Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018485/001.

Names and composition

"ISOPTIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018485/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
018593/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018593/002 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018593/003 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018485/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
018593/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018593/002 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018593/003 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018817/002 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018817/003 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/004 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
018925/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
019038/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
019152/001 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019152/002 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019152/003 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/001 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/002 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019614/003 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
019614/004 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020552/001 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020552/002 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020943/001 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
020943/002 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020943/003 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
070225/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070340/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070341/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070348/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070451/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070468/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070482/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070577/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070617/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070672/001 VERAPAMIL HCL VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
070695/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070696/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070697/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070737/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
070737/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070738/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070739/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070740/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070855/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070856/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070994/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070995/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071019/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071366/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071367/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071423/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071424/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071489/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071489/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071880/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071881/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071881/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072124/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
072125/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072233/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072751/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072799/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072888/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072922/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
072923/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072924/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073168/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073485/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073568/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
073568/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074330/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074587/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074587/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074587/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075072/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075072/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075136/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
075138/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075138/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075138/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
078306/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078306/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078306/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078906/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090529/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090529/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090529/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090700/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090700/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
200878/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
206173/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
206173/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG

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Answered questions

Which of the following is an example of drug duplication? a.aldactone and coreg b.Calan and Isoptin?
c. Coumadin and Zetia d. Dyazide and Vasotec Asked by Shanell Casada 1 year ago.

b) calan and isoptin both have verapamil, a calcium channel blocker. Answered by Monroe Strada 1 year ago.


How dangerous using Isoptin (Verapamil) 120mg a day for long periods?
I have a mild tachycardia and the physician priscribed Isoptin for me a half tab of 240mg a day he said that I can stay on that drug for a long time without notable side effects .... Is it safe to use it for months or years? Please help Asked by Beaulah Bobbit 1 year ago.

I cannot talk on other's behalf, I personally try to use this medication, for controlling of Acute supra venticular tachycardia. Once the patient is controlled, I advise it for a few days only. Next I switch the patient depending on nature and age in consideration, preferably to Beta blocker if indicated along with a blood thinner in some cases the respond to cardoraone and blood thinner and ACE inhibitors. It cannot be used as a permanant medication, due to too many side effects. This is personal opinion. God be with you. Answered by Kellie Sporcic 1 year ago.


Have been taking isoptin 240 sr for 7 years can it cause schamberg disease?
Asked by Gena Cushen 1 year ago.

I don't think so. it opens up arteries and makes BP better. from what I gather, schamberg is the opposite. stuff like this is usually hereditary. Answered by Eleonor Cuffy 1 year ago.


High BP 150/88 pulse 99 should i take 240mg of istoptin?
I am 57 years old. I used to take diovan but then it had side effect of chest and cough problems. so now i am changing to to Isoptin 240mg and esidrex i am in aplace that i do not trust the doctors... i need help to now will this meds help me ... Asked by Aundrea Darakjy 1 year ago.

Hi, The bp is a little higher than normal and so is the pulse. It appears that Verapamil (Isoptin) and Esidrex (hydrochlorothiazide) should bring down your blood pressure and pulse. You should take the dose the doctor prescribed so your blood pressure doesn't go sky high and cause a stroke. It is not up to you to decide the dose and if you try the lower dose, it may not work for you. It appears that just because you may have taken Diovan 80 mg doesn't mean that Verapamil at 80 mg works the same. Each medication has its own doses even though one medication has a higher dose. That is the way the medication is formulated. If you don't trust your doctor, you definitely need to change to another doctor. If you are seeing just a primary doctor, then you really should have a heart doctor. Your primary doctor can make a referral. My father has a regular doctor but also has a cardiologist and believe me, his regular doctor was going to take him off of some of his medication and his cardiologist said absolutely not. You can also invest in a blood pressure machine. Omron has one and so does Walgreen's. Don't use the finger or wrist blood pressure machines because I haven't found one that is accurate to my blood pressure readings. Having a blood pressure machine, you can test your blood pressure in the morning and late in the afternoon to see how effective your medicine is working on your blood pressure and pulse. I don't know if your cardiologist prescribed the medicine but you definitely need a specialist for the heart. Every doctor can't know about everything that is why we have specialists. Answered by Jetta Amedeo 1 year ago.

Your blood pressure is definitely high>140 so What's wrong with you? if you wanted to adjust the dosage by yourself why the hell you went to doctor? Don't mess with blood pressure and pules control drugs it can be very dangerous. Answered by Dena Dinger 1 year ago.

that is not a high bp your pulse is probably high due to excitement or nerves if you change the dosage make sure you speak with the dr. but it is not high your diastolic is low the systolic may be high though the top number. Answered by Andra Latos 1 year ago.


Is verapamil safe during early pregnancy 0-3 months?
i already read that stuff on webmd. thanks Asked by Vanda Mozie 1 year ago.

Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Its use in pregnancy has been limited though the experimental effects of verapamil on fetal heart. If your neurologist say that it is safe, then it must be. If you want to be sure, get a second opinion. Answered by Marquita Baisten 1 year ago.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Calista Lupo 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Viki Doucette 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Sharri Tinker 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Farah Muenzenberger 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Claudie Crouch 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Tomasa Nebesnik 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Bo Strine 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Mozella Tortorice 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Avery Wohlwendi 1 year ago.


Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure?
Does donating blood may reduce blood pressure? I thought to visit the local station run by Red Cross blood donation, it may help lower blood pressure I have heard that it supposedly helps in this and I also can help others who have more need of this blood. Asked by Angela Schelle 1 year ago.

have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some meditations, or herbs. Are there any plants or fruits which eating contributes to reducing blood pressure? Answered by Morgan Reynaga 1 year ago.

Other people have given a lot of good advice already. The first thing to do is to check your diet and lifestyle. Do this before even considering medication. If your doctor is recommending for you to pop a pill without even talking with you first about your lifestyle, you need to sit down with your doctor and have a frank conversation, letting him know this is not an acceptable approach. And consider switching doctors if he continues with this approach. Diet and Lifestyle: Make sure that you are eating a well-balanced and diverse diet, rich in fruits and vegetables, and make sure you're not eating too much salt. Get regular aerobic exercise. It doesn't need to be super vigorous. Regular, brisk walking every day, with slightly more vigorous exercise for at least 30 minutes a few days a week should be all you need. It really helps to be more active in your day-to-day activities too. Take the stairs instead of an elevator...make sure to stand up and move around every 15 minutes or so if you're sitting watching TV or working at a desk. Stretch, and practice your full range of motion too. Herbal Remedies: The herbal remedy that I know the most about is Hibiscus tea. Hibiscus tea is widely consumed as a beverage in a number of countries, and has been for hundreds of years, and it is completely safe and without any serious side effects (other than that it is very sour tasting, something some people object to). Hibiscus has been tested against several prescription blood pressure lowering medications, and has been found to be as effective as some of them. Hibiscus is a common ingredient in herbal teas If you go to the supermarket and read the ingredient list, you will find numerous herbal teas that have hibiscus tea as the main ingredient. Find one that you like the taste of, and drink a few cups a day, and see if that helps. STRESS! People often forget stress when talking about blood pressure. This is a huge issue. Stress hugely raises blood pressure. This means that worrying about blood pressure can in turn raise your blood pressure, by causing you stress. Relaxation exercises, meditation, breathing, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, and the like can be excellent for reducing stress. Affectionate touch, like cuddling, hugs, and the like can also be very good at lowering stress, whether it's with family, friends, or even a pet. Also, working through mental issues and troubling thoughts that are causing you stress can also be very helpful, and can in turn lower your blood pressure. You have many options. Try them all first. Medications can have serious side effects. Take them only as a last resort! And most importantly, stop worrying! Answered by Tomiko Pherigo 1 year ago.

Hawthorne (crataegus oxy.) is a known to lower blood pressure and regulate heartbeat. Coenzyme Q10/ubiquinone is also helpful for heart issues. Magnesium and potassium deficiencies can also contribute to the problem. Obesity, poor diet and excess sodium intake also play a role. There are different causes for high blood pressure, however conventional medicine only treats symptoms and doesn't address underlying causes. Not only do conventional drugs put you in a position of having to take higher and higher doses to acheive the same effect, but they also damage your kidneys and liver. You will end up taking more drugs for these problems too. Some people suffer from "white coat hypertension" -- their bp goes up the minute they see a doctor. You don't mention how severe your problem is. You can try to lose weight (if this is the issue), eat a diet lower in salt, sugar, starches, exercise more (or start walking at least if you're a couch potato). A holistic (whole person) approach to health would also examine any other physiological/psychological issues that you have, because it's unlikely that high bp and rapid pulse are your only issues... You can't lose if you also go to see a professional Homeopath or Naturopath. Answered by Dollie Luckenbaugh 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure? have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some... Answered by Penney Lapre 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Johnette Pasha 1 year ago.

high blood pressure is always stress and or just diet related. Cut out animal products and just eat raw fruit and vegetables as much as posible. Fruit juices and water. No processed foods at all best. Eat whole foods. Exercise a lot to speed up the transition and decrease the toxic build up of fatty acids on your artery walls that cause high blood pressure. This will change your life. Answered by Lisa Mikovec 1 year ago.

Hello, We used this program at John's Hopkins as a relaxation exercise for lowering blood pressure. You might try it as well. It is the Progressive Relaxation program at the link below. Do it every day 2 times a day. It usually works after about a week. Take care Answered by Nicolasa Plenskofski 1 year ago.

Take what you have been prescribed for now. Lose any excess weight, reduce salt and alcohol intake, get 1/2 hour proper exercise a day. Then as you make these lifestyle changes and your BP falls, your doctor will consider taking you off medication. Answered by Bertha Hockett 1 year ago.

