Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018421/001.

Names and composition

"LITHIUM CITRATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LITHIUM CITRATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018421/001 LITHIUM CITRATE LITHIUM CITRATE SYRUP/ORAL EQ 300MG CARBONATE per 5ML
070755/001 LITHIUM CITRATE LITHIUM CITRATE SYRUP/ORAL EQ 300MG CARBONATE per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017672/001 LITHONATE LITHIUM CITRATE SYRUP/ORAL EQ 300MG CARBONATE per 5ML
018421/001 LITHIUM CITRATE LITHIUM CITRATE SYRUP/ORAL EQ 300MG CARBONATE per 5ML
070755/001 LITHIUM CITRATE LITHIUM CITRATE SYRUP/ORAL EQ 300MG CARBONATE per 5ML

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Answered questions

Why was lithium removed from 7-up?
were there any health side effects? is there an FDA paper on the topic? was it forcibly removed or for economic reasons? Asked by Jae Gividen 1 year ago.

Lithium citrate is considered a drug. Leaving it in the 7-up (which was originally marketed as a hangover cure; actually most soft drinks started as some sort of pharmaceutical concoction: Dr Pepper; Coca-Cola, Pepsi) would have implied that it was not a soft drink, but something that requires a MD's prescription to get. That could have hurt the sales a tad. The FDA was coming with a new regulation in 1951 "Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act Amendments PL 82–215", so one can presume that the 7-up company thought wise to remove the lithium just before they would have been forced to do so (and they removed the lithium in 1950). Answered by Rosanne Pfeiffenberge 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why was lithium removed from 7-up? were there any health side effects? is there an FDA paper on the topic? was it forcibly removed or for economic reasons? Answered by Lloyd Bevers 1 year ago.


What are some uses of lithium?
thanks for the help =] Asked by Shaina Beneduce 1 year ago.

Lithium salts were used during the 19th century to treat gout. Lithium salts such as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3), lithium citrate, and lithium orotate are mood stabilizers. They are used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, since unlike most other mood altering drugs, they counteract both mania and depression. Lithium can also be used to augment other antidepressant drugs. It is also sometimes prescribed as a preventive treatment for migraine disease and cluster headaches. Lithium chloride and lithium bromide are extremely hygroscopic and frequently used as desiccants. Lithium stearate is a common all-purpose high-temperature lubricant. Lithium is an alloying agent used to synthesize organic compounds. Lithium is used as a flux to promote the fusing of metals during welding and soldering. It also eliminates the forming of oxides during welding by absorbing impurities. This fusing quality is also important as a flux for producing ceramics, enamels, and glass. Lithium is sometimes used in glasses and ceramics including the glass for the 200-inch (5.08 m) telescope at Mt. Palomar. Alloys of the metal with aluminium, cadmium, copper, and manganese are used to make high performance aircraft parts. Lithium-aluminum alloys are used in aerospace applications, such as the external tank of the Space Shuttle, and is planned for the Orion spacecraft. Lithium niobate is used extensively in telecommunication products, such as mobile phones and optical modulators, for such components as resonant crystals. Lithium products are currently used in more than 60 percent of mobile phones. The high non-linearity of lithium niobate also makes a good choice for non-linear optics applications. Lithium deuteride was the fusion fuel of choice in early versions of the hydrogen bomb. Lithium peroxide, lithium nitrate, lithium chlorate and lithium perchlorate are used and thought of as oxidizers in both rocket propellants and oxygen candles to supply submarines and space capsules with oxygen. Lithium will be used to produce tritium in magnetically confined nuclear fusion reactors using deuterium and tritium as the fuel. Lithium soap has the ability to thicken oils and so is used commercially to manufacture lubricating greases. It is also an efficient and lightweight purifier of air. In confined areas, such as aboard spacecraft and submarines, the concentration of carbon dioxide can approach unhealthy or toxic levels. Lithium hydroxide absorbs the carbon dioxide from the air by reacting with it to form lithium carbonate. Lithium metal is used as a reducing agent in some types of methamphetamine production, particularly in illegal amateur “meth labs.” Answered by Delisa Scuito 1 year ago.

Uses Of Lithium Answered by Vicky Vanslyke 1 year ago.

Pure Lithium is used as a lubricant in auto parts and greasing up vehicles such as the brakes. Sodium Lithium is used as a treatment in mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bi polar disease. Answered by Creola Enockson 1 year ago.

