Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 008107/001.

Names and composition

"LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008107/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 3MG BASE per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008107/002 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008107/003 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM FOR SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE per VIAL
008107/004 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008107/005 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018459/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
040174/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL
040262/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL
070480/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
071104/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 15MG BASE
071198/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
071199/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
071598/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
071600/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
071962/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
072733/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
072734/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
072735/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 15MG BASE
072736/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
073099/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
073101/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
074544/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
074544/002 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
075327/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 15MG BASE
081224/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
081277/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
081278/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
088939/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089352/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 3MG BASE per ML
089353/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089384/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089496/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089503/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 5MG BASE per ML
089504/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 5MG BASE per ML
089628/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089636/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089717/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089915/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008107/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 3MG BASE per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008107/002 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008107/003 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM FOR SOLUTION/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE per VIAL
008107/004 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008107/005 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018342/001 WELLCOVORIN LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018342/002 WELLCOVORIN LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018459/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
040056/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 200MG BASE per VIAL
040147/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 10MG BASE per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
040174/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL
040258/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 200MG BASE per VIAL
040262/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL
040286/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 500MG BASE per VIAL
040332/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 10MG BASE per ML
040335/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL
040338/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
040347/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 10MG BASE per ML
070480/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
071104/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 15MG BASE
071198/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
071199/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
071598/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
071600/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
071962/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
072733/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
072734/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
072735/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 15MG BASE
072736/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
073099/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
073101/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
074544/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
074544/002 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
075327/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 15MG BASE
081224/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
081277/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
081278/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
087439/001 WELLCOVORIN LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 5MG BASE per ML
088939/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089352/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 3MG BASE per ML
089353/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089384/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089465/001 WELLCOVORIN LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089496/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089503/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 5MG BASE per ML
089504/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 5MG BASE per ML
089628/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
089636/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM Injectable/ Injection EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089717/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089833/001 WELLCOVORIN LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per VIAL
089834/001 WELLCOVORIN LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
089915/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
200753/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per VIAL
200753/002 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
200753/003 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 200MG BASE per VIAL
200855/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL
203800/001 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per VIAL
203800/002 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 200MG BASE per VIAL
203800/003 LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM PRESERVATIVE FREE LEUCOVORIN CALCIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 350MG BASE per VIAL

