ISMELIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012329/001.

Names and composition

"ISMELIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012329/001 ISMELIN GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG SULFATE
012329/002 ISMELIN GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG SULFATE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012329/001 ISMELIN GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG SULFATE
012329/002 ISMELIN GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG SULFATE
086113/001 GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG SULFATE
086114/001 GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE GUANETHIDINE MONOSULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG SULFATE

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Answered questions

I found a pill called Ismelin.. what is it for?
This pill was found amongst other pharmaceuticals, in the possession of someone who would intend to abuse it. Does Ismelin (imprinted CIBA on one side, 3 on the other, small white pill) cause intoxicating effects? If so, what are they? Asked by Lashon Barkhurst 1 month ago.

Ismelin is an utterly obsolete medication for high blood pressure. It's so old that I don't even recall prescribing it... I didn't know that branded Ismelin was even produced anymore. One pill? That's not going to do anything much in terms of intoxicating effects. I don't recall that Ismelin had any major psychotropic activity, but it's been every bit of twenty years since I've heard the name, maybe more. Answered by Misti Gignac 1 month ago.

ISNELIN - is the brand name of Guanethidine. Guanethidine lowers blood pressure by decreasing the levels of certain chemicals in the blood. This allows your blood vessels (veins and arteries) to relax (widen). Guanethidine is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Guanethidine is also used to treat high blood pressure in the kidneys. Guanethidine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Guanethidine is available with a prescription under the brand name Ismelin. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. * Ismelin 10 mg--round, pale-yellow, scored tablets * Ismelin 25 mg--round, white, scored tablets Side effects of this medication are as under and you should stop taking guanethidine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately: * an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); * irregular heartbeats; * heart failure (shortness of breath, swelling of ankles or legs, sudden weight gain of 5 pounds or more); or * chest pain. Your pharmacist has additional information about guanethidine written for health professionals that you may read.- Answered by Laura Borstad 1 month ago.

Ismelin, guanethidine monosulfate USP, is an antihypertensive, available as tablets of 10 mg and 25 mg for oral administration. Each 10-mg and 25-mg tablet contains guanethidine monosulfate USP equivalent to 10 mg and 25 mg of guanethidine sulfate USP. Its chemical name is [2-(hexahydro-1(2H)-azocinyl)ethyl] guanidine sulfate 1:1. Guanethidine monosulfate USP is a white to off-white crystalline powder with a molecular weight of 296.38. It is very soluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol, and practically insoluble in chloroform. Inactive Ingredients: Calcium stearate, colloidal silicon dioxide D&C Yellow No. 10 (10-mg tablets), lactose, starch, stearic acid, and sucrose. Answered by Cheree Totosz 1 month ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Lovie Herd 1 month ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Jewell Phuong 1 month ago.


Why do mental health experts insist on hiding a patients illness behind meds?
Before taking Adderall, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * blood pressure medications; * a diuretic (water pill); * cold or allergy medicines (antihistamines); * acetazolamide (Diamox); * chlorpromazine (Thorazine); * ... Asked by Nathan Noens 1 month ago.

Adderall side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. * fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeats; * feeling light-headed, fainting; * increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure); or * tremor, restlessness, hallucinations, unusual behavior, or motor tics (muscle twitches). Less serious side effects may include: * headache or dizziness; * sleep problems (insomnia); * dry mouth or an unpleasant taste in your mouth; * diarrhea, constipation; * loss of appetite, weight loss; or * loss of interest in sex, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Answered by Ardella Buttray 1 month ago.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to amphetamine and dextroamphetamine or if you have: * heart disease or moderate to severe high blood pressure (hypertension); * arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries); * overactive thyroid; * glaucoma; * >> severe anxiety, tension, or agitation<< or * if you have a history of drug or alcohol addiction. Answered by Yvette Measheaw 1 month ago.

