Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 009818/003.

Names and composition

"KEMADRIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROCYCLIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009818/003 KEMADRIN PROCYCLIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
009818/005 KEMADRIN PROCYCLIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009818/003 KEMADRIN PROCYCLIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
009818/005 KEMADRIN PROCYCLIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG

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Answered questions

Is shaking the next morning a normal reaction to nortriptyline and alcohol?
Im currently taking 25mg of nortriptyline twice a day as directed by a doctor. I drink about once a week. Last night I drank fairly heavily and this morning when I woke up I am shaking extremely heavily and I feel wired. Kind of like I drank way to much redbull or took a addarall. Its a very uncomfortable feeling.... Asked by Irina Peper 1 year ago.

Im currently taking 25mg of nortriptyline twice a day as directed by a doctor. I drink about once a week. Last night I drank fairly heavily and this morning when I woke up I am shaking extremely heavily and I feel wired. Kind of like I drank way to much redbull or took a addarall. Its a very uncomfortable feeling. I don't feel hungover at all through. Ive been taking the medication for about three months and Ive drank quite a few times and this is only the second time this has happened. I know the obvious thing to do is not drink but is this shaking dangerous? What is the cause of my shaking sometimes, but majority of the time Im fine? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Answered by Chas Reitz 1 year ago.

Probably potientiated effect by alcohol.Be careful with nortryptilline + alcohol. Consult your doctor as you might require kemadrin!!! Answered by Jaqueline Blausey 1 year ago.

The cause of your shaking is withdrawal from the alcohol, honey. I've a family history of the disease of alcoholism & know of its horrors. You can prevent the shaking by not drinking alcohol. Simple enough. For many people. If it is not for you, please look into Alcoholics Anonymous. Their phone number can be found in the white pages of your phone book. You will find friends there & it will cost you nothing - maybe a dollar if you decide to contribute when the basket is passed. You can decide to stop drinking on your own. If you can, God bless you! If not, help is available from people just like yourself who care. Answered by Sandee Mangum 1 year ago.


What are the symptoms of constipation?
What causes it? And what does it feel like. Asked by Keeley Neller 1 year ago.