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Answered questions

The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Walter Dark 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Debra Deniken 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Lottie Aceret 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Carolann Akbari 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Yang Bussmann 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Lilla Fishell 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Vinita Rodriguiz 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Nelle Kepley 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Jennifer Sheard 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Elda Sittner 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Torri Hoskin 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Evan Nacion 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Angie Devilliers 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Viva Cunard 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Allyson Corporon 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Josh Funes 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Clint Taubert 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Zack Merlin 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Stephen Axley 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Fredricka Macvane 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Macie Douthett 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Pierre Rackett 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Eldora Medieros 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Darryl Mann 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Golda Mckesson 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Marcy Magalong 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Corina Ranildi 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Malcolm Bertus 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Renee Millbern 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Linwood Mehlhaff 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Azalee Wubbena 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Breanne Destefano 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Gabrielle Winzenried 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Lanie Styron 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Madison Kovach 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Velva Mcarthun 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Eryn Boutiette 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Henry Simkulet 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Natalia Haeckel 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Matthew Pacquin 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Vincent Riccitelli 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Cyndi Squiers 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Kelsey Jacobsohn 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Charise Wesolowski 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Carlena Foltz 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Hermina Triplett 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Lynsey Dekoning 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Nelly Mcmellen 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Mignon Turlich 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Joaquin Warp 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Willis Popke 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Takisha Brotherson 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Francisca Monserrate 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Glayds Rulli 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Dorinda Pyfrom 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Margareta Bourek 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Nakita Macgillivray 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Jeane Hyter 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Myrtis Maulin 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Genny Ziola 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Marty Patino 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Deborah Leadman 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Luis Toft 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Tony Egans 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Claude Kristy 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Berna Cardella 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Sheryl Buehl 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Shaunda Maddox 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Janise Easterlin 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Emmaline Meneses 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Buck Dumire 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Shelby Walentoski 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Nancy Mainord 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Cleotilde Langen 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Jacquelin Poelman 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Guillermo Scheu 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Jan Nypaver 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Berna Delossanto 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Gonzalo Urioste 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Setsuko Snooks 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Roxana Giehl 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Darlene Cotreau 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Corazon Tellado 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Armanda Bellott 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Cristen Koestner 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Kimiko Jawad 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Magan Ebesu 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Veronika Pepka 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Victor Schild 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Maybelle Swede 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Angella Catillo 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Ken Tingey 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Zenia Bly 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Latricia Henneke 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Lida Goodnight 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Roselee Consorti 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Sarita Schiro 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Kelsi Frohock 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Mica Erling 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Raymond Vanhoutte 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Belkis Tello 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Nila Hersch 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Gia Nemeth 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Dorian Jean 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Aliza Ade 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Eilene Setias 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Joe Shillingburg 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Milo Carmer 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Toshia Demedeiros 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Ahmed Mcsweeney 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Jess Panone 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Leona Hickson 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Lisette Vevea 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Miki Crowin 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Emilee Snedeker 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Kum Kryston 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Shantel Yamanoha 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Shaunte Liceaga 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Nella Wirch 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Corina Matchette 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Tarah Ivie 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Shavonne Yzquierdo 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Celina Chaudhry 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Theron Earle 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Barbara Crail 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Dion Pothier 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Dayle Abaya 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Sau Stacy 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Lizabeth Marcinkiewicz 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Charles Holdcraft 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Ezra Froneberger 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Jovan Mcelduff 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Hazel Goudeau 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Lashawna Ellis 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Tamar Golebiowski 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Jamison Muncie 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Krystyna Schurkamp 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Latanya Rasool 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Sebrina Defazio 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Debrah Gustus 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Louetta Panny 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Ilene Shippen 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Coletta Cruthird 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Valene Boni 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Charity Mukherjee 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Lashell Savala 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Iesha Aper 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Marianna Lisonbee 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Simonne Marro 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Scott Dipietro 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Lorene Rokisky 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Kali Forker 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Jaymie Schaeffler 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Kayla Bartley 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Migdalia Lorentz 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Luciana Gahl 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Hiroko Plikerd 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Nicolle Goldkamp 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Lucie Swonke 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Carley Porter 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Roy Saeler 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Wendy Cleal 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Isabelle Meilleur 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Dusty Bologna 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Faustino Roderiquez 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Bebe Hansbrough 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Irving Baskin 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Libby Kolek 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Glenn Beuse 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Titus Daleske 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Noel Passi 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Elizabeth Nye 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Edgardo Burget 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Eusebia Galgano 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Izetta Garbe 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Odette Nicolette 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Deandrea Straight 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Daisy Cooter 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Odette Timus 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Alex Rogado 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Tess Wik 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Ina Pratico 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Lavera Macione 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Desire Belback 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Evon Storrs 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Marcel Mellard 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Rickie Sharber 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Zenia Depaulis 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Lovetta Walker 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Tangela Granto 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Lottie Coats 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Elvin Markland 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Mario Brockway 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Flossie Ferdon 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Sarai Olivier 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Carlos Khalid 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Josefine Beshear 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Joye Berhe 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Rickie Osinski 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Adella Mcclee 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Willard Cohagan 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Inocencia Zou 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Ying Bourassa 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Joellen Janeway 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Nelia Menjes 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Josphine Michelotti 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Barry Neeper 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Clara Giarratano 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Chadwick Panozzo 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Gia Barklow 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Viki Silverthorn 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Abdul