Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019507/001.

Names and composition

"KERLONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019507/001 KERLONE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019507/002 KERLONE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019270/001 BETOPTIC BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
019507/001 KERLONE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019507/002 KERLONE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
019845/001 BETOPTIC S BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.25% BASE
075386/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
075446/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
075541/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075541/002 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075630/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
078694/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC EQ 0.5% BASE
078962/001 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078962/002 BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BETAXOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

I want info about non prescription blood pressue control products?
Asked by Dierdre Hunten 1 year ago.

Trying Googling the following: * atenolol (Tenormin), * propranolol (Inderal), * metoprolol (Toprol), * nadolol (Corgard), * betaxolol (Kerlone), * acebutolol (Sectral), * pindolol (Visken), and * bisoprolol (Zebeta). Most BP meds are categorized as: ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, Beta–blockers, Diuretics, Calcium channel blockers (CCBs), or Alpha–blockers Go to www.rxlist.com and search those or you can also try Googling "PDR Online". A PDR is what docs use to narrow down a prescription for a given ailment. Hope that helps. Answered by Luann Burczyk 1 year ago.

Keep weight in normal range, exercise as your doctor allows, get enough sleep, and limit sodium intake - can all make a big difference. The drugs the next person lists all require a prescription. The only non-prescription medications I'm aware of are the over-the-counter diuretics, which dehydrate you and may temporarily lower blood pressure. Don't overdo, you can really hurt yourself. Answered by Paris Cangialosi 1 year ago.


Beta blockers for anxiety/migraines?
Also, I get migraines/cluster headaches on a weekly/bi-weekly basis. I've never had headaches this bad before and they are seriously no fun. Asked by Aaron Husby 1 year ago.

Some time ago, my doctor mentioned beta blockers as a possible aid for anxiety. At the time, I dismissed this because I was not living in a high-stress environment. Currently, however, I am finishing my final semester of engineering school, and I am under a ton of stress/anxiety. I have some bad anxiety problems (which contributes to my depression disorder), for which the doctor put me on citalopram (Celexa) and clonazepam (Klonopin) over a year ago. Recently, someone told me that clonazepam is addictive, which worries me because I don't want to be addicted to any drug. I researched beta-blockers, and was interested in the 2nd-gen varieties that block only the beta-1 receptors. Not being a doctor, I can't presume to know what medication would work best for me, but the following 3 seemed potentially promising. -Sectral -Kerlone -Inderal Can anyone relate personal experiences with these medications? Another thing I was happy to read is that beta blockers dull/shut down emotions. I am under so much stress that I desperately want to just turn that emotional "switch" off, and not have to worry about pesky emotions and crap like that. Answered by Leisha Zarn 1 year ago.

beta blockers can help some people with cluster headaches. Answered by Elfreda Hemenway 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Isaac Tuller 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Haydee Printers 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Leanora Fleeting 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Demetria Lemos 1 year ago.


I want info about non prescription blood pressue control products?
Asked by Jere Burgard 1 year ago.

Trying Googling the following: * atenolol (Tenormin), * propranolol (Inderal), * metoprolol (Toprol), * nadolol (Corgard), * betaxolol (Kerlone), * acebutolol (Sectral), * pindolol (Visken), and * bisoprolol (Zebeta). Most BP meds are categorized as: ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, Beta–blockers, Diuretics, Calcium channel blockers (CCBs), or Alpha–blockers Go to www.rxlist.com and search those or you can also try Googling "PDR Online". A PDR is what docs use to narrow down a prescription for a given ailment. Hope that helps. Answered by Allene Garett 1 year ago.

Keep weight in normal range, exercise as your doctor allows, get enough sleep, and limit sodium intake - can all make a big difference. The drugs the next person lists all require a prescription. The only non-prescription medications I'm aware of are the over-the-counter diuretics, which dehydrate you and may temporarily lower blood pressure. Don't overdo, you can really hurt yourself. Answered by Refugio Honas 1 year ago.


Beta blockers for anxiety/migraines?
Also, I get migraines/cluster headaches on a weekly/bi-weekly basis. I've never had headaches this bad before and they are seriously no fun. Asked by Wyatt Nakamatsu 1 year ago.

Some time ago, my doctor mentioned beta blockers as a possible aid for anxiety. At the time, I dismissed this because I was not living in a high-stress environment. Currently, however, I am finishing my final semester of engineering school, and I am under a ton of stress/anxiety. I have some bad anxiety problems (which contributes to my depression disorder), for which the doctor put me on citalopram (Celexa) and clonazepam (Klonopin) over a year ago. Recently, someone told me that clonazepam is addictive, which worries me because I don't want to be addicted to any drug. I researched beta-blockers, and was interested in the 2nd-gen varieties that block only the beta-1 receptors. Not being a doctor, I can't presume to know what medication would work best for me, but the following 3 seemed potentially promising. -Sectral -Kerlone -Inderal Can anyone relate personal experiences with these medications? Another thing I was happy to read is that beta blockers dull/shut down emotions. I am under so much stress that I desperately want to just turn that emotional "switch" off, and not have to worry about pesky emotions and crap like that. Answered by Damien Alterman 1 year ago.

beta blockers can help some people with cluster headaches. Answered by Meghann Moniz 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Herman Buonassisi 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Chantell Oreily 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Jeanene Venghaus 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Violette Heidelberg 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved