Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010787/002.

Names and composition

"IRON DEXTRAN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of IRON DEXTRAN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010787/002 IRON DEXTRAN IRON DEXTRAN INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG IRON per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010787/002 IRON DEXTRAN IRON DEXTRAN INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG IRON per ML
017441/001 INFED IRON DEXTRAN INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG IRON per ML
017807/001 PROFERDEX IRON DEXTRAN INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG IRON per ML
040024/001 DEXFERRUM IRON DEXTRAN INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG IRON per ML

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Answered questions

Which of these steps are appropriate in the procedure for giving iron dextran injection (Imferon)?
Which of these steps are appropriate in the procedure for giving iron dextran injection (Imferon)? Asked by Genesis Argue 1 year ago.

THE Z-TRACK METHOD of I.M. injection prevents leakage of irritating and discoloring medications (such as iron dextran) into the subcutaneous tissue. It also may be used in elderly patients who have decreased muscle mass. Lateral displacement of the skin during the injection helps seal the drug in the muscle. When preparing to give a medication using this method, make sure the needle you're using is long enough to reach the muscle. As a rule, you'll need to use a 2-inch needle for a 200-lb (91-kg) patient, and a 1 1/4-inch to 1 1/2-inch needle for a 100-lb (45-kg) patient. Gather the equipment you'll need, verify the order on the patient's medication administration record (MAR) by checking it against the prescriber's order, wash your hands, and follow these steps: * Attach one needle to the syringe and draw up the prescribed medication. Remove the first needle and attach the second to prevent tracking the medication through the subcutaneous tissue as you insert the needle. * Confirm the patient's identity, explain the procedure, and provide privacy. * Place the patient in the lateral position, exposing the gluteal muscle to be used as the injection site. * Put on gloves and displace the skin laterally by pulling it away from the injection site. (See Figure 1.) * Clean an area on the upper outer quadrant of the patient's buttocks with an alcohol pad and let it dry. * Insert the needle into the muscle at a 90-degree angle and aspirate for blood return. (See Figure 2.) If none appears, inject the drug slowly. If blood appears, withdraw the needle and start the procedure over with a new syringe and needle at a different site. * Wait 10 seconds, withdraw the needle slowly, and release the displaced skin and subcutaneous tissue to seal the needle track. (See Figure 3.) Don't massage the site or let the patient wear a tightfitting garment over it because that could force the medication into subcutaneous tissue. Encourage him to walk or move about in bed to facilitate absorption of the drug from the injection site. * Discard the needle and syringe in an appropriate sharps container. * Remove and discard your gloves. Practice pointers * Never inject more than 5 ml of solution into a single site. If the patient needs repeated injections, alternate gluteal sites. * Intramuscular injections can cause elevated serum enzyme levels. If measuring enzyme levels is important, suggest that the prescriber switch to LV. administration and adjust dosages accordingly. * Document the injection: Record the medication, dosage, date, time, and site on the patient's MAR. Include the patient's response to the injected drug. Answered by Jeanice Deitrich 1 year ago.


What are iron infusions?
I have all the symptoms of iron deficiency anemia and I'm having a blood test ASAP, but I can't take pills for the life of me. Someone recommended iron infusions as an alternative - what are they? Asked by Foster Tumbaga 1 year ago.

* Iron dextran (trade names including Cosmofer, DexFerrum, Infed) * Iron sucrose (trade names including Venofer) * Iron carboxymaltose (trade name Ferinject) Iron poisoning may result in mortality or short-term and long-term morbidity. Answered by Justin Feth 1 year ago.

Iron can be given orally via tablets or a liquid. If for some reason a person cannot tolerate or absorb oral medications you can have 3 monthly iron infusions which is iron given intravenously (into the vein) over 30-60 minutes. You usually have to attend a daycentre/hospital to have this done. I suggest you wait for your blood test and try liquid preparations if required- infusions should be a last resort. Answered by Jordan Eckhart 1 year ago.


Iron deficiency anemics?
what is the name of a drip that's given to iron deficiency anemics? I know there's a shot also -- b12 but i'm wondering about the drip? what's it called? Asked by Isidra Tarte 1 year ago.

If iron deficiency anemia does not respond to oral treatments, it may be necessary to administer iron parenterally. The drip your referring to is called iron dextran. Its also known as Dexferrum and Infed. ***Iron Dextran may cause serious and possibly fatal allergic reactions. Only use Iron Dextran if oral iron therapy is not adequate or possible. Iron Dextran should be administered under close medical supervision where emergency treatment for a severe allergic reaction is available, if it should occur.*** Answered by Isaac Canney 1 year ago.