Lightbody 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Sybil Popovec 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Santana Bouthot 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Rory Sevilla 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Sumiko Farmer 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Eusebia Rasor 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Chrissy Tolomeo 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Linnie Wrighton 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Anissa Butz 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Donnetta Boldul 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Hanna Bolyard 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Jennette Minner 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Augusta Sengupta 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Tequila Misik 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Isa Ladtkow 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Virgen Scotten 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Veronique Whelehan 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Ellis Ganguli 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Elina Gushue 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Gerald Mandahl 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Hae Woltmann 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Cathie Corrieri 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Benny Sheth 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Russ Etheridge 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Doretha Gorringe 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Fidela Siefferman 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Cheree Peck 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Margarete Vanblaricum 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Sandi Kamai 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Mariam Makos 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Katerine Gradillas 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Devon Hongeva 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Candra Lachley 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Roberta Fullington 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Heriberto Katie 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Michelina Rutenberg 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Wayne Buvens 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Gisele Coppens 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Brigette Ablin 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Aldo Neiger 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Hermina Kuehl 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Tammera Hagos 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Jacki Jacobitz 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Merrill Faulkenberry 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Dinorah Ohlsson 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Yolando Glossner 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Lenard Whiteside 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Rubie Gaucher 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Anastasia Huffmaster 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Jettie Kallenberger 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Apolonia Dumas 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Renda Bievenue 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Hedwig Kimel 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Myung Shigemi 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Ardelia Mcculloh 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Sharika Liebenthal 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Lynne Fillpot 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Renetta Visounnaraj 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Pablo Turnbow 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Adeline Dutko 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Shantel Coral 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Jon Weisgerber 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Tiffanie Girton 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Willis Helper 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Edward Kalland 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Arleen Leskovac 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Scot Zakar 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Young Sadorra 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Linh Leibee 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Eloise Shrawder 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Bao Gutekunst 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Sophie Hyrkas 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Leslie Reuschel 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Evie Quinn 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Esteban Zacharia 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Solange Merrill 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Virgen Jamason 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Kayce Beckelhimer 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Norman Zondlo 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Esther Wernick 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Leena Kaniecki 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Micaela Ranno 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Maryanne Tervo 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Dorthea Simonis 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Darrel Frenz 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Jeanene Witczak 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Dori Engberson 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Alysa Reill 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Dee Schlecter 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Winter Wilmer 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Kathrine Liskovec 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Millicent Day 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Lorri Lauzier 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Yolanda Roura 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Gregg Campagnini 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Buck Murphey 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Patrina Tadesse 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Charise Troyer 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Ebony Mobilio 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Ethelyn Bubolz 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Charmaine Coello 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Melida Forgrave 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Rosalee Tellinghuisen 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Tamatha Swirczek 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Ruthanne Fults 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Andy Iles 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Marry Peasnall 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Landon Gavel 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Shanika Turck 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Leda Yauger 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Jeffry Dunshie 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Joann Jaksic 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Jodee Puca 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Letty Moger 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Elene Odome 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Eugenio Knackstedt 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Rob Moure 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Chas Cheevers 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Jeannine Seeton 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Sharan Gundy 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Hattie Schmittou 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Kim Napierala 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Valeria Blowers 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Alexandria Grudem 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Justin Brar 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Yajaira Horridge 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Thomas Damboise 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Lauren Muterspaw 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Jerrod Scarritt 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Ricardo Dalaq 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Margrett Abrell 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Wan Leimberger 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Deidra Kirchoff 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Cris Rehak 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Rebekah Delegado 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Hana Canupp 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Edgardo Brydon 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Genoveva Gregori 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Cameron Denoncourt 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Jannet Furukawa 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Suzanna Gulla 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Brittny Luecht 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Odell Schnoke 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Frederick Overholser 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Jann Poitevin 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Marquetta Seewald 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Cindi Freire 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Eusebia Victorino 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Ellan Bebeau 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Albertha Krapfl 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Laura Silano 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Carlton Verbridge 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Torie Schrawder 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Beryl Maltbia 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Jolynn Wonsik 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Yung Mulroney 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Tami Heibult 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Celine Brandow 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Deanna Waltersdorf 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Shoshana Hinajosa 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Cecile Vinning 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Raquel Berrio 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Trey Hoelzel 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Tamra Labat 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Augustine Swartz 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Dirk Vogland 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Irma Savini 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Dan Anness 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Eldora Tyo 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Rosie Nazelrod 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Adrianne Vanderwerff 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Jeremy Piner 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Johnetta Henniger 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Shaquana Lor 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Jeffry Rodefer 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Adan Zingaro 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Dagny Berky 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Cornell Eurich 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Eloy Lusane 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Quinn Viscosi 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Mariette Waldrop 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Catina Korzenski 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Genevive Dadd 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Margart Bahde 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Jacquie Kolm 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Hal Streff 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Ruthe Parnin 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Genevive Wygand 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Trish Cerrone 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Jeane Tsinnie 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Nakia Majchrzak 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Tegan Akoni 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Rosemary Grigorov 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Devin Loretz 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Jaimee Heuangvilay 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Richard Despres 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Beatrice Hannon 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Corina Deppe 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Dinah Logwood 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Suzy Cius 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Adriane Mcspirit 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Sharri Passineau 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Neoma Nuding 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Cammie Wisnosky 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Doug Sasseen 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Shelton Ragasa 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Denyse Selfridge 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Vi Zepka 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Marcus Saporito 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Lavonna Pall 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Leandra Albair 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Vergie Uhlir 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Kris Namisnak 