-lithium stearate is mixed with oils to make all-purpose and high-temperature lubricants -lithium hydroxide is used to absorb carbon dioxide in space vehicles -lithium is alloyed with aluminium, copper, manganese, and cadmium to make high perfomance alloys for aircraft -Bahnmetall consists of lead containing 0.04% lithium, 0.7% calcium and 0.6% sodium is harder than pure lead and was used for railroad car bearings in Germany. -compounds such as LiAlH4 and organolithium reagents (LiMe, LiPh, etc.) are very important as reagents in organic chemistry -lithium metal has the highest specific heat of any solid element and so heat transfer applications -various nuclear applications -lithium is sometimes used as battery anode material (high electrochemical potential) and lithium compounds are used in dry cells and storage batteries -lithium is used in the manufacture of special high strength glasses and ceramics -sometimes, lithium-based compounds such as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) are used as drugs to treat manic-depressive disorders. Answered by Jasper Loucks 1 year ago.

treatment of bipolar disorder Answered by Venessa Sprake 1 year ago.

RE: what are some uses of lithium? thanks for the help =] Answered by Ty Marshell 1 year ago.

treatment of depression Answered by Lady Paterniti 1 year ago.

batteries, greases, medicines Answered by Dorthy Kreischer 1 year ago.


Lithium Citrate... can I inject it?
I'm prescribed lithium citrate and I can't take it by mouth because it bothers my stomach so I was wondering can I inject it? It can't be bad for me right? The lithium citrate ends up in my bloodstream anyway, I'm just skipping a step. Asked by Rosalinda Amargo 1 year ago.

If you're talking about crushing the pills and injecting them then absolutely not. Talk to your doctor about the problem you are having. Your doctor is the ONLY person who should be giving you advise on this. Answered by Kirby Wherry 1 year ago.

ask your doctor if you can have the nurses do it. i need medicine injected sometimes up to 5 times a week. I just walk in to the nurses office at Kaiser and they do it for free. However, they wont do that without an order from my doctor. Don't do it yourself, you can get serious infections if you don't do it right. Answered by Manda Sciera 1 year ago.


Lithium Citrate... can I inject it?
I'm prescribed lithium citrate and I can't take it by mouth because it bothers my stomach so I was wondering can I inject it? It can't be bad for me right? The lithium citrate ends up in my bloodstream anyway, I'm just skipping a step. Asked by Marcy Feigel 1 year ago.

It's formulated to go through the stomach. Injecting it can cause a number of problems: 1) the IV dose for most meds is much less than the oral meds 2) you'll likely contaminate the solution when trying to inject it Talk to your doctor about the stomach troubles. Answered by Faustina Daul 1 year ago.


Lithium.....what is it!!!!????
I was listening to lithium by evenacences but idont know what lithium is Asked by Hiroko Debernardi 1 year ago.

