Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018118/001.

Names and composition

"LANOXICAPS" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DIGOXIN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018118/001 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.2MG
018118/002 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.05MG
018118/003 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.1MG
018118/004 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.15MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009330/002 LANOXIN DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.25MG per ML
009330/004 LANOXIN PEDIATRIC DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
018118/001 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.2MG
018118/002 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.05MG
018118/003 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.1MG
018118/004 LANOXICAPS DIGOXIN CAPSULE/ORAL 0.15MG
020405/001 LANOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.0625MG
020405/002 LANOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
020405/003 LANOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.1875MG
020405/004 LANOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
020405/005 LANOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.375MG
020405/006 LANOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
021648/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN ELIXIR/ORAL 0.05MG per ML
040092/001 DIGOXIN PEDIATRIC DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
040093/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.25MG per ML
040206/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.25MG per ML
040282/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
040282/002 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
040481/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.25MG per ML
076268/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
076268/002 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
076363/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
076363/002 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
077002/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
077002/002 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
078556/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
078556/002 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
083217/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.25MG per ML
083391/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.25MG per ML
084386/001 DIGOXIN DIGOXIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.25MG per ML

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Digoxin????? Cardiac Glycocide....?
I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has... Asked by Elisabeth Lombel 1 year ago.

I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has been willing to help me. Any info would be greatly appreciated!!!!!! Answered by Jeane Ditchfield 1 year ago.

I believe Glaxo-Smith Kline (GlaxoWellcome) are the ones that manufacture Lanoxicaps. www.gsk.com I'm not sure if the companies will allow use for school unless it is for Pharmacy School or for a doctor's office. Check around town with your doctor offices and see if they have any GSK pens, note pads or pens that they can give you. I always ask my doctor what kind of cool pens he/she has to give me. Also, ask the nurse who comes in for GSK to sell or give some samples. Try your doctor, or try the local clinic or hospital. Hope this helps! Answered by Tiffany Ciano 1 year ago.


Can someone help me identify this pill?
Yellowish round pill very small with w over 40 divided by the line you can break them in half with. Asked by Majorie Cella 1 year ago.

It's DIGOXIN, also called Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin and is used to treat heart failure and also used to treat a certain type of irregular heartbeat. It's a cardiac glycoside and regulated sodium and potassium inside heart cells to reduces strain on the heart. Answered by Wesley Vest 1 year ago.


Can digoxin cause insomnia?
I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never... Asked by Imelda Postlethwait 1 year ago.

I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never before had trouble sleeping, always slept well and rested well after 7-8 hours of sleep. So I'm really confused. I also take a cumarinic blood thinner and water pills for my condition. I would be so grateful if someone could help me. A heart patient really needs sleep. Thank you. Answered by Barrie Alred 1 year ago.

The generic drug digoxin is mainly prescribed for heart problems like irregular rhythms (arrhythmias) and heart failure. It comes in the form of capsules, liquid, and tablets, and common brand names for it are Lanoxin Elixir Pediatric, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, and Digitek. Recognizing the side effects of digoxin and understanding what to do when they occur is simple with proper background information. Difficulty: Moderately Easy Instructions 1 Consult a doctor if your breasts become larger after taking digoxin and the symptom doesn't go away or becomes uncomfortable. This is a common side effect that both men and women experience. 2 Note that moderate side effects of digoxin require medical intervention if they grow worse or persevere for a period of time. Such symptoms include dizziness, drowsiness, and lightheadedness. 3 Seek immediate medical attention if you experience symptoms like abnormal eyesight or heartbeat, breathing difficulty, confusion, diarrhea, fatigue, hives, itching, lack of appetite, nausea, rash, swollen body parts like the hands or face, unusual bleeding or bruising, upset stomach, vomiting, and weight gain. All of these side effects are considered severe and shouldn't be ignored. 4 Avoid eating too much bran fiber while taking digoxin. People who eat a lot of food with large amounts of bran fiber may absorb less of the drug into the bloodstream through the stomach, which may reduce its effectiveness. 5 See a doctor first for advice if medication for allergies, colds, or coughs is required while taking digoxin. Some drugs used to treat those conditions may react adversely with digoxin and increase both the risk and the severity of side effects. Answered by Dianna Nagode 1 year ago.


Medication question?
So I have the flu, and i am taking z-pac, i am also prescribed 5mg xanax but i am afriad to mix the two. My doctor unfortunatley is not in today so i cannot call and ask him. Could anyone tell me if its alright to mix the two Asked by Elvera Millimaki 1 year ago.

Wait til you talk to your doctor! Before taking azithromycin (Z-Pak), tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: · nelfinavir (Viracept); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); · triazolam (Halcion); · carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); · a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); · HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); ***· alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); · • If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Xanex interacts BADLY with antibiotics such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); Answered by Art Fayson 1 year ago.

im not a pharmacist, but i am knowledgeable about medication, i'm not sure what z-pac is, but if its for the flu, i dont think any severe interactions would occur with any benzodiazepines like xanax. I'm prescribed to 4mg a day but i've never mixed it with flu medicane. i hope that helped some Answered by Ute Guldin 1 year ago.

The label on your prescription will have warnings for common interactions, however, your best bet would be to read the inserts given to you with your receipt. The pharmacist will know better (even more than the doctor) the problems with drug interactions. Call your pharmacist first. There are websites such as drug checker, but they may not be up to date, so read the disclaimer before you bet your life on it. Answered by Micaela Merl 1 year ago.

there should be no problem. but I think you have something wrong. Xanax is available in tablets as 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 milligrams. Are you taking 0.5 mg tablets (they are salmon colored) or is your total daily does 5 mg.. Doctors often write the zero before the decimal and not after. This avoids confusion so pharmacists and nurses do not mistake a half milligram for five milligrams, or ten milligrams for one milligram. Answered by Chanelle Zazueta 1 year ago.

Please ask your pharmacist about drug interactions, and he or she can tell you if they two are ok to take together. (He or she may give you the ok to take both since I believe that the z-pac is an antibiotic medication while xanaz is a tranquilizer. Though don't take advice from us laypeople :) Answered by Adelina Arosemena 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacist. Answered by Un Olguin 1 year ago.


What are the long term side effects of omeprazole?
I want to know about the long term side effects of the medicine, omeprazole. Asked by Shery Goodwin 1 year ago.

Omeprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. It is used to treat ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD or heartburn), and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid production. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you have ever had any type of liver disease. You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Do not use over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) without first talking to your healthcare provider if you have · trouble or pain with swallowing; · vomiting blood; · bloody or black stools; · had heartburn for over 3 months; · heartburn with sweating, lightheadedness, dizziness, chest, shoulder, neck, jaw, or arm pain; · frequent chest pain; · heartburn with wheezing; · unexplained weight loss; · nausea or vomiting; or · stomach pain. Your doctor should evaluate your condition before taking over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) if you have any of the conditions listed above. Omeprazole is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether omeprazole will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take omeprazole without first talking to your doctor if you (female) are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether omeprazole passes into breast milk. If you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives), stop taking omeprazole and seek emergency medical attention. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take omeprazole and talk to your doctor if you experience · drowsiness, dizziness, or headache; · diarrhea, increased gas, or bloating; or · itching. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines · warfarin (Coumadin); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · a medicine for insomnia or anxiety such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), temazepam (Restoril), clorazepate (Tranxene), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), and others; · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); · ampicillin (Omnipen, Principen); or · iron (Feosol, Mol-Iron, Fergon, Femiron, others). You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with omeprazole. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. ADRAC (Australian Adverse Drug Reactions - Therapeutic Goods Administration) has received 19 reports (13 female) describing musculoskeletal problems associated with omeprazole. Ages ranged from 43 to 91 (median 55) years. Of the 16 patients for whom the information is available, 14 took 20 mg daily, 2 took 40 mg and the onset of symptoms occurred as early as one day and as late as 12 months after starting omeprazole. Eight reports documented joint pain and/or swelling including gout in two cases (one of which was confirmed by rechallenge). Nine reports described muscle pain and/or atrophy and symptoms recurred on rechallenge in two of these. Two reports documented both myalgia and arthralgia occurring simultaneously. One report documented a marked elevation of plasma creatine phosphokinase. Ten reports documented recovery, usually within a few days, 4 patients had not recovered a few months after the drug was stopped, and except for an elderly man who died from an unrelated cause, the outcome is unknown in the 4 other cases. Recent overseas reports1 have also documented similar problems and the product information has been updated to include mention of arthralgia, myalgia and muscular weakness. Recently the Committee received a report of a 51 year old man who developed interstitial nephritis several months after commencing omeprazole (Losec) 20 mg daily as treatment for reflux oesophagitis. He had tolerated omeprazole well for the first two months but then developed marked fatigue and rigors. Urine microscopy revealed over 40,000 red cells and 8,000 white cells per mL. His serum creatinine peaked at 0.19 mmol/L and a peripheral eosinophilia of 4.7% was noted. Renal biopsy revealed a marked interstitial infiltrate with prominent eosinophils consistent with acute interstitial nephritis. Omeprazole was withdrawn, he was treated with prednisone and improved rapidly. Two other Australian1,2 and four overseas3 case reports have similarly described interstitial nephritis in association with omeprazole therapy. In these 6 patients who ranged in age from 58 to 86 (median: 75) years, onset occurred from a few weeks to 6 months after commencement of omeprazole therapy and for 3 patients, the reaction recurred on rechallenge. The triad of fever, rash and eosinophilia, is described as the classical presentation of drug-induced interstitial nephritis, but this was observed in only one of these 7 cases. Prescribers should be aware that interstitial nephritis can occur within the first few months after starting omeprazole. Answered by Sherly Glasco 1 year ago.

Omeprazole Side Effects Long Term Answered by Louetta Prial 1 year ago.


What could/can't you do on antibiotic treatments?
I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it.1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or... Asked by Robbin Arps 1 year ago.

I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it. 1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or should you stick to non-milk and non-acidic products? 2) Is it okay to exercize and exert onesself, as long as they feel okay and are taking in enough fluids? 3) Is sexual intercourse okay? (my theory is if god forbid you get anything else, you're already on the antibiotics so it won't stand a chance) 4)Can you go about your life without making any modifications, and slowing yourself down? Answered by Ashlee Holst 1 year ago.

What should I avoid while taking Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Azithromycin can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using azithromycin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: diarrhea that is watery or bloody; chest pain, uneven heartbeats; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Continue using azithromycin and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or stomach pain; dizziness, tired feeling, or headache; vaginal itching or discharge; or mild itching or skin rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Do not take antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours of taking azithromycin. Before taking azithromycin, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: nelfinavir (Viracept); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); triazolam (Halcion); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); phenytoin (Dilantin); cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Theochron); warfarin (Coumadin); pimozide (Orap); or another antibiotic, especially clarithromycin (Biaxin) or erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S, Ery-Tab). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with azithromycin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about azithromycin written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Azithromycin is available with a prescription under the brand name Zithromax. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Answered by Janice Grisso 1 year ago.


Tachycardia, can it cause passing out!?
My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing... Asked by Elena Eyerman 1 year ago.

My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past 1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing out?? Answered by Roberta Cooper 1 year ago.

Of course it can. When you have a supraventricular tachycardia episode, your heart rate increases dramatically. Normal functioning is around 60-100 bpm, while affected by SVT, your heart rate is much higher, around 150-200 bpm (Beats Per Minute). That is not the only symptom though, here are many more: A racing or fluttering feeling in the chest (palpitations). Chest discomfort (pressure, tightness, pain). Lightheadedness or dizziness. Fainting (syncope). Shortness of breath. A pounding pulse. You may feel or see your pulse beating, especially at your neck, where large blood vessels are close to the skin. Sweating. Tightness or fullness in the throat. Tiredness (fatigue). Excessive urine production. I couldnt really tell you if her heart condition is closely realted to the ovarian cancer treatment but I do know that certain conditions that were created due to this treatment have been know to cause tachycardia: Overly high levels of the heart medication digoxin (such as Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin) or the bronchodilator theophylline (such as Bronkodyl, Elixophyllin, Slo-Bid, Slo-Phyllin, or Theo-Dur). Other serious health problems, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, pneumonia, or metabolic problems can all cause or lead to SVT. Just make sure she studies this disease and realizes what she needs to stay away from to help curd these episode. Such as overuse of caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol or use of illegal drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine. Decongestants that contain stimulants should also be avoided, including oxymetazoline (such as Afrin and other brands) and pseudoephedrine (such as Sudafed, Actifed, and other brands). Doctors also warn against using nonprescription diet pills or "pep" pills, because many contain caffeine, ephedra (recently banned), ephedrine, the herb ma huang, or other stimulants. Also a good piece of advice for you is to find out exactly what type of Tachycardia she has. There is a type of Supraventricular Tachycardia called Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, this is simply when an abnormal electrical connection (or bypass tract) between the atria and ventricles of the heart, of which Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) is the most common. The bypass tract allows electricity in the heart to travel abnormally fast and results in a very rapid heart rate. This condition has been shown to be genetic, meaning it can be passed down to offspring. SO both you and your mother be very careful in your diets and pphyscial activity. Either one can be potentially very dangerous. Answered by Kelly Cossey 1 year ago.

it would want to be alot of causes. relies upon on how extreme your potassium factor grow to be.....and in case your well being care provider grow to be in touch. Kidney complications which includes retention or failure might want to reason your ok+ to be extreme. i doesn't say nutritional causes might want to reason your extreme factor except you had complications such as your kidneys because the body releases what potassium that it doesn't desire. Now...on the different area. Did they have a not person-friendly time sticking you? in the adventure that they probed on your arm or hemolyzed your blood pattern...this may reason a pretend extreme factor. Answered by Delia Butner 1 year ago.

tachycardia is a heart rate over 100 beats a minute.that's all i know Answered by Adolph Hsing 1 year ago.


Can you take benadryl with biaxon?
Asked by Fabiola Ramm 1 year ago.

As everyone else who answered has said, yes it is safe to give your dog Benadryl. The general rule of thumb is to give 1 mg for every 1 pound of body weight. In your case, you would give your dog 45 mg. You need to consult w/ a veterinarian before doing this though. He may up the dosage or cut it back depending on the severity of your dog's allergies. You can always just call him and ask instead of taking your dog in, but I suggest taking him in for an exam to rule out fleas or mites. Your vet can also give her a steroid shot called Depo Medrol to help w/ the itching. Good luck and I hope your dog gets some relief soon! Answered by Van Strem 1 year ago.