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Veda Rocray 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Luvenia Bounthapanya 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Sheree Strack 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Kermit Manter 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Nohemi Beckton 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Arnetta Pereyra 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Manual Dopico 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Geraldine Blott 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Maxwell Baillie 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Junita Benneth 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Adele Leehan 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Phyliss Nole 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Jim Balbas 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Pok Alferez 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Summer Harkley 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Argentina Sedberry 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Beata Gudroe 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Marilyn Odwyer 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Dennise Ruhling 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Tamisha Fernatt 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Tammera Rhinehardt 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Shira Maixner 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Stephani Aaland 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Otto Rosal 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Yvone Len 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Kenya Mayne 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Warner Masten 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Natasha Lucky 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Jamie Sahara 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Miriam Palladino 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Tiana Gallegly 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Yong Jaussen 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Sumiko Garwood 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Sylvie Bastow 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Soo Barbur 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Ken Malafronte 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Travis Cumbo 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Noel Tolston 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Allan Woodfolk 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Rudolph Aimone 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Zella Sar 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Willow Wildermuth 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Kasey Teodoro 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Isela Borgelt 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Easter Ogles 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Anissa Chiotti 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Terra Garhart 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Jae Shippey 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Vilma Poellot 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Elva Lepak 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Ellamae Lupold 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Shaquita Liff 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Shanae Algire 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Celestina Airington 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Keneth Eugley 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Joelle Hayashi 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Solange Pullman 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Alla Cahoon 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Beata Boot 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Crista Laroe 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Serena Onstead 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Buck Schwingel 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Kristy Goodnoe 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Owen Kubish 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Otha Zalusky 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Ima Tomshack 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Dannie Salata 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Ehtel Giusti 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Shanice Szwed 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Nicky Tamiya 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Dawna Clingerman 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Nanci Gustin 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Barbera Ronco 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Pam Mowry 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Rebecka Haeder 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Bernadine Granizo 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Morgan Whitesell 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Ami Bitto 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Kelsi Uihlein 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Aron Crnkovich 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Adelle Holliman 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Lydia Briston 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Neal Sitosky 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Chasidy Matturro 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Sarina Onitsuka 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Afton Irigoyen 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by See Burbach 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Jeanette Chevalier 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Ngan Ransberger 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Brenna Radakovich 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Asley Bushweller 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Kathleen Glinka 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Margarito Banerji 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Marvella Dan 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Erasmo Fick 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Etha Fluetsch 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Lynne Heinemeyer 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Ronda Mancell 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Lisha Pion 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Gaston Kusner 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Dreama Deaver 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Brock Faraco 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Albertine Gilcrease 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Elina Wragg 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by America Liebherr 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Emmy Mccoubrey 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Tana Noren 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Marchelle Karmo 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Kimberlee Baxtor 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Argelia Heyd 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Frances Nutley 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Florine Disbrow 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Mathilde Duellman 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Therese Kendzierski 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Madelaine Nassar 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Justin Vanderlaan 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Margret Simoes 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Windy Apuzzo 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Phylis Wichern 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Felton Keovongxay 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Monique Griebling 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Magdalene Pargman 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Derrick Giovino 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Colton Hallin 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Bruna Wooden 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Laree Adu 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Brandon Bogdanski 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Darren Uresti 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Karmen Grear 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Lorrie Bennink 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Jannet Vanleuvan 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Eusebio Brehon 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Corinne Lathrop 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Trey Browder 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Lilliana Craghead 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Tommy Presson 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Alvaro Kilner 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Maire Gerstenkorn 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Dayna Shafran 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Lucien Holan 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Camie Montgonery 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Zaida Valenstein 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Harmony Besner 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Inger Lourenco 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Geoffrey Brodsho 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Natisha Baim 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Frank Toulouse 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Yanira Perun 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Patricia Fortini 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Alexandra Lasure 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Refugio Mu 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Joey Morgano 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Dia Manetta 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Lady Waskom 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Edythe Hatada 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Charleen Ahn 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Jordan Prestage 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Sharita Hafford 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Patti Pheonix 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Wesley Costella 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Lise Kunzie 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Faustino Vivier 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Nichelle Sirois 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Patrick Poullard 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Argelia Khamo 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Kamala Miravalle 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Twila Swilling 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Justina Raatz 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Mozell Kober 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Santos Vaughn 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Jon Lehman 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Bong Boecker 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Lou Sebastian 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Allie Magda 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Jamal Mingle 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Sheryl Lau 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Roberto Arroyd 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Fabian Singerman 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Epifania Daw 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Janie Ashwood 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Dylan Kwiatkowski 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Lorenzo Deckert 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Sherrell Scordo 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Birgit Goodmon 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Junko Drape 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Raguel Piirto 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Cheryle Poles 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Melita Camak 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Ryan Binkowski 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Lexie Maisonet 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Stacie Bisio 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Queen Bush 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Jena Chilvers 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Akiko Folden 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Belinda Isidore 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Donny Blohm 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Romona Dryer 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Jon Trucchi 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Elnora Patriquin 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Dan Dupuy 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Walter Kobs 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Eric Vitro 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Holli Hassett 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Cinda Henfling 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Fred Letlow 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Hortencia Quelette 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Lina Traber 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Willow Woodburn 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Quinton Embleton 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Dirk Klages 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Elia Dierking 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Hoyt Liebsch 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Leontine Bantz 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Tim Biggio 2 years ago.