First line management in conventional medicine is non-pharmacological: lose weight if overweight, exercise, stop smoking if you smoke, reduce alcohol consumption, eat healthily and reduce sodium intake (may help, studies are conflicting). If that does not reduce BP to a satisfactory level, anti-hypertensive medication is indicated. I understand you do not want to take the drugs you are prescribed but needs must. Poorly controlled high blood pressure is a major risk factor for developing a cardiovascular disease later down the line. Long -term you also risk kidney damage, eye damage and damage to your arteries as well as putting a strain on your heart which can lead to left ventricular hypertrophy. The higher your BP, the greater the health risk. AltMed has nothing to offer. Answered by Viola Koob 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Lesli Clauson 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Cherish Kuchler 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Sadie Hudgens 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Branden Oliveri 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Elroy Hostetler 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Naomi Striker 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Fermina Karen 1 year ago.


Which of the following is an example of drug duplication? a.aldactone and coreg b.Calan and Isoptin?
c. Coumadin and Zetia d. Dyazide and Vasotec Asked by Alvin Rogg 1 year ago.

b) calan and isoptin both have verapamil, a calcium channel blocker. Answered by Jani Sugarman 1 year ago.


How dangerous using Isoptin (Verapamil) 120mg a day for long periods?
I have a mild tachycardia and the physician priscribed Isoptin for me a half tab of 240mg a day he said that I can stay on that drug for a long time without notable side effects .... Is it safe to use it for months or years? Please help Asked by Conception Gillyard 1 year ago.

I cannot talk on other's behalf, I personally try to use this medication, for controlling of Acute supra venticular tachycardia. Once the patient is controlled, I advise it for a few days only. Next I switch the patient depending on nature and age in consideration, preferably to Beta blocker if indicated along with a blood thinner in some cases the respond to cardoraone and blood thinner and ACE inhibitors. It cannot be used as a permanant medication, due to too many side effects. This is personal opinion. God be with you. Answered by Kenny Huenergardt 1 year ago.


Have been taking isoptin 240 sr for 7 years can it cause schamberg disease?
Asked by Preston Laurange 1 year ago.

I don't think so. it opens up arteries and makes BP better. from what I gather, schamberg is the opposite. stuff like this is usually hereditary. Answered by Stephen Barrick 1 year ago.


High BP 150/88 pulse 99 should i take 240mg of istoptin?
I am 57 years old. I used to take diovan but then it had side effect of chest and cough problems. so now i am changing to to Isoptin 240mg and esidrex i am in aplace that i do not trust the doctors... i need help to now will this meds help me ... Asked by Sherika Magel 1 year ago.

Hi, The bp is a little higher than normal and so is the pulse. It appears that Verapamil (Isoptin) and Esidrex (hydrochlorothiazide) should bring down your blood pressure and pulse. You should take the dose the doctor prescribed so your blood pressure doesn't go sky high and cause a stroke. It is not up to you to decide the dose and if you try the lower dose, it may not work for you. It appears that just because you may have taken Diovan 80 mg doesn't mean that Verapamil at 80 mg works the same. Each medication has its own doses even though one medication has a higher dose. That is the way the medication is formulated. If you don't trust your doctor, you definitely need to change to another doctor. If you are seeing just a primary doctor, then you really should have a heart doctor. Your primary doctor can make a referral. My father has a regular doctor but also has a cardiologist and believe me, his regular doctor was going to take him off of some of his medication and his cardiologist said absolutely not. You can also invest in a blood pressure machine. Omron has one and so does Walgreen's. Don't use the finger or wrist blood pressure machines because I haven't found one that is accurate to my blood pressure readings. Having a blood pressure machine, you can test your blood pressure in the morning and late in the afternoon to see how effective your medicine is working on your blood pressure and pulse. I don't know if your cardiologist prescribed the medicine but you definitely need a specialist for the heart. Every doctor can't know about everything that is why we have specialists. Answered by Lane Ballew 1 year ago.

Your blood pressure is definitely high>140 so What's wrong with you? if you wanted to adjust the dosage by yourself why the hell you went to doctor? Don't mess with blood pressure and pules control drugs it can be very dangerous. Answered by Trena Kahl 1 year ago.

that is not a high bp your pulse is probably high due to excitement or nerves if you change the dosage make sure you speak with the dr. but it is not high your diastolic is low the systolic may be high though the top number. Answered by Sadye Caal 1 year ago.


Is verapamil safe during early pregnancy 0-3 months?
i already read that stuff on webmd. thanks Asked by Bobbye Evanosky 1 year ago.

Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Its use in pregnancy has been limited though the experimental effects of verapamil on fetal heart. If your neurologist say that it is safe, then it must be. If you want to be sure, get a second opinion. Answered by Gaynell Mcdougal 1 year ago.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Forrest Boehl 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Clark Trumbauer 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Kara Chamul 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Margery Malone 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Kandra Berrien 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Ardis Mickles 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Kimbra Lozey 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Margarita Guilbe 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Monika Demarino 1 year ago.


Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure?
Does donating blood may reduce blood pressure? I thought to visit the local station run by Red Cross blood donation, it may help lower blood pressure I have heard that it supposedly helps in this and I also can help others who have more need of this blood. Asked by Buena Niziolek 1 year ago.

have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some meditations, or herbs. Are there any plants or fruits which eating contributes to reducing blood pressure? Answered by Florentino Tagaloe 1 year ago.

Other people have given a lot of good advice already. The first thing to do is to check your diet and lifestyle. Do this before even considering medication. If your doctor is recommending for you to pop a pill without even talking with you first about your lifestyle, you need to sit down with your doctor and have a frank conversation, letting him know this is not an acceptable approach. And consider switching doctors if he continues with this approach. Diet and Lifestyle: Make sure that you are eating a well-balanced and diverse diet, rich in fruits and vegetables, and make sure you're not eating too much salt. Get regular aerobic exercise. It doesn't need to be super vigorous. Regular, brisk walking every day, with slightly more vigorous exercise for at least 30 minutes a few days a week should be all you need. It really helps to be more active in your day-to-day activities too. Take the stairs instead of an elevator...make sure to stand up and move around every 15 minutes or so if you're sitting watching TV or working at a desk. Stretch, and practice your full range of motion too. Herbal Remedies: The herbal remedy that I know the most about is Hibiscus tea. Hibiscus tea is widely consumed as a beverage in a number of countries, and has been for hundreds of years, and it is completely safe and without any serious side effects (other than that it is very sour tasting, something some people object to). Hibiscus has been tested against several prescription blood pressure lowering medications, and has been found to be as effective as some of them. Hibiscus is a common ingredient in herbal teas If you go to the supermarket and read the ingredient list, you will find numerous herbal teas that have hibiscus tea as the main ingredient. Find one that you like the taste of, and drink a few cups a day, and see if that helps. STRESS! People often forget stress when talking about blood pressure. This is a huge issue. Stress hugely raises blood pressure. This means that worrying about blood pressure can in turn raise your blood pressure, by causing you stress. Relaxation exercises, meditation, breathing, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, and the like can be excellent for reducing stress. Affectionate touch, like cuddling, hugs, and the like can also be very good at lowering stress, whether it's with family, friends, or even a pet. Also, working through mental issues and troubling thoughts that are causing you stress can also be very helpful, and can in turn lower your blood pressure. You have many options. Try them all first. Medications can have serious side effects. Take them only as a last resort! And most importantly, stop worrying! Answered by Jeanene Workowski 1 year ago.

Hawthorne (crataegus oxy.) is a known to lower blood pressure and regulate heartbeat. Coenzyme Q10/ubiquinone is also helpful for heart issues. Magnesium and potassium deficiencies can also contribute to the problem. Obesity, poor diet and excess sodium intake also play a role. There are different causes for high blood pressure, however conventional medicine only treats symptoms and doesn't address underlying causes. Not only do conventional drugs put you in a position of having to take higher and higher doses to acheive the same effect, but they also damage your kidneys and liver. You will end up taking more drugs for these problems too. Some people suffer from "white coat hypertension" -- their bp goes up the minute they see a doctor. You don't mention how severe your problem is. You can try to lose weight (if this is the issue), eat a diet lower in salt, sugar, starches, exercise more (or start walking at least if you're a couch potato). A holistic (whole person) approach to health would also examine any other physiological/psychological issues that you have, because it's unlikely that high bp and rapid pulse are your only issues... You can't lose if you also go to see a professional Homeopath or Naturopath. Answered by Sidney Kinnaman 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure? have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some... Answered by Ginger Navo 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Georgianna Bruski 1 year ago.

high blood pressure is always stress and or just diet related. Cut out animal products and just eat raw fruit and vegetables as much as posible. Fruit juices and water. No processed foods at all best. Eat whole foods. Exercise a lot to speed up the transition and decrease the toxic build up of fatty acids on your artery walls that cause high blood pressure. This will change your life. Answered by Dian Comeaux 1 year ago.

Hello, We used this program at John's Hopkins as a relaxation exercise for lowering blood pressure. You might try it as well. It is the Progressive Relaxation program at the link below. Do it every day 2 times a day. It usually works after about a week. Take care Answered by Claudine Perkey 1 year ago.

Take what you have been prescribed for now. Lose any excess weight, reduce salt and alcohol intake, get 1/2 hour proper exercise a day. Then as you make these lifestyle changes and your BP falls, your doctor will consider taking you off medication. Answered by Le Garsia 1 year ago.

