Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017895/001.

Names and composition

"JANIMINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017895/001 JANIMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
017895/002 JANIMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
017895/003 JANIMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011836/003 PRESAMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
011836/006 PRESAMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
011836/007 PRESAMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
011838/002 TOFRANIL IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5MG per ML
017895/001 JANIMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
017895/002 JANIMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
017895/003 JANIMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
040751/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
040903/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040903/002 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
040903/003 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
081048/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
081049/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
081050/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
083729/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083729/003 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
083729/004 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
083745/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
083799/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083799/002 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
083799/003 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
083827/001 PRAMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083827/002 PRAMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
083827/003 PRAMINE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084252/002 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084869/002 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084936/002 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084937/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085133/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085200/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085220/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085221/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085875/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085877/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085878/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
086267/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
086268/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086269/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086765/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 25MG per ML
087619/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087631/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087776/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087844/001 TOFRANIL IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087845/001 TOFRANIL IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087846/001 TOFRANIL IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088036/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088222/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088223/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088262/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088276/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088292/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089422/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089497/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
090441/001 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090441/002 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
090441/003 IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IMIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG

Ask a doctor

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Answered questions

Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Retta Demling 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Eleanora Dittbrenner 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Numbers Moschetti 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Linn Threats 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Antonetta Sensibaugh 1 year ago.


Will taking vicodin......?
will takin vicodin while on medication for a bacterial infection lesson the effects of my antibacterial meds? Asked by Roy Bielat 1 year ago.

It shouldn't. Vicodin has no published interactions with antibacterial medications. Vicodin has known interaction issues with: * antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others * an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) * atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), glycopyrrolate (Robinul), mepenzolate (Cantil), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop) * bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare) * a bronchodilator such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or * irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Answered by Bonnie Pederson 1 year ago.

I was taking Vicodin for shingles pain at the same time I was taking meds for diverticulitis (it hasn't been the best year for me... lol) and I didn't have a problem. Answered by Sanda Shed 1 year ago.

my mom takes it all of the time alongside with percs,morphine,zanex,oxy,darvoset,tyleno... I say greater & no she has no physcial ailment-she's a junky. I won't even take regularly used asprin because of the fact of her i'm scared Answered by Kittie Harford 1 year ago.

since you are supposed to have been prescribed vicodin your doc would have surely advised you....if not then ask them Answered by Rebekah Zumaya 1 year ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Carman Lener 1 year ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Cornelius Ponton 1 year ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Carey Kurzyniec 1 year ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Johnnie Mcrea 1 year ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Verdie Hrovat 1 year ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Gaynell Vanni 1 year ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Allen Poletti 1 year ago.


Tell me what you think is the best anti-depresant drug available?
I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care.I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need... Asked by Shanel Burges 1 year ago.

I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care. I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need something that works without horrid side effects! Thanks for your opinion. Answered by Sharon Betak 1 year ago.

you know, i cant tell you about the best ant-anexty drug, because it depends on the persons body, me im very senstives, to where your husband my not be, here are some drugs that are perscribed for anxeity Azaspirones: Azaspirones is a class of drug effective in the treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) It works gradually over 2 to 4 weeks. It doesn't have any harsh side-effects and doesn't seem to cause sedation, nor memory and balance problems. It has not been said to cause that "out of it!" feeling. It also does not potentate alcohol. Azaspirones work slowly and people should not switch to benzodiazepines immediately. Example medications: BuSpar BENZODIAZEPINES Benzodiazepines are highly effective against panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. They are fast acting but can make you drowsy. Note: They can initiate withdrawal symptoms when discontinued. Working with your doctor can always help to reduce this issue. The most commonly used benzodiazepine is Xanax. Other commonly used benzodiazepines are Klonopin and Valium. Your doctor will probably start you out taking a low dosage. Then your doctor will gradually increase the dosage until anxiety is controlled. It will usually be prescribed for a short period (maybe 2 to 4 weeks) and then stop them as soon as possible. The habit-forming potential is high. Long-term use is not recommended because it can lead to dependence and withdrawal reactions when stopped. Never stop taking a Benzodiazepines suddenly if you have been taking it for more than a couple weeks. Your doctor will help you taper off the medicine. Example medications: Ativan, Centrax, Dalmane, Klonopin, Librium, Paxipam, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Xanax BETA BLOCKERS Beta Blockers By reducing the effect of adrenaline, The Beta Blockers are used to calm certain anxiety symptoms such as shaking, palpitations and sweating all over yourself. However, they do reduce blood pressure and slow the heartbeat so always talk to your doctor about the entire picture. The medication is fast acting and non-habit forming but should not be taken with other preexisting medical conditions (e.g. asthma, congestive heart failure, diabetes, vascular diseases, hyperthyroidism and angina). Beta-blockers are not FDA approved for the treatment of anxiety but are generally used to do so. Never take a double dose. Example medications: Inderal, Tenormin TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS Tricyclics (TCAs) Tricyclics are a non-addictive medication used to treat depression, mood disorders, bulimia, narcolepsy and anxiety-related disorders. There are studies showing its effective in reducing panic attacks. TCAs work very similar to SSRIs. Although, they have been known to produce weight gain in people using them - they can be very helpful in treating post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. TCAs help to return the levels of neurotransmitters toward a normal state. Remember, Tricyclics are highly dangerous in overdose. Example medications: Adapin , Anafranil, Elavil, Janimine, Ludiomil, Pamelor, Pertofrane, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, Vivactil MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS (MAOIs) MonoAmine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) MAOIs should rarely be used as first line treatment. Often, an MAOIs is indicated for patients who have failed to respond to some of the more commonly used drugs for depression and anxiety. It is then used in the treatment panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, other phobias, and hypochondriacal features. Depressed patients who are clinically characterized as having "atypical" or "nonedogenous" symptoms usually have a mix of anxiety and depression. This is when your doctor may issue an MAOIs. An issue that your doctor should talk to you about is the harsh interactions with many different foods and medications, wines and beer. Even cheese has Tyramine in it which will interact negatively with MAOIs. The specific foods & medications MUST be avoided while taking the drug. Other side-effects of MAOIs is a decrease in blood pressure, insomnia, moderate weight gain and reduced sexual response. Example medications: Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, Parnate SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake inhibitors are the latest in the treatment of anxiety disorders. They are used in the treatment of panic disorder, depression, OCD and other challenges usually require one does per day. They are now the most widely used drugs on planet earth. Studies have show a great improvement in individuals using the medication. Some common side-effects do include nausea, sexual difficulties and nervousness. s Example medications: Celexa, Desryl, Fluvoxamine, Paxil, Prozac, Serzone, Zoloft , Lexapro SERETONIN-NONREPINEPHRINE REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SNRIs) Serotonin-norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) – In addition to serotonin, SNRIs act on the brain chemical norepinephine. Example medications: Effexor & Wellbutrin ANTICONVULSANTS: Anticonvulsants were used for years in the treatment of epilepsy. Research has now shown anticonvulsants can be helpful in treating panic attacks and other psychiatric challenges and improve mood stabilization Example medications: Neurontin Valproic acid Other Sedatives/Hypnotics Sedative and hypnotics are drugs which slow down functions. Examples are: tranquilizers and sleeping pills. Their effects range from calming down anxiousness to promoting sleep. Benzodiazepines are sedative and hypnotics. (see Benzodiazepines) Example medications: Ambien, Lunesta, Sonata, Rozerem The list of Anti-anxiety medications: Actual dosage must be determined by the physician. BENZODIAZEPINES Ativan (Lorazepam) Ativan is an anti-anxiety sedative in the Benzodiazepinesclass. It is used in the treatment for the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. Some people suffering with insomnia due to anxiety may find this drug to be beneficial. The doctor may start you on 2 to 3 milligrams per day or at bedtime. Centrax Centrax is a Benzodiazepine which enhances the function of GABA and can help to calm the symptoms of General Anxiety GAD, Panic Disorder and Social Phobia. It is fast-acting and can make someone start to feel better within a couple days of treatment. Centrax and other benzodiazepines are potentially habit-forming and can cause drowsiness. Dalmane (Flurazepam) Dalmane is a Benzodiazepine and a hypnotic agent that can be used to treat some of the symptoms of anxiety - though it is also used in the treatment for insomnia characterized by difficulty in falling asleep and/or nocturnal awakenings. Klonopin (Clonazepam) Klonopin is an anticonvulsant Benzodiazepine used primarily in the treatment of seizure disorder but may also be used in the treatment of panic disorder and depression. Klonopin tablets have a K-shaped perforation in them. It is believed to work because of its ability to enhance the activity of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Librium (Chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride ) Librium is a Benzodiazepine. It is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of they symptoms of anxiety. It can also be used for withdrawal symptoms of alcoholism. Paxipam (Halazepam) Paxipam is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety. Doctors sometimes use it to relieve anxiety before surgery as well as the control of agitation used by alcohol withdrawal. Halazepam is not commercially available in the United States. Restoril (Temazepam ) Restoril is a Benzodiazepine used in the treatment of insomnia and sometimes used as a hypnotic sedative to relieve symptoms of anxiety. Serax (Oxazepam) Serax is one of the first benzodiazepines. It is used in the short-term management of anxiety, tension, irritability, agitation and anxiety associated with depression. Tranxene (Also known as Clorazepate and Azene) Tranxene is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety, nervousness and tension associated with an anxiety disorder. It has also been used to relieve the symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal as well as certain types of seizures. Tranxene works by balancing the chemicals that cause anxiety, withdrawal symptoms and seizures. The usual dosage your doctor might prescribe is 30 milligrams in small doses. Xanax (Alprazolam) Xanax is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term relief of mild to moderate anxiety, nervousness, tension (related to anxiety) and may be used to treat panic and depression. It has been also prescribed to help tremor, agoraphobia and certain symptoms of PMS. Xanax doesn't stay as long in your body as Valium does. BETA BLOCKERS Inderal (Propranolol) Inderal is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack. Tenormin (Atenolol) Because Tenormin is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack, This specific drug can also be prescribed to help treat abnormally rapid heart rhythms and stimulate the pace of the heart. Azaspirones BuSpar BuSpar is an antianxietyAzaspirone medication that has some of the properties of a Benzodiazepine It is used for the short-term relief of generaliz Answered by Kerrie Dangelis 1 year ago.