The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prev?
The order is for Leucovorin 20mg by mouth 6 hours after administration of the cancer drug methotrexate to prevent toxicity. The child weights 70lb today and is 4ft 2in tall. The safe dose for this medication is 10mg/m2 . On hand you have 5mg Leucovorin Calcium tablets. If safe, how many tablets will you give? Asked by Clora Revelli 2 years ago.

You can use the Du Bois formula for body surface area (BSA): W = Weight and H = Height BSA = 0.007184 x W^0.425 x H^0.725 W = 70lb x 0.453 = 31.7 kg H = 50" x 2.54 = 127 cm BSA = 0.007184 x 31.7^0.425 x 127^0.725 BSA = 0.007184 x 4.34 x 33.51 BSA = 1.04 (~ 1.0) Alternatively, the pediatric formula can be used: [4Wkg+7]/[90+Wkg] [(4 x 31.7) + 7]/[90 + 31.7] 133.8/121.7 = 1.1 So, we'll say for argument's sake that the child's BSA is 1.0 m^2 The safe dose is 10 mg/m^2. Therefore, the dose to give the child is 10 mg. You have 5mg tablets, so the child will get 2 tablets. Answered by Margit Jastremski 2 years ago.

I don't forget myself 2 be verbally endowed, and attempt 2 apply so much 4thought 2 what comes out of my mouth prior 2 itz doing so. For this reason that occurs lovely rattling sometimes! Timothy :o) Answered by Rhea Rouff 2 years ago.


Can toxoplasma b cured.. ?
i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor...I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..??M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap... Asked by Natosha Aran 2 years ago.

i had abortion few mnths ago... test report showd toxoplasma positive... I had been tkin medicine fr 6 mnths bt still its positive.. Doc askd me to cntinu 4 mnths mor... I hv no child til nw... Is there ny1 who had been suffrd by this disease..?? M tkin rovamycin forte... 21 days 2 tyms per day den 15 days gap then again 21 days nd again 15 days gap nd so on.... lyk dis i had cmpletd 6 tyms nd its still positiv nd goin to cntinu 4 mnths mor... Answered by Karry Laube 2 years ago.

Toxoplasmosis can be treated (not completely) with combinations of pyrimethamine with either trisulfapyrimidines or sulfadiazine, plus folinic acid in the form of leucovorin calcium to protect the bone marrow from the toxic effects of pyrimethamine. If this treatment causes hypersensitivity reaction, then pyrimethamine and clindamycin can be used instead. If these drugs are not available, then a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim can be used. Pregnant women and babies can be treated but Toxoplasma gondii cannot be eliminated completely. The parasites can remain within tissue cells in a less active stage (cyst) in locations difficult for the medication to get to. A drug called spiramycin is recommended during the first four months whereas sulfadizaine/pyrimethamine and folinic acid for women that have been pregnant for more than four months. PCR (a method to discover parasite DNA) is often performed on the amniotic fluid to find out if the infant is infected. If the infant is likely to be infected, then treatment is done with drugs such as sulfadizaine, pyrimethamine and folinic acid. Congenitally infected babies are treated with sulfonamide and pyrimethamine. Treatment for persons with ocular disease depends on the size of the eye lesion, the characteristics (acute or chronic) and the location of the lesion. Persons with compromised immune systems (such as AIDS patients) need to be treated until their health improves significantly. Answered by Julissa Rion 2 years ago.


How safe is methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis?
Asked by Katheleen Auber 2 years ago.