Sunsweet prune juice has 8% counseled daily fee of iron, so that's a competent plant-based source of iron. as properly, recuperating digestive well-being can help with absorption of nutrients. get exhilaration from 8oz daily! Answered by Lane Catozzi 1 year ago.


How did you feel after IV Iron Therapy?
I've asked this question a couple times, but haven't gotten many responses. I'm thinking it's cause the time of day I ask, most people are working. So I'm gonna try one last time...I'm 27 weeks pregnant, and have been put on IV Iron Theraphy once a week, for 4 weeks. Doc says I am... Asked by Huey Salano 1 year ago.

I've asked this question a couple times, but haven't gotten many responses. I'm thinking it's cause the time of day I ask, most people are working. So I'm gonna try one last time... I'm 27 weeks pregnant, and have been put on IV Iron Theraphy once a week, for 4 weeks. Doc says I am severely anemic. My levels are at 26, and my doc said they SHOULD be atleast 40. I've been feeling very dizzy, and sleep every chance I get. I'm a stay at home Mommy to a 3 year old daughter, so it's not easy. My heart starts beating really fast, and I feel like I am going to pass out. My doc said it could all be related. Anyway, I am having my first IV Iron session tomorrow morning. I have a lot of things to do after that, and then will be driving 5 hours to Miami for my Baby Shower with friends & family. How should I feel after? Will it make me sick? Or sleepy? Anything? Or should I feel really good after? Also, I know a lot of iron can also make you constipated. Will IV iron do the same thing? Answered by Rozella Daddabbo 1 year ago.

i've never had this but this is from the web Intravenous or Injected Iron In some cases, iron is administered through muscular injections or intravenously. Intravenous iron has the advantage of causing less gastrointestinal discomfort and inconvenience. It may be in the form of iron dextran (Dexferrum, InFed), sodium ferric gluconate complex in sucrose (Ferrlecit), or iron sucrose (Venofer). Ferrlecit or Venofer are proving to be at least equally effective and safer than iron dextran. Candidates. The injected or intravenous forms should be limited to the following patients with iron deficiency: People with iron deficiency anemia in whom oral therapy has clearly failed. Patients with bleeding disorders in which blood loss continues to exceed the rate at which oral iron is absorbed. In emergencies, when people need red blood cells but transfusion is not appropriate or available. In people with serious gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, who cannot take iron therapy by mouth. People undergoing hemodialysis who receive supplemental erythropoietin therapy. Sodium ferric gluconate complex in sucrose (Ferrlecit) or iron sucrose (Venofer) is specifically approved as first-line therapy for these patients. One 2003 study suggested that a combination of iron and vitamin C by mouth might be sufficient to maintain adequate iron and vitamin C stores. Certain patients, even if they meet these qualifications, may not be appropriate candidates or should be monitored closely for complications. They include: Patients with any underlying autoimmune disease. Malnourished patients who also have an underlying infection. Patients who are at risk for iron overload. Side Effects. Some side effects differ depending on how the iron is administered and include the following: Muscular injections include pain at the site. Intravenous administration can cause pain in the vein, flushing, and metallic taste, all of which are brief. For both methods, side effects and serious complications can include: Blood clots Fever Joint aches Headache Rashes A delayed reaction of joint and muscle aches, headache, and malaise occurs 1 - 2 days after the infusion (most commonly with iron dextran) in about 10% of patients. These symptoms respond quickly to NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, in most people. Iron toxicity. Symptoms include nausea, dizziness, and a sudden drop in blood pressure. Sodium ferric gluconate in sucrose (Ferrlecit) or iron sucrose (Venofer) may pose a lower risk for toxicity than iron dextran. Allergic reactions. Allergic reactions that occur with intravenous iron can be very serious and, in rare cases, even fatal. Iron dextran appears to pose a much higher risk than sodium ferric gluconate complex in sucrose or iron sucrose, although allergic reactions can also occur with the latter forms. Oral and injected iron should never be given at the same time. Intravenous iron therapy may be appropriate for some pregnant women who meet these requirements, depending on the pregnancy term and other factors. Answered by Marlen Munstermann 1 year ago.