The hysterectomy is going to give you horrible side effects!!! The hormones change drastically, especially considering what your age may be. I assume you are young because you had a baby. Celexa- works great, I tool it and it worked! Problem was I lost my sex drive completely! I can not handle that, if that is okay with you than I would try that first. A low dose 20 mg should be plenty. Paxil- seemed to work pretty good, with no side effects. Always try to stay on a low dose of any antidepressant. Sounds to me you need an anti-anxiety pill for all the effects of the hysterectomy. Hope this helps! Answered by Domenic Grier 1 year ago.

Your sadness is understandable. So glad you're seeking Dr.'s care. Personally, I've never had problems with Zoloft and it's now available in generic. Its effects seemed strengthened when taking hormone replacement therapy. Unfortunately, trial-and-err with the psych drugs is the only way to find the medication that works for YOUR BODY. Answered by Francisco Rodrigo 1 year ago.

I've tried numerous medications and had given up on meds for years. I too hated the side effects. Unfortionatly my depression didn't give up on me. After my fourth visit to the psych ward I was transfered to a different hospital (I wasn't happy about ir at the time)which turned out to be the best thing for me. The doc's there convinced me to try meds again. They tried me on Welbutrin. It was a vast improvement. Answered by Kassie Astin 1 year ago.

Zoloft. Prooved Answered by Eugena Bixby 1 year ago.

zoloft works for me www.dailystrength.org theres tons of people on there who have lost what you have...if you even need people to talk to, theyre there. that website has helped me more than any drug. Just talking to people who really care and who know exactly what you have/are going through....good luck and im so sorry Answered by Santos Pol 1 year ago.


Antidepressant for bulimia?
what medicine is best for bulimia, I've tried, lexapro, celexa, effexor, proazc, none have helped I still feel down and compulsive, what is the best one with not many side effects like weight gain? Asked by Dawne Scontras 1 year ago.

Hi there. Bulimia is one of those demons that just hangs on once it gets its claws in us, isn't it? I have to assume you are actively receiving therapy and therefore would ask your dr., therapist, whomever you see about another group of antidepressants called Tricyclics. Examples of these are Janimine or Tofranil, Elavil and Norpramin. PLEASE don't give up on stopping. I don't care how many times you slip backwards...just keep those feet of yours moving forward. ;) It's a long, slow road to recovery but I have enough faith for both of us right now that you will succeed. Peace..... Answered by Jerome Amer 1 year ago.

All the medications you listed are good...it's just that these medicines should be taken regularly for long periods of time, (around 6 months to years). If you discontinue them (or skip doses) before the prescribed duration of treatment, it will not work... You just have to be patient and take the medications diligently, you'll surely feel better after a while... Spirituality and religion also helps a lot.... God bless you! Answered by Johnathan Dannenfelser 1 year ago.

I am a Medical Student, and we go through lists and lists of these anti depressants which people use year after year. This week our topic is bullimia, anorexia nervosa, and bigger- exia. We have discussed this, but the best use in which we have learned is to have a strong will power, pray in your religious beliefs, have good morals, change your standards of living, and eat normally, (3 times a day) or if you're a fellow diet practicioner, I recommend, eating 6 times a day, which in fact, speeds up metabolism instead of slowing it down, like what would happen to one who doesn't eat, or throws it up. greater increase in metabolism does the body good, under tons of circumstances. Answered by Isabel Bareis 1 year ago.

try novo- venlafaxine i can lose weight and buy diet pill called cuts or eccelis that diet pill helps. Answered by Annis Malouff 1 year ago.


Can anti-dpressants makee you gain weight?
How do they make you gain weight? Asked by Bobby Vermilyea 1 year ago.