Hi, I also take methotrexate for RA and I've been taking it for a little longer than a year now. I know when I first starting taking it, it would upset my stomach and sometimes throw up. I also got blister on my tongue. And i only started with 3 pills once a week because I have low white blood cells and Methotrexate lowers your blood count. But after a few months my body got used to it and my doctor gave me Folic Acid to help with my blood count and other side effects as well as Leucovorin Calcium. Now I'm up to 5 pills of Methotrexate and I take blood test every month to monitor my blood cells. I did have pain in every joint even my jaw but after taking this drug, i was able to move again and be myself. I'm doing very well and I even take care of my 3 year old daughter by myself but it does get hard because of all the fatigue and lack of energy. But overall I haven't experienced anything too bad from this drug and it helps me be normal as well as being able to take care of my daughter. :) But everyone is different and their bodies or condition may not be the same so its really up to you if you want to try it. I think if you do start it, maybe you should start with a few pills and see how your body reacts to it. I hope this helps you and I know how u feel but I needed to live my life and raise my kid so I just to took it :) Answered by Augustina Houpe 2 years ago.

Hi.Well,I'm going to take a guess and say that your rheumatologist has given you a couple of other immune suppressant medications,and they didn't show much if any improvement(remission is the goal) in your RA.So,your rheumatologist has now put you on methotrexate hoping this medication(stronger immune suppressant) will get the results your doctor wants.As for how safe this specific medication is? It's basically the same as any other immune suppressant drug,and it will lower your immune system,which will make you susceptible to several contagious strains of colds,flu,etc.And,also may cause stomach upset,nausea,and ulcers.So,you should also be taking a prescribed(OTC) medication to help prevent any damage to your stomach,and also a calcium and vitamin D supplement as well.I suggest that you speak to your rheumatologist about any/all potential risks associated with this drug,and any other drug/medication you are taking for your RA.It's very important that you and your doctor both are well informed about any/all medication/s your currently taking whether it be prescription or over the counter(OTC).You should use caution when taking opiate pain killers for RA.Most times opiates don't offer much pain relief for RA,and can be habit forming over a long period of time.Best to take your doctors regime,and advice when it comes to your health.Take care. Answered by Helena Yongue 2 years ago.

Imagine for a moment your arthritis completely vanishing right now. If, in a moment, your pain and stiffness melted away. And your joints all of a sudden functioned like a well-oiled machine. Like a magic wand was waived, you'd be able to jump up from your chair and run around the room like a kid. And imagine that you'd never have to suffer as much as a pinch of arthritis stiffness or pain ever again. I know this sounds impossible right now, but bear with me, because sometimes miracles happen. It was a gift from a woman on the other side of the world. From the kindness of her heart, she took pity on my suffering and taught me how to completely reverse my arthritis. Today, I want to do the same for you! Answered by Arden Trim 2 years ago.

Minocycline has been great for me for 16 years, no side effects to speak of. But now suddenly I am very sick with pericarditis, an inflammation around the sac of the heart. And tetracyclines can cause this, So I am grieving that my wonderful minocycline may have led to this, and have no idea what to switch to, and don t want to switch to anything. I am thinking plaquanil again, I was on it for many years with no ill effects. All the biologics say leukemia and lymphoma as side effects, so no way would I ever try them. I have had this since age 24 and will be 60 in 2015. so have had it for 35 years. Take the least dangerous ones, to live a long life with RA. Answered by Carli Koon 2 years ago.

I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 1993, at the age of 55. My rheumatologist started me on methotrexate at that time, with 3x2.5 mg tablets per week. Since that time, I've taken a total of 12,355 mg (I keep track of all the medications I take). Every three months, I have a liver panel and CBC to monitor the effects of methotrexate. I've been chronically anemic all during this time. In April 2006, I started taking Enbrel. Four years later, I suffered congestive heart failure (CHF) and stopped taking Enbrel. Enbrel really kept the arthritic pains down but CHF was thought to have been caused by it. Now I take 7x2.5 mg per week of methotrexate. I was also taking hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) starting in 2006, to control pain, but have now stopped owing to the FDA restrictions on dispensing this medicine. My liver function is normal. I have always been able to tolerate methotrexate. Answered by Melda Breunig 2 years ago.

Is Methotrexate Safe Answered by Tona Thane 2 years ago.

Personally, I would say it isn't very safe. Opiates would be a lot safer. Its a shame how some doctors are so afraid of giving people pain killers that they would resort to using these poisons rather than treating your pain. I would ask your doctor to refer you to a pain specialist. Answered by Natosha Bethell 2 years ago.