It's an alkali metal with many uses! Because of its specific heat capacity, the highest of all solids, lithium is often used in heat transfer applications. It is an important ingredient in cathode materials, used in rechargeable and single-use BATTERIES because of its high electrochemical potential, light weight, and high current density. Large quantities of lithium are also used in the manufacture of organolithium reagents, especially n-butyllithium which has many uses in fine chemical and polymer synthesis. Medical Use Lithium salts such as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3), lithium citrate, and lithium orotate are mood stabilizers. They are used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, since unlike most other mood altering drugs, they counteract both mania and depression. Lithium can also be used to augment other antidepressant drugs. It is also sometimes prescribed as a preventive treatment for migraine disease and cluster headaches. The active principle in these salts is the lithium ion Li+, which interacts with the normal function of sodium ions to produce numerous changes in the neurotransmitter activity of the brain. Therapeutically useful amounts of lithium are only slightly lower than toxic amounts, so the blood levels of lithium must be carefully monitored during treatment. Common side effects include muscle tremors, twitching, ataxia, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (polyuria and polydypsia) and seizures. Most of the side-effects are a result caused by the increased elimination of potassium. Other uses * Lithium chloride and lithium bromide are extremely hygroscopic and frequently used as desiccants. * Lithium stearate is a common all-purpose high-temperature lubricant. * Lithium is an alloying agent used to synthesize organic compounds. * Lithium is used as a flux to promote the fusing of metals during welding and soldering. It also eliminates the forming of oxides during welding by absorbing impurities. This fusing quality is also important as a flux for producing ceramics, enamels, and glass. * Lithium is sometimes used in glasses and ceramics including the glass for the 200-inch (5.08 m) telescope at Mt. Palomar. * Alloys of the metal with aluminium, cadmium, copper, and manganese are used to make high performance aircraft parts. * Lithium niobate is used extensively in telecommunication products, such as mobile phones and optical modulators, for such components as resonant crystals. * The high non-linearity of lithium niobate also makes a good choice for non-linear optics applications. * Lithium deuteride was the fusion fuel of choice in early versions of the hydrogen bomb. When bombarded by neutrons, both 6Li and 7Li produce tritium—this reaction, which was not fully understood when hydrogen bombs were first tested, was responsible for the runaway yield of the Castle Bravo nuclear test. Tritium fuses with deuterium in a fusion reaction that is relatively easy to achieve. Although details remain secret, lithium apparently no longer plays a role in modern nuclear weapons, having been replaced entirely for the purpose by elemental tritium, which is lighter and easier to handle than lithium salts.[citation needed] * Lithium will be used to produce tritium in magnetically confined nuclear fusion reactors using deuterium and tritium as the fuel. Tritium does not occur naturally and will be produced by surrounding the reacting plasma with a 'blanket' containing lithium where neutrons from the deuterium-tritium reaction in the plasma will react with the lithium to produce more tritium. 6Li + n --> 4He + 3T. Various means of doing this will be tested at the ITER reactor being built at Cadarache, France. * Lithium is used as a source for alpha particles, or helium nuclei. When 7Li is bombarded by accelerated protons, 8Be is formed, which undergoes spontaneous fission to form two alpha particles. This was the first man-made nuclear reaction, produced by Cockroft and Walton in 1929. * Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) is an important compound of lithium obtained from lithium carbonate (Li2CO3). It is a strong base, and when heated with a fat, it produces a lithium soap. Lithium soap has the ability to thicken oils and so is used commercially to manufacture lubricating greases. * Lithium metal is used as a reducing agent in some types of methamphetamine production, particularly in illegal amateur “meth labs.” * Lithium hydroxide is an efficient and lightweight purifier of air. In confined areas, such as aboard spacecraft and submarines, the concentration of carbon dioxide can approach unhealthy or toxic levels. Lithium hydroxide absorbs the carbon dioxide from the air by reacting with it to form lithium carbonate. Answered by Florence Stanford 1 year ago.

lithium is a drug perscribed for people dealing with mental health issues, such as bipolar disorder. Answered by Renita Warchal 1 year ago.

Lithium is an anti psychotic drug. its used for people with schizophrenia and other psychotic conditions. Answered by Thresa Klingenberg 1 year ago.

its a prescription medication - usually used to treat bipolar Answered by Lashaun Bojanowski 1 year ago.

it is a mood-stabilizing drug, mostly used to treat bipolar disorder Answered by Deeann Tews 1 year ago.


What is the difference between Valproic Acid and Lithium?
Asked by Sau Levay 1 year ago.

Lithium Lithium has been used for the treatment of acute bipolar mania for over 50 years. It is an alkali metal similar to sodium and comes as one of two salt preparations, lithium carbonate or lithium citrate. In the US, lithium is considered the drug of choice for adults and children with bipolar disorder. However, European psychiatrists do not use lithium in children, and in Israel the largest child psychiatric hospital does not even have lithium on the hospital formulary. Lithium has multiple complex neurochemical effects, with impact on ion channels, serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine neurotransmitter systems, as well as on second messenger systems. So how does it work? Nobody really knows. Side effects: Up to 75% of patients treated with lithium experience some side effects. Most of these are minor and can be reduced or eliminated by lowering the lithium dose or changing the dosage schedule. Endocrine: Lithium has been associated with thyroid abnormalities. Hypothyroidism occurs in up to 35% of patients treated with lithium. Renal: Lithium inhibits reabsorption of water leading to excessive urination and thirst. There have been some reports of structural kidney damage with long-term lithium use. Cardiovascular: Lithium disrupts the cardiac conduction system and can cause arrhythmias. These changes are usually not significant. Dermatological: Lithium can induce or exacerbate acne, which is a problem for adolescent patients. It is also associated with hair loss. Neurological: Lithium may produce a variety of neurological effects, including muscle weakness, tremor, lethargy, cognitive blunting, and headaches. In children, lithium has been reported to alter EEG patterns and to decrease performance on cognitive testing. Toxicity Even though lithium has a very long list of side effects, that is not what concerns most physicians. The real concern is the toxicity. The blood levels in which, lithium becomes toxic are not much higher than the levels that are necessary for treatment. This combined with the fact that patients who require lithium treatment usually are not particularly reliable or compliant, makes treatment with lithium somewhat precarious. Toxic effects of lithium include marked tremor, nausea and diarrhea, blurred vision, vertigo, confusion, and increased deep tendon reflexes. With higher levels, patients may experience more severe neurological complications and eventually experience seizures, coma, cardiac arrhythmia, permanent neurological damage, and death. Hemodialysis is the only reliable treatment for lithium overdose. Conclusion You are probably wondering by now after reading this list, why would anyone want to go near this stuff. The bottom line is this. Lithium works, and it probably works better than anything else that we have. This is very important. These conditions, bipolar disorder, aggressive personality disorders, conduct disorder, psychotic disorders, etc., are serious psychiatric conditions. Left untreated, they have serious life long and sometimes life terminating consequences. Anticonvulsants Valproic acid (Depakene, Valprotate) Valproic acid is a simple bracket chain carboxylic acid currently available in two preparations; valproic acid, and divalproex sodium a combination of valproic acid and valproate. Some physicians feel that overall this drug is just as effective as lithium and has less serious side effects. Valproate may have a quicker onset of action than lithium. Side effects: * Weight gain * Tremor * Dizziness * Sedation * Headache * Nausea * Indigestion * Bruising * Hair loss Rarely, valproic acid has been associated with fatal hepatic toxicity, hemorrhagic pancreatitis, and agranulocytosis. Valproic acid may increase testosterone levels in teenage girls and produce polycystic ovary syndrome in women who began taking the medication before age 20. Answered by Domitila Smetana 1 year ago.

Sodium Valproate Vs Valproic Acid Answered by Rebeca Poquette 1 year ago.

It sounds like colic, with acid reflux many times the baby will spit up or even vomit a little - up to about 30 minutes after a feeding. Sometimes if you lay them on your lap (belly down) and rub their back, it helps the gas to pass. Answered by Cheryl Bolte 1 year ago.


Is Lithium CItrate any easier on the kidneys than Lithium Carbonate?
Lithium has always been a very helpful drug to me but about a year ago I got dehydrated in mexico and long story short I got minor kidney problems, My creatine is at 1.3 so my doctor is ok with me being on 450 or 0.3 (for me).. but I would rather be on a full dose. So basically the two things Im asking are Is... Asked by Mahalia Luscavage 1 year ago.

Lithium has always been a very helpful drug to me but about a year ago I got dehydrated in mexico and long story short I got minor kidney problems, My creatine is at 1.3 so my doctor is ok with me being on 450 or 0.3 (for me).. but I would rather be on a full dose. So basically the two things Im asking are Is Lithium citrate any easier on the kidneys and is it any less effective Answered by Oma Sourlis 1 year ago.

Probably not. The renal toxicity comes from the lithium ion, not the citrate or carbonate. Same rationale for their efficacies. Answered by Samatha Mozley 1 year ago.


How can Lithium be used as a drug?
I have to do a report over it. Asked by Keva Peppers 1 year ago.

Medical Use: Lithium salts such as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3), lithium citrate, and lithium orotate are mood stabilizers. They are used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, since unlike most other mood altering drugs, they counteract both mania and depression. Lithium can also be used to augment other antidepressant drugs. It is also sometimes prescribed as a preventive treatment for migraine disease and cluster headaches. The active principle in these salts is the lithium ion Li+, which interacts with the normal function of sodium ions to produce numerous changes in the neurotransmitter activity of the brain. Therapeutically useful amounts of lithium are only slightly lower than toxic amounts, so the blood levels of lithium must be carefully monitored during treatment. Answered by Helene Blancato 1 year ago.

It is a drug used for Bipolar disorder. Just look up Bipolar Disorder and Lithium together and you should get a ton of information. Answered by Traci Freyre 1 year ago.


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