Many people are not aware that weight gain is one of the most common side effects associated with many antidepressants prescribed today. In fact, medications such as Fluoxetine (Prozac®) and Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) have actually been marketed for obesity treatment. Antidepressants can affect weight in several ways: They may increase or decrease basal metabolic rate without changing caloric intake. They may affect hormonal changes and increase appetite. Unexpected weight gain can increase the difficulties associated with psychiatric and seizure disorders by further aggravating mood instability and low self-esteem. The following paragraphs contain brief descriptions of several classes of psychotropic and seizure disorder medications. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) SSRIs comprise one of the major classes of antidepressants currently being prescribed by primary care physicians. At first, SSRIs were thought to be associated with weight loss and reduced appetite. For a while, they were even marketed as anti-obesity drugs. It is now known that long-term use of SSRIs is associated with weight gain. The reason that SSRIs contribute to weight gain is not known. Although it was a widely held belief that drugs that increase serotonin output also decrease hunger, this does not seem to be the case. Patients using SSRIs often report symptoms of hypoglycemia (weakness, dizziness, frequent hunger, and headaches) when they do not eat. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may indicate hyperinsulinemia (elevation of insulin in the blood). The five most common SSRIs currently prescribed in the United States today are as follows: Citalopram (Celexa®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Fluvoxamine (Luvox®) Paroxetine (Paxil®) Sertraline (Zoloft®) Paroxetine (Paxil®) appears to have the most significant impact on weight gain of all of the SSRIs. Studies show that patients using Paxil experience an increase in breast size as well as weight gain and increased serum prolactin. One case report linked cravings for carbohydrates with Citalopram (Celexa®) while other studies showed an average weight gain over time of 15-20 pounds with Sertraline (Zoloft), Fluoxetine (Prozac®), and Citalopram (Celexa®). However, SSRIs cause less weight gain, fewer anticholinergic symptoms, and less toxic adverse effects than tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). These findings have led to the increase in SSRI prescriptions by psychiatrists and primary care providers. Primary care providers are not likely to be familiar with the difference between the various SSRIs relative to their possible weight gain side effects. Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs) TCAs were the most commonly prescribed antidepressants before SSRIs became widely available. Tricyclic antidepressants are often used to treat sleep disorders and to help patients manage pain. Most physicians are aware that TCAs can contribute significantly to weight gain. Weight gain and other side effects vary from one TCA to another as well as from one patient to another. Many drugs in this class induce slowing of the metabolism and carbohydrate cravings. Factors more clearly understood involve histamine and alpha 1 receptor blocking actions. Appetite stimulation and weight gain make it extremely difficult for the diabetic using a TCA to control blood sugar. TCAs include the following: Amitriptyline (Elavil®) Amoxapine (Asendin®) Clomipramine (Anafranil®) Desipramine (Norepramine®, Pertofrane®) Doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®) Imipramine (Janimine®, Tofranil®) Nortriptyline (Aventyl®, Pamelor®) Protriptyline (Vivactil®) Trimipramine (Rhotramine®, Surmontil®) Weight gain with TCAs is dose dependent and relative to the length of therapy. The greatest weight gain among TCA patients has been observed with those using either amitriptyline (Elavil®) or imipramine (Janimine®, Tofranil ®). Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) There are two categories of MAOIs: nonselective, irreversible MAOIs and reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase type A (RIMAs). The nonselective irreversible MAOIs cause weight gain similar to TCAs while the newer, selective MAOIs do not appear to have any effect on body weight. There is not much information available on the current use of MAOIs in clinical practice because they have some dangerous side effects and are used less frequently than other antidepressants. Nonselective, irreversible MAOIs include the following: Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) Phenelzine (Nardil®) Tranylcypromine (Parnate®) Selective reversible RIMAs include the following: Moclobemide (Manerix®) Toloxatone (Humoryl®) Other Antidepressants Other antidepressants that do not fall strictly under the classifications of SSRIs, TCAs, or MAOIs include the following: Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) Mitrazapine (Remeron®) Nefazadone (Serzone®) Trazadone (Desyrel®) Venlafaxine (Effexor®) Venlafaxine (Effexor®) has been shown to cause weight gain but not as severe as has been reported with the SSRIs paroxetine (Paxil®), fuoxetine (Prozac®), and sertraline (Zoloft®). Mitrazapine (Remeron®) has been associated with significant weight gain, possibly secondary to interactions with the histamine (H1) receptor. It is not associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, sexual dysfunction, or increased heart rate, as seen with the SSRIs. Trazadone (Desyrel®) is an antidepressant with sedative properties that is frequently used as a sleep aid as well as treatment for depression. It appears to cause less weight gain than amitriptyline (Elavil®) but more than buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®). There is currently no information available relating Nefazadone (Serzone®) to increased appetite or weight gain. Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) has not been associated with weight gain and is commonly used with some success in smoking cessation. Anticonvulsants/Mood Stabilizers These drugs were initially used only for seizure disorders. The following anticonvulsants are now prescribed frequently in the treatment of bipolar disorder and other selected forms of depression: Carbamazepine (Tegretol®) Divalproex (Depakote®) Gabapentin (Neurontin®) Lamotrigine (Lamictal®) Topiramate (Topamax®) Anticonvulsants tend to cause hyperinsulinemia (elevated insulin in the blood) and increased appetite leading to weight gain. Hyperinsulinemia also results in increased testosterone, which causes a risk to women on these medications for development of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (POS). Polycystic ovary syndrome can cause weight gain, male pattern baldness, increased facial hair, skin tags, acne, infertility, high blood pressure, abnormal lipid levels, and heart disease. Seizure disorder studies showed that patients taking anticonvulsants who had either a normal or below normal body mass index had the most severe weight gain. Conventional Mood Stabilizers Mood stabilizers were commonly used before anticonvulsants were developed for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Mood stabilizers commonly prescribed consisted primarily of the following: Lithium (Cibalith-S®, Duralith®, Ekalith®, Eskalith CR®, Lithane®, Lithobid®, Lithonate®, Lithotabs®) Typically, one-third to two-thirds of the patients treated with Lithium gain weight. Of those, 25 percent gain enough weight to be classified as obese. Weight gain is dose dependent, but low doses of lithium (less than .8 mm/L) are often not therapeutic: therefore, low-dose lithium is usually not an alternative. Antipsychotics One of the most common reasons for noncompliance and discontinued use of antipsychotic medication is weight gain. The agent believed to be responsible for the increased food intake of patients taking antipsychotics is the serotonin blocker. Conventional anti-psychotics include the following: Haloperidol (Haldol®, Peridol®) Molindone (Moban®) Thioridazine (Apo-Thioridazine®, Mellaril®, Novo-Ridazine®, PMS-Thioridazine®) Newer antipsychotics, classified as atypical antipsychotics, include the following: Clozapine (Clozaril®) Olanzapine (Zyprexa®) Quetiapine (Seroquel®) Risperidone (Risperdal®) Sertindole (Serlect®) Ziprasidone (Seldox®) Haloperidol (Haldol®, Peridol®) is a conventional antipsychotic with a lower incidence of weight gain than the newer agents clozapine (Clozaril®), olanzapine (Zyprexa®), and sertindole (Serlect®). A retrospective study showed that clozapine (Clozaril®) and olanzapine (Zyprexa®) had the greatest associated weight gain, followed by intermediate weight gain with risperidone (Risperdal®). Patients treated with sertindole (Serlect®) had less weight gain than those treated with haloperidol. Another study linked clozapine (Clozaril®) to significant weight gain and lipid abnormalities, suggesting increased risk for diabetes. Among the conventional antipsychotics, thioridazine and chlorpromazine have greater potential for weight gain, while molindone (Moban®) is the only antipsychotic shown not to increase weight on a consistent basis. Studies show that antipsychotic agents have an effect on the reproductive hormones. Women receiving antipsychotics tended to display hyperprlactinemia and tended to be hypoestrogenic. Women with primary obesity did not have hyperprolactinemia and tended to have normal or elevated estradiol serum levels. These differences have pathogenic and therapeutic implications besides the effects on gonadal and adrenal steroids. Prolactin alone promotes appetite and insulin resistance that may underlie the excessive body weight observed in hyperprolactinemic conditions detected in both animal and clinical studies Answered by Larhonda Cable 1 year ago.

Some do, some don't. I know Prozac has a high instance of weight gain, while things like Effexor and Zoloft do not. Answered by Lakeshia Morath 1 year ago.

rumors sometimes have a grain of truth. i suppose if you are depressed and less active you can gain weight,so that is why it is important to exercise when on anti depressents.even walking is good. Answered by Kendal Vache 1 year ago.

yes I've been on the for 30 years and they will put the weight on so watch what you eat also you can ask the doc to switch your med's some are better than others for helping on the weight Answered by Marni Rivena 1 year ago.

use the freezer to add some extra oomph to summer foods freeze grapes for some bite sized delights or get a popsicle mold and freeze some greek yogurt with berries Answered by Belen Mcray 1 year ago.

try a pasta less spaghetti by mixing shredded zucchini veggie meatballs and raw tomato sauce seasoned with a dash of zesty oregano Answered by Edris Asamoah 1 year ago.

Certain ones can, and others dont. You just have to make it clear to your Dr. that you want something that doesnt interfere with your wieght. This wasnt in your question, but there are also some that interfere with your sex drive. Just thougt I'd mention that, you should ask your Dr. when he prescribes them to you.... Answered by Cher Kubsch 1 year ago.

Social worker, Mayo clinic website , lung specialist and Internist, all say "Yes." Not that the antidepressants cause it, they stimulae the appetite Answered by Betty Tayan 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Krishna Racicot 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Eula Chang 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Shirlene Peskin 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Claudio Derham 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Darcey Burges 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Kaycee Kilstofte 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Bernadine Pankake 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Mistie Mcalarney 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Stefan Honan 1 year ago.


Will taking vicodin......?
will takin vicodin while on medication for a bacterial infection lesson the effects of my antibacterial meds? Asked by Oralia Evangelist 1 year ago.

It shouldn't. Vicodin has no published interactions with antibacterial medications. Vicodin has known interaction issues with: * antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others * an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) * atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), glycopyrrolate (Robinul), mepenzolate (Cantil), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop) * bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare) * a bronchodilator such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or * irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Answered by Annika Selinger 1 year ago.

I was taking Vicodin for shingles pain at the same time I was taking meds for diverticulitis (it hasn't been the best year for me... lol) and I didn't have a problem. Answered by Cornell Depace 1 year ago.

my mom takes it all of the time alongside with percs,morphine,zanex,oxy,darvoset,tyleno... I say greater & no she has no physcial ailment-she's a junky. I won't even take regularly used asprin because of the fact of her i'm scared Answered by Enda Pounders 1 year ago.

since you are supposed to have been prescribed vicodin your doc would have surely advised you....if not then ask them Answered by Thomasina Ismay 1 year ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Francoise Sigala 1 year ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Alexander Intermill 1 year ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Janyce Naser 1 year ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by China Peltier 1 year ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Scott Sutulovich 1 year ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Cletus Clyne 1 year ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Miss Bodily 1 year ago.


Tell me what you think is the best anti-depresant drug available?
I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care.I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need... Asked by Muriel Going 1 year ago.