I know methotrexate was a death sentence for me. I told my doctor cancer ran in my family big time. 6 months later I had nodules on my lungs, ild, ctd, and cancer. I don t even trust my doctors now because I can t get a straight answer Answered by Judie Manser 2 years ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Aura Duley 2 years ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Willette Reznik 2 years ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Mitsue Sheen 2 years ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Tona Crossan 2 years ago.


Can you list antidotes to the ff substances/drugs?
Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) Cyanide Narcotics/opioid overdose Thrombolytics Iron Acetaminophen Anti depressants Methotrexate Digoxin Benzodiazepines Lead Warfarin Heparin Asked by Lee Bains 2 years ago.

I believe yahoo answers should be the last resort a responsible student must consider in answering questions like this. Anyway, PEACE.... Anti cholinesterase (cholinergics) - atropine Cyanide - sodium thiosulfate Narcotics/opioid overdose - naloxone (Narcan) Thrombolytics - aminocaproic acid (Amicar) Iron - deferoxamine Acetaminophen - acetylcystein Anti depressants - phentolamine Methotrexate - leucovorin Digoxin - Digibind Benzodiazepines - flumenazil Lead - calcium EDTA Warfarin - vit. K Heparin - protamine sulfate Answered by Emilia Harlee 2 years ago.


Can someone that has had chemotherapy for colon cancer (maybe stage 3) help me...?
Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what... Asked by Lavern Galardo 2 years ago.

Someone very dear to me has just had a foot of their colon removed with a large tumor and 15 of 18 of the surrounding lymphs showed positive for cancer from the pathology report, now the suggested treatment is 6 months of chemo, 3 days in a row (port surgically implanted) every other week. I have no idea what other kinds of treatments there are, i am just so worried about this regiment, and how hard it is going to be, has anyone gone through this that can help me? I want to know more about the subject so that i can help my loved one through this and help make sure this is the right decision on the chemo. Does chemo make you extremely ill? ANY insight will be much appreciated.... Answered by Doreatha Wilhelmy 2 years ago.

I just finished chemo for stage 3 colon cancer at the end of April, and I was lucky. I never got sick, and my oncologist said there wasn't any reason anybody should with all the anti-nausea medicines that are available now. I got two different types of anti-nausea medicines during chemo, and they gave me pills to take in case I needed them for the few days after treatment (I never did). The chemo will consist of 3 different medications: oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (Flouracil). 5-FU has been in use since the 1950's, and has a very good success rate. Leucovorin is a vitamin that helps the 5-FU work better, and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a newer drug. The chemo usually takes about 4-6 hours. She should be given at least two anti-nausea medicines during treatment. I received an anti-nausea medicine first, then a second one at the same time as the Leucovorin and oxaliplatin, then the 5-FU, then calcium and potassium, which also helped prevent nausea. The worst symptom I had from the chemo was my hands hurt if they got cold, even from drinking cold drinks (many people wear cotton gloves when they have to do things like open the refrigerator). Other people also get mouth sores, but they can give you a medicine to gargle with, or you can just use salt water. You can lose you hair on rare occasions, but it only happens in about 5% of cases, and about 25% of people have thinning hair. Mine started thinning at the very end, but only because it stopped growing, and wasn't replacing itself. Make sure your friend goes to a good cancer center. I went to the Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, which is one of the best (Lance Armstrong went there when he had prostate cancer, even though he lives nowhere near Indy). If you go there, I would strongly recommend my oncologist, Dr. Paul Helft. He is an ethicist, which means he believes in including the patient and his family in every stage of treatment. He spent 3 hours with me and my family the first meeting, and met with me before every treatment, which my cousin, an oncology nurse, said was unheard of. Good luck to you and your friend. Answered by Nathanael Paulshock 2 years ago.

Chemo affects cells that multiply rapidly: cancer cells and cells that are lining your stomach. So that is why chemo patients often have a lack of appetite and feel like throwing up. Chemo makes the person very fatigued, lose their hair, and have altered taste buds. The best way to help get through chemo and help your dear friend is to STAY/ BE POSITIVE, be helpful by helping them with things (only if they want...some are very sensitive to the fact that they have chemo and actually need help...depends on the person, so just be careful and sensitive), and making sure that they eat and get proper nutrition, and that they take their medication on time and as prescribed. Also allowing them to talk out their problems. I don't recommend being sad along with them. Just be attentive and let them spill their guts. Also try to provide hope, and a positive atmosphere as much as you can. Thanks Answered by Teofila Ceasar 2 years ago.

Chemo is important in the treatment of colon cancer. I think it is called F4. It doesn't usually cause nasea or hair loss. Without it the cancer will run riot. It will cause fatigue. Just go with it. Cancer treatments can save lives. Answered by Magali Newgent 2 years ago.

