Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010669/002.

Names and composition

"LEUKERAN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLORAMBUCIL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010669/002 LEUKERAN CHLORAMBUCIL TABLET/ORAL 2MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010669/002 LEUKERAN CHLORAMBUCIL TABLET/ORAL 2MG

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Answered questions

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia?
My grandpa suffers from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He's been taking only medicine improving his immunological system for 5 years but no chemotherapy. Now as he has 73 thousands of leukocytes, his doctor prescribed him 'Leukeran'. My grandpa is afraid of the side effects of the chemotherapy... He doesn't have any... Asked by Latasha Hoysradt 1 year ago.

My grandpa suffers from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He's been taking only medicine improving his immunological system for 5 years but no chemotherapy. Now as he has 73 thousands of leukocytes, his doctor prescribed him 'Leukeran'. My grandpa is afraid of the side effects of the chemotherapy... He doesn't have any other symptoms apart from the number of white blood cells. Is there any better and more effective way of treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the USA? I live in Poland and I'm not sure if the doctor tells us about all possibilities. I'll be grateful for any suggestions or information you can provide. Thanks in advance! Answered by Meta Dalegowski 1 year ago.

Stone - scientific care isn't consistently required and you'll be observed up as an outpatient on a regular foundation, specifically situations for some years, without % for further action. Older those with early point CLL have a typical existence expectancy. scientific care interior the fashion of chemotherapy would be required in case you're sick or have many enlarged lymph glands, or become heavily anemic. issues of low blood cellular counts, alongside with hemorrhage and an infection, represent a considerable clarification for dying and could be intently monitored. Many sufferers die of another undertaking after some years. stay every day as best you could. do no longer hesitate to stay in touch with your wellness practitioner whenever you sense in % of help. Answered by Antonio Opula 1 year ago.


Side effects of feline lymphoma treatment?
Recently my cat did not seem to be feeling well, so I took him to the vet where he was diagnosed with lymphoma that has caused his kidneys to fail. It's weird that the kidney failure happened so quickly-- he had a full blood panel done when I first adopted him 3 months ago that showed no problems with his... Asked by Shea Verrier 1 year ago.

Recently my cat did not seem to be feeling well, so I took him to the vet where he was diagnosed with lymphoma that has caused his kidneys to fail. It's weird that the kidney failure happened so quickly-- he had a full blood panel done when I first adopted him 3 months ago that showed no problems with his kidneys. Anyway, I've been administering subcutaneous fluids to combat the dehydration from kidney failure for a couple of days now and he immediately felt better, acting more lively than I have ever seen this 8 yr old. Today, we started him on chlorambucil (Leukeran) and prednisolone. I know what the side effects are from the information provided, but I was wondering if anyone else has had experience with these drugs on their cats. I was so ecstatic to see him bounce back after the "crash," and I'm afraid that these drugs for the cancer will make him feel unwell again. I gave him the meds a few hours ago. He is sleeping now, but I am anxious to see how he will react. So anyone out there... did your cats experience negative side effects from these drugs? Answered by Pearline Whitmire 1 year ago.

I had a cat with Lymphoma, and it was a very hard disease to live with. She was too old for chemotherapy in mine and the vetenarians opinion. It wasn't worth it, so we treated her with prednisone alone. I can tell you she sometimes would lose sleep on it, and would get hyperactive. It is a steroid, so expect behavioral changes and weight gain. Eating habits may change, and he will be very thirsty so leave extra clean water around for him. On the Leukeran, he may have some hair and bone marrow loss, for it is chemotherapy. He can become anemic on the medication, so make sure he is properly nourished and hydrated. Keep up your vet visits and I really hope the best for you and you kitty! Answered by Benny Caneva 1 year ago.

I have a cat with Lymphoma and she has had it for a couple of years. I am treating her with chlorambucil and prednisone...but now just a few days ago she started to fail. She is lethargic and not eating too well. The vet wants to do an ultrasound but I am not convinced it is worthwhile. Maybe its time to let her go? Answered by Rebecca Melve 1 year ago.

well...sorry can't help, but hopefully the cat will be healthy and feel well - lymphona doesn't sound like...common cold - but cancer treatments improve with every day...so there's hope. Answered by Noelle Stavely 1 year ago.


How likely is it that my cat has been misdiagnosed?
A little while ago my cat was diagnosed with feline lymphoma. She was sick and we took her to the vet. They did an ultrasound and a needle biopsy that all pointed to lymphoma though they are not 100% sure without doing surgery, but we didn't want to put her through that.We started her on Prednisone but... Asked by Carol Saleado 1 year ago.

