KAPVAY Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 022331/003.

Names and composition

"KAPVAY" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
022331/003 KAPVAY CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.1MG
022331/004 KAPVAY CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017407/001 CATAPRES CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
017407/002 CATAPRES CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
017407/003 CATAPRES CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
022331/001 JENLOGA CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.1MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022331/002 JENLOGA CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020615/001 DURACLON CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 10ML (0.1MG per ML)
020615/002 DURACLON CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per 10ML (0.5MG per ML)
091104/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 10ML (0.1MG per ML)
202984/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.1MG
091104/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per 10ML (0.5MG per ML)
202984/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.2MG
200300/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 10ML (0.1MG per ML)
200300/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per 10ML (0.5MG per ML)
022331/003 KAPVAY CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.1MG
200673/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 10ML (0.1MG per ML)
022331/004 KAPVAY CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
200673/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per 10ML (0.5MG per ML)
202601/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 10ML (0.1MG per ML)
202601/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per 10ML (0.5MG per ML)
202792/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.1MG
202792/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.2MG
202983/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.1MG
202983/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.2MG
203167/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per 10ML (0.1MG per ML)
203167/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per 10ML (0.5MG per ML)
203320/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.1MG
203320/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 0.2MG
070317/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
070317/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070317/003 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070395/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070396/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070397/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
070459/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
070460/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070461/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070659/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
070702/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070747/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070881/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070882/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070883/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
070886/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070887/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070923/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
070924/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070925/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070963/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
070964/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070965/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070974/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
070975/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
070976/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
071101/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
071102/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
071103/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
071252/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
071253/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
071254/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
071294/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
071783/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
071784/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
071785/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
072138/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
072139/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
072140/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
077901/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
077901/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
077901/003 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
078099/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
078099/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
078099/003 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
078895/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
078895/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
078895/003 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
090329/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
090329/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
090329/003 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
091368/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
091368/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
091368/003 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
202297/001 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
202297/002 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
202297/003 CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE CLONIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG

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Answered questions

What are kapvay and concerta?
Asked by Hermina Whiby 1 month ago.

Drugs for ADHD. Answered by Samella Pischke 1 month ago.


Are these two medications related for ADHD? kapvay and Intuitive?
My daughter is ADHD. She was taken intuitive and started having chest pains and low heart rate. The Dr. took her off in may and we kept him free of meds until late july. The medication she started taken then isn't enough for her during school so they are wanting to add Kapvay. I was reading over the side... Asked by Noble Solinski 1 month ago.

My daughter is ADHD. She was taken intuitive and started having chest pains and low heart rate. The Dr. took her off in may and we kept him free of meds until late july. The medication she started taken then isn't enough for her during school so they are wanting to add Kapvay. I was reading over the side effects and they are really close to intuitive! Im not sure if I should give it to her or not. I can not get her to the doctor until next week to discuss it so im trying to do a little research my self. Does anyone know anything about Kapvay? And if it is related to Intuitive? They have the same color on the pamphlets and came in the same starter box! Answered by Juliane Gobeil 1 month ago.

Daughter, him. I'm confused. Answered by Madge Tokarski 1 month ago.

Intuitive Medication For Adhd Answered by Jaunita Revera 1 month ago.

They have different Active Ingredients. Many medications have the same side effects. Almost all medicines share side effects with other types, actually. Having similar advertisements has nothing to do with the active Ingredients. In Intuniv the active ingredient in guanfacine, whereas in Kapvay it is Clonidine. Answered by Darell Dinatale 1 month ago.


Can i carry a non controlled substance prescription drug without the bottle?
I have two prescriptions Kapvay and clonidine they are a none controlled substance my pharmacist says yes i just wanted to get a second opinion Asked by Verda Karmel 1 month ago.

Yes, you can. But if you are going to fly you need to have the bottle or the TSA will take your pills away. I'd just carry them in the convenient bottle, myself. Answered by Rogelio Bainbridge 1 month ago.

If they are legally prescribed to you, you are allowed to store them in any manner you desire. Answered by Pearl Gagliano 1 month ago.


Can you snort proanthenols enzyme capsules as a drug?
I take seroquel xr and kapvay. I have a question if i snort proanthenols enzymes will it wake me up or can it cause a fatal effect because of my meds? Asked by India Nolton 1 month ago.

You can snort almost anything. That doesn't mean it's a smart thing to do. Either take the capsule orally as intended or not at all. Answered by Elanor Escovedo 1 month ago.