First line management in conventional medicine is non-pharmacological: lose weight if overweight, exercise, stop smoking if you smoke, reduce alcohol consumption, eat healthily and reduce sodium intake (may help, studies are conflicting). If that does not reduce BP to a satisfactory level, anti-hypertensive medication is indicated. I understand you do not want to take the drugs you are prescribed but needs must. Poorly controlled high blood pressure is a major risk factor for developing a cardiovascular disease later down the line. Long -term you also risk kidney damage, eye damage and damage to your arteries as well as putting a strain on your heart which can lead to left ventricular hypertrophy. The higher your BP, the greater the health risk. AltMed has nothing to offer. Answered by Arie Allshouse 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Laurence Hausrath 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Pei Wiklund 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Jutta Hintz 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Juliann Enos 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Malisa Moradel 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Migdalia Whisenhunt 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Ruben Dauenhauer 1 year ago.


Which of the following is an example of drug duplication? a.aldactone and coreg b.Calan and Isoptin?
c. Coumadin and Zetia d. Dyazide and Vasotec Asked by Jill Zahourek 1 year ago.

b) calan and isoptin both have verapamil, a calcium channel blocker. Answered by Sabine Vanwormer 1 year ago.


How dangerous using Isoptin (Verapamil) 120mg a day for long periods?
I have a mild tachycardia and the physician priscribed Isoptin for me a half tab of 240mg a day he said that I can stay on that drug for a long time without notable side effects .... Is it safe to use it for months or years? Please help Asked by Mitch Stenslien 1 year ago.

I cannot talk on other's behalf, I personally try to use this medication, for controlling of Acute supra venticular tachycardia. Once the patient is controlled, I advise it for a few days only. Next I switch the patient depending on nature and age in consideration, preferably to Beta blocker if indicated along with a blood thinner in some cases the respond to cardoraone and blood thinner and ACE inhibitors. It cannot be used as a permanant medication, due to too many side effects. This is personal opinion. God be with you. Answered by Emily Bream 1 year ago.


Have been taking isoptin 240 sr for 7 years can it cause schamberg disease?
Asked by Deon Sellberg 1 year ago.

I don't think so. it opens up arteries and makes BP better. from what I gather, schamberg is the opposite. stuff like this is usually hereditary. Answered by Wendell Glatzel 1 year ago.


High BP 150/88 pulse 99 should i take 240mg of istoptin?
I am 57 years old. I used to take diovan but then it had side effect of chest and cough problems. so now i am changing to to Isoptin 240mg and esidrex i am in aplace that i do not trust the doctors... i need help to now will this meds help me ... Asked by Raymond Fensel 1 year ago.

Hi, The bp is a little higher than normal and so is the pulse. It appears that Verapamil (Isoptin) and Esidrex (hydrochlorothiazide) should bring down your blood pressure and pulse. You should take the dose the doctor prescribed so your blood pressure doesn't go sky high and cause a stroke. It is not up to you to decide the dose and if you try the lower dose, it may not work for you. It appears that just because you may have taken Diovan 80 mg doesn't mean that Verapamil at 80 mg works the same. Each medication has its own doses even though one medication has a higher dose. That is the way the medication is formulated. If you don't trust your doctor, you definitely need to change to another doctor. If you are seeing just a primary doctor, then you really should have a heart doctor. Your primary doctor can make a referral. My father has a regular doctor but also has a cardiologist and believe me, his regular doctor was going to take him off of some of his medication and his cardiologist said absolutely not. You can also invest in a blood pressure machine. Omron has one and so does Walgreen's. Don't use the finger or wrist blood pressure machines because I haven't found one that is accurate to my blood pressure readings. Having a blood pressure machine, you can test your blood pressure in the morning and late in the afternoon to see how effective your medicine is working on your blood pressure and pulse. I don't know if your cardiologist prescribed the medicine but you definitely need a specialist for the heart. Every doctor can't know about everything that is why we have specialists. Answered by Faviola Bretana 1 year ago.

Your blood pressure is definitely high>140 so What's wrong with you? if you wanted to adjust the dosage by yourself why the hell you went to doctor? Don't mess with blood pressure and pules control drugs it can be very dangerous. Answered by Rivka Ullman 1 year ago.

that is not a high bp your pulse is probably high due to excitement or nerves if you change the dosage make sure you speak with the dr. but it is not high your diastolic is low the systolic may be high though the top number. Answered by Jennie Klawinski 1 year ago.


Is verapamil safe during early pregnancy 0-3 months?
i already read that stuff on webmd. thanks Asked by Isidra Priem 1 year ago.

Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Its use in pregnancy has been limited though the experimental effects of verapamil on fetal heart. If your neurologist say that it is safe, then it must be. If you want to be sure, get a second opinion. Answered by Jarrod Rasnic 1 year ago.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Bethel Anselmi 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Granville Umnus 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Mika Perce 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Efren Moorehead 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Etta Swims 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Shoshana Culbertson 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Ignacio Wyles 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Candida Hyneman 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Demarcus Culbreath 1 year ago.


Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure?
Does donating blood may reduce blood pressure? I thought to visit the local station run by Red Cross blood donation, it may help lower blood pressure I have heard that it supposedly helps in this and I also can help others who have more need of this blood. Asked by Berenice Gockerell 1 year ago.

have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some meditations, or herbs. Are there any plants or fruits which eating contributes to reducing blood pressure? Answered by Erna Poss 1 year ago.

Other people have given a lot of good advice already. The first thing to do is to check your diet and lifestyle. Do this before even considering medication. If your doctor is recommending for you to pop a pill without even talking with you first about your lifestyle, you need to sit down with your doctor and have a frank conversation, letting him know this is not an acceptable approach. And consider switching doctors if he continues with this approach. Diet and Lifestyle: Make sure that you are eating a well-balanced and diverse diet, rich in fruits and vegetables, and make sure you're not eating too much salt. Get regular aerobic exercise. It doesn't need to be super vigorous. Regular, brisk walking every day, with slightly more vigorous exercise for at least 30 minutes a few days a week should be all you need. It really helps to be more active in your day-to-day activities too. Take the stairs instead of an elevator...make sure to stand up and move around every 15 minutes or so if you're sitting watching TV or working at a desk. Stretch, and practice your full range of motion too. Herbal Remedies: The herbal remedy that I know the most about is Hibiscus tea. Hibiscus tea is widely consumed as a beverage in a number of countries, and has been for hundreds of years, and it is completely safe and without any serious side effects (other than that it is very sour tasting, something some people object to). Hibiscus has been tested against several prescription blood pressure lowering medications, and has been found to be as effective as some of them. Hibiscus is a common ingredient in herbal teas If you go to the supermarket and read the ingredient list, you will find numerous herbal teas that have hibiscus tea as the main ingredient. Find one that you like the taste of, and drink a few cups a day, and see if that helps. STRESS! People often forget stress when talking about blood pressure. This is a huge issue. Stress hugely raises blood pressure. This means that worrying about blood pressure can in turn raise your blood pressure, by causing you stress. Relaxation exercises, meditation, breathing, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, and the like can be excellent for reducing stress. Affectionate touch, like cuddling, hugs, and the like can also be very good at lowering stress, whether it's with family, friends, or even a pet. Also, working through mental issues and troubling thoughts that are causing you stress can also be very helpful, and can in turn lower your blood pressure. You have many options. Try them all first. Medications can have serious side effects. Take them only as a last resort! And most importantly, stop worrying! Answered by Jen Brociner 1 year ago.

Hawthorne (crataegus oxy.) is a known to lower blood pressure and regulate heartbeat. Coenzyme Q10/ubiquinone is also helpful for heart issues. Magnesium and potassium deficiencies can also contribute to the problem. Obesity, poor diet and excess sodium intake also play a role. There are different causes for high blood pressure, however conventional medicine only treats symptoms and doesn't address underlying causes. Not only do conventional drugs put you in a position of having to take higher and higher doses to acheive the same effect, but they also damage your kidneys and liver. You will end up taking more drugs for these problems too. Some people suffer from "white coat hypertension" -- their bp goes up the minute they see a doctor. You don't mention how severe your problem is. You can try to lose weight (if this is the issue), eat a diet lower in salt, sugar, starches, exercise more (or start walking at least if you're a couch potato). A holistic (whole person) approach to health would also examine any other physiological/psychological issues that you have, because it's unlikely that high bp and rapid pulse are your only issues... You can't lose if you also go to see a professional Homeopath or Naturopath. Answered by Jaunita Schneiders 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure? have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some... Answered by Percy Charron 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Sunday Kieke 1 year ago.

high blood pressure is always stress and or just diet related. Cut out animal products and just eat raw fruit and vegetables as much as posible. Fruit juices and water. No processed foods at all best. Eat whole foods. Exercise a lot to speed up the transition and decrease the toxic build up of fatty acids on your artery walls that cause high blood pressure. This will change your life. Answered by Jesus Georgiana 1 year ago.

Hello, We used this program at John's Hopkins as a relaxation exercise for lowering blood pressure. You might try it as well. It is the Progressive Relaxation program at the link below. Do it every day 2 times a day. It usually works after about a week. Take care Answered by Broderick Prudencio 1 year ago.

Take what you have been prescribed for now. Lose any excess weight, reduce salt and alcohol intake, get 1/2 hour proper exercise a day. Then as you make these lifestyle changes and your BP falls, your doctor will consider taking you off medication. Answered by Moses Soeder 1 year ago.

First line management in conventional medicine is non-pharmacological: lose weight if overweight, exercise, stop smoking if you smoke, reduce alcohol consumption, eat healthily and reduce sodium intake (may help, studies are conflicting). If that does not reduce BP to a satisfactory level, anti-hypertensive medication is indicated. I understand you do not want to take the drugs you are prescribed but needs must. Poorly controlled high blood pressure is a major risk factor for developing a cardiovascular disease later down the line. Long -term you also risk kidney damage, eye damage and damage to your arteries as well as putting a strain on your heart which can lead to left ventricular hypertrophy. The higher your BP, the greater the health risk. AltMed has nothing to offer. Answered by Pearl Bergamo 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Monte Pfeffer 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Charita Nava 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Dewey Bernau 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Andreas Laidlaw 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Kyra Dupler 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Tracee Canchola 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Deanna Mcculloh 1 year ago.


Which of the following is an example of drug duplication? a.aldactone and coreg b.Calan and Isoptin?
c. Coumadin and Zetia d. Dyazide and Vasotec Asked by Ana Carmello 1 year ago.

b) calan and isoptin both have verapamil, a calcium channel blocker. Answered by Chelsey Herdman 1 year ago.


How dangerous using Isoptin (Verapamil) 120mg a day for long periods?
I have a mild tachycardia and the physician priscribed Isoptin for me a half tab of 240mg a day he said that I can stay on that drug for a long time without notable side effects .... Is it safe to use it for months or years? Please help Asked by Roosevelt Hastert 1 year ago.

I cannot talk on other's behalf, I personally try to use this medication, for controlling of Acute supra venticular tachycardia. Once the patient is controlled, I advise it for a few days only. Next I switch the patient depending on nature and age in consideration, preferably to Beta blocker if indicated along with a blood thinner in some cases the respond to cardoraone and blood thinner and ACE inhibitors. It cannot be used as a permanant medication, due to too many side effects. This is personal opinion. God be with you. Answered by Britni Dicola 1 year ago.


Have been taking isoptin 240 sr for 7 years can it cause schamberg disease?
Asked by Nedra Oeler 1 year ago.

I don't think so. it opens up arteries and makes BP better. from what I gather, schamberg is the opposite. stuff like this is usually hereditary. Answered by Daisy Mongelli 1 year ago.


High BP 150/88 pulse 99 should i take 240mg of istoptin?
I am 57 years old. I used to take diovan but then it had side effect of chest and cough problems. so now i am changing to to Isoptin 240mg and esidrex i am in aplace that i do not trust the doctors... i need help to now will this meds help me ... Asked by Loriann Crayne 1 year ago.

Hi, The bp is a little higher than normal and so is the pulse. It appears that Verapamil (Isoptin) and Esidrex (hydrochlorothiazide) should bring down your blood pressure and pulse. You should take the dose the doctor prescribed so your blood pressure doesn't go sky high and cause a stroke. It is not up to you to decide the dose and if you try the lower dose, it may not work for you. It appears that just because you may have taken Diovan 80 mg doesn't mean that Verapamil at 80 mg works the same. Each medication has its own doses even though one medication has a higher dose. That is the way the medication is formulated. If you don't trust your doctor, you definitely need to change to another doctor. If you are seeing just a primary doctor, then you really should have a heart doctor. Your primary doctor can make a referral. My father has a regular doctor but also has a cardiologist and believe me, his regular doctor was going to take him off of some of his medication and his cardiologist said absolutely not. You can also invest in a blood pressure machine. Omron has one and so does Walgreen's. Don't use the finger or wrist blood pressure machines because I haven't found one that is accurate to my blood pressure readings. Having a blood pressure machine, you can test your blood pressure in the morning and late in the afternoon to see how effective your medicine is working on your blood pressure and pulse. I don't know if your cardiologist prescribed the medicine but you definitely need a specialist for the heart. Every doctor can't know about everything that is why we have specialists. Answered by Julio Brozina 1 year ago.

Your blood pressure is definitely high>140 so What's wrong with you? if you wanted to adjust the dosage by yourself why the hell you went to doctor? Don't mess with blood pressure and pules control drugs it can be very dangerous. Answered by Idell Glackin 1 year ago.

that is not a high bp your pulse is probably high due to excitement or nerves if you change the dosage make sure you speak with the dr. but it is not high your diastolic is low the systolic may be high though the top number. Answered by Margherita Artis 1 year ago.


Is verapamil safe during early pregnancy 0-3 months?
i already read that stuff on webmd. thanks Asked by Jetta Calonne 1 year ago.

Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Its use in pregnancy has been limited though the experimental effects of verapamil on fetal heart. If your neurologist say that it is safe, then it must be. If you want to be sure, get a second opinion. Answered by Honey Devall 1 year ago.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Donald Gitlewski 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Coleman Ballinger 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Elizabet Gist 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Silva Loecken 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Lisandra Bedingfield 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Dell Lomba 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Afton Vaissiere 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Harley Manard 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Jannie Castiglia 1 year ago.


Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure?
Does donating blood may reduce blood pressure? I thought to visit the local station run by Red Cross blood donation, it may help lower blood pressure I have heard that it supposedly helps in this and I also can help others who have more need of this blood. Asked by Lynn Chrisp 1 year ago.

have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some meditations, or herbs. Are there any plants or fruits which eating contributes to reducing blood pressure? Answered by Joel Sandigo 1 year ago.

Other people have given a lot of good advice already. The first thing to do is to check your diet and lifestyle. Do this before even considering medication. If your doctor is recommending for you to pop a pill without even talking with you first about your lifestyle, you need to sit down with your doctor and have a frank conversation, letting him know this is not an acceptable approach. And consider switching doctors if he continues with this approach. Diet and Lifestyle: Make sure that you are eating a well-balanced and diverse diet, rich in fruits and vegetables, and make sure you're not eating too much salt. Get regular aerobic exercise. It doesn't need to be super vigorous. Regular, brisk walking every day, with slightly more vigorous exercise for at least 30 minutes a few days a week should be all you need. It really helps to be more active in your day-to-day activities too. Take the stairs instead of an elevator...make sure to stand up and move around every 15 minutes or so if you're sitting watching TV or working at a desk. Stretch, and practice your full range of motion too. Herbal Remedies: The herbal remedy that I know the most about is Hibiscus tea. Hibiscus tea is widely consumed as a beverage in a number of countries, and has been for hundreds of years, and it is completely safe and without any serious side effects (other than that it is very sour tasting, something some people object to). Hibiscus has been tested against several prescription blood pressure lowering medications, and has been found to be as effective as some of them. Hibiscus is a common ingredient in herbal teas If you go to the supermarket and read the ingredient list, you will find numerous herbal teas that have hibiscus tea as the main ingredient. Find one that you like the taste of, and drink a few cups a day, and see if that helps. STRESS! People often forget stress when talking about blood pressure. This is a huge issue. Stress hugely raises blood pressure. This means that worrying about blood pressure can in turn raise your blood pressure, by causing you stress. Relaxation exercises, meditation, breathing, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, and the like can be excellent for reducing stress. Affectionate touch, like cuddling, hugs, and the like can also be very good at lowering stress, whether it's with family, friends, or even a pet. Also, working through mental issues and troubling thoughts that are causing you stress can also be very helpful, and can in turn lower your blood pressure. You have many options. Try them all first. Medications can have serious side effects. Take them only as a last resort! And most importantly, stop worrying! Answered by Echo Devins 1 year ago.

Hawthorne (crataegus oxy.) is a known to lower blood pressure and regulate heartbeat. Coenzyme Q10/ubiquinone is also helpful for heart issues. Magnesium and potassium deficiencies can also contribute to the problem. Obesity, poor diet and excess sodium intake also play a role. There are different causes for high blood pressure, however conventional medicine only treats symptoms and doesn't address underlying causes. Not only do conventional drugs put you in a position of having to take higher and higher doses to acheive the same effect, but they also damage your kidneys and liver. You will end up taking more drugs for these problems too. Some people suffer from "white coat hypertension" -- their bp goes up the minute they see a doctor. You don't mention how severe your problem is. You can try to lose weight (if this is the issue), eat a diet lower in salt, sugar, starches, exercise more (or start walking at least if you're a couch potato). A holistic (whole person) approach to health would also examine any other physiological/psychological issues that you have, because it's unlikely that high bp and rapid pulse are your only issues... You can't lose if you also go to see a professional Homeopath or Naturopath. Answered by Jody Laroe 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does anyone know a good non-pharmacological way to reduce blood pressure? have high blood pressure and rapid pulse, my cardiologist prescribe me Isoptin , what the truth is a very small dose but I do not want to take it, because in the end I will have to take increasingly higher doses. I would like to know if there are any natural ways to lower blood pressure, some... Answered by Dorthy Penha 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Nenita Engles 1 year ago.

high blood pressure is always stress and or just diet related. Cut out animal products and just eat raw fruit and vegetables as much as posible. Fruit juices and water. No processed foods at all best. Eat whole foods. Exercise a lot to speed up the transition and decrease the toxic build up of fatty acids on your artery walls that cause high blood pressure. This will change your life. Answered by Gil Kwong 1 year ago.

Hello, We used this program at John's Hopkins as a relaxation exercise for lowering blood pressure. You might try it as well. It is the Progressive Relaxation program at the link below. Do it every day 2 times a day. It usually works after about a week. Take care Answered by Breanna Landor 1 year ago.

Take what you have been prescribed for now. Lose any excess weight, reduce salt and alcohol intake, get 1/2 hour proper exercise a day. Then as you make these lifestyle changes and your BP falls, your doctor will consider taking you off medication. Answered by Corrie Studniarz 1 year ago.

First line management in conventional medicine is non-pharmacological: lose weight if overweight, exercise, stop smoking if you smoke, reduce alcohol consumption, eat healthily and reduce sodium intake (may help, studies are conflicting). If that does not reduce BP to a satisfactory level, anti-hypertensive medication is indicated. I understand you do not want to take the drugs you are prescribed but needs must. Poorly controlled high blood pressure is a major risk factor for developing a cardiovascular disease later down the line. Long -term you also risk kidney damage, eye damage and damage to your arteries as well as putting a strain on your heart which can lead to left ventricular hypertrophy. The higher your BP, the greater the health risk. AltMed has nothing to offer. Answered by Eulalia Fleshner 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Argelia Rochon 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Caroyln Mohrmann 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Yuk Sweeney 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Winston Gibbings 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Eun Mcgovern 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Merle Formaggioni 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Bobbye Northway 1 year ago.


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