Before using Adderall, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: * a congenital heart defect; * high blood pressure; * heart failure, heart rhythm disorder, or recent heart attack; >> a personal or family history of mental illness, psychotic disorder, bipolar illness, depression, or suicide attempt<< epilepsy or other seizure disorder; or * tics (muscle twitches) or Tourette's syndrome. Answered by Steven Zayas 1 month ago.

Before taking Adderall, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * blood pressure medications; * a diuretic (water pill); * cold or allergy medicines (antihistamines); * acetazolamide (Diamox); * chlorpromazine (Thorazine); * ethosuximide (Zarontin); * guanethidine (Ismelin); * haloperidol (Haldol); * lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid); * methenamine (Hiprex, Mandelamine, Urex); * phenytoin (Dilantin), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); * propoxyphene (Darvon, Darvocet); * reserpine; * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer); or * antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Ascendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), or nortriptyline (Pamelor). Answered by Somer Rauda 1 month ago.

You are right. Psychiatric drugs are very dangerous, and "chemical imbalance" is a fraud. Psychiatrists claim that a person “needs” a drug to combat their “chemical imbalance” in the brain which is causing a person's “mental disorder”. However, the concept that a brain-based, chemical imbalance underlies mental illness is false. While popularized by heavy public marketing, it is simply psychiatric wishful thinking. As with all of psychiatry's disease models, it has been thoroughly discredited by researchers. Diabetes is a biochemical imbalance. However, as Harvard psychiatrist Joseph Glenmullen states, “the definitive test and biochemical imbalance is a high blood sugar balance level. Treatment in severe cases is insulin injections, which restore sugar balance. The symptoms clear and retest shows the blood sugar is normal. Nothing like a sodium imbalance or blood sugar imbalance exists for depression or any other psychiatric syndrome.” In 1996, psychiatrist David Kaiser said, “...modern psychiatry has yet to convincingly prove the genetic/biologic cause of any single mental illness...Patients [have] been diagnosed with ‘chemical imbalances’ despite the fact that no test exists to support such a claim, and...there is no real conception of what a correct chemical balance would look like.” Answered by Carroll Imada 1 month ago.

While some doctors may not fully understand a persons symptoms and quickly recommend a medication for treatment, they are not trying to hide anything. In fact, by treating a mental illness with a medication they are clearly indicating the presence of an illness and the need for psychotropic medication. Often times, a persons chemical imbalance prevents them from being able to see clearly and any other treatment would be useless. Once the medication has returned the brain to it's chemical balance, other treatment options can be considered. Answered by Salvador Whyman 1 month ago.

Mental disorders are chemical imbalances in the brain. Depending on the medication prescribed, it helps to levels out the chemicals that brain would normally produced on it's own. Experts don't hide the illness. They treat the illness with the necessary formulas of medications over a period of time and therapy is usually also recommended with the use of mental health medications. The eye doctor insists on contacts or glasses with bad eyesight and the physician insists on antibiotics for infections. Mental health is no different and in many cases it is inherited. Answered by Luana Burgun 1 month ago.

It's not hiding an illness, it is treating it. Many mental illnesses are caused by chemical imbalances in the brain and are best dealt with with medication. Therapy is also a recommended treatment for mental illness, it really helps having an unbiased individual to talk to. Answered by Lesa Orso 1 month ago.

Modern Western psychiatry is quite young compared to ancient wisdom healing traditions and ignores the spiritual and energetic aspects of the human journey. There is always some spiritual element to issues that psychiatry generally labels as 'psychopathology'. 'Transpersonal counselling' and 'energy work' are just two areas of therapy where an holistic perspective combines with new understandings from quantum physics. Answered by Chere Brightwell 1 month ago.

Actually, alot of the time the medication is in the person's head. Only think it's working because it's what a doctor gave them. They've been doing this for so long now and truthfully, it works. Answered by Latosha Polintan 1 month ago.

not all people have side effects from drugs. ANd most mental health experts recommend other forms of treatment besides drugs or in combination of drugs. Answered by Lyndsey Rouge 1 month ago.

to help the person with the illness have easier coping with the outside world instead of being treated any different from anyone else Answered by Derick Rohlack 1 month ago.