People react differently to chemo and a lot depends on what drugs they are on. Yes it can make you very ill, but so does cancer. If you really want to help them make the right decision then you really should be with them when this is discussed with their oncologist. Answered by Aubrey Moreau 2 years ago.


Cancer of the pancrous?
Asked by Felica Galletti 2 years ago.

The pancreas is a gland, which is located in the back of the abdomen, lying almost on the spine. It produces Insulin, the hormone that controls the blood sugar, as well as many enzymes that are needed for digestion of food. Cancer of pancreas is now the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in United States. The 5-year relative survival rate of patients with this cancer is only 3 to 5%. Roughly 28,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. This type of cancer is found most frequently in men and African-Americans. The average age at the time of diagnosis being 65 years. Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages when cure is not possible. Cause: The actual cause of pancreas cancer is unknown. However, some environmental factors, especially cigarette smoking, play a role in the development of this cancer. Signs and symptoms: Cancer of the pancreas can grow for a long time without causing any problems. Most patients are diagnosed in advanced stages and present with any of the following signs: Abdominal pain Weight loss Nausea, vomiting Jaundice, as a result of obstruction of bile ducts Anemia Back pain due to invasion of nerves Diagnosis: When suspected, CT scan or Ultrasound examination of the abdomen may establish the diagnosis. A Fine needle aspiration of the pancreas may confirm the existence of the cancer. This cancer can also be detected by an endoscopy-assisted study of the pancreas, which allows taking a biopsy at the same time. Staging: Endoscopic ultrasound is a very sensitive study that should be done to determine the depth of invasion of the cancer into the tissues around the pancreas, as well as evaluation of the local lymph glands. CT scan of abdomen, as well as bone scans, may have to be done to complete the staging workup Treatment: Surgery: Management of this disease relies on surgery in an attempt to remove most or all of the Pancreas and to reconstruct the continuity of the bowels. This is a rather difficult procedure and carries a very high risk, even in the best hands. Indications for surgery are limited to younger patients with very small size tumors. Chemotherapy: Is appropriate for patients in whom the disease is not cured with surgery. Gemcitabine, VP-16, Cisplatinum, Mitomycin, Taxol, Taxotere, 5-FU and Leucovorin are among the most commonly used drugs for Pancreas cancer. These drugs are used in combination and can have moderate to severe toxic effects. A newer drug that has now become available is Radiation: For the most part, it is used to control the symptoms of the advanced disease. Radiation at the time of surgery, referred to as intra-operative radiation, has not proven to be more effective than external radiation, which can also be combined with chemotherapy. Pattern of Spread: If left untreated, or if it fails to respond to treatment, Pancreas cancer can spread to the liver, lymph glands in the abdomen, lungs and almost anywhere else. Prognosis: In most Americans, this cancer carries a very poor prognosis, which is due to the advanced stage of the illness at the time of diagnosis, and in such cases, survival is short. The disease can be cured only if it is caught very early. Special Situations Patients with advanced pancreas cancer may develop any of the following complications. Pleural effusion Bone metastasis Paraneoplastic syndromes High calcium level Blood clots in the legs and other organs Pain: Most patients with this cancer experience substantial pain, which can be debilitating. Control of pain is central to care of patients with this illness. Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block can control the pain in great majority of such patients. Survival: Survival of patients with this cancer depends on the type and extent of the cancer at the time of initial diagnosis. One-third of patients with early stages may be cured with surgery alone. In the majority of patients in whom cure is not possible, survival could vary from months to years, depending on the extent of cancer, overall condition of the patient, as well as response to treatment and duration of the response Follow-up After completion of treatment, and in any combination that might have taken place, the patient needs to remain under surveillance for the possibility of recurrence of cancer. Follow-up should be scheduled on a regular basis (initially every one to three months for one to two years). The frequency of follow-up will depend on the condition of the patient and his disease. In each follow-up visit, the patient is examined and, normally, a CT scan of the abdomen is obtained at intervals. Treatment of advanced or recurrent disease will depend on the stage and extent of the recurring disease. Most patients are then treated with chemotherapy using the same agents mentioned above. Radiation therapy may be helpful in managing painful or symptomatic areas to which the cancer has spread. If patients experience pain, different pain medications may be used to alleviate the pain. For patients with advanced disease, where most treatments have failed, one could consider assistance from hospice. Answered by Jeraldine Downin 2 years ago.


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