Why do psychiatrists prescribe stimulants first when treating ADHD?
Why dont they prescribe non-stimulants (which are apparently safer first?Examples of Medications for ADHDStimulants: Adderall, Concerta, Ritalin, and VyvanseNon-stimulants: Strattera and IntunivI understand that stimulants may be a good business because they are more addictive. But other than money,... Asked by Anitra Hammons 1 month ago.

Why dont they prescribe non-stimulants (which are apparently safer first? Examples of Medications for ADHD Stimulants: Adderall, Concerta, Ritalin, and Vyvanse Non-stimulants: Strattera and Intuniv I understand that stimulants may be a good business because they are more addictive. But other than money, there must be another reason why psychiatrists prefer to prescribe stimulants over non-stimulants. Psychiatrists can't be that inhuman! Answered by Ta Budd 1 month ago.

The efficacy of stimulants medications for the treatment of ADHD is far greater than the efficacy of non-stimulant FDA approved medications which are Strattera (atomoxetine), Intuniv (guanfacine extended-release), and Kapvay (clonidine extended-release). Actually you are somewhat wrong about stimulants being "good business because they are more addictive." All of the non-stimulant medications are very expensive and drug companies make far more money. A large number of stimulants have gone generic and cost much less than brand name drugs. Stimulants sold as a generic include Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Adderall XR (mixed amphetamine salts extended-release), Desoxyn (methamphetamine), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Dexedrine Spansules (dextroamphetamine sustained-release), Ritalin (methylphenidate), Ritalin SR (methylphenidate sustained-release), and Focalin (dexmethylphenidate). The three stimulants I most prescribe Dexedrine, Ritalin, and Dexedrine Spansules are all much cheaper than something like Strattera. In addition although stimulant medications do have the potential for abuse it does not mean that a person is guaranteed to become addicted. Actually people who have a legitimate need to take stimulants rarely become addicted. In addition taking stimulants by mouth rarely leads to addiction. Nearly all stimulant addicts snort, smoke, or inject the drugs. Any half good doctor will evaluate a patient for risks of substance abuse problems, drug seeking behaviours, and will continuously re-evaluate patients taking controlled substances for indications of addiction, abuse, or drug diversion. It is also becoming more common for doctors to have patients sign a controlled substance contract and even undergo random drug tests (to both make sure the patient is taking the medication and is not taking any other unauthorized controlled substances) or potentially to have random pill counts to ensure proper compliance. I personally require patients to sign a controlled substance contract and may require drug tests/pill counts. Some doctors do prescribe non-stimulants as first-line treatments to all patients and non-stimulant medications may certainly be the best first-line treatment for some patients. However evidence based guidelines clearly indicate that stimulants are typically the best first-line treatment since they are effective in about 75% of patients. Non-stimulant medication is only effective in about 30% of patients (at best) and most of those don't have as much of a response as they do to stimulants. In general the people who do best on non-stimulant medications are people who don't respond to stimulants. Thus since stimulants are typically far more effective it makes sense to try they first and leave non-stimulants to people who don't respond since that is a very small percent. Also people who have serious side effects to stimulants and people who have a serious history of stimulant addiction are normally put on non-stimulants. However sometimes even people who have a history of stimulant addiction may, under careful supervision, do well on prescription stimulants. We prescribe stimulants first (typically) based on both clinical experience and evidence based treatment guidelines. And for most people stimulants don't lead to problems and are much cheaper than non-stimulants. Also amphetamines are over 100 years old and methylphenidate is over 50 years old- both of these medication types are among the best studied in human history and are the best studied medications in children. Medication like Intuniv (guanfacine extended-release), and Kapvay (clonidine extended-release) have been associated with far more deaths in children than stimulants. Those same medications come in instant-release versions under brand names Catapres (clonidine) and Tenex (guanfacine) and are mostly used as antihypertensives (they lower blood pressure). I don't know where you are getting your information but its not accurate, certainly not on a large scale. Answered by Titus Rautenstrauch 1 month ago.

They prescribe them because they work. Answered by Mable Chilo 1 month ago.


7 year old taken off prozac seems to be developing tics?
My recently adopted son first came to me on a cocktail of medication. In the first several months he was weaned off vyvanse and kapvay.Two months ago he was weaned off risperidone.And last month he took his last dose of prozac.Yes, I am doing this under the case of a physician.. The child has a long list... Asked by Sammy Mehle 1 month ago.