I had my first iron infusion , very critical however as of feb 27th 2016, I feel great Dr. Haggarty at kaiser is awesome, I have a series of iron infusions, best take labs per two weeks after a cycle to per my MD. states andi shall do just that. I work within the medical field.I not ever offered this option although the surgeon which had given me a blood transfusion and other options which also terrific i was not intruduce to the iron infusion. I wake up energized and when tired i am NOToverly tired , since this is my first thus far i give it five stars ***** and state make sure you receive what is best for you! iron supplements do not absirb in my body well as many it does not. Why go years and years not feeling your best try it see the results for yourself some will be helpful others my not, but always remember its up to you to try something out to improve the quality of your life. overall. energized, mind body soul, muscles joints and yes I already had energy , but this is the real enegy plus which i should have out of many years i feel right now fabulous thankful to Dr. Haggarty of Santa Teresa Kaiser for giving options listening responding and really reaching out helping me . I recommend him ") in addition to what ever you would need know you will receive and start to smile knowing you taking care of yourself it feel absoul /great. In addition every thing about you feel new physically mentally you exhale. your mate will love the new energy and so will YOU Answered by Valeria Wildin 1 year ago.

Ferrlecit Side Effects Answered by Justa Fote 1 year ago.


When do iron pills start to work?
have anemia my hands are always cold, feeling cold all the time especially when i wake up, get sick alot more often and worse than people who dont have it. i plan on taking iron pills every day. but does anyone actually know when they start to work? like when can i start looking forward to waking up with a normal... Asked by Keneth Timmers 1 year ago.

have anemia my hands are always cold, feeling cold all the time especially when i wake up, get sick alot more often and worse than people who dont have it. i plan on taking iron pills every day. but does anyone actually know when they start to work? like when can i start looking forward to waking up with a normal body temp lol! does it have a cumlative affect or do the pills work right away and you can feel it right away?... thanks 15 minutes ago - 3 days left to answer. Answered by Danette Donchez 1 year ago.

What is your ferratin level -- if the doctor doesn't know, have him check specifically for this test. I had critical anemia for several years. I went through 2 different sets of treatments where I had IVs of iron dextran 2ce a week. The first time I saw my hematologist, he told me that had I dropped much lower my heart would have stopped. The constant anemia was due to an ulcer, and the iron pills aggravated it. I just could not take them. Get a shot of vitamin B12 to boost your energy, but get the full panel blood work up. I ended up bleeding to death when the paramedics took me in; the next day I got three liters of blood and medications to stop the internal bleeding. 5 days later they took out the ulcer and 1/3 of my stomach. No surgeon would touch me when I came in because the risk was too high. I had to go on the IVs again because now my stomach is too small to digest iron -- by the time is starts to digest it is in the small intestine on the way out. Right now, I'm on a really great high -- I haven't been anemic for 9 months! It appears my liver has taken over and is processing some of the overage I have of ferratin and keeping me normal. Anemia is nothing to sneeze at -- it can be deadly. The iron pills tore up my stomach more. You need an endoscopy to see what is in your stomach as well as a good hematologist to get you well. Let me know. Answered by Arron Mares 1 year ago.

I think it has a cumulative effect. You need to take enough to meet your body's current needs AND replenish your reserves, so one pill isn't likely to make you feel much better. About five years ago, I had a case of simultaneous B12 and Iron deficiencies, and it took me a few weeks of supplements before I started to be able to think clearly again (I was having a lot of problems with my memory and deductive thinking) and to be able to stay awake past five pm - then it was about two-three months before my Iron was back in the normal range and I actually had the energy levels of a normal person. It really depends on how low your iron is. If it's not too major I'd expect that you'd start to feel better within a week, and it'll a few weeks before you feel totally normal again. Answered by Ira Westmoreland 1 year ago.

It takes a few days for your body to start building up red blood cells and you start feeling a bit better...but it could take months before you are right again if your anemic....I take iron pills too, anemia sucks! Eat iron rich food and help yourself out! If you are vegetarian, quit it!! Meat is best for those of us with this condition. Answered by Jodie Laiben 1 year ago.


Health(iron defiiency)?
I am anemic and i was wondering what is the fastest way to increase my iron and how? Asked by Vernell Schellenberg 1 year ago.

