Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011287/001.

Names and composition

"KAYEXALATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011287/001 KAYEXALATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 453.6GM per BOT

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011287/001 KAYEXALATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 453.6GM per BOT
040028/001 KIONEX SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SUSPENSION/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per 60ML
040029/001 KIONEX SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 454GM per BOT
040905/001 KALEXATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 454GM per BOT
040905/002 KALEXATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per BOT
040909/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 454GM per BOT
087859/001 SPS SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SUSPENSION/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per 60ML
088453/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SUSPENSION/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per 60ML
088717/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SUSPENSION/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per 60ML
088786/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 453.6GM per BOT
089049/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SUSPENSION/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per 60ML
089910/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 454GM per BOT
090313/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 453.6GM per BOT
090590/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SUSPENSION/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per 60ML
202333/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 453.6GM per BOT
204071/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 454GM per BOT
204071/002 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 15GM per BOT
205727/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 454GM per BOT
206815/001 SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE POWDER/ORAL, RECTAL 454GM per BOT

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Answered questions

Who uses sodium polystyrene sulfonate powder (Kayexalate) rather than the suspension, and why?
Asked by Mai Boza 1 year ago.

sodium polystyrene sulfonate Pronunciation: SEW dee um paw lee STEER een SULL foe nate Brand: Kayexalate, Kionex What is the most important information I should know about sodium polystyrene sulfonate? What is sodium polystyrene sulfonate? Sodium polystyrene sulfonate is an ion-exchange resin. It loses a sodium ion, that is replaced by a potassium ion. This reduces potassium in the blood. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate is used to treat hyperkalemia (high levels of potassium in the blood). Sodium polystyrene sulfonate may also be used for purposes other than those listed here. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking sodium polystyrene sulfonate? Before taking sodium polystyrene sulfonate, talk to your doctor if you have congestive heart failure; high blood pressure; swelling; a low level of calcium or potassium in the blood; or are on a salt restricted diet or are taking a potassium supplement or a potassium-sparing diuretic such as K-Dur, Klor-Con, and others; You may not be able to take sodium polystyrene sulfonate or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether sodium polystyrene sulfonate will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take sodium polystyrene sulfonate without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether sodium polystyrene sulfonate will be harmful to an nursing baby. Do not take sodium polystyrene sulfonate without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take sodium polystyrene sulfonate? Take polystyrene sulfonate exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to explain them to you. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate is usually administered by a healthcare professional. Take the oral suspension by mouth as directed by your doctor. Shake the suspension well before measuring a dose. To ensure you get the correct dose, use a dose measuring spoon or cup to measure a dose, not a regular table spoon. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate can also be given as an enema (into the rectum). Follow your doctor's instructions. Store sodium polystyrene sulfonate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take the next regularly scheduled dose as directed. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? See emergency medical attention if an overdose of sodium polystyrene sulfonate is suspected. Symptoms of a sodium polystyrene sulfonate overdose are not known. What should I avoid while taking sodium polystyrene sulfonate? Do not use salt substitutes or take potassium supplements without first talking to your doctor. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate affects potassium levels in the body. What are the possible side effects of sodium polystyrene sulfonate? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, seek emergency medical treatment or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); chest pain; irregular heartbeats or changes in heartbeat; irritability or depression; increased thirst or urination; muscle spasms; rectal or lower abdominal pain; or unusual swelling or weakness. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Talk to your doctor if you experience diarrhea or constipation; nausea or vomiting; or decreased appetite. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect sodium polystyrene sulfonate? Before taking an ACE inhibitor, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: a heart medicine, especially digoxin (Lanoxin); a potassium-sparing diuretic (water pill) such as triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), spironolactone (Aldactone), or amiloride (Midamor); a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con, and others; a salt substitute that contains potassium; or a calcium supplement. You may not be able to take sodium polystyrene sulfonate, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Antacids that contain calcium, aluminum, or magnesium such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox and others may decrease the effects of sodium polystyrene sulfonate. Do not take an antacid without first talking to your doctor during treatment with sodium polystyrene sulfonate. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with sodium polystyrene sulfonate or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about sodium polystyrene sulfonate written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Sodium polystyrene sulfonate is available with a prescription under the brand names Kayexalate and Kionex. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. --------------------------------------... Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2003 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.02. Revision date: 2/13/04. Answered by Tawanda Mcgavock 1 year ago.

Kayexalate Uses Answered by Kirby Rude 1 year ago.

Kayexalate Dosage Answered by Catherin Gremmels 1 year ago.


