Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018833/001.

Names and composition

"LITHANE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LITHIUM CARBONATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018833/001 LITHANE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016782/001 LITHONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
016834/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
016860/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
016980/001 LITHOTABS LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
017812/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
017812/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
017812/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
017971/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018027/001 LITHOBID LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
018152/001 ESKALITH CR LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018558/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018833/001 LITHANE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070407/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
072542/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076121/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076170/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076243/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076243/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
076366/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076382/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076490/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076691/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076795/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076823/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
076823/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076823/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
076832/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078715/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078763/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
079139/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
079139/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
079139/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
079159/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
079159/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
079159/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
090702/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
090702/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
090702/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
091027/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
091544/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
091616/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
202219/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
202288/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
204445/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
204779/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
205532/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
205663/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG

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Answered questions

What meds are best for bipolar with mania?
i need to be stable.i have children. Asked by Marisha Penrose 1 year ago.

Lithium (Carbolith, Duralith, Lithobid, Lithizine, Eskalith, Lithane) is one of the standard mood stabilizing drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is extremely helpful for most patients and it significantly reduces the rate of hospitalizations in bipolar disorder. Some studies report the following advantages of lithium: Lithium is effective in 60 - 80% of all hypomanic and manic episodes. (Valproate may be better in patients with multiple manic episodes, mixed episodes, and rapid cycling.) It helps to prevent relapses. It helps psychosocial functioning. It may help reduce the risk for suicide regardless of its effects on stabilizing mood. It may act directly on the nerve clusters affecting the circadian rhythm and slow down the cycle of this "biologic clock." (There is some evidence that patients with bipolar disorder have a faster biologic clock.) It works well for most patients even if they have discontinued taking it and wish to restart treatment. Antiseizure drugs, also called anti-epileptics or anticonvulsants, affect the neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), which helps prevent nerve cells from over-firing. These drugs may be an alternative for patients (especially substance abusers) who do not tolerate or respond to lithium. They also may be used in combination with lithium, atypical antipsychotics, or other drugs. Standard Antiseizure Drugs. Valproate (Depakote), also called valproic acid or divalproex, is now a first option for many bipolar disorder patients. Valproate also helps migraine headaches, a common problem among patients. Lamotrigine (Lamictal) is approved for maintenance treatment of adults with bipolar I disorder. It also appears to be be better for treating bipolar depression than other mood stabilizers. Carbamazepine (Epitol, Tegretol) is a standard alternative antiseizure drug used for mood stabilizing. In 2004, the FDA approved an extended release form of carbamazepine (Equetro). Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal) is another drug that is similar to carbamezepine. Atypical antipsychotics are standard drugs for schizophrenia. They are now proving to be beneficial for bipolar disorder when used alone or in combination with the mood stabilizers that treat mania. These drugs include clozapine (Clozaril) (the first atypical antipsychotic), olanzapine (Zyprexa), risperidone (Risperdal), quetiapine (Seroquel), aripiprazole (Abilify) and ziprasidone (Geodon). Olanzapine was the first atypical antipsychotic approved for treatment of bipolar disorder. In 2000, the FDA approved it to treat bipolar mania and mixed states. In 2004, the drug became the first atypical antipsychotic approved for bipolar maintenance treatment. Symbyax, a drug that combines olanzapine and the antidepressant fluoxetine, was approved in 2003 for treatment of bipolar depression. Risperidone, ziprasidone, and ariprazole have been approved for treatment of bipolar mania and mixed states. Quetiapine is approved only for treatment of bipolar mania but is also being investigated for bipolar depression. Clozapine has not yet been approved for treatment of bipolar disorder, but has shown promise in investigative studies. However, this drug has more significant side effects than other atypical antipsychotics. It poses a risk of white blood cell reduction (agranulocytosis) and has the highest risk of weight gain of all atypicals. Antidepressants are sometimes used for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder, but their use is controversial. They trigger mania in 12 - 28% of patients. In addition, a number of studies report no additional benefits from antidepressants. A 2002 study suggested that they may be helpful for patients whose depression occurs after an episode-free period (rather than after a manic or hypomanic episode.) Specific antidepressants may be beneficial in certain circumstances. However, any patient on antidepressants who develops symptoms of hypomania should stop taking these drugs, since hypomania is often a sign of impending mania. All antidepressants should be tapered off after the mood has been stabilized for a month. Bupropion. The antidepressant bupropion (Wellbutrin) appears to pose a lower risk for triggering mania than do other antidepressants. Side effects include restlessness, agitation, sleeplessness, headache, rashes, stomach problems, and in rare cases, hallucinations and bizarre thinking. Initial weight loss occurs in about 25% of patients. High doses may cause seizures. This side effect is uncommon and tends to occur in patients with eating disorders (anorexia or bulimia) or those with risk factors for seizures. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine (Prozac), citalopram (Celexa), sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), are sometimes used to treat bipolar depression, but their benefits have not yet been established. They may be useful in patients whose depression does not respond to lithium; they do not appear to be useful as an add-on treatment to lithium. Answered by Giovanna Wayne 1 year ago.

Wow i feel for you i once lived with a Bipolar person and know a few more and grew up with my older sister being Bipolar as well (at that time they did not know what it was) some drugs make them much worse but they all had one thing in common and that is smoking pot which seemed to help the best i don't and never did smoke it so i am not saying that because i believe in it but it seemed to work the best hope this helps Michael Answered by Lucilla Pancheri 1 year ago.

I have bipolar and have been lucky with only one medication. But, others I know have taken the same medication and haven't been that lucky. Everyone is different. And a pill won't cure everything. Therapy and other types of therapy need to be addressed as well when taking meds. Answered by Kasha Lavelle 1 year ago.

Lithium. Eflexor-8. Answered by Sha Kreisher 1 year ago.

Only your doctor can tell you what is best for you. I could give you a whole list of medications used for these conditions. But a doctor needs to evaluate your symptoms and decide what medications are best for you. Check out these web sites for Bipolar disease and Mania www.webmd.com www.medscape.com Answered by Nolan Sontag 1 year ago.

That is something you would have to discuss with your doctor. One kind of medication could work great for one person, and not help the other at all. Doctors sometimes try different ones until they find one that works. A lot of people don't like the way some medications make them feel, it's all about finding the right one. Answered by Janelle Dach 1 year ago.

My daughter was diagnosed at 17 and lithium worked for almost 10 years for her. In her 30 s and now 40 s so has had to adjust her meds multiple times along with ECT. Recently she was able to ween herself off of all but three drugs, lithium being one of them. She remained stable for 6 months and then she started to have trouble sleeping and lots of anxiety. Unfortunately, she has had to restart clozapine which she feels makes one feel like a walking zombie. It is a day to day battle for those suffering from any form of mental illness. Seeing her continue to fight this demon, makes me extremely proud to call her my daughter. Answered by Dorothy Devanski 1 year ago.

we are all different depending on too many factors to name I take lithium, wellbutrin and lexapro it has been working for a long time now good luck and listen to your doctor, don't fight the meds they will help you keep your sanity in the end Answered by Gricelda Goombi 1 year ago.

There is no one med that is best for everyone. What works for me, may not work for you. Paxil and Zoloft are the most popular. Again, they may or may not work for you. Answered by Kizzy Widder 1 year ago.


What are the long term affects of bipolar disorder?
What does lithium do to your body? And what other mental illness can also be confused with bipolar disorder? Asked by Rodney Perrotta 1 year ago.