A little while ago my cat was diagnosed with feline lymphoma. She was sick and we took her to the vet. They did an ultrasound and a needle biopsy that all pointed to lymphoma though they are not 100% sure without doing surgery, but we didn't want to put her through that. We started her on Prednisone but she was still showing symptoms. We put her on Lukeran and all the symptoms went away. She is fine and even gaining weight. My bf was wondering if maybe it was something else and not lymphoma. I think with all those tests we had, it is more than likely lymphoma but I wanted to double check. How likely is it that she could have been misdiagnosed? Should we get a second opinion? Answered by Clyde Grof 1 year ago.

Not likely that she was misdiagnosed. Leukeran is a chemotherapy agent for lymphoma. Your cat is doing better because the tumors are shrinking in response to the medication. You need to continue on the treatment plan your veterinarian has set for you. Good luck. Answered by Fern Laskosky 1 year ago.

Just to put your mind at rest, you could ask your vet if it's possible your cat has IBD instead. Without the biopsy, it's virtually impossible to tell which disease is present, although I suspect since your cat is responding well to chemo that it is, indeed, lymphoma. I'm intrigued that your vet could determine that it is lymphoma instead of IBD. In our case, IBD was suspected all along, but it turned out to be lymphoma. Oh, and IBD = inflammatory bowel disease, a common ailment among cats. Answered by Sharilyn Corrett 1 year ago.

^^^^ I agree. Her symptoms have subsided because the meds are working. Answered by Myrna Doeden 1 year ago.


My doctor wants me to go on chlorambucil to treat my uveitis for ten months?
its usually used for lumkemia has anyone ever been on it, if so what did you experience? Asked by Claudette Miyasato 1 year ago.

You're correct in that chlorambucil (Leukeran) is used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia and also lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease. It's also usde to treat macroglobulinemia, nephrotic syndrome, Behcet's syndrome and....tah tah...intractable idiopathic uveitis. Speak to your doctor about possible adverse effects including those that are common, less common and life-threatening. Answered by Dionne Lindstedt 1 year ago.


Cure for CLL?
Asked by Cheri Brinn 1 year ago.

Sentence typing? Answered by Mechelle Held 1 year ago.


My cat's disease!!?
My cat has a disease called pemphigus (probably not right spelling) pronounced pem-fi-gus. Her immune system produces too many white blood cells. She got REALLY sick and she went all scabby and lost some hair. She is MUCH better now but she eats too much even though we have cut back. She is so fat that even her... Asked by Glendora Hefler 1 year ago.

My cat has a disease called pemphigus (probably not right spelling) pronounced pem-fi-gus. Her immune system produces too many white blood cells. She got REALLY sick and she went all scabby and lost some hair. She is MUCH better now but she eats too much even though we have cut back. She is so fat that even her stomach is pink where her hair has rubbed away. Her hair will never grow back because of all the drugs she is on. She takes leukeran and some other drugs that help. In total, she has 3 drugs. What should i do about her fat and her constant eating?? Answered by Elton Westland 1 year ago.

You need to make sure she is on a calorie restricted diet, and then actually measure out her food in 2-3 meals over the day. Measuring is important, what looks like a 1/4 cup to you is probably way more than is needed, and most cats should not be fed more than 1/4 cup per meal. Answered by Ilona Carrizales 1 year ago.

the only thing u can do is put down just so much food at one time,say half cup, 2 or 3 times a day and don't give her any more than that each day and she will loose weight. and then check with ur vet Answered by Lynna Kinney 1 year ago.

I would talk to your vet about it because it might be difficult because of the drugs she's on. You might have to put her on special diet food that has less calories. But I would call and ask the vet because there could be things you need to be careful with because of her meds. Good luck!!! Answered by Jose Fukunaga 1 year ago.

I'm sorry, I never heard of it, but follow the vet's advice. Answered by Kirstin Akima 1 year ago.

feed her once a day......dont leave out the food..... Answered by Demetra Carithers 1 year ago.


My husband has polymyocitis, and has for over 3 yrs. Can anyone help with how I can cope better? It is hard.?
He had this for 10 weeks before finally being diagonsed. It is an immune disorder where your immune system thinks your muscles don't belong and attacks them. He is on IV-IG therapy, methotrexate shots, prednisone, and immuran. They can't seem to get him into "remission", and it is hard to watch... Asked by Clay Ottinger 1 year ago.

He had this for 10 weeks before finally being diagonsed. It is an immune disorder where your immune system thinks your muscles don't belong and attacks them. He is on IV-IG therapy, methotrexate shots, prednisone, and immuran. They can't seem to get him into "remission", and it is hard to watch him have a flare up, and dwindle down in front of my very eyes. He is still working through all of this too. I don't know how he does it. Does anyone know of this or how I can help he and I both to cope better? Sometimes he does better than I do. We have both gotten into a rut, where we don't want to go anywhere or do anything. I try to, but sometimes I would just rather be here with him. We both work, and sometimes that is all we do. I also attend things alone when I do go and then I feel guilty for having left him home. Any docs out there who know of different treatments? Thanks for listening and any suggestions you all may have. Answered by Jin Manghane 1 year ago.

