JANTOVEN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 040416/001.

Names and composition

"JANTOVEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of WARFARIN SODIUM.

Answered questions

Is there a drug interaction with jantoven and nyquill?
Asked by Dorinda Temples 3 months ago.

Ask your local Pharmacist. they are highly trained in drugs and drug interactions. You will get much more accurate information from them. Answered by Kimbra Spenst 3 months ago.


Hi, i hada blood clot in my lung after surgery.i am now on warfarin.wot will happen if i drink beer?
Asked by Onita Brzenk 3 months ago.

Megan, Alcohol interacts with warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) to either raise or lower the INR depending upon how it is used. INR - international normalized ratio - is a ratio that helps physicians monitor patients taking anticoagulant medications. The most common protein in the blood is albumin. Most of the warfarin that a person takes in a dose physically binds to albumin. The warfarin that is bound is then inactive. Alcohol appears to lower the amount of warfarin that is bound to albumin. The unbound warfarin is the part that has an effect on the clotting factors. Therefore, the INR will increase because there is more warfarin working in the body. Daily alcohol use of greater than three or more drinks will result in the possibility of several thing happening. First, the enzymes that metabolize the warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) can become more active. This means that the INR test will show that you are not taking enough warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven). Then your warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) dose will be increased. Should you suddenly stop drinking, the INR will shoot upward and increase your risk of bleeding. The other thing that might happen is that the alcohol will irritate the lining of your gastrointestinal tract. If this causes bleeding to start, it can be very difficult to stop. So, to sum up – avoidance is best, but moderation should be applied if you must partake of alcohol. If you do take alcohol, you should be aware of the risk. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Tyra Abbe 3 months ago.

Warfin is a Blood thinner ans so is alcohol, You can cause youer blood to become so thin that even a lil bump to the skin will cause internal bleeding! I dont recommend any alcohol while on blood thinners Answered by Margarito Tweedle 3 months ago.

You should read the warnings on the warfarin for drinking and most of the time you are not suppose to drink and take MDS. Common sense to not mix alcohol and drugs. Think, read and then use common sense to not do something that is detrimental to your health. Answered by Angelena Sandora 3 months ago.

blood will be REALLY thin!!!!! ask GP for definate answer! Answered by Emerson Lamery 3 months ago.


Can anyone tell me wheare coumadin comes from?
I have to take coumadin [warferin] its a blood thinner for heart patients. and I cannot find the place wheare it comes from on the net. for example codine comes from the bark of a tree, and opium comes from a flower seed pod . thankyou for your timely reply G. singh Asked by Ariane Goodaker 3 months ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Warfarin inhibits the synthesis of biologically active forms of the vitamin K-dependent clotting factors: II, VII, IX and X, as well as the regulatory factors protein C, protein S and protein Z. Other proteins not involved in blood clotting, such as osteocalcin, or matrix Gla protein, may also be affected. The precursors of these factors require carboxylation of their glutamic acid residues to allow the coagulation factors to bind to phospholipid surfaces inside blood vessels, on the vascular endothelium. This enzyme that carries out the carboxylation of glutamic acid is the gamma-glutamyl carboxylase. The carboxylation reaction will only proceed if the carboxylase enzyme is able to convert a reduced form of Vitamin K (Vitamin K hydroquinone) to vitamin K epoxide at the same time. The Vitamin K epoxide is in turn recycled back to Vitamin K and Vitamin K hydroquinone by another enzyme, the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). Warfarin inhibits epoxide reductase[1] (specifically the VKORC1 subunit[2][3]), thereby diminishing available vitamin K and Vitamin K hydroquinone in the tissues, which inhibits the carboxylation activity of the glutamyl carboxylase. When this occurs, the coagulation factors are no longer carboxylated at certain glutamic acid residues, and are incapable of binding to the endothelial surface of blood vessels, and are thus biologically inactive. As the body stores of previously-produced active factors degrade (over several days) and are replaced by inactive factors, the anticoagulation effect becomes apparent. The coagulation factors are produced, but have decreased functionality due to undercarboxylation; they are collectively referred to as PIVKAs (proteins induced [by] vitamin K absence/antagonism). Hence, the effect of warfarin is to diminish blood clotting in the patient. Warfarin is prescribed to people with an increased tendency for thrombosis or as prophylaxis in those individuals who have already formed a blood clot (thrombus) which required treatment. This can help prevent formation of future blood clots and help reduce the risk of embolism (migration of a thrombus to a spot where it blocks blood supply to a vital organ). Common clinical indications for warfarin use are atrial fibrillation, artificial heart valves, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.[4] Dosing of warfarin is complicated by the fact that it is known to interact with many commonly used medications and other chemicals that may be present in appreciable quantities in food. These interactions may enhance or reduce warfarin's anticoagulation effect. Many commonly used antibiotics, such as metronidazole or the macrolides, will greatly increase the effect of warfarin by reducing the metabolism of warfarin in the body. Other broad-spectrum antibiotics can reduce the amount of the normal bacterial flora in the bowel, which make significant quantities of Vitamin K, thus potentiating the effect of warfarin. In addition, food that contains large quantities of Vitamin K will reduce the warfarin effect; and medical conditions such as hypo- or hyperthyroidism will alter the rate of breakdown of the clotting factors. Therefore, in order to optimise the therapeutic effect without risking dangerous side effects, such as bleeding, close monitoring of the degree of anticoagulation is required by blood testing (INR). Initially, checking may be as often as twice a week; the intervals can be lengthened if the patient manages stable therapeutic INR levels on an unchanged warfarin dose. When initiating warfarin therapy ("warfarinisation"), the doctor will decide how strong the anticoagulant therapy needs to be. The target INR level will vary from case to case dependent upon the clinical indicators, but tends to be 2-3 in most conditions. In particular, target INR will be 2.5-3.5 in patients with artificial (mechanical) heart valves. The oral anticoagulant ximelagatran (Exanta®) was expected to replace warfarin to a large degree when introduced; however, reports of hepatotoxicity (liver damage) prompted its manufacturer to withdraw it from further development. Other drugs offering the efficacy of warfarin without a need for monitoring, such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban, are under development. The only common side-effect of warfarin is hemorrhage (bleeding). The risk of severe bleeding is small but definite (1-2% annually) and any benefit needs to outweigh this risk when warfarin is considered as a therapeutic measure. Risk of bleeding is augmented if the INR is out of range (due to accidental or deliberate overdose or due to interactions), and may cause hemoptysis (coughing up blood), excessive bruising, bleeding from nose or gums, or blood in urine or stool. A feared (but rare) complication of warfarin is warfarin necrosis, which occurs more frequently shortly after commencing treatment in patients with a deficiency of protein C. Protein C is an innate anticoagulant that, like the procoagulant factors that warfarin inhibits, requires vitamin K-dependent carboxylation for its activity. Since warfarin initially decreases protein C levels faster than the coagulation factors, it can paradoxically increase the blood's tendency to coagulate when treatment is first begun (many patients when starting on warfarin are given heparin in parallel to combat this), leading to massive thrombosis with skin necrosis and gangrene of limbs. Its natural counterpart, purpura fulminans, occurs in children who are homozygous for protein C mutations. Answered by Velda Memory 3 months ago.

Originally used as a poison to kill rodents. Once the rats would ingest the poison, they would basically bleed to death. Answered by Tyron Blissett 3 months ago.


How long does cumiden take to dissolve a bkoodclot?
the medcine coumiden how long does it take to dissolvee a blood clot Asked by Odelia Brest 3 months ago.

Warfarin is the most commonly used oral anticoagulant in the US. An anticoagulant is a drug used to prevent unwanted and dangerous blood clots. Although anticoagulants are often called "blood thinners," warfarin does not actually make your blood thinner. Warfarin interferes with the body's ability to make a blood clot (see How does warfarin work?). Warfarin is also sold as Coumadin and Jantoven, which are brand names for the generic drug warfarin. Warfarin is a product that was initially developed at the University of Wisconsin around 1950 as a product of spoiled sweet clover. Excessive intake by cattle caused them to bleed because warfarin interferes with the blood clotting process. In the U.S. a refined form of this compound has been used widely for about 50 years and currently is taken by millions of patients each year to prevent blood clots. Unwanted blood clots may cause strokes, heart attacks, and other very serious (and possibly deadly) events - such as blood clots in the legs or lungs. If it is used correctly, warfarin can be one of the most valuable drugs we have. If warfarin therapy is not managed very carefully, however, it also can be one of the most dangerous drugs we have because of the potential to induce bleeding. Return to top Print this question How does warfarin work? In order for your blood to form a clot, you have to have certain proteins in your blood. Normally, your liver makes these proteins and it requires vitamin K to do so. You get vitamin K from many of the foods you eat (especially green vegetables and certain oils). Warfarin reduces your liver's ability to use vitamin K to make these blood clotting proteins, which makes it harder for your blood to clot. Vitamin K and warfarin tend to work against each other. For this reason warfarin is often referred to as a vitamin K antagonist (VKA). If your intake of vitamin K increases, you will need more warfarin to keep your blood from clotting. If your intake of vitamin K is reduced, your dose of warfarin will also have to be reduced in order to keep you from bleeding. Fortunately, both the amount of vitamin K and warfarin in your body tends to rise and fall somewhat slowly. Therefore, one way to think about this balance between warfarin and vitamin K is that it is the WEEKLY (rather than the daily) intake that is being balanced against each other. Additionally, because the level of warfarin rises or falls rather slowly, any change in dose may take several days or even a few weeks to reach a new stable level. Similarly, if you miss a dose of warfarin (or take an extra dose) the level of warfarin (and therefore its effect) may be altered for several days. Return to top Print this question How is warfarin taken? The clinician who is responsible for managing your warfarin therapy will tell you exactly how to take it. If the instructions are not perfectly clear, ask your clinician to explain the instructions again or to write down the instructions for you. Once you clearly understand the instructions, take your warfarin exactly as your clinician instructs you. Often times the dosage schedule may require taking different doses on different days of the week. This is required to "fine tune" the weekly dose of warfarin to meet you needs. Only regular blood tests can predict how fast drug is working, or if it is working, when is your next appointment! there is no way to tell as everyone is different! Answered by Samira Stdenis 3 months ago.


What is cumadin made out of?
Asked by Candace Almaraz 3 months ago.

Rat poison! Seriously. Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin, Jantoven, Marevan, and Waran) is an anticoagulant. It was initially marketed as a pesticide against rats and mice, and is still popular for this purpose, although not used as much because of new products available now. After its introduction, it turned out to be effective and relatively safe in the prevention of abnormal formation and migration of blood clots Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing to ensure an adequate yet safe dose is taken. Answered by David Bartush 3 months ago.

Warfarin sodium = Rat poison Answered by Concha Pedez 3 months ago.

Coumadin is the trade (manufacturer's name) for warfarin. It is used to thin the blood so it doesn't clot as fast. Answered by Stewart Rachel 3 months ago.


What is the connection between green tea and certain heart medications?
So, you are correct EA. Wise words, DD... once again. Asked by Kathi Lippa 3 months ago.

Is that atrial fibrillation? Or was it ventricle fibrillation I love tea but I try to drink the non-caffintated teas. Green teas is an antioxidant. May interact with some of the heart meds. I know it interferes with an anticoagulants. I think an occasionally cup of tea would be okay, so long that it isn't green tea. Answered by Lorinda Ritch 3 months ago.

Because, when or if your medication fails, the settlement from your insurance will probably be void when they find that you continued drinking tea. The medication you are on should be for the benefit of you being able to modify your life and habits to allow you to return to survivability. Green tea is full of incidental chemicals that may be of benefit to you. You may be able to return to enjoying that cup of tea, but, until then you are subject to the dictates of the pharmas and your doctor. Answered by Tasha Plock 3 months ago.

Green tea has caffeine and that can cause heart irregularties. Check with your doctor to see if it is safe for you. Answered by Alex Noor 3 months ago.

you should ask your dr because green tea can interact with certain meds Answered by Beatrice Polfer 3 months ago.


I am an 85 yr.old male in chronic a-fib since 1995. I have midly impaired L vent.systolic func. Mod. severely?
dilated L atrium. Mod R atrial enlarge.Atrial septal aneurysm without shunt. Thickened & calcified Mitral Valve. Midly sclerotic aortic valve without stenosis. Mod-severe Mitral valve regurgitation. Mod tricuspid and pulmonic valve regurgitation. Mild aortic valve regurgitation. I take the following meds:Digoxin... Asked by Angelique Oldenburg 3 months ago.

dilated L atrium. Mod R atrial enlarge.Atrial septal aneurysm without shunt. Thickened & calcified Mitral Valve. Midly sclerotic aortic valve without stenosis. Mod-severe Mitral valve regurgitation. Mod tricuspid and pulmonic valve regurgitation. Mild aortic valve regurgitation. I take the following meds: Digoxin 0.125mg daily Jantoven 2.5mg Tue & Fri 3 mg all other days Lisinopril HCTZ 20-12.5mg daily Why would my doctor now add Hydrazaline 10mg 2x daily for 1 month then increase to 25mg 2x daily thereafter??? Answered by Paulita Eichhorn 3 months ago.

Because of heart failure. If u tolerated it then his plan is to increase the dose. Answered by Tameka Kohn 3 months ago.


What can you tell me about the drug prolixin?
Asked by Van Orellano 3 months ago.

Dear the Blood of Jesus, As you see trying to answer UR questions as soon as possible some I see have more time left for me to answer so with time I will answer all. All said, Prolixin (fluphenazine)is an anti-psychotic medication in a group of drugs called phenothiazine's . It works by changing the actions of chemicals in your brain.Fluphenazine is used to treat psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia.Fluphenazine is not for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. Fluphenazine may cause heart failure, sudden death, or pneumonia in older adults with dementia-related conditions.if you have twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs. This Drug must be stopped immediately and do call the doctor immediately. if you have liver disease, brain damage, bone marrow depression, a blood cell disorder, or if you are also using large amounts of alcohol or medicines that make you sleepy, or if you are or anyone is you are allergic to fluphenazine or other phenothiazine's. this medication should not be used too. if you have heart disease or high blood pressure, a history of seizures, Parkinson's disease, liver or kidney disease, severe asthma or breathing problem, past or present breast cancer, adrenal gland tumor, enlarged prostate, urination problems, glaucoma, low levels of calcium in your blood, or if you have ever had a serious side effect while using fluphenazine or similar medicines. Or any other medications that is being taken The doctor must be notified about it.Fluphenazine is not for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. Fluphenazine may cause heart failure, sudden death, or pneumonia in older adults with dementia-related conditions. IF you or anyone who have liver disease, brain damage, bone marrow depression, or a blood cell disorder low platelets or low red or white blood cell counts, or if you are also using large amounts of alcohol or medicines that make you sleepy should not use that medication too. Also you can not use if you are allergic to fluphenazine or other phenothiazine's such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), promethazine (Adgan, Pentazine, Phenergan), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine).Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can interact with fluphenazine and cause medical problems or increase side effects. Also please tell you Doctor if you are using or taking, antibiotic,birth control pills or hormone replacement estrogens;blood pressure medication;a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);certain asthma medications or bronchodilators; incontinence medications;insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth;medication for nausea, vomiting, or motion sickness;ulcer or irritable bowel medications. There are so many different types of medications that you should tell your Doctor about the best way is always no matter what Medication you take or taken or will be taken please and I urge you please tell your Doctor any and all medications that you take taken or will be taken. It's an Utmost important when you take any medication to tell your doctor any and all medications you are taking or allergic to. If you are not sure what you are allergic to please have allergy test for almost anything that will make it either to know which medication you should and should not take. PLEASE KNOW THIS IS A SMALL AMOUNT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THIS MEDICATION YOU MUST SPEAK WITH YOUR DR. WITH ANY MEDICAL ADVICE THEY SHOULD KNOW ALL MEDICAL HISTORY OF YOU ANY FAMILY MEMBER FATHER MOTHER SON DAUGHTERS UNCLES AUNTS ANY AND ALL BLOOD RELATIVES IS VERY IMPORTANT. THIS IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE ONLY YOUR DOCTOR KNOW WHAT IS BEST FOR YOU AND THEY MUST KNOW YOUR MEDICAL HISTORY BLOOD TESTES URINE AND SO ON. PLEASE ALWAYS CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR. Answered by Briana Lufborough 3 months ago.


How much alcohol can one safely drink while on coumadin?
@ Jim, dude that's what I did 9 months ago and it didn't friggin work. I could try again but the docs are reluctant to do that this time, they just wanna throw in a mechanical one and call it quits. Asked by Ozie Lamberty 3 months ago.

I'm about to undergo my second valve replacement surgery in 9 months and the doctors think i need a mechanical valve. This would require i be put on the medication coumadin for the rest of my life. I don't like the idea of this medicine and I'm worried about carrying on a normal lifestyle. Two things I really want to be able to do are continue to weight-lift and continue to be able to drink more than one beer per day. Is anyone on coumadin or does anyone know what is safe in one or both of these areas? Answered by Emely Dziduch 3 months ago.

Matador, thank you for your thorough answer. If you don't mind me asking, where did you get your info? Specifically the bit about how many units of alcohol one can drink? I don't know if you have been through anything like this, but its just hard to wrap one's mind around making some of these serious lifestyle changes. You are right, my options are: 1) basically do this with a mechanical valve and be set for life but on coumadin, 2) do another tissue surgery, but risk another operation in a few years (which would just suck), 3) do nothing and face death in the near future (which isn't really an option). I'm really only struggling with the possible drinking and workout limitations, I've been heavy into both for quite a long time in my life. I guess I'm starting to recognize that maybe I need to find more professional help if I'm really not going to be able to partake in either to the extent I want to. It shouldn't be this hard to give something up when the other option is death or Answered by Pat Chasse 3 months ago.

Liam, You may not like the idea of taking Coumadin for the rest of your life but there is a reason which, if you have not been informed, allow me to explain. Mechanical valves are designed to outlast the patient, and have typically been stress-tested to last several hundred years. Although mechanical valves are long-lasting and generally present a one-surgery solution, there is an increased risk of blood clots forming with mechanical valves. As a result, mechanical valve recipients must take anticoagulant (blood thinning) drugs such as Coumadin/Warfarin for the rest of their lives, making the patient more prone to bleeding. After cardiac surgery it is highly advisable to let your central nervous system (and heart rate) not react to artificial stimulants, like caffeine found in many canned drinks and especially in coffee. You will probably be given the ‘OK’ to start drinking coffee a few weeks after aortic valve replacement. As I mentioned above, Coumadin is the brand name for Warfarin, which is also known under the brand names of Jantoven, Marevan, Lawarin, Waran, and Warfant. It is dangerous to binge drink or get drunk while taking warfarin. Doing this may increase the effect of warfarin and so increase the risk of bleeding. Care must therefore be taken with injuries, dental and general surgery etc, surgeons and dentists must be informed that you are taking warfarin. Do not drink more than three units of alcohol a day if you are a man or two units a day if you are a woman. It is not safe to save up units to have on one day. One unit is roughly equivalent to half a pint of beer or lager, a single measure (25ml) of a spirit such as vodka, or a small glass (125ml) of wine. People with liver disease who are taking warfarin should not drink alcohol. If, however, you find this to be intolerable and not acceptable for the lifestyle that you wish to continue, then I am sure that the surgery is not 'compulsory' and you can choose not to undergo this surgery. Of course, you may then find that the valve which was to have been replaced will fail and you will probably suffer a coronary incident and, possibly, die. You are going to have to accept the fact that after surgery of this type, lifestyle changes are mandatory if you wish to continue with your life. You can live without a massive intake of alcohol. Weightlifting and/or power training with heavy weights is not considered to be good following this type of surgery. There must always, therefore, be in-depth individual counselling with an experienced cardiological sports instructor and a cardiologist. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Rona Cominotti 3 months ago.

Coumadin thins out your blood and so does alcohol. If I were you I wouldn't even risk it. Answered by Tracey Eccles 3 months ago.

Get a pig valve and then you can live on aspirin instead and be able to get stupid drunk every night until you die Answered by Jacques Rifai 3 months ago.


If I'm on Warfarin(coomiden), What do I take for headaches?
My mom just went to the hospital and she is on a blood thiner and its called Warfarin and she has a headache and she can only take one type of pill for headaches. Do you know what it is she can take? Please..I need your help! :]]] Asked by Etsuko Liranzo 3 months ago.

she can only take paracetamol. She CANT take any thing with aspirin in it coz this too will thin the blood and Ibuprofen will affect the blood thickness too, codeine is fine and this is sometimes combined with paracetamol so both of these are safe for her (if she takes a lot of paracetamol over a long time it may slightly affect her blood but if she on warfarin she will be getting blood checks and her warfarin dosage will be adjusted accordingly pls check with her doc if you're still concerned Answered by Clora Hesson 3 months ago.

Fast To Relieve Your Headache. Answered by Mellisa Jodoin 3 months ago.

Coumadin And Headaches Answered by Shannan Lupacchino 3 months ago.

Tylenol (acetaminophen) is safe as it does not affect the clotting process. Just stay away from aspirin... Answered by Onita Labrum 3 months ago.

acetaminophen such as Tylenol. no aspirin as it also thins the blood. Answered by Marlena Saric 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
040416/001 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040416/002 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040416/003 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040416/004 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040416/005 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040416/006 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040416/007 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040416/008 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040416/009 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009218/005 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
009218/007 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
009218/012 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 75MG per VIAL
009218/013 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
009218/016 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
009218/018 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
009218/020 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL
009218/022 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009218/023 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
009218/024 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
009218/025 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
009218/026 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
011771/001 ATHROMBIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 25MG
011771/002 ATHROMBIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
011771/003 ATHROMBIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017020/001 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
017020/002 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017020/003 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017020/004 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
017020/005 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040145/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040145/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040145/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040145/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040145/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040145/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040145/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040145/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040145/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040196/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040196/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040196/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040196/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040196/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040196/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040196/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040196/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040196/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040301/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040301/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040301/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040301/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040301/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040301/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040301/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040301/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040301/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040415/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040415/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040415/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040415/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040415/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040415/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040415/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040415/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040415/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040416/001 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040416/002 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040416/003 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040416/004 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040416/005 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040416/006 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040416/007 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040416/008 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040416/009 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040616/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040616/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040616/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040616/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040616/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040616/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040616/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040616/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040616/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040663/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040663/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040663/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040663/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040663/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040663/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040663/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040663/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040663/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086118/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
086119/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
086120/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
086122/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086123/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
088719/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
088720/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
088721/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090935/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
090935/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
090935/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
090935/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
090935/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
090935/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090935/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
090935/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
090935/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
200104/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
200104/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
200104/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
200104/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
200104/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
200104/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
200104/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
200104/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
200104/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
202202/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
202202/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
202202/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
202202/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
202202/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
202202/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202202/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
202202/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
202202/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG

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