I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care. I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need something that works without horrid side effects! Thanks for your opinion. Answered by Trish Piacente 1 year ago.

you know, i cant tell you about the best ant-anexty drug, because it depends on the persons body, me im very senstives, to where your husband my not be, here are some drugs that are perscribed for anxeity Azaspirones: Azaspirones is a class of drug effective in the treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) It works gradually over 2 to 4 weeks. It doesn't have any harsh side-effects and doesn't seem to cause sedation, nor memory and balance problems. It has not been said to cause that "out of it!" feeling. It also does not potentate alcohol. Azaspirones work slowly and people should not switch to benzodiazepines immediately. Example medications: BuSpar BENZODIAZEPINES Benzodiazepines are highly effective against panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. They are fast acting but can make you drowsy. Note: They can initiate withdrawal symptoms when discontinued. Working with your doctor can always help to reduce this issue. The most commonly used benzodiazepine is Xanax. Other commonly used benzodiazepines are Klonopin and Valium. Your doctor will probably start you out taking a low dosage. Then your doctor will gradually increase the dosage until anxiety is controlled. It will usually be prescribed for a short period (maybe 2 to 4 weeks) and then stop them as soon as possible. The habit-forming potential is high. Long-term use is not recommended because it can lead to dependence and withdrawal reactions when stopped. Never stop taking a Benzodiazepines suddenly if you have been taking it for more than a couple weeks. Your doctor will help you taper off the medicine. Example medications: Ativan, Centrax, Dalmane, Klonopin, Librium, Paxipam, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Xanax BETA BLOCKERS Beta Blockers By reducing the effect of adrenaline, The Beta Blockers are used to calm certain anxiety symptoms such as shaking, palpitations and sweating all over yourself. However, they do reduce blood pressure and slow the heartbeat so always talk to your doctor about the entire picture. The medication is fast acting and non-habit forming but should not be taken with other preexisting medical conditions (e.g. asthma, congestive heart failure, diabetes, vascular diseases, hyperthyroidism and angina). Beta-blockers are not FDA approved for the treatment of anxiety but are generally used to do so. Never take a double dose. Example medications: Inderal, Tenormin TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS Tricyclics (TCAs) Tricyclics are a non-addictive medication used to treat depression, mood disorders, bulimia, narcolepsy and anxiety-related disorders. There are studies showing its effective in reducing panic attacks. TCAs work very similar to SSRIs. Although, they have been known to produce weight gain in people using them - they can be very helpful in treating post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. TCAs help to return the levels of neurotransmitters toward a normal state. Remember, Tricyclics are highly dangerous in overdose. Example medications: Adapin , Anafranil, Elavil, Janimine, Ludiomil, Pamelor, Pertofrane, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, Vivactil MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS (MAOIs) MonoAmine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) MAOIs should rarely be used as first line treatment. Often, an MAOIs is indicated for patients who have failed to respond to some of the more commonly used drugs for depression and anxiety. It is then used in the treatment panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, other phobias, and hypochondriacal features. Depressed patients who are clinically characterized as having "atypical" or "nonedogenous" symptoms usually have a mix of anxiety and depression. This is when your doctor may issue an MAOIs. An issue that your doctor should talk to you about is the harsh interactions with many different foods and medications, wines and beer. Even cheese has Tyramine in it which will interact negatively with MAOIs. The specific foods & medications MUST be avoided while taking the drug. Other side-effects of MAOIs is a decrease in blood pressure, insomnia, moderate weight gain and reduced sexual response. Example medications: Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, Parnate SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake inhibitors are the latest in the treatment of anxiety disorders. They are used in the treatment of panic disorder, depression, OCD and other challenges usually require one does per day. They are now the most widely used drugs on planet earth. Studies have show a great improvement in individuals using the medication. Some common side-effects do include nausea, sexual difficulties and nervousness. s Example medications: Celexa, Desryl, Fluvoxamine, Paxil, Prozac, Serzone, Zoloft , Lexapro SERETONIN-NONREPINEPHRINE REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SNRIs) Serotonin-norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) – In addition to serotonin, SNRIs act on the brain chemical norepinephine. Example medications: Effexor & Wellbutrin ANTICONVULSANTS: Anticonvulsants were used for years in the treatment of epilepsy. Research has now shown anticonvulsants can be helpful in treating panic attacks and other psychiatric challenges and improve mood stabilization Example medications: Neurontin Valproic acid Other Sedatives/Hypnotics Sedative and hypnotics are drugs which slow down functions. Examples are: tranquilizers and sleeping pills. Their effects range from calming down anxiousness to promoting sleep. Benzodiazepines are sedative and hypnotics. (see Benzodiazepines) Example medications: Ambien, Lunesta, Sonata, Rozerem The list of Anti-anxiety medications: Actual dosage must be determined by the physician. BENZODIAZEPINES Ativan (Lorazepam) Ativan is an anti-anxiety sedative in the Benzodiazepinesclass. It is used in the treatment for the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. Some people suffering with insomnia due to anxiety may find this drug to be beneficial. The doctor may start you on 2 to 3 milligrams per day or at bedtime. Centrax Centrax is a Benzodiazepine which enhances the function of GABA and can help to calm the symptoms of General Anxiety GAD, Panic Disorder and Social Phobia. It is fast-acting and can make someone start to feel better within a couple days of treatment. Centrax and other benzodiazepines are potentially habit-forming and can cause drowsiness. Dalmane (Flurazepam) Dalmane is a Benzodiazepine and a hypnotic agent that can be used to treat some of the symptoms of anxiety - though it is also used in the treatment for insomnia characterized by difficulty in falling asleep and/or nocturnal awakenings. Klonopin (Clonazepam) Klonopin is an anticonvulsant Benzodiazepine used primarily in the treatment of seizure disorder but may also be used in the treatment of panic disorder and depression. Klonopin tablets have a K-shaped perforation in them. It is believed to work because of its ability to enhance the activity of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Librium (Chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride ) Librium is a Benzodiazepine. It is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of they symptoms of anxiety. It can also be used for withdrawal symptoms of alcoholism. Paxipam (Halazepam) Paxipam is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety. Doctors sometimes use it to relieve anxiety before surgery as well as the control of agitation used by alcohol withdrawal. Halazepam is not commercially available in the United States. Restoril (Temazepam ) Restoril is a Benzodiazepine used in the treatment of insomnia and sometimes used as a hypnotic sedative to relieve symptoms of anxiety. Serax (Oxazepam) Serax is one of the first benzodiazepines. It is used in the short-term management of anxiety, tension, irritability, agitation and anxiety associated with depression. Tranxene (Also known as Clorazepate and Azene) Tranxene is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety, nervousness and tension associated with an anxiety disorder. It has also been used to relieve the symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal as well as certain types of seizures. Tranxene works by balancing the chemicals that cause anxiety, withdrawal symptoms and seizures. The usual dosage your doctor might prescribe is 30 milligrams in small doses. Xanax (Alprazolam) Xanax is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term relief of mild to moderate anxiety, nervousness, tension (related to anxiety) and may be used to treat panic and depression. It has been also prescribed to help tremor, agoraphobia and certain symptoms of PMS. Xanax doesn't stay as long in your body as Valium does. BETA BLOCKERS Inderal (Propranolol) Inderal is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack. Tenormin (Atenolol) Because Tenormin is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack, This specific drug can also be prescribed to help treat abnormally rapid heart rhythms and stimulate the pace of the heart. Azaspirones BuSpar BuSpar is an antianxietyAzaspirone medication that has some of the properties of a Benzodiazepine It is used for the short-term relief of generaliz Answered by Cornell Anzualda 1 year ago.

The hysterectomy is going to give you horrible side effects!!! The hormones change drastically, especially considering what your age may be. I assume you are young because you had a baby. Celexa- works great, I tool it and it worked! Problem was I lost my sex drive completely! I can not handle that, if that is okay with you than I would try that first. A low dose 20 mg should be plenty. Paxil- seemed to work pretty good, with no side effects. Always try to stay on a low dose of any antidepressant. Sounds to me you need an anti-anxiety pill for all the effects of the hysterectomy. Hope this helps! Answered by Nelly Dearin 1 year ago.

Your sadness is understandable. So glad you're seeking Dr.'s care. Personally, I've never had problems with Zoloft and it's now available in generic. Its effects seemed strengthened when taking hormone replacement therapy. Unfortunately, trial-and-err with the psych drugs is the only way to find the medication that works for YOUR BODY. Answered by Adan Plansinis 1 year ago.

I've tried numerous medications and had given up on meds for years. I too hated the side effects. Unfortionatly my depression didn't give up on me. After my fourth visit to the psych ward I was transfered to a different hospital (I wasn't happy about ir at the time)which turned out to be the best thing for me. The doc's there convinced me to try meds again. They tried me on Welbutrin. It was a vast improvement. Answered by Chanda Coultrap 1 year ago.

Zoloft. Prooved Answered by Shamika Dicampli 1 year ago.

zoloft works for me www.dailystrength.org theres tons of people on there who have lost what you have...if you even need people to talk to, theyre there. that website has helped me more than any drug. Just talking to people who really care and who know exactly what you have/are going through....good luck and im so sorry Answered by Vannesa Donath 1 year ago.


Antidepressant for bulimia?
what medicine is best for bulimia, I've tried, lexapro, celexa, effexor, proazc, none have helped I still feel down and compulsive, what is the best one with not many side effects like weight gain? Asked by Sherwood Flem 1 year ago.

Hi there. Bulimia is one of those demons that just hangs on once it gets its claws in us, isn't it? I have to assume you are actively receiving therapy and therefore would ask your dr., therapist, whomever you see about another group of antidepressants called Tricyclics. Examples of these are Janimine or Tofranil, Elavil and Norpramin. PLEASE don't give up on stopping. I don't care how many times you slip backwards...just keep those feet of yours moving forward. ;) It's a long, slow road to recovery but I have enough faith for both of us right now that you will succeed. Peace..... Answered by Carole Godde 1 year ago.

All the medications you listed are good...it's just that these medicines should be taken regularly for long periods of time, (around 6 months to years). If you discontinue them (or skip doses) before the prescribed duration of treatment, it will not work... You just have to be patient and take the medications diligently, you'll surely feel better after a while... Spirituality and religion also helps a lot.... God bless you! Answered by Jeramy Keanu 1 year ago.

I am a Medical Student, and we go through lists and lists of these anti depressants which people use year after year. This week our topic is bullimia, anorexia nervosa, and bigger- exia. We have discussed this, but the best use in which we have learned is to have a strong will power, pray in your religious beliefs, have good morals, change your standards of living, and eat normally, (3 times a day) or if you're a fellow diet practicioner, I recommend, eating 6 times a day, which in fact, speeds up metabolism instead of slowing it down, like what would happen to one who doesn't eat, or throws it up. greater increase in metabolism does the body good, under tons of circumstances. Answered by Tessa Hennig 1 year ago.

try novo- venlafaxine i can lose weight and buy diet pill called cuts or eccelis that diet pill helps. Answered by Junko Mccoyle 1 year ago.


Can anti-dpressants makee you gain weight?
How do they make you gain weight? Asked by Donette Thackery 1 year ago.

Many people are not aware that weight gain is one of the most common side effects associated with many antidepressants prescribed today. In fact, medications such as Fluoxetine (Prozac®) and Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) have actually been marketed for obesity treatment. Antidepressants can affect weight in several ways: They may increase or decrease basal metabolic rate without changing caloric intake. They may affect hormonal changes and increase appetite. Unexpected weight gain can increase the difficulties associated with psychiatric and seizure disorders by further aggravating mood instability and low self-esteem. The following paragraphs contain brief descriptions of several classes of psychotropic and seizure disorder medications. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) SSRIs comprise one of the major classes of antidepressants currently being prescribed by primary care physicians. At first, SSRIs were thought to be associated with weight loss and reduced appetite. For a while, they were even marketed as anti-obesity drugs. It is now known that long-term use of SSRIs is associated with weight gain. The reason that SSRIs contribute to weight gain is not known. Although it was a widely held belief that drugs that increase serotonin output also decrease hunger, this does not seem to be the case. Patients using SSRIs often report symptoms of hypoglycemia (weakness, dizziness, frequent hunger, and headaches) when they do not eat. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may indicate hyperinsulinemia (elevation of insulin in the blood). The five most common SSRIs currently prescribed in the United States today are as follows: Citalopram (Celexa®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Fluvoxamine (Luvox®) Paroxetine (Paxil®) Sertraline (Zoloft®) Paroxetine (Paxil®) appears to have the most significant impact on weight gain of all of the SSRIs. Studies show that patients using Paxil experience an increase in breast size as well as weight gain and increased serum prolactin. One case report linked cravings for carbohydrates with Citalopram (Celexa®) while other studies showed an average weight gain over time of 15-20 pounds with Sertraline (Zoloft), Fluoxetine (Prozac®), and Citalopram (Celexa®). However, SSRIs cause less weight gain, fewer anticholinergic symptoms, and less toxic adverse effects than tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). These findings have led to the increase in SSRI prescriptions by psychiatrists and primary care providers. Primary care providers are not likely to be familiar with the difference between the various SSRIs relative to their possible weight gain side effects. Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs) TCAs were the most commonly prescribed antidepressants before SSRIs became widely available. Tricyclic antidepressants are often used to treat sleep disorders and to help patients manage pain. Most physicians are aware that TCAs can contribute significantly to weight gain. Weight gain and other side effects vary from one TCA to another as well as from one patient to another. Many drugs in this class induce slowing of the metabolism and carbohydrate cravings. Factors more clearly understood involve histamine and alpha 1 receptor blocking actions. Appetite stimulation and weight gain make it extremely difficult for the diabetic using a TCA to control blood sugar. TCAs include the following: Amitriptyline (Elavil®) Amoxapine (Asendin®) Clomipramine (Anafranil®) Desipramine (Norepramine®, Pertofrane®) Doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®) Imipramine (Janimine®, Tofranil®) Nortriptyline (Aventyl®, Pamelor®) Protriptyline (Vivactil®) Trimipramine (Rhotramine®, Surmontil®) Weight gain with TCAs is dose dependent and relative to the length of therapy. The greatest weight gain among TCA patients has been observed with those using either amitriptyline (Elavil®) or imipramine (Janimine®, Tofranil ®). Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) There are two categories of MAOIs: nonselective, irreversible MAOIs and reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase type A (RIMAs). The nonselective irreversible MAOIs cause weight gain similar to TCAs while the newer, selective MAOIs do not appear to have any effect on body weight. There is not much information available on the current use of MAOIs in clinical practice because they have some dangerous side effects and are used less frequently than other antidepressants. Nonselective, irreversible MAOIs include the following: Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) Phenelzine (Nardil®) Tranylcypromine (Parnate®) Selective reversible RIMAs include the following: Moclobemide (Manerix®) Toloxatone (Humoryl®) Other Antidepressants Other antidepressants that do not fall strictly under the classifications of SSRIs, TCAs, or MAOIs include the following: Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) Mitrazapine (Remeron®) Nefazadone (Serzone®) Trazadone (Desyrel®) Venlafaxine (Effexor®) Venlafaxine (Effexor®) has been shown to cause weight gain but not as severe as has been reported with the SSRIs paroxetine (Paxil®), fuoxetine (Prozac®), and sertraline (Zoloft®). Mitrazapine (Remeron®) has been associated with significant weight gain, possibly secondary to interactions with the histamine (H1) receptor. It is not associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, sexual dysfunction, or increased heart rate, as seen with the SSRIs. Trazadone (Desyrel®) is an antidepressant with sedative properties that is frequently used as a sleep aid as well as treatment for depression. It appears to cause less weight gain than amitriptyline (Elavil®) but more than buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®). There is currently no information available relating Nefazadone (Serzone®) to increased appetite or weight gain. Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) has not been associated with weight gain and is commonly used with some success in smoking cessation. Anticonvulsants/Mood Stabilizers These drugs were initially used only for seizure disorders. The following anticonvulsants are now prescribed frequently in the treatment of bipolar disorder and other selected forms of depression: Carbamazepine (Tegretol®) Divalproex (Depakote®) Gabapentin (Neurontin®) Lamotrigine (Lamictal®) Topiramate (Topamax®) Anticonvulsants tend to cause hyperinsulinemia (elevated insulin in the blood) and increased appetite leading to weight gain. Hyperinsulinemia also results in increased testosterone, which causes a risk to women on these medications for development of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (POS). Polycystic ovary syndrome can cause weight gain, male pattern baldness, increased facial hair, skin tags, acne, infertility, high blood pressure, abnormal lipid levels, and heart disease. Seizure disorder studies showed that patients taking anticonvulsants who had either a normal or below normal body mass index had the most severe weight gain. Conventional Mood Stabilizers Mood stabilizers were commonly used before anticonvulsants were developed for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Mood stabilizers commonly prescribed consisted primarily of the following: Lithium (Cibalith-S®, Duralith®, Ekalith®, Eskalith CR®, Lithane®, Lithobid®, Lithonate®, Lithotabs®) Typically, one-third to two-thirds of the patients treated with Lithium gain weight. Of those, 25 percent gain enough weight to be classified as obese. Weight gain is dose dependent, but low doses of lithium (less than .8 mm/L) are often not therapeutic: therefore, low-dose lithium is usually not an alternative. Antipsychotics One of the most common reasons for noncompliance and discontinued use of antipsychotic medication is weight gain. The agent believed to be responsible for the increased food intake of patients taking antipsychotics is the serotonin blocker. Conventional anti-psychotics include the following: Haloperidol (Haldol®, Peridol®) Molindone (Moban®) Thioridazine (Apo-Thioridazine®, Mellaril®, Novo-Ridazine®, PMS-Thioridazine®) Newer antipsychotics, classified as atypical antipsychotics, include the following: Clozapine (Clozaril®) Olanzapine (Zyprexa®) Quetiapine (Seroquel®) Risperidone (Risperdal®) Sertindole (Serlect®) Ziprasidone (Seldox®) Haloperidol (Haldol®, Peridol®) is a conventional antipsychotic with a lower incidence of weight gain than the newer agents clozapine (Clozaril®), olanzapine (Zyprexa®), and sertindole (Serlect®). A retrospective study showed that clozapine (Clozaril®) and olanzapine (Zyprexa®) had the greatest associated weight gain, followed by intermediate weight gain with risperidone (Risperdal®). Patients treated with sertindole (Serlect®) had less weight gain than those treated with haloperidol. Another study linked clozapine (Clozaril®) to significant weight gain and lipid abnormalities, suggesting increased risk for diabetes. Among the conventional antipsychotics, thioridazine and chlorpromazine have greater potential for weight gain, while molindone (Moban®) is the only antipsychotic shown not to increase weight on a consistent basis. Studies show that antipsychotic agents have an effect on the reproductive hormones. Women receiving antipsychotics tended to display hyperprlactinemia and tended to be hypoestrogenic. Women with primary obesity did not have hyperprolactinemia and tended to have normal or elevated estradiol serum levels. These differences have pathogenic and therapeutic implications besides the effects on gonadal and adrenal steroids. Prolactin alone promotes appetite and insulin resistance that may underlie the excessive body weight observed in hyperprolactinemic conditions detected in both animal and clinical studies Answered by Tiffiny Folta 1 year ago.

Some do, some don't. I know Prozac has a high instance of weight gain, while things like Effexor and Zoloft do not. Answered by Marva Kallevig 1 year ago.

rumors sometimes have a grain of truth. i suppose if you are depressed and less active you can gain weight,so that is why it is important to exercise when on anti depressents.even walking is good. Answered by Randell Fedie 1 year ago.

yes I've been on the for 30 years and they will put the weight on so watch what you eat also you can ask the doc to switch your med's some are better than others for helping on the weight Answered by Eric Distler 1 year ago.

use the freezer to add some extra oomph to summer foods freeze grapes for some bite sized delights or get a popsicle mold and freeze some greek yogurt with berries Answered by Marylou Vanzante 1 year ago.

try a pasta less spaghetti by mixing shredded zucchini veggie meatballs and raw tomato sauce seasoned with a dash of zesty oregano Answered by Ahmad Belue 1 year ago.

Certain ones can, and others dont. You just have to make it clear to your Dr. that you want something that doesnt interfere with your wieght. This wasnt in your question, but there are also some that interfere with your sex drive. Just thougt I'd mention that, you should ask your Dr. when he prescribes them to you.... Answered by Cori Laraby 1 year ago.

Social worker, Mayo clinic website , lung specialist and Internist, all say "Yes." Not that the antidepressants cause it, they stimulae the appetite Answered by Harrison Huls 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Annamarie Boros 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Chanda Rochkes 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Dorian Paripovich 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Ariel Gerula 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Dania Mongolo 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Eboni Herman 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Nery Baranovic 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Kemberly Bayles 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Marcy Dubbs 1 year ago.


Will taking vicodin......?
will takin vicodin while on medication for a bacterial infection lesson the effects of my antibacterial meds? Asked by Doris Hanstein 1 year ago.

It shouldn't. Vicodin has no published interactions with antibacterial medications. Vicodin has known interaction issues with: * antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others * an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) * atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), glycopyrrolate (Robinul), mepenzolate (Cantil), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop) * bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare) * a bronchodilator such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or * irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Answered by Ciara Storjohann 1 year ago.

I was taking Vicodin for shingles pain at the same time I was taking meds for diverticulitis (it hasn't been the best year for me... lol) and I didn't have a problem. Answered by Nelle Alex 1 year ago.

my mom takes it all of the time alongside with percs,morphine,zanex,oxy,darvoset,tyleno... I say greater & no she has no physcial ailment-she's a junky. I won't even take regularly used asprin because of the fact of her i'm scared Answered by Lavern Endries 1 year ago.

since you are supposed to have been prescribed vicodin your doc would have surely advised you....if not then ask them Answered by Michelina Gemaehlich 1 year ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Hector Barck 1 year ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Emmy Krahe 1 year ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Stacey Pelzer 1 year ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Spring Starkie 1 year ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Raleigh Marsek 1 year ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Jacques Brouillard 1 year ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Numbers Schnack 1 year ago.


Tell me what you think is the best anti-depresant drug available?
I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care.I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need... Asked by Delma Opper 1 year ago.

I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care. I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need something that works without horrid side effects! Thanks for your opinion. Answered by Hannah Lefort 1 year ago.