The fastest way is to get whole blood pumped in, but this technique is used to treat severe cases and the ones who are bleeding heavily or have lost a great deal of blood. There are certain other instances where whole blood is invariably pumped in to spruce up the iron levels and thus the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Next in the line is a calculated Iron-Dextran infusion, which can be dangerous. In your case the iron stores would be necessitating replenishment by diet alone or combined with some iron supplements. Red meat supplies good amounts of iron and if you are vegge, then green leafy vegetables will help, which can be taken as soup, salad or as a cooked vegetable meal. Heme containing syrups are available in the market, which work faster than the normal syrups, capsules and tablets of iron. If you decide to take iron capsules, then they are to be taken regularly 2 to 3 times a day after meals (never on a empty stomach) and continued for at least 2 to 3 months after the haemoglobin content of your blood returns to normal. This extra duration is essential to replace the normal iron stores of your body as the stores would have also gone down requiring replacement. Answered by Raylene Freyman 1 year ago.

For fastest results I suggest all natural Iron Plus C Complex. A young friend of mine during the latter part of her pregnancy had very low iron. She ordered the Iron Plus C Complex and she started to see the difference right away in the form of more energy. At her next drs. appointment her iron was just fine and she continues to use the product since she tends to have a problem in general with her iron level. C is added for better iron absorption. Also, the iron used in this product is from plants and does not cause constipation. Hope this is useful and feel free to contact me with questions or if you would like to know the brand I'm referring to. Answered by Elana Sangha 1 year ago.

U can go to a drug store and pick up a bottle of iron supplements. Supposedly iron tabs are best taken with vitamin c (vit c activates iron to work) so if u find a tab with both that would be better. If u cant just drink a glass of orange juice with the iron tablet. Answered by Elmo Clibon 1 year ago.

Be careful what iron supplement that you choose because some of them cause constipation. There is one called slow fe that doesn't. Eat food that are rich in iron like nuts, leafy green vegetables, liver,beans,whole wheat bread, cream of wheat,blackstrap molasses,grapes and raisins are a few iron rich foods. Drinking orange juice will help the body absorb your iron supplement. Answered by Lizabeth Hannegan 1 year ago.

you can always take a supplement but the best way to increase your iron is by changing your diet... eat alot of fruits and veggies (the darker in color, the better). Red meat also has alot of iron... especially liver. Bon Appetit :) Answered by Carrie Jiang 1 year ago.

An organic liquid iron supplement is your best choice. Answered by Luetta Slaymaker 1 year ago.

eat more iron rich foods...you can get a list of them on almost any health website......and when you eat them drink orange juice with it cause the vitamin C helps with iron absorbtion Answered by Danille Fernstrom 1 year ago.


What is the best Iron pill to take when my Firritin Serum levels are low??
due to Hypothyrodism Asked by Susann Tlamka 1 year ago.

Usually ferrous sulphate in the oral form. Dextran iron (an injectable haematinic) can be prescribed in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia not resposive to oral iron therapy. If you are only mildly iron deficient you could just increase your intake of iron rich foods (particularly red meat). Vitamin C also aids in the absorption of iron. Maybe have a steak and a fresh fruit salad for dinner tonight! Answered by Louella Sinner 1 year ago.

I'm not a nutrition specialist, but I'd have to say one in which "iron" is on the label. Answered by Jay Bux 1 year ago.


Intravenous iron treatment?
I was diagnosed with severe anemia recently, my haemoglobin was 57 and the doctor did blood transfusion and afterwards started me on intravenous iron treatment (1100mg Iron dextran). I have been following this treatment now for 10 days straight and doc says my iron level is still very low. Going up by only 8.I... Asked by Elza Codere 1 year ago.

I was diagnosed with severe anemia recently, my haemoglobin was 57 and the doctor did blood transfusion and afterwards started me on intravenous iron treatment (1100mg Iron dextran). I have been following this treatment now for 10 days straight and doc says my iron level is still very low. Going up by only 8. I wanna know is it normal for my iron to still be this low and also what are the side effects of prolonged intravenous iron treatment? Answered by Felisa Cohenour 1 year ago.

Yes, as the previous person had stated, it appears that you have an issue in absorbing iron. Two things you can do to help iron absorption is to supplement with the protein Lysine...take approx 1000 mg per day and also supplement with vitamin C. I always prefer a natural source like Camu Camu powder which is the most potent natural source of Vitamin C. Another decent source if you cannot get that is Amla powder. These should be taken when attempting to increase your iron counts as it will help your body to retain the iron. Answered by Anjelica Kendrick 1 year ago.

It's not normal, that's why most people don't have to do it regularly. You seem to have an iron uptake issue, which I'm sure your doctor is, or soon will be, aware of. One of the first symptoms you'll probably notice is green poop, This is caused by extra high amounts of iron passing out of your body. Answered by Laveta Avelar 1 year ago.


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