What complications or expected outcomes should the nurse expect when giving kayexalate?
I made up this question I know it decreases serum K+ in the blood by getting rid of it through diarrhea. Doesn't diarrhea from the medication causes metabolic acidosis? What other things should the nurse look for when giving Kayexalate? Asked by Argelia Kneeskern 1 year ago.

It doesn't remove K+ via diarrhea. It's an exchange resin called Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate. It's mechanism of action is as follows: Removes potassium by exchanging sodium ions for potassium ions in the intestine before the resin is passed from the body. For the most part, this action occurs in the large intestine, which excretes potassium ions to a greater degree than does the small intestine. Monitoring Parameters: Exchange capacity is 1 mEq/g in vivo, and in vitro capacity is 3.1 mEq/g, therefore, a wide range of exchange capacity exists such that close monitoring of serum electrolytes (potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium) is necessary; ECG Answered by Nena Yoney 1 year ago.


Does kayexalate powder san (sodium polystyrene sulfonate- powder have sulfur in it?
Asked by Taina Moe 1 year ago.

Sulfonates by definition contain sulfur. Answered by Pa Liestman 1 year ago.


Best medication to reduce water retention?
Other than Lasix, what is the best medication to reduce water retention for Hepatitis C patient? Asked by Tandra Vidot 1 year ago.

What?! Kayexalate is for hyperkalemia not water retention. An RN? Really? This is basic nurse stuff. Loop-diuretics are prescribed for hepatitis patients. Lasix (furosemide) is good but it requires a potassium supplement if it's going to be used on a regular basis. Another loop-diuretic is Bumex (bumetanide). There's also Edacrin (ethacrynic acid). But also ask your doctor about thiazide diuretics and potassium-sparing diurectics. Answered by Shonta Shisler 1 year ago.

No salt weight loss application will help alot. I dont think of is a good possibility to take drug to cut back water retention in basic terms for seems. diuretics lowers the water retention interior the blood, yet there are a danger side impacts. it may focus Uric Acid on your joints and is amazingly painfull, it in simple terms take place to me. There are very powerfull drugs which could do greater, yet many times is in simple terms giving to decrease the blood volume to make it much less confusing for the midsection to pump at a decrease rigidity. The side impacts are somtimes very undesirable. it is a good possibility in the experience that your blood rigidity is in simple terms too intense. communicate alongside with your conventional practitioner in case you like, yet taking drug to look greater perfect is in no way a good theory, except there is somthing you didnt tell me. Answered by Patricia Aurand 1 year ago.


What happens when there is too much potassium in your body and your Dr prescribes sodium polystrene suflonate-
Asked by Mertie Meixner 1 year ago.

This is Kayexalate and is used to remove excess potassium from the body. You want to know what happens when there is an abnormally high level of potassium in your body and your doctor prescribes sodium polysterene sulfonate. Well, if you take it orally and/or as an enema, Kayexalate functions as a potassium-binder in the intestinal tract, where absorption of postassium takes place. This resin binds to potassium and both are expelled in the feces. Be prepared for runny stool. Answered by James Kennemore 1 year ago.


Can I get calcium resonium (calcium polystyrene solfonate) in US. If yes, from which pharmaceutical company?
My father takes calcium resonium to lower his blood potassium in Hong Kong. He is in U.S. now and the doctor wrote him a perscription but the pharmacy does not know where to order it. Asked by Sherilyn Vaghy 1 year ago.

Kayexalate is Sodium polystyrene sulfonate, what we use here in States. Used to bind potassium and help excrete it in folks who aren't doing so on their own. This is a common medicine; he needs to try another pharmacy. Answered by Cindi Deitz 1 year ago.


How to relieve potassium buildup in your body?
Asked by Leland Ra 1 year ago.

go to medical doctor they will prescribe something like Kayexalate Answered by Lorelei Wrobleski 1 year ago.


Can an RN or MD please answer this question about plumonary edema?
Why is the risk of pulmonary edema increased with the use of sodium bicarbonate and sodium polystyreme sulfonate (Kayexalate)? Asked by Nikole Dilliard 1 year ago.

Simple. Both contain sodium. In the body, water tends to 'follow' sodium. So if you increase your sodium intake, then water will be retained. If you're already overloaded with fluid, it could result in pulmonary edema. A VERY simplified explanation. Answered by Arnette Monsalve 1 year ago.

how can you trust that the person that answers your question is a true licensed professional? my thoughts are to call your regular doctor and ask them. Answered by Dionna Krebel 1 year ago.


How do I become familiar with this medication list?
Like a week before school my prof. emailed me this medication list to be familiar with and write up....Is there an easier way to look up all these meds and not have to write them out? She wants me to do a drug sheet for each...Medications ListTypeMedicationAnalgesic/ UrinaryPhenazopyridine... Asked by Sigrid Smeathers 1 year ago.