Because its unsafe to the patient and others to not be medicated with mental disorders. Answered by Bertie Nestel 1 month ago.

To recover faster! Answered by Mabelle Leclear 1 month ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Leora Schachterle 1 month ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Casandra Klemisch 1 month ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Maurita Bembi 1 month ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Berry Musumeci 1 month ago.


Can I take Ritalin with Phentermine at the same time?
Can I take Ritalin with Phentermine at the same time? Ritalin is a ADD med but I was wondering if I can take Phentermine at the same time? Help. Asked by Larry Suhr 1 month ago.

Before taking phentermine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: -medicines to treat high blood pressure; -insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth; -guanadrel (Hylorel), guanethidine (Ismelin); -antidepressants such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft); or antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with phentermine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Oneida Gilb 1 month ago.

I typed in Phentermine and Ritalin into a drug interaction checker and nothing came back--so you probably could take them both. Maybe tomorrow go ahead and call your Pharmacist to make sure, ok? Answered by Erin Veroeven 1 month ago.

Phentermine, a prescription medicine, is used as a weight loss aid, as it works on the brain’s satiety center. It works to reduce appetite and increase ANS activity. It can be used to reduce health risks which are often linked with obesity. It’s most effective when combined with healthy lifestyle changes, diet, and exercise. Answered by Yadira Collaco 1 month ago.

i wouldn't advise it Ritalin is pretty strong even at a low dosage Answered by Edelmira Ellithorpe 1 month ago.


My grandma has explosive diarrhea, what should she do?
Asked by Gaston Ruhn 1 month ago.

It depends. Is your grandma sick? Because it could be the bacteria or virus causing it. Or is she on any high blood pressure medications because this one drug Ismelin can have explosive diarrhea as a side effect. Answered by Latarsha Mccubrey 1 month ago.

Call a doctor immediately. It can be a very serious condition in elderly people if allowed to continue. Please seek medical advice. Answered by Vita Pruskowski 1 month ago.

It should pass it's probably something she ate, She should let it pass. Answered by Glynis Hasen 1 month ago.

You should have posted this in seniors, they know what to do. Answered by Sondra Klabunde 1 month ago.

sit on the crapper till it goes away Answered by Antione Arviso 1 month ago.


Does zoloft and flexrils have a bad interactions?
Asked by Berna Barncastle 1 month ago.

I tried drugs.com and found nothing as for the named drug flexrils. Check the spelling on it nevermind you should call a wlagreens or riteaid or cvs. They would know a bunch better then just anyone on yahoo answers. You don't know who is answering this thing.: ) Answered by Freddie Belschner 1 month ago.


I take Adderall, should I avoid blood thinners?
Since Adderall can cause high blood pressure, is aspirin,alcohol, anything that thins the blood a bad mix? I assume it could cause stroke er something.. Asked by Fermina Mcneill 1 month ago.

I take Adderall as well, but have not heard anything specific about avoiding things that might thin the blood. I looked up some information, and it basically lists the types of meds that you should let your doc know about before mixing w/ adderall. Next time you are at the pharmacy or at the doctor's office, ask them any specific questions about the medicine(s) you are taking, since they would know best. Before taking amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: · insulin or another medicine to treat diabetes; · guanethidine (Ismelin) or reserpine (Diutensin-R); · doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), prazosin (Minipress), or guanadrel(Hylorel); · a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine); · lithium (Lithobid, Lithonate, Eskalith, others); · haloperidol (Haldol); or · a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Asendin), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil), clomipramine (Anafranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), or desipramine (Norpramin). • You may not be able to take amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with amphetamine-dextroamphetamine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products. Answered by Lovetta Galves 1 month ago.

Is Adderall A Blood Thinner Answered by Parthenia Stall 1 month ago.

GOOD question. [ Worry not about those who make fun of your question - it is not a 'dumb' question at all.] Here's the MD - Hematologist answer. "Elizabeth" "Supernova" and "James T" have it right. "Blood thinner" is a misnomer - deceptive name. Anticoagulants such as heparin and coumadin inhibit blood clotting by interfering with the clotting proteins in the blood. There are 12 of these factors. More than you want to know. Drugs such as aspirin inhibit the function of platelets - - the small blood cells that often start the clot process. These agents do not decrease the number of platelets - - they decrease the function or "stickiness" (adhesion) of platelets so they no longer clump up and start clots. Answered by Ivory Herms 1 month ago.

What a great idea, as opposed to asking a licensed pharmicist, which are available 24 hours a day, and free to speak to, or asking a doctor, you have decided to take your medical advice from the general public. Outstanding choice. I say absolutely no, you should mix as many prescriptions as possible. If you start to feel funny, you are just not taking enough. Double your dose. Answered by Neely Guichard 1 month ago.

When you say blood thinners and dont mention warfarin sodium anywhere, you obviously dont mean real blood thinners. You should ask your aspirin question to a pharm. Answered by Karima Pronk 1 month ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Cassondra Higgons 1 month ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Rhiannon Nevels 1 month ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Anastacia Woltman 1 month ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Malik Gabhart 1 month ago.


Prescription Dexedrine use how it can effect my body and mind?
Ive been on 45 mg to 60 mg of dexedrine for a year. I dont feel any negetive effects only positive. I love the drug, I perform better on it and it has gotten my life back on track (no impulses that lead to legal problems etc.) I am paranoid on longterm effects because i can see it being a lifetime drug because it... Asked by Manual Offerman 1 month ago.

Ive been on 45 mg to 60 mg of dexedrine for a year. I dont feel any negetive effects only positive. I love the drug, I perform better on it and it has gotten my life back on track (no impulses that lead to legal problems etc.) I am paranoid on longterm effects because i can see it being a lifetime drug because it is that helpful. Online ive read horror stories but it is never specified at what dose, if it is meth or all amphetamines, how it is administered, etc. I take mine purily medically. what am I looking at health wise? And as for snorting it, small dose wise in the mornings, does that scientifically greatly increase, these ill effects (I believe it would but my friend swears by it, as i said I use it as it is perscribed purily curiousity)? But yea my main point is taking it as perscribed, for a year plus more, what effects can it have on me? Answered by Saundra Zanetti 1 month ago.

What are the possible side effects of dextroamphetamine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using dextroamphetamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeats; feeling light-headed, fainting; increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure); or tremor, restlessness, hallucinations, unusual behavior, or motor tics (muscle twitches). Less serious side effects may include: headache or dizziness; sleep problems (insomnia); dry mouth or an unpleasant taste in your mouth; diarrhea, constipation; loss of appetite, weight loss; or loss of interest in sex, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. What other drugs will affect dextroamphetamine? Before taking dextroamphetamine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: blood pressure medications; a diuretic (water pill); cold or allergy medicines (antihistamines); acetazolamide (Diamox); chlorpromazine (Thorazine); ethosuximide (Zarontin); guanethidine (Ismelin); haloperidol (Haldol); lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid); methenamine (Hiprex, Mandelamine, Urex); phenytoin (Dilantin), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); propoxyphene (Darvon, Darvocet); reserpine; sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer); or antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Ascendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), or nortriptyline (Pamelor). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with dextroamphetamine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor Answered by Renea Rehfeld 1 month ago.

Can you spell S P E E D? Answered by Lupe Carothers 1 month ago.

i would talk to your doctor about it. Answered by Adriene Stant 1 month ago.

Please contact me:[email protected] Thanks Answered by Carlita Glueckert 1 month ago.


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