgery to remove the stone. Answered by Frankie Scivally 1 year ago.

Kidney stones can be either large or small and consist of usually Ca/Mg Phosphate or Uric acid. The smaller stones pass into the ureter and then into the bladder and from there exit the body on urination. The pain occurs when the stone is moving down the ureter. Some times the ureter will swell around the stone and obstruct the passage of urine. The build up of pressure in the obstructed collecting system can cause pain and a place for infection to start. So, take your pain killers as needed (percocet is good) and drink plenty of fluid (beer is good). If the pain continues or gets worse go back to the doctor for an ultrasound or IVP (Intravenous pyelogram) Sorry for your pain. Good Luck Answered by Phylis Rivord 1 year ago.

That is the strongest level of percocet, you need a script for it and it is one of the tightest controlled pain meds believe it or not. I think because of abuse of use not because of addiction. It will help with the pain of passing the stone. Just drink lots of water also. Answered by Edgardo Hsueh 1 year ago.

I can not support you with medicinal drugs, rather then herbs like parsley, celery seed & root, cornsilk, oatstraw, dandelion (leaf & root) and burdock. Make a well robust tea and drink copious quantities. I CAN support you with a few recommendation for preserving them from returning. A nutrition including plant situated entire meals will make sure quality wellbeing throughout all principal frame services. prohibit (or bigger) do away with processed meals, like bread, delicate cereals, & as a substitute decide upon entire grains, like rice(brown), oats, beans & legumes. Eat tons of end result & vegetables, and prohibit or do away with animal fats & protein (no, I'm now not kidding, you will not want it if you're getting a kind of usual meals. Ounce according to ounce, crops have approach better protein content material - and better pleasant for that subject.) a few well studying fabric at the field, The China Study. Here's on your wellbeing! Answered by Daisey Bigaud 1 year ago.


Side efects of cyclosporine?
Asked by Luciana Saxbury 1 year ago.

Cyclosporine is a very strong medicine. It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. You and your doctor should talk about the good this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop fever or chills, a sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, mouth sores, abdominal pain, pale stools, or darkened urine. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects. If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking cyclosporine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusual tiredness or weakness; cough or hoarseness, fever, or chills; painful or difficult urination; severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; unusual bleeding or bruising; seizures; or a sudden unusual feeling of discomfort or illness. Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take cyclosporine and notify your doctor if you experience tremor (shaking); increased bodily hair growth; gum problems; high blood pressure; numbness or tingling; or decreased appetite. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporine increase your risk of certain types of cancer, such as lymphomas or skin cancer. Ask you doctor about the risks and benefits of cyclosporine in your treatment. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect cyclosporine? There are many drug/drug interactions with cyclosporine and you should tell your doctor of any drugs you are on and any new drugs, including herbal products, you start. The interactions could alter cyclosporine levels causing a decrease in effectiveness or an increase in side effects. The side effects or effectiveness of the other drugs may also be altered. The following are some examples of medicatoins that may result in a drug/drug interaction when taken with cyclosporine: trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, others), gentamicin (Garamycin, others), and vancomycin (Vancocin); ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Naprosyn, Anaprox, Aleve, others), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), fenoprofen (Nalfon), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), and tolmetin (Tolectin); amphotericin B (Fungizone) and ketoconazole (Nizoral); tacrolimus (Prograf); melphalan (Alkeran); cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB) and ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) and verapamil (Calan, Verelan); ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), and fluconazole (Diflucan); danazol (Danocrine) and methylprednisolone (Medrol, others); erythromycin (Ery-Tab, E-Mycin, E.E.S., P.C.E., others), clarithromycin (Biaxin); bromocriptine (Parlodel); colchicine and allopurinol (Aloprim, Lopurin, Zyloprim); indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), lopinavir-ritonavir(Kaletra) and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase); metoclopramide (Reglan); prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, others); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); lovastatin (Mevacor), fluvastatin (Lescol), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), or atorvastatin (Lipitor); PUVA or UVB therapy; and potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone, Spironol), or triamterene (Dyrenium); and any type of vaccination. Answered by Cleta Colombo 1 year ago.

Hi -- "It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. " Answered by Cecilia Boeh 1 year ago.


Can anyone tell me ,is there any traditional medicine to help cure Gout or at least reduce the pain?
Asked by Lanette Aro 1 year ago.