What is constipation? Although constipation is a common term, from a medical perspective it is hard to define precisely. The dictionary definition is: ‘A condition in which bowel emptying occurs infrequently or in which the stools are hard and small or where bowel movement causes difficulty or pain.’ But defining infrequent is difficult when some 90 per cent of people in Western countries have a bowel pattern that ranges from three bowel movements a day to three per week. And it is possible to move your bowels every day and still be constipated if the stools are hard and difficult to pass. Equally, a daily bowel movement is by no means essential for, nor a sign of, good health. Provided the bowels move regularly and without discomfort, it doesn't matter if your natural bowel frequency is once every two or three days. How common is it? Constipation is thought to affect a quarter of the population at some time. Constipation is more common in the elderly because: the power of the bowel muscles diminishes with age they tend to take more medicines that have constipating side effects. Bypass diarrhoea This happens when a hard plug of stool in the lower bowel (faecal impaction) stops a proper evacuation. Only the more liquid stool from higher up in the bowel can then be passed. For this reason correct diagnosis is important. Medicine to slow the bowel down will make the condition worse if a person is actually constipated. What are the symptoms of constipation? Tummy pain associated with bowel movements. A feeling of incomplete emptying of the bowel. A bloated feeling in the stomach region. Diarrhoea: constipation is one of the most common causes of diarrhoea, especially in the elderly in care. Diarrhoea caused by constipation is known as bypass diarrhoea. What causes constipation? Poor general health. Immobility or an inactive lifestyle. Insufficient fluid intake. A diet low in fibre. Fibre retains fluid and makes the stools light and soft. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Inadequate toilet facilities. An underactive thyroid gland. Spinal injury. Multiple sclerosis. Colon or rectal cancer. Kidney failure. Too much calcium in the blood. Tumours and other lesions of the bowel. Certain medicines, eg codeine-containing painkillers (co-dydramol, co-proxamol), morphine-like painkillers, antidepressants, aluminium-containing antacids, iron supplements, and anticholinergics such as procyclidine (eg Kemadrin) (used in Parkinson's disease). Constipation should not simply be accepted or ignored. Persistent constipation or any change in bowel habit (whether towards constipation or looseness) should be investigated, especially in adults over 40 years. However, for most people with long-standing constipation there is no identifiable cause. What can help prevent constipation? A well-balanced diet high in fibre, including bran, fruits and vegetables, is often helpful. Cutting down on white bread, cakes and sugar. Drinking at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. Hot beverages, such as coffee, tea or hot water may stimulate bowel movements. Prunes and plum juice can also be beneficial. Regular exercise improves digestion and reduces stress. A regular bowel habit. The best time is usually the first hour after breakfast. Don't hurry and sit for at least 10 minutes, regardless of whether you manage to pass a stool. Don't strain. What are the complications of constipation? Haemorrhoids. These are swollen veins at the anus, caused by straining at a stool over a long period of time. If large enough they will be visible from the outside. They can be painful or cause local bleeding. Dependency on laxatives. The bowel in someone who has abused laxatives over a long period of time becomes sluggish and eventually dependent on the use of these drugs. Hernia (bulging of the abdominal contents through a weak point in the abdominal wall). This is made worse by too much straining when trying to get rid of hard stools. A prolapse of the womb or rectum. These complications result from excess straining and weakness of the muscles in this area. What medicines are used to treat constipation? Bulking agents such as bran and ispaghula husk. These work gently and are the most common type of laxatives (examples are Fybogel and Regulan). They don’t need to be in the form of medicines – increasing the fibre content of your diet should be the main treatment. Bulking agents should always be taken with plenty of fluids. Stimulant laxatives that cause the bowel muscles to contract such as senna (eg Senokot) or bisacodyl (eg Dulco-lax). Osmotic laxatives (such as lactulose) that increase the amount of water in the stools by drawing water in from the bowel lining. Detergents that break down surface layers in the stool, letting water penetrate and soften it (such as docusate sodium (eg Dioctyl)). Macrogols (polyethylene glycols). Answered by Monique Pisicchio 1 year ago.


My daughter age 37 unmarried is suffering from acute depression OCD & Phobia that the parents are responsible?
she is being treated:- 1-Recept.(Risperidon) 4mg=1 tab at night. 2-Kemadrin 5mg=1 tab at night. 3-Tranxene 10mg=1cap at night. these all are not giving any fruitful results from so many years. Asked by Marilou Alls 1 year ago.

My daughter age 37 unmarried is suffering from acute depression OCD & Phobia that the parents are responsible for the above from the last ten years almost. Can any God fearing person help me out & oblige from this agonising painful torture & take me out from this dilemma. I humbly appeal on humantarian grounds to the world community for the help in this matter. May God Bless you all with harmony and peace. Thank you. chzafar1937@yahoo.com Answered by Merle Zysk 1 year ago.

Does she go to a doctor? Is she on medication? That's what she needs to do. Answered by Mauricio Klingshirn 1 year ago.