you know, i cant tell you about the best ant-anexty drug, because it depends on the persons body, me im very senstives, to where your husband my not be, here are some drugs that are perscribed for anxeity Azaspirones: Azaspirones is a class of drug effective in the treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) It works gradually over 2 to 4 weeks. It doesn't have any harsh side-effects and doesn't seem to cause sedation, nor memory and balance problems. It has not been said to cause that "out of it!" feeling. It also does not potentate alcohol. Azaspirones work slowly and people should not switch to benzodiazepines immediately. Example medications: BuSpar BENZODIAZEPINES Benzodiazepines are highly effective against panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. They are fast acting but can make you drowsy. Note: They can initiate withdrawal symptoms when discontinued. Working with your doctor can always help to reduce this issue. The most commonly used benzodiazepine is Xanax. Other commonly used benzodiazepines are Klonopin and Valium. Your doctor will probably start you out taking a low dosage. Then your doctor will gradually increase the dosage until anxiety is controlled. It will usually be prescribed for a short period (maybe 2 to 4 weeks) and then stop them as soon as possible. The habit-forming potential is high. Long-term use is not recommended because it can lead to dependence and withdrawal reactions when stopped. Never stop taking a Benzodiazepines suddenly if you have been taking it for more than a couple weeks. Your doctor will help you taper off the medicine. Example medications: Ativan, Centrax, Dalmane, Klonopin, Librium, Paxipam, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Xanax BETA BLOCKERS Beta Blockers By reducing the effect of adrenaline, The Beta Blockers are used to calm certain anxiety symptoms such as shaking, palpitations and sweating all over yourself. However, they do reduce blood pressure and slow the heartbeat so always talk to your doctor about the entire picture. The medication is fast acting and non-habit forming but should not be taken with other preexisting medical conditions (e.g. asthma, congestive heart failure, diabetes, vascular diseases, hyperthyroidism and angina). Beta-blockers are not FDA approved for the treatment of anxiety but are generally used to do so. Never take a double dose. Example medications: Inderal, Tenormin TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS Tricyclics (TCAs) Tricyclics are a non-addictive medication used to treat depression, mood disorders, bulimia, narcolepsy and anxiety-related disorders. There are studies showing its effective in reducing panic attacks. TCAs work very similar to SSRIs. Although, they have been known to produce weight gain in people using them - they can be very helpful in treating post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. TCAs help to return the levels of neurotransmitters toward a normal state. Remember, Tricyclics are highly dangerous in overdose. Example medications: Adapin , Anafranil, Elavil, Janimine, Ludiomil, Pamelor, Pertofrane, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, Vivactil MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS (MAOIs) MonoAmine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) MAOIs should rarely be used as first line treatment. Often, an MAOIs is indicated for patients who have failed to respond to some of the more commonly used drugs for depression and anxiety. It is then used in the treatment panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, other phobias, and hypochondriacal features. Depressed patients who are clinically characterized as having "atypical" or "nonedogenous" symptoms usually have a mix of anxiety and depression. This is when your doctor may issue an MAOIs. An issue that your doctor should talk to you about is the harsh interactions with many different foods and medications, wines and beer. Even cheese has Tyramine in it which will interact negatively with MAOIs. The specific foods & medications MUST be avoided while taking the drug. Other side-effects of MAOIs is a decrease in blood pressure, insomnia, moderate weight gain and reduced sexual response. Example medications: Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, Parnate SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake inhibitors are the latest in the treatment of anxiety disorders. They are used in the treatment of panic disorder, depression, OCD and other challenges usually require one does per day. They are now the most widely used drugs on planet earth. Studies have show a great improvement in individuals using the medication. Some common side-effects do include nausea, sexual difficulties and nervousness. s Example medications: Celexa, Desryl, Fluvoxamine, Paxil, Prozac, Serzone, Zoloft , Lexapro SERETONIN-NONREPINEPHRINE REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SNRIs) Serotonin-norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) – In addition to serotonin, SNRIs act on the brain chemical norepinephine. Example medications: Effexor & Wellbutrin ANTICONVULSANTS: Anticonvulsants were used for years in the treatment of epilepsy. Research has now shown anticonvulsants can be helpful in treating panic attacks and other psychiatric challenges and improve mood stabilization Example medications: Neurontin Valproic acid Other Sedatives/Hypnotics Sedative and hypnotics are drugs which slow down functions. Examples are: tranquilizers and sleeping pills. Their effects range from calming down anxiousness to promoting sleep. Benzodiazepines are sedative and hypnotics. (see Benzodiazepines) Example medications: Ambien, Lunesta, Sonata, Rozerem The list of Anti-anxiety medications: Actual dosage must be determined by the physician. BENZODIAZEPINES Ativan (Lorazepam) Ativan is an anti-anxiety sedative in the Benzodiazepinesclass. It is used in the treatment for the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. Some people suffering with insomnia due to anxiety may find this drug to be beneficial. The doctor may start you on 2 to 3 milligrams per day or at bedtime. Centrax Centrax is a Benzodiazepine which enhances the function of GABA and can help to calm the symptoms of General Anxiety GAD, Panic Disorder and Social Phobia. It is fast-acting and can make someone start to feel better within a couple days of treatment. Centrax and other benzodiazepines are potentially habit-forming and can cause drowsiness. Dalmane (Flurazepam) Dalmane is a Benzodiazepine and a hypnotic agent that can be used to treat some of the symptoms of anxiety - though it is also used in the treatment for insomnia characterized by difficulty in falling asleep and/or nocturnal awakenings. Klonopin (Clonazepam) Klonopin is an anticonvulsant Benzodiazepine used primarily in the treatment of seizure disorder but may also be used in the treatment of panic disorder and depression. Klonopin tablets have a K-shaped perforation in them. It is believed to work because of its ability to enhance the activity of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Librium (Chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride ) Librium is a Benzodiazepine. It is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of they symptoms of anxiety. It can also be used for withdrawal symptoms of alcoholism. Paxipam (Halazepam) Paxipam is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety. Doctors sometimes use it to relieve anxiety before surgery as well as the control of agitation used by alcohol withdrawal. Halazepam is not commercially available in the United States. Restoril (Temazepam ) Restoril is a Benzodiazepine used in the treatment of insomnia and sometimes used as a hypnotic sedative to relieve symptoms of anxiety. Serax (Oxazepam) Serax is one of the first benzodiazepines. It is used in the short-term management of anxiety, tension, irritability, agitation and anxiety associated with depression. Tranxene (Also known as Clorazepate and Azene) Tranxene is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety, nervousness and tension associated with an anxiety disorder. It has also been used to relieve the symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal as well as certain types of seizures. Tranxene works by balancing the chemicals that cause anxiety, withdrawal symptoms and seizures. The usual dosage your doctor might prescribe is 30 milligrams in small doses. Xanax (Alprazolam) Xanax is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term relief of mild to moderate anxiety, nervousness, tension (related to anxiety) and may be used to treat panic and depression. It has been also prescribed to help tremor, agoraphobia and certain symptoms of PMS. Xanax doesn't stay as long in your body as Valium does. BETA BLOCKERS Inderal (Propranolol) Inderal is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack. Tenormin (Atenolol) Because Tenormin is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack, This specific drug can also be prescribed to help treat abnormally rapid heart rhythms and stimulate the pace of the heart. Azaspirones BuSpar BuSpar is an antianxietyAzaspirone medication that has some of the properties of a Benzodiazepine It is used for the short-term relief of generaliz Answered by Tifany Tautuiaki 1 year ago.

The hysterectomy is going to give you horrible side effects!!! The hormones change drastically, especially considering what your age may be. I assume you are young because you had a baby. Celexa- works great, I tool it and it worked! Problem was I lost my sex drive completely! I can not handle that, if that is okay with you than I would try that first. A low dose 20 mg should be plenty. Paxil- seemed to work pretty good, with no side effects. Always try to stay on a low dose of any antidepressant. Sounds to me you need an anti-anxiety pill for all the effects of the hysterectomy. Hope this helps! Answered by Sharie Zurheide 1 year ago.

Your sadness is understandable. So glad you're seeking Dr.'s care. Personally, I've never had problems with Zoloft and it's now available in generic. Its effects seemed strengthened when taking hormone replacement therapy. Unfortunately, trial-and-err with the psych drugs is the only way to find the medication that works for YOUR BODY. Answered by Isis Drivers 1 year ago.

I've tried numerous medications and had given up on meds for years. I too hated the side effects. Unfortionatly my depression didn't give up on me. After my fourth visit to the psych ward I was transfered to a different hospital (I wasn't happy about ir at the time)which turned out to be the best thing for me. The doc's there convinced me to try meds again. They tried me on Welbutrin. It was a vast improvement. Answered by Eve Orrell 1 year ago.

Zoloft. Prooved Answered by Ashlee Gampong 1 year ago.

zoloft works for me www.dailystrength.org theres tons of people on there who have lost what you have...if you even need people to talk to, theyre there. that website has helped me more than any drug. Just talking to people who really care and who know exactly what you have/are going through....good luck and im so sorry Answered by Ettie Kaines 1 year ago.


Antidepressant for bulimia?
what medicine is best for bulimia, I've tried, lexapro, celexa, effexor, proazc, none have helped I still feel down and compulsive, what is the best one with not many side effects like weight gain? Asked by Garry Bridenbaugh 1 year ago.

Hi there. Bulimia is one of those demons that just hangs on once it gets its claws in us, isn't it? I have to assume you are actively receiving therapy and therefore would ask your dr., therapist, whomever you see about another group of antidepressants called Tricyclics. Examples of these are Janimine or Tofranil, Elavil and Norpramin. PLEASE don't give up on stopping. I don't care how many times you slip backwards...just keep those feet of yours moving forward. ;) It's a long, slow road to recovery but I have enough faith for both of us right now that you will succeed. Peace..... Answered by Abraham Sluter 1 year ago.

All the medications you listed are good...it's just that these medicines should be taken regularly for long periods of time, (around 6 months to years). If you discontinue them (or skip doses) before the prescribed duration of treatment, it will not work... You just have to be patient and take the medications diligently, you'll surely feel better after a while... Spirituality and religion also helps a lot.... God bless you! Answered by Geneva Winlock 1 year ago.

I am a Medical Student, and we go through lists and lists of these anti depressants which people use year after year. This week our topic is bullimia, anorexia nervosa, and bigger- exia. We have discussed this, but the best use in which we have learned is to have a strong will power, pray in your religious beliefs, have good morals, change your standards of living, and eat normally, (3 times a day) or if you're a fellow diet practicioner, I recommend, eating 6 times a day, which in fact, speeds up metabolism instead of slowing it down, like what would happen to one who doesn't eat, or throws it up. greater increase in metabolism does the body good, under tons of circumstances. Answered by Rolando Gorley 1 year ago.

try novo- venlafaxine i can lose weight and buy diet pill called cuts or eccelis that diet pill helps. Answered by Angelyn Endecott 1 year ago.


Can anti-dpressants makee you gain weight?
How do they make you gain weight? Asked by Kena Meyers 1 year ago.

Many people are not aware that weight gain is one of the most common side effects associated with many antidepressants prescribed today. In fact, medications such as Fluoxetine (Prozac®) and Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) have actually been marketed for obesity treatment. Antidepressants can affect weight in several ways: They may increase or decrease basal metabolic rate without changing caloric intake. They may affect hormonal changes and increase appetite. Unexpected weight gain can increase the difficulties associated with psychiatric and seizure disorders by further aggravating mood instability and low self-esteem. The following paragraphs contain brief descriptions of several classes of psychotropic and seizure disorder medications. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) SSRIs comprise one of the major classes of antidepressants currently being prescribed by primary care physicians. At first, SSRIs were thought to be associated with weight loss and reduced appetite. For a while, they were even marketed as anti-obesity drugs. It is now known that long-term use of SSRIs is associated with weight gain. The reason that SSRIs contribute to weight gain is not known. Although it was a widely held belief that drugs that increase serotonin output also decrease hunger, this does not seem to be the case. Patients using SSRIs often report symptoms of hypoglycemia (weakness, dizziness, frequent hunger, and headaches) when they do not eat. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may indicate hyperinsulinemia (elevation of insulin in the blood). The five most common SSRIs currently prescribed in the United States today are as follows: Citalopram (Celexa®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Fluvoxamine (Luvox®) Paroxetine (Paxil®) Sertraline (Zoloft®) Paroxetine (Paxil®) appears to have the most significant impact on weight gain of all of the SSRIs. Studies show that patients using Paxil experience an increase in breast size as well as weight gain and increased serum prolactin. One case report linked cravings for carbohydrates with Citalopram (Celexa®) while other studies showed an average weight gain over time of 15-20 pounds with Sertraline (Zoloft), Fluoxetine (Prozac®), and Citalopram (Celexa®). However, SSRIs cause less weight gain, fewer anticholinergic symptoms, and less toxic adverse effects than tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). These findings have led to the increase in SSRI prescriptions by psychiatrists and primary care providers. Primary care providers are not likely to be familiar with the difference between the various SSRIs relative to their possible weight gain side effects. Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs) TCAs were the most commonly prescribed antidepressants before SSRIs became widely available. Tricyclic antidepressants are often used to treat sleep disorders and to help patients manage pain. Most physicians are aware that TCAs can contribute significantly to weight gain. Weight gain and other side effects vary from one TCA to another as well as from one patient to another. Many drugs in this class induce slowing of the metabolism and carbohydrate cravings. Factors more clearly understood involve histamine and alpha 1 receptor blocking actions. Appetite stimulation and weight gain make it extremely difficult for the diabetic using a TCA to control blood sugar. TCAs include the following: Amitriptyline (Elavil®) Amoxapine (Asendin®) Clomipramine (Anafranil®) Desipramine (Norepramine®, Pertofrane®) Doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®) Imipramine (Janimine®, Tofranil®) Nortriptyline (Aventyl®, Pamelor®) Protriptyline (Vivactil®) Trimipramine (Rhotramine®, Surmontil®) Weight gain with TCAs is dose dependent and relative to the length of therapy. The greatest weight gain among TCA patients has been observed with those using either amitriptyline (Elavil®) or imipramine (Janimine®, Tofranil ®). Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) There are two categories of MAOIs: nonselective, irreversible MAOIs and reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase type A (RIMAs). The nonselective irreversible MAOIs cause weight gain similar to TCAs while the newer, selective MAOIs do not appear to have any effect on body weight. There is not much information available on the current use of MAOIs in clinical practice because they have some dangerous side effects and are used less frequently than other antidepressants. Nonselective, irreversible MAOIs include the following: Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) Phenelzine (Nardil®) Tranylcypromine (Parnate®) Selective reversible RIMAs include the following: Moclobemide (Manerix®) Toloxatone (Humoryl®) Other Antidepressants Other antidepressants that do not fall strictly under the classifications of SSRIs, TCAs, or MAOIs include the following: Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) Mitrazapine (Remeron®) Nefazadone (Serzone®) Trazadone (Desyrel®) Venlafaxine (Effexor®) Venlafaxine (Effexor®) has been shown to cause weight gain but not as severe as has been reported with the SSRIs paroxetine (Paxil®), fuoxetine (Prozac®), and sertraline (Zoloft®). Mitrazapine (Remeron®) has been associated with significant weight gain, possibly secondary to interactions with the histamine (H1) receptor. It is not associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, sexual dysfunction, or increased heart rate, as seen with the SSRIs. Trazadone (Desyrel®) is an antidepressant with sedative properties that is frequently used as a sleep aid as well as treatment for depression. It appears to cause less weight gain than amitriptyline (Elavil®) but more than buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®). There is currently no information available relating Nefazadone (Serzone®) to increased appetite or weight gain. Buproprion HCL (Wellbutrin®) has not been associated with weight gain and is commonly used with some success in smoking cessation. Anticonvulsants/Mood Stabilizers These drugs were initially used only for seizure disorders. The following anticonvulsants are now prescribed frequently in the treatment of bipolar disorder and other selected forms of depression: Carbamazepine (Tegretol®) Divalproex (Depakote®) Gabapentin (Neurontin®) Lamotrigine (Lamictal®) Topiramate (Topamax®) Anticonvulsants tend to cause hyperinsulinemia (elevated insulin in the blood) and increased appetite leading to weight gain. Hyperinsulinemia also results in increased testosterone, which causes a risk to women on these medications for development of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (POS). Polycystic ovary syndrome can cause weight gain, male pattern baldness, increased facial hair, skin tags, acne, infertility, high blood pressure, abnormal lipid levels, and heart disease. Seizure disorder studies showed that patients taking anticonvulsants who had either a normal or below normal body mass index had the most severe weight gain. Conventional Mood Stabilizers Mood stabilizers were commonly used before anticonvulsants were developed for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Mood stabilizers commonly prescribed consisted primarily of the following: Lithium (Cibalith-S®, Duralith®, Ekalith®, Eskalith CR®, Lithane®, Lithobid®, Lithonate®, Lithotabs®) Typically, one-third to two-thirds of the patients treated with Lithium gain weight. Of those, 25 percent gain enough weight to be classified as obese. Weight gain is dose dependent, but low doses of lithium (less than .8 mm/L) are often not therapeutic: therefore, low-dose lithium is usually not an alternative. Antipsychotics One of the most common reasons for noncompliance and discontinued use of antipsychotic medication is weight gain. The agent believed to be responsible for the increased food intake of patients taking antipsychotics is the serotonin blocker. Conventional anti-psychotics include the following: Haloperidol (Haldol®, Peridol®) Molindone (Moban®) Thioridazine (Apo-Thioridazine®, Mellaril®, Novo-Ridazine®, PMS-Thioridazine®) Newer antipsychotics, classified as atypical antipsychotics, include the following: Clozapine (Clozaril®) Olanzapine (Zyprexa®) Quetiapine (Seroquel®) Risperidone (Risperdal®) Sertindole (Serlect®) Ziprasidone (Seldox®) Haloperidol (Haldol®, Peridol®) is a conventional antipsychotic with a lower incidence of weight gain than the newer agents clozapine (Clozaril®), olanzapine (Zyprexa®), and sertindole (Serlect®). A retrospective study showed that clozapine (Clozaril®) and olanzapine (Zyprexa®) had the greatest associated weight gain, followed by intermediate weight gain with risperidone (Risperdal®). Patients treated with sertindole (Serlect®) had less weight gain than those treated with haloperidol. Another study linked clozapine (Clozaril®) to significant weight gain and lipid abnormalities, suggesting increased risk for diabetes. Among the conventional antipsychotics, thioridazine and chlorpromazine have greater potential for weight gain, while molindone (Moban®) is the only antipsychotic shown not to increase weight on a consistent basis. Studies show that antipsychotic agents have an effect on the reproductive hormones. Women receiving antipsychotics tended to display hyperprlactinemia and tended to be hypoestrogenic. Women with primary obesity did not have hyperprolactinemia and tended to have normal or elevated estradiol serum levels. These differences have pathogenic and therapeutic implications besides the effects on gonadal and adrenal steroids. Prolactin alone promotes appetite and insulin resistance that may underlie the excessive body weight observed in hyperprolactinemic conditions detected in both animal and clinical studies Answered by Rickey Lecroy 1 year ago.

Some do, some don't. I know Prozac has a high instance of weight gain, while things like Effexor and Zoloft do not. Answered by Lonnie Show 1 year ago.

rumors sometimes have a grain of truth. i suppose if you are depressed and less active you can gain weight,so that is why it is important to exercise when on anti depressents.even walking is good. Answered by Una Taybron 1 year ago.

yes I've been on the for 30 years and they will put the weight on so watch what you eat also you can ask the doc to switch your med's some are better than others for helping on the weight Answered by Cherryl Crumbley 1 year ago.

use the freezer to add some extra oomph to summer foods freeze grapes for some bite sized delights or get a popsicle mold and freeze some greek yogurt with berries Answered by Brant Huppenbauer 1 year ago.

try a pasta less spaghetti by mixing shredded zucchini veggie meatballs and raw tomato sauce seasoned with a dash of zesty oregano Answered by Maryjo Hutzler 1 year ago.

Certain ones can, and others dont. You just have to make it clear to your Dr. that you want something that doesnt interfere with your wieght. This wasnt in your question, but there are also some that interfere with your sex drive. Just thougt I'd mention that, you should ask your Dr. when he prescribes them to you.... Answered by Ling Rothfuss 1 year ago.

Social worker, Mayo clinic website , lung specialist and Internist, all say "Yes." Not that the antidepressants cause it, they stimulae the appetite Answered by Eloise Mangieri 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Augustine Eicke 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Lynne Vientos 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Nereida Raitz 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Arlinda Galkin 1 year ago.


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