Like a week before school my prof. emailed me this medication list to be familiar with and write up....Is there an easier way to look up all these meds and not have to write them out? She wants me to do a drug sheet for each... Medications List TypeMedication Analgesic/ UrinaryPhenazopyridine (Pyridium) Ditropan Detrol AntibioticAmikain Amoxicillin Amoxicillin/ Clavulanic Acid Amhotericin B Ampicillin Ampicillin/ Sulbactam (Unasym) Azthromycin Bactracin Cefazolin Cefazolin 1/ Metronidazole Ceftazidime Cefuroxime Ciprofloxacin Clindamycin Clotrimazole Trouche Demeclocycline Dicloxacillin Doxycycline Erythromycin Fluconazole Gentamicin AntibioticIsoniazid (INH) Ketoconazole Levofloxacin Linezolid (Zyvox) Metronidazole (Flagyl) Miconazole Neomycin Sulfate (Bacitracin) Nystatin Oxacillin Penicillin G Benz/ Procaine Penicillin G Benzathine Penicillin G Potassium Penicillin G Procaine Penicillin V Potassium Piperacillin Piperacillin/ Tazobactam (Zosyn) Polymyxin B Sulfate (Neosporin) Pyrazinamide Rifampin Tetracycline Tobramycin Tygacil Unasym Vancomycin AnticoagulantEnoxaparin Heparin Warfarin Vitamin K Antiemetic-5- HT3- AntagonistCompazine, Zofran Class II Controlled SubstanceHaldol Codiene Fentanyl Hydromorphone Meperidine HCL (Demerol) Methadone HCL Methylphenidate HCL (Ritalin) Morphine Oxycodone Oxycodone 5 mg/APAP 325 mg Class III-V Controlled SubstanceAcetaminophen/ Codeine 120/12 Acetaminophen/ Codeine 300/30 Alprazolam Clonazepam Codeine/ Calcium Iodide Diazepam Diphenoxylate 2.5 mg/ Atrophine (Lomotil) Guifenesine/ Codeine 200/20 Hydrocodone 5mg/ APAP 500mg Lorazepam Midazolam Class III-V Controlled SubstancePhenobarbital Propoxyphene (Darvon) Temazepam (Restoril) Zolpidem CorticosteroidsBetamethasone Cortisone Acetate Dexamethasone Hydrocortisone Methylprednisolone Predinisolone Prednisone Flu Prophylaxis& Pneumonia vaccine IV Nutritional AgentsTPN/PPN LaxativesColace Senikot S Lactulose Citrate of Magnesia M.O.M. Lasix& Bumex Spironolactone (Aldactone) Quinapril (Accupril) Metoprolol XL (Toprol) Diltiazem CD (Tazar) Digixon (Lanoxin) Atenolol (Tenormin) Amiodarone (Cordorone)Coreg Nadolol (Corgard) Betapace (Altace) Respiratory MedsXopenex Albuterol Atrovent Beclomethasone Budisonide (Pulmicort) Mucomyst Olanzcypine (Zyprexa) Fluctretine (Prozac)& Zoloft, Buspar Alprazolan (Xanax)& Wellbutrin Lecothyroxine (Synthroid) Ferrous Sulfate Calcium Carbonate Aldentronate Updates were made by staff and I didn’t have time to check for doubles. Please add the following: Pancreas? Kayexalate Megace Phoslo Iron (Feosol) MVI (multivitamin) Actos Namenda Metformin Insulin all types Sinemet Narcan Romazicone Nulytely Librium Answered by Maggie Luttenegger 1 year ago.

That's a hell of a list. Honestly the only way you're going to get them memorized is either to give them regularly (if you're a nurse) or to write them all down. Write down what they are for, dosages, side effects, etc. Literally doing it helps you get them down. You already have many of them separated by their effects which is good and is a starting point. Answered by Malika Deprey 1 year ago.

OMG this is a dream come true for me! I used to be a CPht and I miss it. I don't know if *you* have ever worked in a pharmacy but they keep a giant brown book that includes the information on every single drug known to man. It's the stuff you'd find in the folded pamphlet that accompanies drugs inside the bottles. I worked for Walgreens, but it's been a couple of years. I'm not sure if they still keep it around, call the Pharmacist on duty and ask about it. See if it's available anywhere else, like a medical library you might have access to? Answered by Wendell Henkes 1 year ago.

Yes, it can turn into a mental ilness. Don't listen to the other two people who responded. An overactive imagination about success and wealth and other things of that nature can lead to frustration and possibly into a serious mental condition. You need to focus on reasonable and real things, and It doesn't help you are on anti-depressants. Answered by Jaunita Duliba 1 year ago.


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