I am still struggling with blaming my parents for my depression. I logically know they always had my best interest at heart raising me, but I am mad that they didn't see I was getting sick and get me help. It's not your fault. It's not God's fault. You love you daughter and God loves both of you. Meds are probably something to look at, but because the side effects can be rough many people don't stay on them. I would try to find a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) class/group/therapist. DBT litterally teaches you to rethink the world. Right now I bet everything is black and white to her, no grays. DBT teaches you to live in the middle. The class I am in is 3 times a week, three hours, for ten weeks. After two weeks my mom is seeing a change in me, and I can see light at the end of the tunnel. I am in a group class, and I wouldn't change that for anything now. Before I was forced into my group (suicide attempt) I wanted private DBT. The group understands me. We role play, work out problems. My first class I couldn't figure out how a class of depressed people could be so happy. I get it now, we all need to be healed, and we are all healers. We're kind of like a family, but we are all striving to over come our dysfunctions instead of living in them. As far as God goes you daughter needs to understand that he was not out to get her when she was created. Remember, Jesus suffered for all of us in Gethsemane, he knows all the pain. However, I do not believe that you should be the one to try to tell her this. My gut feeling tells me she is depressed, resents a lot in her life, and her God fearing mother trying to get her to believe God loves her is not something she can comprehend. I might even venture to say she's tired of the preaching. So, as a mom with an adult daughter what can you do. Pray, but I bet you do that now. Find some DBT options. Find out where they are, when classes start, how much they cost, and how to afford them. In the class they will talk about meds and even the need of God in our lives. Let them start the ball rolling and see if she starts on good meds, and shows signs of dispersed levity. Hold off on the bible for now. A novel by Elizabeth Gilbert called Eat, Pray, Love talks about bringing love into your life. The other book (a very easy read) is How to Survive the Loss of a Love. The loss doesn't have to be a person, it can be your health, your independence, anything. That book also talks about God's role and love. Finally, you read them too. Know what she is learning. Take some time to heal yourself. I have been fighting for 15 years, and now I have the upper hand on my illness. I pray that this helps you. God Bless. -Alice Answered by Lindy Sealock 1 year ago.

I'm 52 years old and I have been dealing with depression since the age of 9 and I don't blame my parents. Life isn't perfect and we have to accept that sometimes bad things happen to good people. I'm also a parent and my girls know that I raised them the best that I could with what I had at the time. You have to accept that she has her own issues and hopefully she's getting the help that she needs. Just becasue she maybe blames you You don't have to accept the blame you know that you did the best that you could and NO one can ask for more than that. NOT even you or your daughter. Answered by Darryl Jessee 1 year ago.

She needs to see a psychiatrist ... should have seen one 10 years ago, and probably be on medication to get her out of the depression. Please make an appointment as soon as possible. You might need a 'letter of recommendation' from your GP to refer your daughter to a psychiatrist. Wishing you and your daughter all the best of Happiness. Answered by Kyung Mcpherren 1 year ago.


Haldol and Pimozide?
Is there any body out there who has had personal experience with any of these two drugs? Or, do you know anyone directly that has been on them? I ask because I suffer from OCD, and I have tried four "new" anti-psychotics, and they have only been partly helpful. I am thinking about augmenting my Paroxetine... Asked by Elin Vanzile 1 year ago.

Is there any body out there who has had personal experience with any of these two drugs? Or, do you know anyone directly that has been on them? I ask because I suffer from OCD, and I have tried four "new" anti-psychotics, and they have only been partly helpful. I am thinking about augmenting my Paroxetine with either Haldol or Pimozide, but I've heard that they are seldom chosen because of horrible side-effects and long term problems. If I'm given a script for Cogentin/Benzatropine, will that stop dystonias...etc? What can you tell me about these two medications and do you think they could be helpful? My mind is out of control, and this OCD has been going on for so long, its stale. I need to find something that works. Any answer will be appreciated. Thank You. Answered by Otto Soberanes 1 year ago.

Ive never taken pimozide but i almost certain that it cant be taken with paroxetine. Im a bit like you, ive tried the new atypical antipsychotics and none of them did me any good the older typical ones work better for me. I have taken halodol and i hated it it make me agitatedfor about 3 hours and then id turn into a complete zombie. Ivw always said that if the house had gone on fire while i was on haldol i would have sat and burned i was so out of it. The old drug i found most useful was stelazine (Trifluoperazine). It really helped me. Its not widely prescribed though because in a tiny number of people its cause pseudoparkinsons which doesnt go even when the drug is stopped. It didnt do that to me or anyone i know whos taken it but it was a risk. After id been on it for a year the docotr alos put me on a low dose of kemadrin *anti parkinson drug) as a precaution. If you dont like the sound of that risk then you should probably try halodl first but if that doesnt work out then i would definitly recommend stelazine. I didnt experience any bad side affects with it at all. Answered by Latisha Domingues 1 year ago.