Lithium Active Ingredients: Lithium Representative Names: Eskalith, Lithane, Lithonate, Lithotabs Available Product Images: What are lithium tablets or capsules? What should my health care professional know before I take lithium? How should I take this medicine? What if I miss a dose? What drug(s) may interact with lithium? What side effects may I notice from taking lithium? What should I watch for while taking lithium? Where can I keep my medicine? What are lithium tablets or capsules? (Back to top) LITHIUM (Eskalith®, Lithonate®, Lithane®, Lithotabs®) helps to control extreme mood swings in manic-depressive illness. Lithium helps you to maintain a more balanced state, without swinging from a highly elated, over-excited state to that of being very sad and depressed. Lithium can prevent or reduce these episodes. Generic lithium tablets or capsules are available. What should my health care professional know before I take lithium? (Back to top) They need to know if you have any of these conditions: •dehydration (diarrhea or sweating) •heart or blood vessel disease •kidney disease •leukemia •low level of salt in the blood, or low-salt diet •Parkinson's disease •psoriasis •seizures (convulsions) •under-active thyroid, or thyroid disease •an unusual or allergic reaction to lithium, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives •pregnant or trying to get pregnant •breast-feeding How should I take this medicine? (Back to top) Take lithium tablets or capsules by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Swallow the tablets or capsules with a drink of water. Take after a meal or snack to avoid stomach upset. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your prescriber's advice. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. Elderly patients over age 65 years may have a stronger reaction to this medicine and need smaller doses. What if I miss a dose? (Back to top) If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose (less than 2 hours), take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses. What drug(s) may interact with lithium? (Back to top) •antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, or COX-2 inhibitors, such as celecoxib) •caffeine •calcium iodide •carbamazepine •filgrastim, G-CSF, or pegfilgrastim •guarana •medicines for diabetes •medicines for high blood pressure •medicines for mental problems and psychotic disturbances •metronidazole •potassium iodide, KI •sodium bicarbonate •sodium chloride •verapamil •water pills Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines. What side effects may I notice from taking lithium? (Back to top) Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible: More common: •diarrhea •drowsiness •loss of appetite •muscle weakness •nausea, vomiting •slurred speech These symptoms can progress to: •blurred vision •clumsiness or loss of balance •confusion •dizziness •seizures •trembling Rare or uncommon: •difficulty speaking or swallowing •fainting •hair loss •hoarseness •slow, fast, or irregular heartbeat (palpitations) •pain, coldness, or blue coloration of fingers or toes •rough, dry skin •sensitivity to cold •swelling in the neck •unusual tiredness or weakness •unusual weight gain Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): •increased thirst •increased frequency and urgency to pass urine •muscle twitches •nausea •skin rash •stomach bloating, full feeling •trembling of the hands What should I watch for while taking lithium? (Back to top) Visit your prescriber or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. It can take several weeks of treatment to get improvement in your condition. You must continue to take lithium at regular intervals even when your symptoms are better. Do not stop taking lithium except on your prescriber's advice. The amount of lithium you take is very important. Taking more than the prescribed dose can cause serious side effects. The amount of salt (sodium) in your body influences the effects of lithium, and lithium can increase salt loss from the body. Eat a normal diet that includes salt. Do not change to salt substitutes. Avoid changes involving diet, or medications that include large amounts of sodium (such as sodium bicarbonate). Ask your prescriber or health care professional for advice if you are not sure. Drink plenty of fluids while you are taking lithium. Avoid drinks that contain caffeine, such as coffee, tea and colas. You will need extra fluids if you have diarrhea or sweat a lot. This will help prevent toxic effects from lithium. Be careful not to get overheated during exercise, saunas, hot baths, and hot weather. Consult your prescriber or health care professional if you have a high fever or persistent diarrhea. You may get dizzy, drowsy, or have blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how lithium affects you. Make sure that family members or friends know of early signs of lithium toxicity (see side effects above). If you are going to have surgery, tell your prescriber or health care professional that you are taking lithium. Where can I keep my medicine? (Back to top) Keep out of the reach of children in a container that small children cannot open. Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Keep container tightly closed. Protect from light. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date. Lithium is one of the best drugs to use for bipolar disorder because it helps to manage the mania and depression associated with it. You just have to be careful because there is a small range between the therapeutic levels and the levels of toxicity Answered by Lizbeth Baehr 1 year ago.

As someone who is bipolar, and not taking meds, I would have to say that unless you have a religious calling (are very devout and can depend on that to keep from committing suicide or becoming sociopathic) you are better off getting a proper prescription to stabilize you. Personally, I believe that God made me this way for a reason, and the visions that I have when I am manic are not necessarily a bad thing. More often than not, the clarity that I have when manic, even though I see things that other people don't, allows me to see things that almost always turn out to be true. When I am in fellowship with other Christians, it gives me enough strength to endure the pain that comes with the chronic depressions. I have pretty much given up the hope of ever having a normal life, but I hold on to the belief that there is a reason for it. Without that support and religious devotion, I would have surely committed suicide. Just so you know, the depressions were much milder when I was young... not much more than a normal teenage angst. If you try to live without medication, you absolutely MUST have the love and support of friends and family, and I wouldn't do it unless you feel that you have a religious calling, because it certainly will prevent you from having normal relationships with people. If you want to have a normal life, you should see a doctor and a psychiatrist and get a proper prescription. Answered by Lannie Nettle 1 year ago.

Lithium is one of the best drugs to use for bipolar disorder because it helps to manage the mania and depression associated with it. You just have to be careful because there is a small range between the therapeutic levels and the levels of toxicity. Answered by Leontine Buzzi 1 year ago.

Psychotic mania and psychotic depression will end you up in a loony bin before you kill yourself Answered by Marisol Wetzstein 1 year ago.


What kind of medications are used to treat bipolar syndrome?
Asked by Ines Rafferty 1 year ago.

Tegretol Depakote Risperdal Geodon Wellbutrin Eskalith Lithane Lithobid Cibalith-S Lithium Lamictol Answered by Len Brevik 1 year ago.

I believe Zoloft is one med. But, I'm sure there are others depending on the severity of your condition. Answered by Jake Haasch 1 year ago.


What is lithium?
uses? tell me everything Asked by Asuncion Witty 1 year ago.

What is lithium? Lithium carbonate--a salt--came to be regularly used to control manic depression in this country in the 1960's. Today it is the most commonly used medication to treat bipolar disorder (manic depression). There are a variety of different brands of lithium dispensed in tablets, capsules, and liquid form: Cibalith-S, Eskalith, Lithane, Lithobid, Lithonate, and Lithotabs. Lithium is helpful in 70 percent to 80 percent of people with bipolar disorder, making it one of the most effective psychiatric medications available. What does lithium treat? Lithium has been most frequently and effectively used to control and prevent manic episodes in persons with bipolar disorder. Lithium has been successful in treating depression as well. In fact, the occurrence of depression in a person who has been taking lithium is often an indication that a higher dose is needed. In some cases, lithium is even a successful treatment for those with unipolar depression, or those who have never had a manic episode. Individuals who respond to lithium for depression are often those who have not responded to tricyclic antidepressants after several weeks of treatment. When given lithium in addition to their antidepressants, some of these people have shown significant improvement. Lithium has also successfully treated schizophrenia in cases where there is a schizophrenic thought disorder accompanied by a change in mood that mimics either mania or depression. The similarity between people with this type of schizophrenia and those diagnosed with manic depression is their affective disorder--that is, the experience of strong emotions not related to what is happening in the environment. People with schizophrenia not experiencing an affective disorder will not likely respond to the combination of lithium and antipsychotic medication. How long does lithium take to work? For lithium to reach its maximum effectiveness, two or even three weeks is often required. To control severe mania, doctors often will prescribe an antipsychotic such as Haldol while waiting for lithium to take affect. When the manic symptoms disappear, the antipsychotic will usually be discontinued, but the lithium continued. Physicians using combinations of lithium and antipsychotics are urged to closely monitor patients because of the danger of a toxic reaction to the combination of lithium and Haldol. Some people on lithium report having breakthrough depression. These individuals may respond to an increase in the dosage or the addition of an antidepressant. When depressions occur in those who have been taking lithium and who are able to tolerate a higher dose, it is possible that the dosage has been inadequate. What are the side effects of lithium? Common side effects of lithium include nausea, loss of appetite, and mild diarrhea. These usually will taper off after the first few weeks. Dizziness and hand tremors have also been reported, and tremors can be diminished effectively if the dosage of lithium is gradually decreased. Medications that control tremors are Cogentin and Inderal. With Inderal, however, there may be a lowering of the patient's blood pressure and heart rate, and sudden discontinuation can cause anxiety and tremulousness. Increased production of urine and excessive thirst are two common side effects that are usually not serious problems, but patients with kidney disease should not be given lithium. Midamor is a drug that can reduce urinating. Taking the day's dosage of lithium at bedtime also seems to help with the problem of increased urination. Other side effects of lithium include weight gain, hypothyroidism, increased white blood cell count, skin rashes, and birth defects. People who are taking lithium should consult their doctor before taking the following: Ibuprofen (Advil), acetazolamide, antihypertensives, anti-inflammatory drugs, calcium channel blockers, carbamazepine, diuretics, hydroxyzine, inderal, procardia, marijuana, muscle relaxants, neuroleptics, table salt, baking powder, tetracycline, tricyclic antidepressants, MAO inhibitors, or caffeine. While on lithium, a patient's blood level must be closely monitored. If the blood level of lithium is too low, the patient's symptoms will not be relieved. If the blood level of lithium is too high, there is a danger of a toxic reaction. Are there specific concerns about lithium and pregnancy? A study was done in 1992 to measure the effect of lithium on unborn babies. It was found that exposure to lithium during the first trimester of pregnancy might be associated with the increased risk of Ebstein's anomaly, a rare cardiac malformation. Otherwise, the rate of congenital malformations did not differ between the group that took lithium and the control group. Birthweight, however, was found to be significantly higher in the lithium group, despite the high percentage of lithium users who were also cigarette smokers (almost twice as many as the control group). Reviewed by Robert Prein, MD of the National Institute of Mental Health, Rockville, MD Answered by Marguerite Drey 1 year ago.