My recently adopted son first came to me on a cocktail of medication. In the first several months he was weaned off vyvanse and kapvay. Two months ago he was weaned off risperidone. And last month he took his last dose of prozac. Yes, I am doing this under the case of a physician.. The child has a long list of diagnoses, but no one is certain about any of them. (ADD/ADHD, Depression, Anxiety, emotionally disturbed, disruptive behavior disorder, attachment disorder, mood disorder nos, possible aspergers) In the past two weeks (about two weeks after taking his last dose of prozac) he started developing some repetitive behaviors... He learned how to whistle, and is constantly whistling (this one I believe is fairly normal). He also claps, ALL the time. He literally sits up in his sleep and starts clapping his hands. He hold his arms in an awkward way and is very stiff about it. He does this around the house, when he wakes up in the morning, when we go out, and it seems to be worse the more chaotic somewhere is. It is driving me insane. When I ask him to stop, he does, but he starts back up again if I do not give him something else to do with his hands. When I asked him why he clapped all the time his response (while clapping) was “it’s so addicting”. He has always made strange.. animal like noises at random. But this has drastically increased since the medication is completely gone. So much so, that I have to tell him that we communicate through words and if he needs or wants something, he needs to use his words. This works… but the next time he wants a drink, he is reaching for his cup, roaring, growling, or screeching. Has anyone else had this problem? The goal is to get all of the medication and give him a clean psychiatric evaluation, so eventually he will probably be back on medications. He was just on such a mixture that the doctor and I could not tell which behaviors were symptoms, and which were side effects. Answered by Van Bonetto 1 month ago.

ADHD, Depression, Anxiety, separation anxiety, tics, clapping/flapping hands, repetitive behaviors, not asking for what he wants and just pointing or grunting for it, are all symptoms associated with Aspergers. The whistle could be a vocal tic. If he has ADHD & OCD with at least one vocal tic (coughing, clearing throat constantly, grunting, whistling) and some motor tics (facial grimaces, twitches, odd movements) it could actually be tourettes as a comorbid disorder. Most people don't think their kid has tourettes because they confuse tourettes for coprolalia (which is the disorder where people blurt out curse words). Aspergers and Tourettes are sometimes comorbid disorders with each other. I don't think weaning him off of the medication was a good idea but he shouldn't have been on so many kinds in the first place because there are several medications that cover a variety of symptoms. Such as zoloft. That covers Anxiety, depression, ADHD, and OCD behaviors in just one medication. You should read this book "The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome" by Tony Attwood. You will find that a lot of these diagnoses he has are actually one diagnosis, Aspergers. And it lists all the symptoms and why he is having these reactions in certain situations. Aspergers isn't only social, it affects motor skills, sensory processing, anxiety, sleep issues, and a variety of other issues. You should look into it because it sounds to me like he has Aspergers. Also I suggest bringing him to someone who specializes in Autism Spectrum related disorders. Answered by Torri Tecson 1 month ago.

Sounds like the meds were masking a whole lot, and will continue to, they don't heal anyone. If it were me I would take him here for evaluation, amenclinics.com, and then here to resolve and reduce pain and symptoms, many times 100% permanently. eftmasters.com, this woman knows thismethod and is a psychologist as well, masteringeft.com This is the only method that is proven to remove /reduce the symptoms by resolving the underlying pain and cause , once and for all. You need experts and experience with this one. Best wishes I don't think people should adopt or even use doctors or therapists without realizing what they can and cannot do for the person. Many people make this mistake. Cheer up, the method I just gave you is accepted by the American psychological association and many doctors who think outside the box, including, mercola.com, gupta, doctoroz, dr amen, and many others It is proven to help heal ptsd in six hours, stressproject.org and most mental illnesses, it is not painful and it does not take a long time. Understand that psychotrophic meds are either suppressants (schizo/bi polar), or placebos, proven . Answered by Marlon Neizer 1 month ago.


Which ADHD drugs can make you lose weight?
Asked by Gerry Raviele 1 month ago.

Nearly all FDA approved ADHD medications except Intuniv (guanfacine extended-release) and Kapvay (clonidine extended-release) can cause weight loss and/or anorexia (loss of appetite). In addition the non-stimulant medication Strattera (atomoxetine) rarely causes clinically significant weight loss. The medications renowned for their ability to cause weight loss include amphetamine stimulants and the amphetamine-like stimulants methylphenidate and dexmethylphenidate. FDA approved amphetamines for ADHD Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts) Adderall XR (mixed amphetamine salts extended-release) Desoxyn (methamphetamine) Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine) Dexedrine Spansules (dextroamphetamine extended-release) Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) FDA approved methylphenidate drugs for ADHD Ritalin (methylphenidate) Concerta (methylphenidate extended-release) Ritalin LA (methylphenidate extended-release) Ritalin SR (methylphenidate sustained-release) Daytrana (methylphenidate transdermal) Focalin (dexmethylphenidate) Focalin XR (dexmethylphenidate extended-release) One of the FDA approved medications for ADHD, Desoxyn (methamphetamine), is also approved for exogenous obesity. Other amphetamines also used to have FDA approved indications for weight loss. Answered by Porter Stothart 1 month ago.

Use 3 bite rule have three small bites and put fork down each time Answered by Inez Eitnier 1 month ago.

try drinking skim milk at breakfast instead of juice overweight people who drank skim milk for breakfast ate fewer calories Answered by Zella Cerruti 1 month ago.

Eat foods that bur more fat Answered by Tory Bigio 1 month ago.

exercise and healthy food and a trainer. Answered by Randy Pepion 1 month ago.


Is it dangerous to have diarrhea continuously for 15+ days after stopping my meds?
Hey! I went off my medications without weaning myself, just a sudden stop. (2mg Risperdol(Resperidone), 40mg Prozac, and .4mg Kapvay) and I have been experiencing diarrhea regularly.At first, I wasn't that worried, but now it's been a couple weeks and I'm starting to get worried...I just want to... Asked by Kathryne Blechinger 1 month ago.

Hey! I went off my medications without weaning myself, just a sudden stop. (2mg Risperdol(Resperidone), 40mg Prozac, and .4mg Kapvay) and I have been experiencing diarrhea regularly. At first, I wasn't that worried, but now it's been a couple weeks and I'm starting to get worried... I just want to make sure nothing's wrong with my body, I dunno, like a sudden change in chemicals and what not... Thanks! Answered by Cherish Pecanty 1 month ago.

Yeah, going off psych meds suddenly is always a really bad idea. They take weeks to get out of your system and the withdrawal side effects are nasty. It may still be a few weeks before they run out of your system. But you can't abide more days of diarrhea. Contact the prescribing doctor and get them to give you some solutions. Answered by Rosemarie Moll 1 month ago.

Talk to your Dr. now. Answered by Katia Elia 1 month ago.


Focalin and dayquil? blood pressure?
please give me a straight-forward yes or no answer. Asked by Albertha Dolbow 1 month ago.

hi, i take 15mg of focalin (tablet, not xr) in the morning and the afternoon. i take .1 mg of kapvay at night to help stop my fidgeting, but last night was my second time taking it so i don't think it's working yet. if i take the normal dose of dayquil, i believe it's 2 pills, will it raise my blood pressure? what about nyquil? 10 points :) Answered by Troy Sourlis 1 month ago.

in terms of BP focalin in and of itself can increase heart rate, and BP is a ratio of flow and rate. Dayquil has similar properties to the stimulants in combinant use the effect could be duplicated, or multiplied based on how they interact chemically. Answered by Marybeth Dornbos 1 month ago.


Better and "safer" ADD medicines?
My brother is currently 17 years old and weighs about 135 pounds. he takes 72 mg of concerta for ADD everyday he says it messes with his sleep and when he doesn't take it he sleeps better and he has mild tourettes and it seems like the medication brings it out sometimes. what are the long term effects of this... Asked by Natalya Dowson 1 month ago.

My brother is currently 17 years old and weighs about 135 pounds. he takes 72 mg of concerta for ADD everyday he says it messes with his sleep and when he doesn't take it he sleeps better and he has mild tourettes and it seems like the medication brings it out sometimes. what are the long term effects of this medication? and what are some safer and healthier alternative or generic medications for ADD that won't cause tourettes ticks or mess with your mood mind or sleep? Answered by Kathi Clive 1 month ago.