Is shaking the next morning a normal reaction to nortriptyline and alcohol?
Im currently taking 25mg of nortriptyline twice a day as directed by a doctor. I drink about once a week. Last night I drank fairly heavily and this morning when I woke up I am shaking extremely heavily and I feel wired. Kind of like I drank way to much redbull or took a addarall. Its a very uncomfortable feeling.... Asked by Randy Monjaras 1 year ago.

Im currently taking 25mg of nortriptyline twice a day as directed by a doctor. I drink about once a week. Last night I drank fairly heavily and this morning when I woke up I am shaking extremely heavily and I feel wired. Kind of like I drank way to much redbull or took a addarall. Its a very uncomfortable feeling. I don't feel hungover at all through. Ive been taking the medication for about three months and Ive drank quite a few times and this is only the second time this has happened. I know the obvious thing to do is not drink but is this shaking dangerous? What is the cause of my shaking sometimes, but majority of the time Im fine? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Answered by Eleonor Lunter 1 year ago.

Probably potientiated effect by alcohol.Be careful with nortryptilline + alcohol. Consult your doctor as you might require kemadrin!!! Answered by Tammi Pirieda 1 year ago.

The cause of your shaking is withdrawal from the alcohol, honey. I've a family history of the disease of alcoholism & know of its horrors. You can prevent the shaking by not drinking alcohol. Simple enough. For many people. If it is not for you, please look into Alcoholics Anonymous. Their phone number can be found in the white pages of your phone book. You will find friends there & it will cost you nothing - maybe a dollar if you decide to contribute when the basket is passed. You can decide to stop drinking on your own. If you can, God bless you! If not, help is available from people just like yourself who care. Answered by Denis Trosper 1 year ago.


What are the symptoms of constipation?
What causes it? And what does it feel like. Asked by Christena Eldred 1 year ago.

What is constipation? Although constipation is a common term, from a medical perspective it is hard to define precisely. The dictionary definition is: ‘A condition in which bowel emptying occurs infrequently or in which the stools are hard and small or where bowel movement causes difficulty or pain.’ But defining infrequent is difficult when some 90 per cent of people in Western countries have a bowel pattern that ranges from three bowel movements a day to three per week. And it is possible to move your bowels every day and still be constipated if the stools are hard and difficult to pass. Equally, a daily bowel movement is by no means essential for, nor a sign of, good health. Provided the bowels move regularly and without discomfort, it doesn't matter if your natural bowel frequency is once every two or three days. How common is it? Constipation is thought to affect a quarter of the population at some time. Constipation is more common in the elderly because: the power of the bowel muscles diminishes with age they tend to take more medicines that have constipating side effects. Bypass diarrhoea This happens when a hard plug of stool in the lower bowel (faecal impaction) stops a proper evacuation. Only the more liquid stool from higher up in the bowel can then be passed. For this reason correct diagnosis is important. Medicine to slow the bowel down will make the condition worse if a person is actually constipated. What are the symptoms of constipation? Tummy pain associated with bowel movements. A feeling of incomplete emptying of the bowel. A bloated feeling in the stomach region. Diarrhoea: constipation is one of the most common causes of diarrhoea, especially in the elderly in care. Diarrhoea caused by constipation is known as bypass diarrhoea. What causes constipation? Poor general health. Immobility or an inactive lifestyle. Insufficient fluid intake. A diet low in fibre. Fibre retains fluid and makes the stools light and soft. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Inadequate toilet facilities. An underactive thyroid gland. Spinal injury. Multiple sclerosis. Colon or rectal cancer. Kidney failure. Too much calcium in the blood. Tumours and other lesions of the bowel. Certain medicines, eg codeine-containing painkillers (co-dydramol, co-proxamol), morphine-like painkillers, antidepressants, aluminium-containing antacids, iron supplements, and anticholinergics such as procyclidine (eg Kemadrin) (used in Parkinson's disease). Constipation should not simply be accepted or ignored. Persistent constipation or any change in bowel habit (whether towards constipation or looseness) should be investigated, especially in adults over 40 years. However, for most people with long-standing constipation there is no identifiable cause. What can help prevent constipation? A well-balanced diet high in fibre, including bran, fruits and vegetables, is often helpful. Cutting down on white bread, cakes and sugar. Drinking at least 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. Hot beverages, such as coffee, tea or hot water may stimulate bowel movements. Prunes and plum juice can also be beneficial. Regular exercise improves digestion and reduces stress. A regular bowel habit. The best time is usually the first hour after breakfast. Don't hurry and sit for at least 10 minutes, regardless of whether you manage to pass a stool. Don't strain. What are the complications of constipation? Haemorrhoids. These are swollen veins at the anus, caused by straining at a stool over a long period of time. If large enough they will be visible from the outside. They can be painful or cause local bleeding. Dependency on laxatives. The bowel in someone who has abused laxatives over a long period of time becomes sluggish and eventually dependent on the use of these drugs. Hernia (bulging of the abdominal contents through a weak point in the abdominal wall). This is made worse by too much straining when trying to get rid of hard stools. A prolapse of the womb or rectum. These complications result from excess straining and weakness of the muscles in this area. What medicines are used to treat constipation? Bulking agents such as bran and ispaghula husk. These work gently and are the most common type of laxatives (examples are Fybogel and Regulan). They don’t need to be in the form of medicines – increasing the fibre content of your diet should be the main treatment. Bulking agents should always be taken with plenty of fluids. Stimulant laxatives that cause the bowel muscles to contract such as senna (eg Senokot) or bisacodyl (eg Dulco-lax). Osmotic laxatives (such as lactulose) that increase the amount of water in the stools by drawing water in from the bowel lining. Detergents that break down surface layers in the stool, letting water penetrate and soften it (such as docusate sodium (eg Dioctyl)). Macrogols (polyethylene glycols). Answered by Alexa Marina 1 year ago.


My daughter age 37 unmarried is suffering from acute depression OCD & Phobia that the parents are responsible?
she is being treated:- 1-Recept.(Risperidon) 4mg=1 tab at night. 2-Kemadrin 5mg=1 tab at night. 3-Tranxene 10mg=1cap at night. these all are not giving any fruitful results from so many years. Asked by Erin Mcconathy 1 year ago.

My daughter age 37 unmarried is suffering from acute depression OCD & Phobia that the parents are responsible for the above from the last ten years almost. Can any God fearing person help me out & oblige from this agonising painful torture & take me out from this dilemma. I humbly appeal on humantarian grounds to the world community for the help in this matter. May God Bless you all with harmony and peace. Thank you. chzafar1937@yahoo.com Answered by Perry Kirschke 1 year ago.

Does she go to a doctor? Is she on medication? That's what she needs to do. Answered by Lucienne Merchant 1 year ago.

I am still struggling with blaming my parents for my depression. I logically know they always had my best interest at heart raising me, but I am mad that they didn't see I was getting sick and get me help. It's not your fault. It's not God's fault. You love you daughter and God loves both of you. Meds are probably something to look at, but because the side effects can be rough many people don't stay on them. I would try to find a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) class/group/therapist. DBT litterally teaches you to rethink the world. Right now I bet everything is black and white to her, no grays. DBT teaches you to live in the middle. The class I am in is 3 times a week, three hours, for ten weeks. After two weeks my mom is seeing a change in me, and I can see light at the end of the tunnel. I am in a group class, and I wouldn't change that for anything now. Before I was forced into my group (suicide attempt) I wanted private DBT. The group understands me. We role play, work out problems. My first class I couldn't figure out how a class of depressed people could be so happy. I get it now, we all need to be healed, and we are all healers. We're kind of like a family, but we are all striving to over come our dysfunctions instead of living in them. As far as God goes you daughter needs to understand that he was not out to get her when she was created. Remember, Jesus suffered for all of us in Gethsemane, he knows all the pain. However, I do not believe that you should be the one to try to tell her this. My gut feeling tells me she is depressed, resents a lot in her life, and her God fearing mother trying to get her to believe God loves her is not something she can comprehend. I might even venture to say she's tired of the preaching. So, as a mom with an adult daughter what can you do. Pray, but I bet you do that now. Find some DBT options. Find out where they are, when classes start, how much they cost, and how to afford them. In the class they will talk about meds and even the need of God in our lives. Let them start the ball rolling and see if she starts on good meds, and shows signs of dispersed levity. Hold off on the bible for now. A novel by Elizabeth Gilbert called Eat, Pray, Love talks about bringing love into your life. The other book (a very easy read) is How to Survive the Loss of a Love. The loss doesn't have to be a person, it can be your health, your independence, anything. That book also talks about God's role and love. Finally, you read them too. Know what she is learning. Take some time to heal yourself. I have been fighting for 15 years, and now I have the upper hand on my illness. I pray that this helps you. God Bless. -Alice Answered by Nadine Merl 1 year ago.

I'm 52 years old and I have been dealing with depression since the age of 9 and I don't blame my parents. Life isn't perfect and we have to accept that sometimes bad things happen to good people. I'm also a parent and my girls know that I raised them the best that I could with what I had at the time. You have to accept that she has her own issues and hopefully she's getting the help that she needs. Just becasue she maybe blames you You don't have to accept the blame you know that you did the best that you could and NO one can ask for more than that. NOT even you or your daughter. Answered by Albertina Holthouse 1 year ago.

She needs to see a psychiatrist ... should have seen one 10 years ago, and probably be on medication to get her out of the depression. Please make an appointment as soon as possible. You might need a 'letter of recommendation' from your GP to refer your daughter to a psychiatrist. Wishing you and your daughter all the best of Happiness. Answered by Charla Pawlicki 1 year ago.


Haldol and Pimozide?
Is there any body out there who has had personal experience with any of these two drugs? Or, do you know anyone directly that has been on them? I ask because I suffer from OCD, and I have tried four "new" anti-psychotics, and they have only been partly helpful. I am thinking about augmenting my Paroxetine... Asked by Jeffrey Meryman 1 year ago.

Is there any body out there who has had personal experience with any of these two drugs? Or, do you know anyone directly that has been on them? I ask because I suffer from OCD, and I have tried four "new" anti-psychotics, and they have only been partly helpful. I am thinking about augmenting my Paroxetine with either Haldol or Pimozide, but I've heard that they are seldom chosen because of horrible side-effects and long term problems. If I'm given a script for Cogentin/Benzatropine, will that stop dystonias...etc? What can you tell me about these two medications and do you think they could be helpful? My mind is out of control, and this OCD has been going on for so long, its stale. I need to find something that works. Any answer will be appreciated. Thank You. Answered by Kendal Severyn 1 year ago.

Ive never taken pimozide but i almost certain that it cant be taken with paroxetine. Im a bit like you, ive tried the new atypical antipsychotics and none of them did me any good the older typical ones work better for me. I have taken halodol and i hated it it make me agitatedfor about 3 hours and then id turn into a complete zombie. Ivw always said that if the house had gone on fire while i was on haldol i would have sat and burned i was so out of it. The old drug i found most useful was stelazine (Trifluoperazine). It really helped me. Its not widely prescribed though because in a tiny number of people its cause pseudoparkinsons which doesnt go even when the drug is stopped. It didnt do that to me or anyone i know whos taken it but it was a risk. After id been on it for a year the docotr alos put me on a low dose of kemadrin *anti parkinson drug) as a precaution. If you dont like the sound of that risk then you should probably try halodl first but if that doesnt work out then i would definitly recommend stelazine. I didnt experience any bad side affects with it at all. Answered by Kaitlyn Mccuaig 1 year ago.


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