a nirvana song and a evenesence song lol no but really its: Atomic Structure of Lithium Atomic Radius: 2.05Å Atomic Volume: 13.1cm3/mol Covalent Radius: 1.23Å Cross Section (Thermal Neutron Capture) a/barns: 70.5 Crystal Structure: Cubic body centered Electron Configuration: 1s2 2s1 Electrons per Energy Level: 2,1 Shell Model Ionic Radius: 0.76Å Filling Orbital: 2s1 Number of Electrons (with no charge): 3 Number of Neutrons (most common/stable nuclide): 4 Number of Protons: 3 Oxidation States: 1 Valence Electrons: 2s1 Lithium affects the flow of sodium through nerve and muscle cells in the body. Sodium affects excitation or mania. Lithium is used to treat the manic episodes of manic depression. Manic symptoms include hyperactivity, rushed speech, poor judgment, reduced need for sleep, aggression, and anger. Lithium also helps to prevent or lessen the intensity of manic episodes. Answered by Miriam Tardugno 1 year ago.

Everybody missed the point. Lithium is a metal that is even cooler than sodium when you chuck it into water. Rather than just fizzing around like sodium, lithium is almost explosive. Answered by Samuel Klenk 1 year ago.

Lithium is a silvery white metal in the group known as Alkali Earths in the periodic table. It is the least active member of this group.You can look the rest up for yourself. Answered by Terrell Abdel 1 year ago.

It's a soft, highly reactive metal. It is used in medicine to treat manic depressive disorders and correct brain functions. It is lethal in large doses and effect metabolism, depending on the person whether it increases or decrease it. It's symbol is Li, and it's atomic # is 3. Answered by Meridith Marten 1 year ago.

Usually used as a heavy duty anti-depressant. Answered by Truman Deem 1 year ago.

a rare metal with industrial applications as well medicinal uses. Answered by Misti Ache 1 year ago.

lithium is a prototype acid thingy i learned bout it in skool today erm im not reeli sure look it up ok. Answered by Elliott Marien 1 year ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Emmie Balonek 1 year ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Bart Harben 1 year ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Jeannetta Aggarwal 1 year ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Pearle Picquet 1 year ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Phebe Lesnick 1 year ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Ronda Janzen 1 year ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Karan Brandenberg 1 year ago.