Firstly very few drugs have undergone high quality long-term studies however methylphenidate, the substance in Concerta, is one of the most studied drugs in history and has been around for about 60 years. Stimulants worsen Tourette syndrome about 25% of the time and insomnia is certainly a frequent side effect. For the most part there are not really any "long-term" effects of the medication. The issues with sleep and some worsening of Tourette Syndrome are simply side effects, they don't mean the drug is causing damage or anything like that. Any ADHD medication has the potential to worsen Tourette Syndrome and cause sleep problems however there are some options. 1) It may be worth reducing the dose of Concerta which is already at the official maximum dose and see what happens. 2) Switch to a different medication like Dexedrine Spansules (dextroamphetamine extended-release) which may need to be taken twice daily but it lasts a shorter time than Concerta so it should make sleep easier. 3) The typical treatment recommendation for a person with ADHD and Tourette Syndrome is using a stimulant AND an alpha-agonist such as Catapres (clonidine), Catapres-TTS (clonidine transdermal), Kapvay (clonidine extended-release), Tenex (guanfacine), or Intuniv (guanfacine extended-release). Both Intuniv and Kapvay, which I don't believe is yet on the market, are actually FDA approved for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) also Kapvay is FDA approved to be used as a monotherapy treatment and an add-on therapy to stimulant medication. A large meta-analysis (a study of studies) in children and adolescents with both Tourette Syndrome and ADHD revealed that methylphenidate, the only stimulant tested, was best for ADHD, and that alpha 2-agonists were best for both ADHD and tic symptoms. In addition clonidine and to a very small extent guanfacine are commonly prescribed to people with ADHD who develop insomnia. Simply put adding a drug like clonidine to the Concerta can control the ADHD even better, it can help control or eliminate ticks, and it can help with sleep. Generic clonidine or guanfacine are also very cheap and typically there is no need to use the over priced extended release forms. Also the Catapres-TTS (clonidine transdermal) is a patch that lasts a full week so it is a good option and it is generic. Also the drug Klonopin (clonazepam) is a first-line treatment for Tourette Syndrome as are clonidine and guanfacine but clonazepam is typically more effective and appropriate for sleep than alpha-agonists. I know it sounds bad to add an extra medication to control side effects but sometimes it is required. But addition adding clonidine, guanfacine, or clonazepam will likely also help with the ADHD and help with the insomnia and ticks. All three of these drugs are also well studied and are very safe when taken as prescribed. Often these medications may be added to stimulants even if there are no side effects because they can be so useful for the ADHD. I don't think safety is a big concern, what needs to be found is a way to manage the Tourette Syndrome and ADHD. And any psychotropic medication from Benadryl to Concerta will effect his mind, that is the reason it helps ADHD so for something to help him it must effect his mind. The only long term issues from Concerta are the small risk of becoming depressed after stopping Concerta, if his heart is healthy there is no evidence Concerta will cause cardiovascular problems, Concerta is neurotoxic but only in extremely large doses, far more than 72 mg so it will not cause brain damage or anything like that. However I would encourage the doctor be asked that question. But like I said methylphenidate is about 60 years old and amphetamines (Dexedrine, Adderall, Desoxyn, Vyvanse) are over 100 years old so we have a good understanding of them. As for pricing Concerta is certainly expensive and there are generic forms of methylphenidate- both instant release and extended release. Generic Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Dexedrine Spansules (dextroamphetamine extended-release) Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Focalin (dexmethylphenidate), Ritalin (methylphenidate), and Ritalin SR (methylphenidate extended-release) are the cheapest medications although for most of them they need to be taken 2-3 times daily. Consumer reports recommends generic Dexedrine, Adderall, or Ritalin based on price, safety, and efficacy. In general (clearly I don't have your brothers medical records) from what you have said I would say switching to generic instant release Ritalin with clonidine or clonazepam or Dexedrine with clonidine or clonazepam are the best options. Answered by Nadene Vernola 1 month ago.

Would you propose we stop medicare? America's health care is good for SOME people. Not everyone. Actually, what we should do is make the drug companies stop spending so much damn money on advertising. That is obscene. We are one of TWO countries that allow that. This Adam Smith vision of Health Care has it's benefits. But how can you look yourself in the mirror and say "Well, some people deserve cancer treatment, some people just don't.?? " Look at Australia-there is a good example of a compromise. America will most likely get this Australian style Health care anyway, not the UK's. Health care, like education, is a right in a civilized society. Answered by Augustus Ficklin 1 month ago.

Concerta And Clonidine Answered by Rossana Kann 1 month ago.

All drug prescriptions have serious side effects...I would try to go natural as possible. He has to watch his diet. He has to avoid "processed food, junk food, and fast food" Do a google search on "food and ADD". There are also many many natural remedies for ADD just google "ADD and natural home remedies" or do "ADD and natural herb remedies".you will find lots of info. He also shouldn't get vaccinated anymore bc vaccines have been known to cause ADD/ADHD. Hope this helps you on your search :) P.S. 2 good documentary films you & your brother should watch is "the beautiful truth" and "simply raw"...amazing info and you can help yourselves and others. God Bless :) Answered by Mariel Dworaczyk 1 month ago.

Well most ADD medicines if not all of them are going to mess with those things. Its just a matter of what is not "as bad". I would consider a small dosage of Adderal such as 10mg a day (there are also 20mg, 25mg and 30mg). Have him talk to his doctor about switching to something more like that. Answered by Gisele Rieke 1 month ago.


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