Gout is caused by an accumulation of uric acid in the joint tissues. Currently, there is no cure for gout, but through proper diet, a healthy lifestyle and medications, the symptoms of gout can be relieved and further episodes eliminated. *Proper diet Avoid or restrict foods high in purine (a substance that produces uric acid when broken down). These foods include: sardines, anchovies, brains, liver, kidneys, tripe, sweetbreads, tongue, shellfish (mussels and oysters), fish roe, scallops, peas, lentils, beans and an excessive amount of red meat. Drink 10 to 12 eight-ounce glasses of non-alcoholic fluids daily. *Healthy lifestyle Reduce alcohol consumption Lose weight *Medications Using medications for gout can be complicated, because the treatment needs to be tailored for each person and may need to be changed from time to time. To relieve the pain and swelling of an acute attack, the doctor may prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, corticosteroid drugs, and/or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). To prevent future attacks, the doctor may recommend colchicine, probenecid (Benemid, Parbenem or Probalan), sulfinpyrazone (Anturane), or allopurinol (Lopurin, Zurinol or Zyloprim). All of these drugs are powerful, so the patient needs to understand why they are taking them, what side effects may occur and what to do if they have problems with the medication. *Prevention of Gout -To lower risk factors, consider: supervised weight-loss program with exercise (if the patient is overweight) avoiding a purine-rich diet avoiding alcohol consumption, especially binge drinking changing to another drug, if taking diuretics for hypertension Answered by Annie Vanbuskirk 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Rheba Cryan 1 year ago.

Gout can also be managed through lifestyle and diet changes. Weight loss, staying hydrated, limiting alcohol consumption, and restricting intake of foods high in purines (which the human body converts into uric acid) can all prevent a gout outbreak. Food extremely high in purines include: Organ meats like hearts and brains Herring Mussels Sardines Yeast Foods moderately high in purines include: Anchovies Bacon Liver Salmon Turkey Scallops Haddock Kidneys Goose Vegetables like peas, beans, spinach, cauliflower, and mushrooms are all high in purines; however, studies have shown that gout sufferers don’t experience an increased risk of outbreaks if they consume these foods. Additionally, though most foods associated with gout have a high protein content, studies have shown that a high-protein diet like Atkins or South Beach has no effect on gout outbreaks. Ultimately, the diet associated with the development of gout is the same diet associated with heart disease. Answered by Audrey Hernando 1 year ago.

No, I dont believe this is a miracle. I have had leukemia, twice. And there are several things that could show bad lab results, but nothing be wrong once you do the biopsy. I have actually been in that position before. A lab showed outragously high white blood cell counts and a lot of blast cells, but when they did the biopsy to double check and some more lab work, I just has a really bad infection. No cancer. Answered by Tawnya Stair 1 year ago.


Gout,causes,cures,remeades?
Asked by Evon Oien 1 year ago.

Gout can be hereditary and it can be triggered by all sorts of foods and drinks. My husband takes a daily dose of allopurinol, and as long as he takes it faithfully, the gout stays away. When it hits, it's horrible. It's so painful that he can't stand even the weight of a sheet over the affected area. My sympathies are with anyone who suffers from gout. It can be treated, but relief isn't instant. This is one of the few types of arthritis where the cause is known. It results from deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in the connective tissue, joint spaces, or both. Normally this is a byproduct of the breakdown of purines or waste products in the body. Normally uric acid breaks down in the blood and is eliminated in urine. When the body increases its production of uric acid or if the kidneys do not eliminate enough of it from the body, levels build up. This is called hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is not a disease and is not dangerous. However, if excess uric acid crystals form as a result of hyperuricemia, gout can develop. Foods that may trigger gout include beer and other alcoholic beverages, anchovies, sardines (in oil), fish roes, herring, yeast, organ meats (e.g., liver, kidneys), legumes (e.g., dried beans, peas, and soybeans), meat extracts, consommé, gravies, mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, and poultry. Weight loss can help reduce uric acid levels in those people that are overweight. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) block prostaglandins, the substances that dilate blood vessels and cause inflammation and pain. They are taken orally at their highest safe dosage as long as symptoms persist and for three or four days after. There are dozens of NSAIDs. Indomethacin (Indocin) is the usual choice. Colchicine, a derivative of the autumn crocus, has been used to treat gout for thousands of years. This drug relieves the pain and swelling and can help prevent future attacks. Although highly effective, it is no longer the first treatment choice due to the potential for unpleasant side effects. Corticosteroids may be used if NSAIDs are not tolerated. Allopurinol (Lopurin, Zyloprim) blocks uric acid production and is the drug most often used in long-term treatment for older patients and those with high levels of excreted uric acid. Answered by Lester Contrino 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Merry Robberson 1 year ago.

elevated uric ucid level in the blood causes gout. it comes from meat and high protein diets. you see a doctor for correct diagnosis then the treatment is easy. Answered by Lizette Seabold 1 year ago.

Allopurinol. Answered by Dick Mckibbens 1 year ago.


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