Is alli safe with high blood pressure medication?
well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayedhigh ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacsto lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious.i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150.im having... Asked by Russel Franceski 1 year ago.

well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayed high ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacs to lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious. i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150. im having trouble getting my weight off and i was just wanting a few pros and cons about the alli? i was told its great! but i want some real answers from real people. ---note--- i DO plan on talking with my dr about this next week, but i wanted a little pros and cons from you guys, and possibly some people that are or have used alli and some of your success and fail stories! Answered by Garfield Schoeb 1 year ago.

Alli is over-the-counter version of Orlistat.It is safe for people to use who are dealing with high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol. Before taking Alli, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth; cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid); or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with orlistat. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Marin Dembowski 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Estella Agrela 1 year ago.

Alli is not safe at all. Answered by Leon Schurg 1 year ago.


Digoxin????? Cardiac Glycocide....?
I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has... Asked by Arden Mioduszewski 1 year ago.

I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has been willing to help me. Any info would be greatly appreciated!!!!!! Answered by Deangelo Bradway 1 year ago.

I believe Glaxo-Smith Kline (GlaxoWellcome) are the ones that manufacture Lanoxicaps. www.gsk.com I'm not sure if the companies will allow use for school unless it is for Pharmacy School or for a doctor's office. Check around town with your doctor offices and see if they have any GSK pens, note pads or pens that they can give you. I always ask my doctor what kind of cool pens he/she has to give me. Also, ask the nurse who comes in for GSK to sell or give some samples. Try your doctor, or try the local clinic or hospital. Hope this helps! Answered by Lisandra Deaderick 1 year ago.


Can someone help me identify this pill?
Yellowish round pill very small with w over 40 divided by the line you can break them in half with. Asked by Karren Grobes 1 year ago.

It's DIGOXIN, also called Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin and is used to treat heart failure and also used to treat a certain type of irregular heartbeat. It's a cardiac glycoside and regulated sodium and potassium inside heart cells to reduces strain on the heart. Answered by Clifton Portley 1 year ago.


Can digoxin cause insomnia?
I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never... Asked by Mercedez Rajaratnam 1 year ago.

I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never before had trouble sleeping, always slept well and rested well after 7-8 hours of sleep. So I'm really confused. I also take a cumarinic blood thinner and water pills for my condition. I would be so grateful if someone could help me. A heart patient really needs sleep. Thank you. Answered by America Piasecki 1 year ago.

The generic drug digoxin is mainly prescribed for heart problems like irregular rhythms (arrhythmias) and heart failure. It comes in the form of capsules, liquid, and tablets, and common brand names for it are Lanoxin Elixir Pediatric, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, and Digitek. Recognizing the side effects of digoxin and understanding what to do when they occur is simple with proper background information. Difficulty: Moderately Easy Instructions 1 Consult a doctor if your breasts become larger after taking digoxin and the symptom doesn't go away or becomes uncomfortable. This is a common side effect that both men and women experience. 2 Note that moderate side effects of digoxin require medical intervention if they grow worse or persevere for a period of time. Such symptoms include dizziness, drowsiness, and lightheadedness. 3 Seek immediate medical attention if you experience symptoms like abnormal eyesight or heartbeat, breathing difficulty, confusion, diarrhea, fatigue, hives, itching, lack of appetite, nausea, rash, swollen body parts like the hands or face, unusual bleeding or bruising, upset stomach, vomiting, and weight gain. All of these side effects are considered severe and shouldn't be ignored. 4 Avoid eating too much bran fiber while taking digoxin. People who eat a lot of food with large amounts of bran fiber may absorb less of the drug into the bloodstream through the stomach, which may reduce its effectiveness. 5 See a doctor first for advice if medication for allergies, colds, or coughs is required while taking digoxin. Some drugs used to treat those conditions may react adversely with digoxin and increase both the risk and the severity of side effects. Answered by Eldon Cilento 1 year ago.


Medication question?
So I have the flu, and i am taking z-pac, i am also prescribed 5mg xanax but i am afriad to mix the two. My doctor unfortunatley is not in today so i cannot call and ask him. Could anyone tell me if its alright to mix the two Asked by Lulu Rollerson 1 year ago.

Wait til you talk to your doctor! Before taking azithromycin (Z-Pak), tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: · nelfinavir (Viracept); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); · triazolam (Halcion); · carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); · a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); · HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); ***· alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); · • If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Xanex interacts BADLY with antibiotics such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); Answered by Chantay Schoneman 1 year ago.

im not a pharmacist, but i am knowledgeable about medication, i'm not sure what z-pac is, but if its for the flu, i dont think any severe interactions would occur with any benzodiazepines like xanax. I'm prescribed to 4mg a day but i've never mixed it with flu medicane. i hope that helped some Answered by Breanna Sjostrand 1 year ago.

The label on your prescription will have warnings for common interactions, however, your best bet would be to read the inserts given to you with your receipt. The pharmacist will know better (even more than the doctor) the problems with drug interactions. Call your pharmacist first. There are websites such as drug checker, but they may not be up to date, so read the disclaimer before you bet your life on it. Answered by Nathaniel Bradway 1 year ago.

there should be no problem. but I think you have something wrong. Xanax is available in tablets as 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 milligrams. Are you taking 0.5 mg tablets (they are salmon colored) or is your total daily does 5 mg.. Doctors often write the zero before the decimal and not after. This avoids confusion so pharmacists and nurses do not mistake a half milligram for five milligrams, or ten milligrams for one milligram. Answered by Crista Saitta 1 year ago.

Please ask your pharmacist about drug interactions, and he or she can tell you if they two are ok to take together. (He or she may give you the ok to take both since I believe that the z-pac is an antibiotic medication while xanaz is a tranquilizer. Though don't take advice from us laypeople :) Answered by Janeth Hovis 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacist. Answered by Linnea Sherill 1 year ago.


What could/can't you do on antibiotic treatments?
I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it.1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or... Asked by Adan Breitling 1 year ago.

I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it. 1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or should you stick to non-milk and non-acidic products? 2) Is it okay to exercize and exert onesself, as long as they feel okay and are taking in enough fluids? 3) Is sexual intercourse okay? (my theory is if god forbid you get anything else, you're already on the antibiotics so it won't stand a chance) 4)Can you go about your life without making any modifications, and slowing yourself down? Answered by Odell Woodson 1 year ago.

What should I avoid while taking Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Azithromycin can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using azithromycin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: diarrhea that is watery or bloody; chest pain, uneven heartbeats; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Continue using azithromycin and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or stomach pain; dizziness, tired feeling, or headache; vaginal itching or discharge; or mild itching or skin rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Do not take antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours of taking azithromycin. Before taking azithromycin, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: nelfinavir (Viracept); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); triazolam (Halcion); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); phenytoin (Dilantin); cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Theochron); warfarin (Coumadin); pimozide (Orap); or another antibiotic, especially clarithromycin (Biaxin) or erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S, Ery-Tab). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with azithromycin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about azithromycin written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Azithromycin is available with a prescription under the brand name Zithromax. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Answered by Armida Biddiscombe 1 year ago.


What are the long term side effects of omeprazole?
I want to know about the long term side effects of the medicine, omeprazole. Asked by Gerry Berrell 1 year ago.

Omeprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. It is used to treat ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD or heartburn), and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid production. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you have ever had any type of liver disease. You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Do not use over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) without first talking to your healthcare provider if you have · trouble or pain with swallowing; · vomiting blood; · bloody or black stools; · had heartburn for over 3 months; · heartburn with sweating, lightheadedness, dizziness, chest, shoulder, neck, jaw, or arm pain; · frequent chest pain; · heartburn with wheezing; · unexplained weight loss; · nausea or vomiting; or · stomach pain. Your doctor should evaluate your condition before taking over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) if you have any of the conditions listed above. Omeprazole is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether omeprazole will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take omeprazole without first talking to your doctor if you (female) are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether omeprazole passes into breast milk. If you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives), stop taking omeprazole and seek emergency medical attention. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take omeprazole and talk to your doctor if you experience · drowsiness, dizziness, or headache; · diarrhea, increased gas, or bloating; or · itching. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines · warfarin (Coumadin); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · a medicine for insomnia or anxiety such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), temazepam (Restoril), clorazepate (Tranxene), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), and others; · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); · ampicillin (Omnipen, Principen); or · iron (Feosol, Mol-Iron, Fergon, Femiron, others). You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with omeprazole. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. ADRAC (Australian Adverse Drug Reactions - Therapeutic Goods Administration) has received 19 reports (13 female) describing musculoskeletal problems associated with omeprazole. Ages ranged from 43 to 91 (median 55) years. Of the 16 patients for whom the information is available, 14 took 20 mg daily, 2 took 40 mg and the onset of symptoms occurred as early as one day and as late as 12 months after starting omeprazole. Eight reports documented joint pain and/or swelling including gout in two cases (one of which was confirmed by rechallenge). Nine reports described muscle pain and/or atrophy and symptoms recurred on rechallenge in two of these. Two reports documented both myalgia and arthralgia occurring simultaneously. One report documented a marked elevation of plasma creatine phosphokinase. Ten reports documented recovery, usually within a few days, 4 patients had not recovered a few months after the drug was stopped, and except for an elderly man who died from an unrelated cause, the outcome is unknown in the 4 other cases. Recent overseas reports1 have also documented similar problems and the product information has been updated to include mention of arthralgia, myalgia and muscular weakness. Recently the Committee received a report of a 51 year old man who developed interstitial nephritis several months after commencing omeprazole (Losec) 20 mg daily as treatment for reflux oesophagitis. He had tolerated omeprazole well for the first two months but then developed marked fatigue and rigors. Urine microscopy revealed over 40,000 red cells and 8,000 white cells per mL. His serum creatinine peaked at 0.19 mmol/L and a peripheral eosinophilia of 4.7% was noted. Renal biopsy revealed a marked interstitial infiltrate with prominent eosinophils consistent with acute interstitial nephritis. Omeprazole was withdrawn, he was treated with prednisone and improved rapidly. Two other Australian1,2 and four overseas3 case reports have similarly described interstitial nephritis in association with omeprazole therapy. In these 6 patients who ranged in age from 58 to 86 (median: 75) years, onset occurred from a few weeks to 6 months after commencement of omeprazole therapy and for 3 patients, the reaction recurred on rechallenge. The triad of fever, rash and eosinophilia, is described as the classical presentation of drug-induced interstitial nephritis, but this was observed in only one of these 7 cases. Prescribers should be aware that interstitial nephritis can occur within the first few months after starting omeprazole. Answered by Marya Edmiston 1 year ago.

Omeprazole Side Effects Long Term Answered by Marybeth Gushard 1 year ago.


Tachycardia, can it cause passing out!?
My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing... Asked by Vena Mendiola 1 year ago.

My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past 1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing out?? Answered by Dannielle Emmerling 1 year ago.

Of course it can. When you have a supraventricular tachycardia episode, your heart rate increases dramatically. Normal functioning is around 60-100 bpm, while affected by SVT, your heart rate is much higher, around 150-200 bpm (Beats Per Minute). That is not the only symptom though, here are many more: A racing or fluttering feeling in the chest (palpitations). Chest discomfort (pressure, tightness, pain). Lightheadedness or dizziness. Fainting (syncope). Shortness of breath. A pounding pulse. You may feel or see your pulse beating, especially at your neck, where large blood vessels are close to the skin. Sweating. Tightness or fullness in the throat. Tiredness (fatigue). Excessive urine production. I couldnt really tell you if her heart condition is closely realted to the ovarian cancer treatment but I do know that certain conditions that were created due to this treatment have been know to cause tachycardia: Overly high levels of the heart medication digoxin (such as Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin) or the bronchodilator theophylline (such as Bronkodyl, Elixophyllin, Slo-Bid, Slo-Phyllin, or Theo-Dur). Other serious health problems, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, pneumonia, or metabolic problems can all cause or lead to SVT. Just make sure she studies this disease and realizes what she needs to stay away from to help curd these episode. Such as overuse of caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol or use of illegal drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine. Decongestants that contain stimulants should also be avoided, including oxymetazoline (such as Afrin and other brands) and pseudoephedrine (such as Sudafed, Actifed, and other brands). Doctors also warn against using nonprescription diet pills or "pep" pills, because many contain caffeine, ephedra (recently banned), ephedrine, the herb ma huang, or other stimulants. Also a good piece of advice for you is to find out exactly what type of Tachycardia she has. There is a type of Supraventricular Tachycardia called Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, this is simply when an abnormal electrical connection (or bypass tract) between the atria and ventricles of the heart, of which Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) is the most common. The bypass tract allows electricity in the heart to travel abnormally fast and results in a very rapid heart rate. This condition has been shown to be genetic, meaning it can be passed down to offspring. SO both you and your mother be very careful in your diets and pphyscial activity. Either one can be potentially very dangerous. Answered by Robin Pelak 1 year ago.

it would want to be alot of causes. relies upon on how extreme your potassium factor grow to be.....and in case your well being care provider grow to be in touch. Kidney complications which includes retention or failure might want to reason your ok+ to be extreme. i doesn't say nutritional causes might want to reason your extreme factor except you had complications such as your kidneys because the body releases what potassium that it doesn't desire. Now...on the different area. Did they have a not person-friendly time sticking you? in the adventure that they probed on your arm or hemolyzed your blood pattern...this may reason a pretend extreme factor. Answered by Keenan Elsberry 1 year ago.

tachycardia is a heart rate over 100 beats a minute.that's all i know Answered by Kandace Strausz 1 year ago.


Can you take benadryl with biaxon?
Asked by Claudie Orlowsky 1 year ago.

As everyone else who answered has said, yes it is safe to give your dog Benadryl. The general rule of thumb is to give 1 mg for every 1 pound of body weight. In your case, you would give your dog 45 mg. You need to consult w/ a veterinarian before doing this though. He may up the dosage or cut it back depending on the severity of your dog's allergies. You can always just call him and ask instead of taking your dog in, but I suggest taking him in for an exam to rule out fleas or mites. Your vet can also give her a steroid shot called Depo Medrol to help w/ the itching. Good luck and I hope your dog gets some relief soon! Answered by Keira Olsten 1 year ago.


Is alli safe with high blood pressure medication?
well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayedhigh ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacsto lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious.i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150.im having... Asked by Oscar Garrean 1 year ago.

well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayed high ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacs to lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious. i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150. im having trouble getting my weight off and i was just wanting a few pros and cons about the alli? i was told its great! but i want some real answers from real people. ---note--- i DO plan on talking with my dr about this next week, but i wanted a little pros and cons from you guys, and possibly some people that are or have used alli and some of your success and fail stories! Answered by Cherish Gandarillia 1 year ago.

Alli is over-the-counter version of Orlistat.It is safe for people to use who are dealing with high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol. Before taking Alli, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth; cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid); or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with orlistat. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Tressa Wierenga 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Lauren Garramone 1 year ago.

Alli is not safe at all. Answered by Dorthey Lindall 1 year ago.


Digoxin????? Cardiac Glycocide....?
I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has... Asked by Rudy Dusel 1 year ago.

I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has been willing to help me. Any info would be greatly appreciated!!!!!! Answered by Margurite Sherville 1 year ago.

I believe Glaxo-Smith Kline (GlaxoWellcome) are the ones that manufacture Lanoxicaps. www.gsk.com I'm not sure if the companies will allow use for school unless it is for Pharmacy School or for a doctor's office. Check around town with your doctor offices and see if they have any GSK pens, note pads or pens that they can give you. I always ask my doctor what kind of cool pens he/she has to give me. Also, ask the nurse who comes in for GSK to sell or give some samples. Try your doctor, or try the local clinic or hospital. Hope this helps! Answered by Georgiana Forero 1 year ago.


Can someone help me identify this pill?
Yellowish round pill very small with w over 40 divided by the line you can break them in half with. Asked by Rex Vall 1 year ago.

It's DIGOXIN, also called Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin and is used to treat heart failure and also used to treat a certain type of irregular heartbeat. It's a cardiac glycoside and regulated sodium and potassium inside heart cells to reduces strain on the heart. Answered by Earle Rita 1 year ago.


Can digoxin cause insomnia?
I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never... Asked by Lasonya Marsek 1 year ago.

I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never before had trouble sleeping, always slept well and rested well after 7-8 hours of sleep. So I'm really confused. I also take a cumarinic blood thinner and water pills for my condition. I would be so grateful if someone could help me. A heart patient really needs sleep. Thank you. Answered by Jacqulyn Bleything 1 year ago.

The generic drug digoxin is mainly prescribed for heart problems like irregular rhythms (arrhythmias) and heart failure. It comes in the form of capsules, liquid, and tablets, and common brand names for it are Lanoxin Elixir Pediatric, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, and Digitek. Recognizing the side effects of digoxin and understanding what to do when they occur is simple with proper background information. Difficulty: Moderately Easy Instructions 1 Consult a doctor if your breasts become larger after taking digoxin and the symptom doesn't go away or becomes uncomfortable. This is a common side effect that both men and women experience. 2 Note that moderate side effects of digoxin require medical intervention if they grow worse or persevere for a period of time. Such symptoms include dizziness, drowsiness, and lightheadedness. 3 Seek immediate medical attention if you experience symptoms like abnormal eyesight or heartbeat, breathing difficulty, confusion, diarrhea, fatigue, hives, itching, lack of appetite, nausea, rash, swollen body parts like the hands or face, unusual bleeding or bruising, upset stomach, vomiting, and weight gain. All of these side effects are considered severe and shouldn't be ignored. 4 Avoid eating too much bran fiber while taking digoxin. People who eat a lot of food with large amounts of bran fiber may absorb less of the drug into the bloodstream through the stomach, which may reduce its effectiveness. 5 See a doctor first for advice if medication for allergies, colds, or coughs is required while taking digoxin. Some drugs used to treat those conditions may react adversely with digoxin and increase both the risk and the severity of side effects. Answered by Eric Anesi 1 year ago.


Medication question?
So I have the flu, and i am taking z-pac, i am also prescribed 5mg xanax but i am afriad to mix the two. My doctor unfortunatley is not in today so i cannot call and ask him. Could anyone tell me if its alright to mix the two Asked by Rubye Morgenstein 1 year ago.

Wait til you talk to your doctor! Before taking azithromycin (Z-Pak), tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: · nelfinavir (Viracept); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); · triazolam (Halcion); · carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); · a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); · HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); ***· alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); · • If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Xanex interacts BADLY with antibiotics such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); Answered by Delilah Him 1 year ago.

im not a pharmacist, but i am knowledgeable about medication, i'm not sure what z-pac is, but if its for the flu, i dont think any severe interactions would occur with any benzodiazepines like xanax. I'm prescribed to 4mg a day but i've never mixed it with flu medicane. i hope that helped some Answered by Lakenya Serrano 1 year ago.

The label on your prescription will have warnings for common interactions, however, your best bet would be to read the inserts given to you with your receipt. The pharmacist will know better (even more than the doctor) the problems with drug interactions. Call your pharmacist first. There are websites such as drug checker, but they may not be up to date, so read the disclaimer before you bet your life on it. Answered by Chang Braught 1 year ago.

there should be no problem. but I think you have something wrong. Xanax is available in tablets as 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 milligrams. Are you taking 0.5 mg tablets (they are salmon colored) or is your total daily does 5 mg.. Doctors often write the zero before the decimal and not after. This avoids confusion so pharmacists and nurses do not mistake a half milligram for five milligrams, or ten milligrams for one milligram. Answered by Omar Nisbett 1 year ago.

Please ask your pharmacist about drug interactions, and he or she can tell you if they two are ok to take together. (He or she may give you the ok to take both since I believe that the z-pac is an antibiotic medication while xanaz is a tranquilizer. Though don't take advice from us laypeople :) Answered by Mariko Lancia 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacist. Answered by Ashly Vanhaitsma 1 year ago.


What could/can't you do on antibiotic treatments?
I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it.1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or... Asked by Genia Alvino 1 year ago.

I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it. 1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or should you stick to non-milk and non-acidic products? 2) Is it okay to exercize and exert onesself, as long as they feel okay and are taking in enough fluids? 3) Is sexual intercourse okay? (my theory is if god forbid you get anything else, you're already on the antibiotics so it won't stand a chance) 4)Can you go about your life without making any modifications, and slowing yourself down? Answered by Helen Slaugh 1 year ago.

What should I avoid while taking Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Azithromycin can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using azithromycin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: diarrhea that is watery or bloody; chest pain, uneven heartbeats; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Continue using azithromycin and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or stomach pain; dizziness, tired feeling, or headache; vaginal itching or discharge; or mild itching or skin rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Do not take antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours of taking azithromycin. Before taking azithromycin, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: nelfinavir (Viracept); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); triazolam (Halcion); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); phenytoin (Dilantin); cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Theochron); warfarin (Coumadin); pimozide (Orap); or another antibiotic, especially clarithromycin (Biaxin) or erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S, Ery-Tab). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with azithromycin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about azithromycin written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Azithromycin is available with a prescription under the brand name Zithromax. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Answered by Deon Jedik 1 year ago.


What are the long term side effects of omeprazole?
I want to know about the long term side effects of the medicine, omeprazole. Asked by Shayla Umbel 1 year ago.

Omeprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. It is used to treat ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD or heartburn), and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid production. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you have ever had any type of liver disease. You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Do not use over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) without first talking to your healthcare provider if you have · trouble or pain with swallowing; · vomiting blood; · bloody or black stools; · had heartburn for over 3 months; · heartburn with sweating, lightheadedness, dizziness, chest, shoulder, neck, jaw, or arm pain; · frequent chest pain; · heartburn with wheezing; · unexplained weight loss; · nausea or vomiting; or · stomach pain. Your doctor should evaluate your condition before taking over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) if you have any of the conditions listed above. Omeprazole is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether omeprazole will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take omeprazole without first talking to your doctor if you (female) are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether omeprazole passes into breast milk. If you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives), stop taking omeprazole and seek emergency medical attention. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take omeprazole and talk to your doctor if you experience · drowsiness, dizziness, or headache; · diarrhea, increased gas, or bloating; or · itching. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines · warfarin (Coumadin); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · a medicine for insomnia or anxiety such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), temazepam (Restoril), clorazepate (Tranxene), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), and others; · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); · ampicillin (Omnipen, Principen); or · iron (Feosol, Mol-Iron, Fergon, Femiron, others). You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with omeprazole. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. ADRAC (Australian Adverse Drug Reactions - Therapeutic Goods Administration) has received 19 reports (13 female) describing musculoskeletal problems associated with omeprazole. Ages ranged from 43 to 91 (median 55) years. Of the 16 patients for whom the information is available, 14 took 20 mg daily, 2 took 40 mg and the onset of symptoms occurred as early as one day and as late as 12 months after starting omeprazole. Eight reports documented joint pain and/or swelling including gout in two cases (one of which was confirmed by rechallenge). Nine reports described muscle pain and/or atrophy and symptoms recurred on rechallenge in two of these. Two reports documented both myalgia and arthralgia occurring simultaneously. One report documented a marked elevation of plasma creatine phosphokinase. Ten reports documented recovery, usually within a few days, 4 patients had not recovered a few months after the drug was stopped, and except for an elderly man who died from an unrelated cause, the outcome is unknown in the 4 other cases. Recent overseas reports1 have also documented similar problems and the product information has been updated to include mention of arthralgia, myalgia and muscular weakness. Recently the Committee received a report of a 51 year old man who developed interstitial nephritis several months after commencing omeprazole (Losec) 20 mg daily as treatment for reflux oesophagitis. He had tolerated omeprazole well for the first two months but then developed marked fatigue and rigors. Urine microscopy revealed over 40,000 red cells and 8,000 white cells per mL. His serum creatinine peaked at 0.19 mmol/L and a peripheral eosinophilia of 4.7% was noted. Renal biopsy revealed a marked interstitial infiltrate with prominent eosinophils consistent with acute interstitial nephritis. Omeprazole was withdrawn, he was treated with prednisone and improved rapidly. Two other Australian1,2 and four overseas3 case reports have similarly described interstitial nephritis in association with omeprazole therapy. In these 6 patients who ranged in age from 58 to 86 (median: 75) years, onset occurred from a few weeks to 6 months after commencement of omeprazole therapy and for 3 patients, the reaction recurred on rechallenge. The triad of fever, rash and eosinophilia, is described as the classical presentation of drug-induced interstitial nephritis, but this was observed in only one of these 7 cases. Prescribers should be aware that interstitial nephritis can occur within the first few months after starting omeprazole. Answered by Dalton Drath 1 year ago.

Omeprazole Side Effects Long Term Answered by Xiomara Sackey 1 year ago.


Tachycardia, can it cause passing out!?
My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing... Asked by Fidel Magouyrk 1 year ago.

My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past 1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing out?? Answered by Orville Ohayon 1 year ago.

Of course it can. When you have a supraventricular tachycardia episode, your heart rate increases dramatically. Normal functioning is around 60-100 bpm, while affected by SVT, your heart rate is much higher, around 150-200 bpm (Beats Per Minute). That is not the only symptom though, here are many more: A racing or fluttering feeling in the chest (palpitations). Chest discomfort (pressure, tightness, pain). Lightheadedness or dizziness. Fainting (syncope). Shortness of breath. A pounding pulse. You may feel or see your pulse beating, especially at your neck, where large blood vessels are close to the skin. Sweating. Tightness or fullness in the throat. Tiredness (fatigue). Excessive urine production. I couldnt really tell you if her heart condition is closely realted to the ovarian cancer treatment but I do know that certain conditions that were created due to this treatment have been know to cause tachycardia: Overly high levels of the heart medication digoxin (such as Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin) or the bronchodilator theophylline (such as Bronkodyl, Elixophyllin, Slo-Bid, Slo-Phyllin, or Theo-Dur). Other serious health problems, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, pneumonia, or metabolic problems can all cause or lead to SVT. Just make sure she studies this disease and realizes what she needs to stay away from to help curd these episode. Such as overuse of caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol or use of illegal drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine. Decongestants that contain stimulants should also be avoided, including oxymetazoline (such as Afrin and other brands) and pseudoephedrine (such as Sudafed, Actifed, and other brands). Doctors also warn against using nonprescription diet pills or "pep" pills, because many contain caffeine, ephedra (recently banned), ephedrine, the herb ma huang, or other stimulants. Also a good piece of advice for you is to find out exactly what type of Tachycardia she has. There is a type of Supraventricular Tachycardia called Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, this is simply when an abnormal electrical connection (or bypass tract) between the atria and ventricles of the heart, of which Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) is the most common. The bypass tract allows electricity in the heart to travel abnormally fast and results in a very rapid heart rate. This condition has been shown to be genetic, meaning it can be passed down to offspring. SO both you and your mother be very careful in your diets and pphyscial activity. Either one can be potentially very dangerous. Answered by Corrin Fogerson 1 year ago.

it would want to be alot of causes. relies upon on how extreme your potassium factor grow to be.....and in case your well being care provider grow to be in touch. Kidney complications which includes retention or failure might want to reason your ok+ to be extreme. i doesn't say nutritional causes might want to reason your extreme factor except you had complications such as your kidneys because the body releases what potassium that it doesn't desire. Now...on the different area. Did they have a not person-friendly time sticking you? in the adventure that they probed on your arm or hemolyzed your blood pattern...this may reason a pretend extreme factor. Answered by Jose Haas 1 year ago.

tachycardia is a heart rate over 100 beats a minute.that's all i know Answered by Epifania Connet 1 year ago.


Can you take benadryl with biaxon?
Asked by Rosalind Buttry 1 year ago.

As everyone else who answered has said, yes it is safe to give your dog Benadryl. The general rule of thumb is to give 1 mg for every 1 pound of body weight. In your case, you would give your dog 45 mg. You need to consult w/ a veterinarian before doing this though. He may up the dosage or cut it back depending on the severity of your dog's allergies. You can always just call him and ask instead of taking your dog in, but I suggest taking him in for an exam to rule out fleas or mites. Your vet can also give her a steroid shot called Depo Medrol to help w/ the itching. Good luck and I hope your dog gets some relief soon! Answered by Sudie Saxe 1 year ago.


Is alli safe with high blood pressure medication?
well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayedhigh ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacsto lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious.i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150.im having... Asked by Francesco Borgeson 1 year ago.

well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayed high ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacs to lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious. i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150. im having trouble getting my weight off and i was just wanting a few pros and cons about the alli? i was told its great! but i want some real answers from real people. ---note--- i DO plan on talking with my dr about this next week, but i wanted a little pros and cons from you guys, and possibly some people that are or have used alli and some of your success and fail stories! Answered by Fredricka Gielstra 1 year ago.

Alli is over-the-counter version of Orlistat.It is safe for people to use who are dealing with high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol. Before taking Alli, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth; cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid); or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with orlistat. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Earlean Gambardella 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Zonia Clause 1 year ago.

Alli is not safe at all. Answered by Shannan Torain 1 year ago.


Digoxin????? Cardiac Glycocide....?
I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has... Asked by Pinkie Columbia 1 year ago.

I have to do a presentation for school on the newest Cardiac Glycocide. Digoxin is the most popular, but I think that Lanoxicaps is the newest. I need to know what company makes them and I need to find out a way to get phamplets, pens, note pads, etc. Anything that has the company logo. So far no company has been willing to help me. Any info would be greatly appreciated!!!!!! Answered by Exie Mangicavallo 1 year ago.