Is all Lithium the same?
I have read that Lithium comes in different forms. And, I am taking Lithium Carbonate. Is that a generic form, or just plain Lithium? Sometimes I feel like what I take helps me more than other times, and I wondered if I was taking a low quality type. IF so, what is the best quality to ask for? Asked by Lady Amason 1 year ago.

lithium is short for lithium carbonate. there are 2 brands the main one is priadel. dont do any thing until youve had a word with the doc or it could all go pear shaped. are you having blood tests? if not why not? Answered by Ashely Reder 1 year ago.


Has anyone heard of cluster headaches and if so can someone please tell me why they happen ?
My husband suffers with cluster headaches and he suffers very badly from them. Do cluster headaches go on for days at a time and then suddenly stop. What causes them and what is the best cure? Thanks for your help. Asked by Mallory Tokuoka 1 year ago.

The exact cause of cluster headaches is not known. Many experts believe that cluster headaches and migraine headaches have a common cause that begins in the trigeminal nerve, a nerve that carries sensations from the head to the brain and that ends in the blood vessels that surround the brain. Other experts link cluster headaches to the hypothalamus, an area of the brain. Either explanation would account for the periodic nature of the headache.People with cluster headaches usually receive drug therapies. These treatments may be classified as abortive or preventive. Abortive treatments are directed at stopping or reducing the severity of an attack, and include: Inhalation of high-flow, concentrated oxygen Injection of Depo-Medrol Imitrex injection Dihydroergotoamine injection and ergotomine tartrate tablets Zomig, Zomig-ZMT, and Zomig nasal spray Maxalt, Maxalt-MLT Axert Deltasone Preventive treatments are used to reduce the frequency and intensity of cluster headaches and improve the person's quality of life. Preventive drugs include:Blood pressure medications, such as beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers,Antidepressants ,Anticonvulsants, Periactin Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such asNaprosyn ,Sansert Calan, Verelan, Covera-HS Eskalith, Lithane, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs Surgeries including nerve blocks, ablative neurosurgical procedures and radiosurgery have helped some people with cluster headaches. Nerve blocks involve the injection of pain medicine into or around a nerve or the spine. Ablative neurosurgical procedures are operations that involve the removal or destruction of a part of the brain, the spinal cord, or a nerve. Radiosurgery, a type of surgery that uses radiant energy and does not involve cutting, recently has been used to provide a less invasive alternative for people who have persistent cluster headaches.Some people with cluster headaches have been helped by alternative or complementary therapies such as chiropractic, acupuncture, osteopathic manipulation, and herbal remedies. NREMT-P Answered by Bobbi Boan 1 year ago.

I would suggest that you visit a doctor for the best answer, I can only share what I know. I have had cluster headaches since I was young- most people think they have a 'migraine' but don't really understand what a migraine is. A migraine is means you close all the windows, blinds, and hide in your room for 3 days crying yourself to sleep / awake. I get cluster headaches that litteraly shut down my life for days at a time - I cannot work, sleep, or function when I get one. For those who are going to say 'you are just a wimp- I get headaches all the time' then you are lucky and have never had a cluster headache. Those who suffer simply ignore normal pain. For example, I had a broken foot for a week before I went to the doctor because it was a minor inconvenience. Image a pain far worse for days, that shuts down half of your head, and you simply want to die. Get to a good doctor, there are good medications for cluster headaches. I have not, however, heard of anyone dying from them, so I suspect it was something more serious. Good luck- cluster headaches suck, but when you find out the trigger, you can head off the cluster before they become life-altering. Answered by Alva Clapsaddle 1 year ago.

This website has a lot of good information about cluster headaches. My brief perusal of the information says....yes they can come and go, they happen in cycles, (you may be able to chart your husband's over a period of time), Imitrex looked like the drug of choice (there is no cure), men are MUCH more likely than women to suffer from them. They sound perfectly horrid, I hope you find some relief for your husband very soon. Answered by Mindy Menefield 1 year ago.

Cluster headache is classified as vascular headache.It is due to dilataion of brain vasculater and the real causes are not fully understood.It may be due any problem in hyporthalamus or it may be genetically in origine.Any way , some diets and behaviors can trigger it . Answered by Loralee Grant 1 year ago.

Yes, I was actually diagnosed with that too. I underwent a lot of tests and that was their conclusion. Unfortunately, I was told I would "out grow" them. They are similar to migraines and you can take migraine medicine for them. Answered by Harold Brainerd 1 year ago.


Bipolar???
What kind of medication would you take? Asked by Taneka Hines 1 year ago.

stroooooong mood swings cravings for attention did i mention STRONG mood swings. most people take medication for it. depression is also a common sign but not in all cases some med trademark names are tegretol, depakote, and lithane, but you cant get them without prescription because there are diffferent amounts that certain people take like 10 mg or 20 mg for ex. Answered by Soledad Heenan 1 year ago.

Well I have Bipolar and before I wasn't treated I would stay up for days, I wouldn't eat, I would try to do millions of things at once and not get a single thing done, I would be extremely hyper or extremely depressed, I would be very irritable, annoyed, or anxious, I would get very emotional and cry a lot, I would get very mad and have fights with my mom that I regret later, I would get very overwhelmed if I had a lot of home work, and I would also have panic attacks/ anxiety attacks and it would take me about 15 minutes to an hour to calm down. When you have a panic attack, your hands start shaking really fast, you start breathing in short quick breaths, (hyperventilating) your heart is pounding and you head feels like it's on fire because you're not getting enought oxygen to your brain due to the hyperventylation. The best way to calm down from that is if your standing, sit on the floor, close your eyes, take big long deep breaths and let them out slowly while thinking about your favorite memory, a place you would want to go, or just make one up and think about it. Writing and drawing also helps bipolar people too. Bipolar people are also very creative. A lot of famous actors, writers, artist, and musicians have it. Answered by Miranda Park 1 year ago.

Bipolar disorder is not a single disorder, but a category of mood disorders defined by the presence of one or more episodes of abnormally elevated mood, clinically referred to as mania. Individuals who experience manic episodes also commonly experience depressive episodes or symptoms, or mixed episodes in which features of both mania and depression are present at the same time. These episodes are normally separated by periods of normal mood, but in some patients, depression and mania may rapidly alternate, known as rapid cycling. Extreme manic episodes can sometimes lead to psychotic symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations. The disorder has been subdivided into bipolar I, bipolar II, Bipolar NOS, and cyclothymia based on the type and severity of mood episodes experienced. Answered by Nerissa Resnick 1 year ago.

being out of control happy and then really really down and depressed. if ur just being moody that doesn't mean ur bipolar. a lot of people today think they are bipolar, especially teenagers, when in fact they aren't. so i would go see a psychiatrist first before u think that u r bipolar. Answered by Paige Essner 1 year ago.

Strong mood swings. Really hyper and happy when happy, really really depressed when sad. Manic behavior violence doesnt see the world in a realistic point of view impulsive selfish Answered by Fredrick Hamed 1 year ago.


what is lithium and include details please?
tell me its atomic number, mass number, everything i need to know for a 11 year old boy please. Asked by Louis Vetrano 1 year ago.

Lithium carbonate--a salt--came to be regularly used to control manic depression in this country in the 1960's. Today it is the most commonly used medication to treat bipolar disorder (manic depression). There are a variety of different brands of lithium dispensed in tablets, capsules, and liquid form: Cibalith-S, Eskalith, Lithane, Lithobid, Lithonate, and Lithotabs. Lithium is helpful in 70 percent to 80 percent of people with bipolar disorder, making it one of the most effective psychiatric medications available. Answered by Retha Pam 1 year ago.

Lithium is an element. Atomic Symbol: Li Atomic Number: 3 Protons: 3 Electrons: 3 Neutrons: 4 Mass Number: 7 For all elements Atomic number= protons= electrons protons + neutrons= mass number Answered by Janine Balder 1 year ago.

Go to Wikipedia and look up Lithium. Answered by Lise Ortega 1 year ago.

It's a powerful drug & it works. I hope that's the last resort. Answered by Chung Loren 1 year ago.

here you go Answered by Sherman Devillier 1 year ago.


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