How is polymyositis treated? Initially, polymyositis is treated with high doses of corticosteroids. These are medications related to cortisone and can be given by mouth or intravenously. They are given because they can have a powerful effect to decrease the inflammation in the muscles. They usually are required for years and their continued use will be based on what the doctor finds related to symptoms, examination, and muscle enzyme blood test. Corticosteroids have many predictable and unpredictable side effects. In high doses, they commonly cause an increase in appetite and weight, puffiness of the face, and easy bruising. They can also cause sweats, facial-hair growth, upset stomach, sensitive emotions, leg swelling, acne, cataracts, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, worsening of diabetes, and increased risk of infection. A rare complication of cortisone medications is severe bone damage (avascular necrosis) which can destroy large joints, such as the hips and shoulders. Further, abruptly stopping corticosteroids can cause flares of the disease and result in other side effects including nausea, vomiting, and decreased blood pressure. Corticosteroids do not always adequately improve polymyositis. In these patients, immunosuppressive medications are considered. These medications can be effective by suppressing the immune response that attracts the white blood cells of inflammation to the muscles. Many types are now commonly used and others are still experimental. Methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) can be taken by mouth or by injection into the body. Azathioprine (Imuran) is an oral drug. Both can cause liver and bone-marrow side effects and require regular blood monitoring. Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), chlorambucil (Leukeran), and cyclosporine (Sandimmune) have been used for serious complications of severe disease, such as scarring of the lungs (pulmonary fibrosis). These also can have severe side effects which must be considered with each patient individually. Treatment with intravenous infusion of immunoglobulins (IVIG) has been shown to be effective in severe cases of polymyositis that are resistant to other treatments. Recent research reports indicate that intravenous rituximab (Rituxan) may be helpful in treating resistant disease. Patients with calcium deposits (calcinosis) from dermatomyositis can sometimes benefit by taking diltiazem (Cardizem) to shrink the size of the calcium deposits. This effect, however, occurs slowly—frequently over years, and is not always effective. The complication of calcium deposits in muscles and soft tissues occurs more frequently in children than adults. Physical therapy is an important part of the treatment of polymyositis. When to begin and the continued degree of exercise and range of motion of extremities is customized for each patient. Patients can ultimately do well, especially with early medical treatment of disease and disease flares. Answered by Mervin Desper 1 year ago.

The answer below is good. Socially ? I have a severe physical problem also. It's osteo-arthritis in the degenerative stages and, all they can do is treat the pain with drugs, the surgeons gave up. It's eating me faster then they can help. My spouse has gone into a shock you could say, she just doesn't seem to understand unless I yell. I should understand her problems also but, it's hard. We've been married fifty one years. We can't go anywhere without all my crap that I have to take including the control unit for my transplant, etc. I feel for you and him. Hang in there. Answered by Keeley Haycook 1 year ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Stasia Norgaard 1 year ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Riva Beeghly 1 year ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Phoebe Pachar 1 year ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Delmy Caldarone 1 year ago.


Has anyone experienced side effects on Imuran?
i also suffer from colitis Asked by Lynette Pecoraino 1 year ago.

Azathioprine is also used to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition in which sores develop in the intestine causing pain and diarrhea). Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this drug for your condition. Azathioprine can cause a decrease in the number of blood cells in your bone marrow. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: unusual bleeding or bruising; excessive tiredness; pale skin; headache; confusion; dizziness; fast heartbeat; difficulty sleeping; weakness; shortness of breath; and sore throat, fever, chills, and other signs of infection. Your doctor will order tests before, during, and after your treatment to see if your blood cells are affected by this drug. Azathioprine may increase your risk of developing certain types of cancer, especially skin cancer and lymphoma. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had cancer and if you are taking or have ever taken alkylating agents such as chlorambucil (Leukeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), or melphalan (Alkeran) for cancer. Tell your doctor immediately if you notice any changes in your skin or any lumps or masses anywhere in your body. Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking this medication. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory and ulcerative disease arising in the colonic mucosa, characterized most often by bloody diarrhea. Extraintestinal symptoms, particularly arthritis, may occur. Long-term risk of colon cancer is high. Diagnosis is by colonoscopy. Treatment is with 5-aminosalicylic acid, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, anticytokines, antibiotics, and occasionally surgery. Please see the web pages for more details on Azathioprine (generic name) Imuran (brand name) and Ulcerative colitis. Answered by Jannette Dody 1 year ago.


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