I believe Glaxo-Smith Kline (GlaxoWellcome) are the ones that manufacture Lanoxicaps. www.gsk.com I'm not sure if the companies will allow use for school unless it is for Pharmacy School or for a doctor's office. Check around town with your doctor offices and see if they have any GSK pens, note pads or pens that they can give you. I always ask my doctor what kind of cool pens he/she has to give me. Also, ask the nurse who comes in for GSK to sell or give some samples. Try your doctor, or try the local clinic or hospital. Hope this helps! Answered by Delia Starch 1 year ago.


Can someone help me identify this pill?
Yellowish round pill very small with w over 40 divided by the line you can break them in half with. Asked by Tiffaney Stickley 1 year ago.

It's DIGOXIN, also called Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin and is used to treat heart failure and also used to treat a certain type of irregular heartbeat. It's a cardiac glycoside and regulated sodium and potassium inside heart cells to reduces strain on the heart. Answered by Carie Beausoleil 1 year ago.


Can digoxin cause insomnia?
I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never... Asked by Mahalia Kellett 1 year ago.

I really hope to get some answers here, from someone who knows what they're talking about... So: I have a heart condition, I take this drug, digoxin, every day, 0.25 mg. In the last 4 nights it's been really hard for me to fall asleep, only happens late in the morning around 2 or 3 am. I should say I never before had trouble sleeping, always slept well and rested well after 7-8 hours of sleep. So I'm really confused. I also take a cumarinic blood thinner and water pills for my condition. I would be so grateful if someone could help me. A heart patient really needs sleep. Thank you. Answered by Oma Cucuta 1 year ago.

The generic drug digoxin is mainly prescribed for heart problems like irregular rhythms (arrhythmias) and heart failure. It comes in the form of capsules, liquid, and tablets, and common brand names for it are Lanoxin Elixir Pediatric, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, and Digitek. Recognizing the side effects of digoxin and understanding what to do when they occur is simple with proper background information. Difficulty: Moderately Easy Instructions 1 Consult a doctor if your breasts become larger after taking digoxin and the symptom doesn't go away or becomes uncomfortable. This is a common side effect that both men and women experience. 2 Note that moderate side effects of digoxin require medical intervention if they grow worse or persevere for a period of time. Such symptoms include dizziness, drowsiness, and lightheadedness. 3 Seek immediate medical attention if you experience symptoms like abnormal eyesight or heartbeat, breathing difficulty, confusion, diarrhea, fatigue, hives, itching, lack of appetite, nausea, rash, swollen body parts like the hands or face, unusual bleeding or bruising, upset stomach, vomiting, and weight gain. All of these side effects are considered severe and shouldn't be ignored. 4 Avoid eating too much bran fiber while taking digoxin. People who eat a lot of food with large amounts of bran fiber may absorb less of the drug into the bloodstream through the stomach, which may reduce its effectiveness. 5 See a doctor first for advice if medication for allergies, colds, or coughs is required while taking digoxin. Some drugs used to treat those conditions may react adversely with digoxin and increase both the risk and the severity of side effects. Answered by Robbi Kendig 1 year ago.


Medication question?
So I have the flu, and i am taking z-pac, i am also prescribed 5mg xanax but i am afriad to mix the two. My doctor unfortunatley is not in today so i cannot call and ask him. Could anyone tell me if its alright to mix the two Asked by Louann Piechowski 1 year ago.

Wait til you talk to your doctor! Before taking azithromycin (Z-Pak), tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: · nelfinavir (Viracept); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); · triazolam (Halcion); · carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); · a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); · HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); ***· alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); · • If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Xanex interacts BADLY with antibiotics such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); Answered by Broderick Werries 1 year ago.

im not a pharmacist, but i am knowledgeable about medication, i'm not sure what z-pac is, but if its for the flu, i dont think any severe interactions would occur with any benzodiazepines like xanax. I'm prescribed to 4mg a day but i've never mixed it with flu medicane. i hope that helped some Answered by Rosy Pietz 1 year ago.

The label on your prescription will have warnings for common interactions, however, your best bet would be to read the inserts given to you with your receipt. The pharmacist will know better (even more than the doctor) the problems with drug interactions. Call your pharmacist first. There are websites such as drug checker, but they may not be up to date, so read the disclaimer before you bet your life on it. Answered by Shaina Kuczenski 1 year ago.

there should be no problem. but I think you have something wrong. Xanax is available in tablets as 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 milligrams. Are you taking 0.5 mg tablets (they are salmon colored) or is your total daily does 5 mg.. Doctors often write the zero before the decimal and not after. This avoids confusion so pharmacists and nurses do not mistake a half milligram for five milligrams, or ten milligrams for one milligram. Answered by Clayton Brandolino 1 year ago.

Please ask your pharmacist about drug interactions, and he or she can tell you if they two are ok to take together. (He or she may give you the ok to take both since I believe that the z-pac is an antibiotic medication while xanaz is a tranquilizer. Though don't take advice from us laypeople :) Answered by Micki Kleppe 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacist. Answered by Bess Dixon 1 year ago.


What could/can't you do on antibiotic treatments?
I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it.1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or... Asked by Maryjo Lemoyne 1 year ago.

I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it. 1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or should you stick to non-milk and non-acidic products? 2) Is it okay to exercize and exert onesself, as long as they feel okay and are taking in enough fluids? 3) Is sexual intercourse okay? (my theory is if god forbid you get anything else, you're already on the antibiotics so it won't stand a chance) 4)Can you go about your life without making any modifications, and slowing yourself down? Answered by Maryjane Denman 1 year ago.

What should I avoid while taking Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Azithromycin can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using azithromycin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: diarrhea that is watery or bloody; chest pain, uneven heartbeats; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Continue using azithromycin and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or stomach pain; dizziness, tired feeling, or headache; vaginal itching or discharge; or mild itching or skin rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Do not take antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours of taking azithromycin. Before taking azithromycin, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: nelfinavir (Viracept); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); triazolam (Halcion); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); phenytoin (Dilantin); cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Theochron); warfarin (Coumadin); pimozide (Orap); or another antibiotic, especially clarithromycin (Biaxin) or erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S, Ery-Tab). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with azithromycin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about azithromycin written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Azithromycin is available with a prescription under the brand name Zithromax. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Answered by Leslie Wintle 1 year ago.


What are the long term side effects of omeprazole?
I want to know about the long term side effects of the medicine, omeprazole. Asked by Zenia Fabio 1 year ago.

Omeprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. It is used to treat ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD or heartburn), and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid production. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you have ever had any type of liver disease. You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Do not use over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) without first talking to your healthcare provider if you have · trouble or pain with swallowing; · vomiting blood; · bloody or black stools; · had heartburn for over 3 months; · heartburn with sweating, lightheadedness, dizziness, chest, shoulder, neck, jaw, or arm pain; · frequent chest pain; · heartburn with wheezing; · unexplained weight loss; · nausea or vomiting; or · stomach pain. Your doctor should evaluate your condition before taking over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) if you have any of the conditions listed above. Omeprazole is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether omeprazole will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take omeprazole without first talking to your doctor if you (female) are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether omeprazole passes into breast milk. If you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives), stop taking omeprazole and seek emergency medical attention. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take omeprazole and talk to your doctor if you experience · drowsiness, dizziness, or headache; · diarrhea, increased gas, or bloating; or · itching. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. Before taking omeprazole, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines · warfarin (Coumadin); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · a medicine for insomnia or anxiety such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), temazepam (Restoril), clorazepate (Tranxene), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), and others; · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); · ampicillin (Omnipen, Principen); or · iron (Feosol, Mol-Iron, Fergon, Femiron, others). You may not be able to take omeprazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with omeprazole. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. ADRAC (Australian Adverse Drug Reactions - Therapeutic Goods Administration) has received 19 reports (13 female) describing musculoskeletal problems associated with omeprazole. Ages ranged from 43 to 91 (median 55) years. Of the 16 patients for whom the information is available, 14 took 20 mg daily, 2 took 40 mg and the onset of symptoms occurred as early as one day and as late as 12 months after starting omeprazole. Eight reports documented joint pain and/or swelling including gout in two cases (one of which was confirmed by rechallenge). Nine reports described muscle pain and/or atrophy and symptoms recurred on rechallenge in two of these. Two reports documented both myalgia and arthralgia occurring simultaneously. One report documented a marked elevation of plasma creatine phosphokinase. Ten reports documented recovery, usually within a few days, 4 patients had not recovered a few months after the drug was stopped, and except for an elderly man who died from an unrelated cause, the outcome is unknown in the 4 other cases. Recent overseas reports1 have also documented similar problems and the product information has been updated to include mention of arthralgia, myalgia and muscular weakness. Recently the Committee received a report of a 51 year old man who developed interstitial nephritis several months after commencing omeprazole (Losec) 20 mg daily as treatment for reflux oesophagitis. He had tolerated omeprazole well for the first two months but then developed marked fatigue and rigors. Urine microscopy revealed over 40,000 red cells and 8,000 white cells per mL. His serum creatinine peaked at 0.19 mmol/L and a peripheral eosinophilia of 4.7% was noted. Renal biopsy revealed a marked interstitial infiltrate with prominent eosinophils consistent with acute interstitial nephritis. Omeprazole was withdrawn, he was treated with prednisone and improved rapidly. Two other Australian1,2 and four overseas3 case reports have similarly described interstitial nephritis in association with omeprazole therapy. In these 6 patients who ranged in age from 58 to 86 (median: 75) years, onset occurred from a few weeks to 6 months after commencement of omeprazole therapy and for 3 patients, the reaction recurred on rechallenge. The triad of fever, rash and eosinophilia, is described as the classical presentation of drug-induced interstitial nephritis, but this was observed in only one of these 7 cases. Prescribers should be aware that interstitial nephritis can occur within the first few months after starting omeprazole. Answered by Ronald Murai 1 year ago.

Omeprazole Side Effects Long Term Answered by Rosalina Jorres 1 year ago.


Tachycardia, can it cause passing out!?
My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing... Asked by Brendan Kliger 1 year ago.

My mom has this problem of passing out from time to time. She has hit her head a few times. Her doctor just told her she has tachycardia. She has also been undergoing chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer for the past 1 1/2 years. Is there any connections between these problems, and what can she do about the passing out?? Answered by Marline Katzman 1 year ago.

Of course it can. When you have a supraventricular tachycardia episode, your heart rate increases dramatically. Normal functioning is around 60-100 bpm, while affected by SVT, your heart rate is much higher, around 150-200 bpm (Beats Per Minute). That is not the only symptom though, here are many more: A racing or fluttering feeling in the chest (palpitations). Chest discomfort (pressure, tightness, pain). Lightheadedness or dizziness. Fainting (syncope). Shortness of breath. A pounding pulse. You may feel or see your pulse beating, especially at your neck, where large blood vessels are close to the skin. Sweating. Tightness or fullness in the throat. Tiredness (fatigue). Excessive urine production. I couldnt really tell you if her heart condition is closely realted to the ovarian cancer treatment but I do know that certain conditions that were created due to this treatment have been know to cause tachycardia: Overly high levels of the heart medication digoxin (such as Lanoxicaps or Lanoxin) or the bronchodilator theophylline (such as Bronkodyl, Elixophyllin, Slo-Bid, Slo-Phyllin, or Theo-Dur). Other serious health problems, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, pneumonia, or metabolic problems can all cause or lead to SVT. Just make sure she studies this disease and realizes what she needs to stay away from to help curd these episode. Such as overuse of caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol or use of illegal drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine. Decongestants that contain stimulants should also be avoided, including oxymetazoline (such as Afrin and other brands) and pseudoephedrine (such as Sudafed, Actifed, and other brands). Doctors also warn against using nonprescription diet pills or "pep" pills, because many contain caffeine, ephedra (recently banned), ephedrine, the herb ma huang, or other stimulants. Also a good piece of advice for you is to find out exactly what type of Tachycardia she has. There is a type of Supraventricular Tachycardia called Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, this is simply when an abnormal electrical connection (or bypass tract) between the atria and ventricles of the heart, of which Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) is the most common. The bypass tract allows electricity in the heart to travel abnormally fast and results in a very rapid heart rate. This condition has been shown to be genetic, meaning it can be passed down to offspring. SO both you and your mother be very careful in your diets and pphyscial activity. Either one can be potentially very dangerous. Answered by Patrick Cackowski 1 year ago.

it would want to be alot of causes. relies upon on how extreme your potassium factor grow to be.....and in case your well being care provider grow to be in touch. Kidney complications which includes retention or failure might want to reason your ok+ to be extreme. i doesn't say nutritional causes might want to reason your extreme factor except you had complications such as your kidneys because the body releases what potassium that it doesn't desire. Now...on the different area. Did they have a not person-friendly time sticking you? in the adventure that they probed on your arm or hemolyzed your blood pattern...this may reason a pretend extreme factor. Answered by Cayla Derick 1 year ago.

tachycardia is a heart rate over 100 beats a minute.that's all i know Answered by Cherelle Shappen 1 year ago.


Can you take benadryl with biaxon?
Asked by Denae Pescatore 1 year ago.

As everyone else who answered has said, yes it is safe to give your dog Benadryl. The general rule of thumb is to give 1 mg for every 1 pound of body weight. In your case, you would give your dog 45 mg. You need to consult w/ a veterinarian before doing this though. He may up the dosage or cut it back depending on the severity of your dog's allergies. You can always just call him and ask instead of taking your dog in, but I suggest taking him in for an exam to rule out fleas or mites. Your vet can also give her a steroid shot called Depo Medrol to help w/ the itching. Good luck and I hope your dog gets some relief soon! Answered by Darcie Ausman 1 year ago.


Is alli safe with high blood pressure medication?
well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayedhigh ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacsto lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious.i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150.im having... Asked by Lauralee Paulk 1 year ago.

well im 18 years old, i had my daughter in september of 09. i developed high blood pressure "preeclampsia" and it has stayed high ever scence. im currently taking 10MG of norvacs to lower my blood pressure, and im very body concious. i weighed 120 when i got pregnant, now i weigh 150. im having trouble getting my weight off and i was just wanting a few pros and cons about the alli? i was told its great! but i want some real answers from real people. ---note--- i DO plan on talking with my dr about this next week, but i wanted a little pros and cons from you guys, and possibly some people that are or have used alli and some of your success and fail stories! Answered by Emily Kuhse 1 year ago.

Alli is over-the-counter version of Orlistat.It is safe for people to use who are dealing with high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol. Before taking Alli, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth; cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid); or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with orlistat. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Fallon Finnemore 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Alysa Ficek 1 year ago.

Alli is not safe at all. Answered by Destiny Varieur 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved