IRESSA Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 021399/001.

Names and composition

"IRESSA" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GEFITINIB.
It belongs to the class Protein kinase inhibitors and is used in Antineoplastics (Cancer)

Answered questions

How effective IRESSA for spreaded lung cancer after chemo?
Shortly after chemo , my aunt's lung cancer spreaded to other part of her body, she is really weak and can't even sit up. Do you think take IRESSA can help her? I know IRESSA is a prescription drug,but my aunt is in china it is hard to get IRESSA there, I am in States how can I get some IRESSA for her?... Asked by Stevie Galipeau 3 months ago.

Shortly after chemo , my aunt's lung cancer spreaded to other part of her body, she is really weak and can't even sit up. Do you think take IRESSA can help her? I know IRESSA is a prescription drug,but my aunt is in china it is hard to get IRESSA there, I am in States how can I get some IRESSA for her? Thank you very much! Answered by Loida Mrozek 3 months ago.

they might't provide him chemo through fact of a broken leg? difficult smash and sorry to pay attention that SpaceMonkey. This sounds like a variety of terrible email forwards the place the 7 year previous no longer basically has lung maximum cancers yet in addition has a tumor from being overwhelmed on the top and however the little female has time to deliver out emails begging for money so the medical doctors can heal her, and however the medical doctors do no longer care adequate that somebody in her kinfolk beats her. Answered by Clay Barillas 3 months ago.

In some folks, Iressa, or gefitinib, can be a good drug for the treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Asians, women, and non-smokers, and adenocarcinoma with bronchioalveolar features in their cancers are the ones who will respond to it. In the U.S., Iressa is not approved for lung cancer patients unless you have already been on it or are getting it through a clinical trial. The one way you might be able to get it, would be to contact Astra Zeneca. Pharmaceutical companies usually have avenues to allow people to obtain drugs cheaply if they meet certain criteria. Answered by Nell Sadberry 3 months ago.


Any difference between the generic Gefitinib and IRESSA's in quality?
Hi, what is the difference between the generic Gefitinib and IRESSA's in quality? The generic Gefitinib are lot cheaper, but how about the quality? Thank you so much! Asked by Arlean Trochesset 3 months ago.

All I can find out is that the only difference between the two is the cost being less for the generic. Answered by Jule Lamance 3 months ago.


Side effects of iressa and whole brain radiation?
Asked by Maile Tiso 3 months ago.

Destruction of brain cells. Can cause loss of memory, seizures. Answered by Guy Nissila 3 months ago.


Can I get cheap / free anti-cancer Iressa?
My sister (60) got 6x5x5cm size lung adenosquamouscarcinoma and has had lobectomy operation. Part (1/2) of her left lung was took away successfuly. For the next, she must take 1 tablet Iressa every day for the rest of he life. The price of Iressa is very very very expensive for her and for me and all of my... Asked by Ursula Antila 3 months ago.

My sister (60) got 6x5x5cm size lung adenosquamouscarcinoma and has had lobectomy operation. Part (1/2) of her left lung was took away successfuly. For the next, she must take 1 tablet Iressa every day for the rest of he life. The price of Iressa is very very very expensive for her and for me and all of my sisters & brother who will support her. We can afford for some months, but after that is big question. Her life is no more than 1 year, said the doctors. Are there foundations or wise persons who can give me information about cheap ones or hopefully have unused excessive ones and will donate them? Thank you very much. Answered by Venus Wienecke 3 months ago.

Try the manufacturer. Answered by Darla Juluke 3 months ago.


Cancer medicine - Gefitinib for skin cancer?
Does anyone know if Gefitinib or ZD1839 is effective for treating skin cancer?My father was recently diagnose with undifferentiated perineural squamous cell carcinoma - it is a rare form of the more common squamous cell carcinoma and given a short time to live.We are trying ever possible angle. Any info... Asked by Peter Emmitt 3 months ago.

Does anyone know if Gefitinib or ZD1839 is effective for treating skin cancer? My father was recently diagnose with undifferentiated perineural squamous cell carcinoma - it is a rare form of the more common squamous cell carcinoma and given a short time to live. We are trying ever possible angle. Any info on this drug or any cancer drug and centers who specialize in this form of cancer would be greatly appreciated. Thank you! Answered by Sandie Dahler 3 months ago.

Most "common" epidermis melanoma therapies paintings best considering the fact that the "cancers" were not rally cancers in any respect. Others are caustic pastes that can kill the outside of the melanoma even as it invades deeper and will grow to be very hazardous. Traditional cure for epidermis melanoma could be very robust and useful. While mess around with melanoma? Answered by Bethanie Tricarico 3 months ago.

There is a 4-herb tea that is suppose to help naturally. It has cured many ailments including cancer. YOu can get more info on www.thenaturalyou.net. or you can contact me. Answered by Erwin Schmitmeyer 3 months ago.


Is Tarceva a safe cancer treatment? What are your experiences, or what have you heard?
My mother has lung cancer, and the doctor suggested this new drug that has been out for about 5 years called Tarceva. Is it safe? Have you heard any storys on it? Asked by Otto Fron 3 months ago.

My dad took Iressa which is very similar to Tarceva and it gave him a huge chunk of quality time. when, dealing with drugs to treat cancer none of them are "safe". However, the side effects from chemo are much worse. The only obvious side effect he had was skin rashes. Almost like adult acne. Of all the lung cancer treatments out there this is the most promising. Good luck to your mom, I wish you and your family the best. Answered by Chance Gemmill 3 months ago.

These are questions for her Dr. The decision to use any medication needs to be an informed decision. Your Dr is always in the best position to advise of the pros and cons in a particular case. For example, It was suggested that I use a particular form of chemotherapy. I was advised that this particular form increased my risk of certain cancers in 20 years time. This was balanced against the risk I could be dead within 5 years if I didn't use it. I decided to take the chemo and risk future cancers as at least it meant I had a future to get those cancers! Answered by Kim Perrier 3 months ago.


How effective is sorafenib 200 MG (organic name NEXAVAR) IN Malignant melanoma?
my father is 52 years old & has been diaognised with maligant melanoma ! doctors says that as liver is effected by the disease surgery will be of no use ! so they suggest for palliative treatment & started giving interferon to him & also ask us to arrange for new medicine SORAFENIB/NEXAVAR as it is not available in... Asked by Earlie Dreger 3 months ago.

my father is 52 years old & has been diaognised with maligant melanoma ! doctors says that as liver is effected by the disease surgery will be of no use ! so they suggest for palliative treatment & started giving interferon to him & also ask us to arrange for new medicine SORAFENIB/NEXAVAR as it is not available in INDIA & very costly too ?can some body tell us abt its effect specifically in melanoma ? & secondly any other possible, better treatment/medicine for this disease? pls reply early Answered by Jesse Eliszewski 3 months ago.

Sorafenib is a targeted drug therapy. It is a small molecular inhibitor of Raf kinase, PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor) and VEGF receptor kinase. Other current PDGR, VEGF and, EGFR inhibitor drugs such as Iressa, Tarceva and Avastin have provided some benefit to a select group of patients. These are pretty much anti-angiogenesis drugs. Most of these drugs have been approved for specific cancers Avastin for colon cancer, Iressa for long cancer, Nexavar for kidney cancer. However, these drugs are also used in clinical trials and off-label. Nexavar for melanoma would be off label. Again, the benefits shown so far have been limited for the approved cancers. So, there is little to no data collected for non-approved cancers. When these targeted therapies were designed, they had a rationale of their method of action and a disease location in mind. So, trying these drugs for other cancers is close to a total shot in the dark. I wish I had a better answer but, advanced melanoma is a very difficult to treat disease. From what I've read, there are very encouraging results in the treatment of melanoma from some clinical trials involving engineered vaccines. I know alot of the work is being done at NCI and JHU. I'm not sure if that can help you. Answered by Derick Koeller 3 months ago.

I'm sure you would receive a Moore actuate answer from a doctor. what do you think? Answered by Trena Huprich 3 months ago.


Any lung cancer survivers out there?
I have just been told recently by the doctors that I have non small cell lung cancer and am in the 3rd or 4th stage. I need some words of encouragement from people who have won the battle over this terrible cancer. Thank you in advance. Asked by Leslie Scercy 3 months ago.

My sister (non-smoker) was diagnosed in 2002 with stage 4 NSCLC. She never did chemo or radiation. She has done Iressa (which you can't get anymore), and that really helped her for about 31/2 years. She then tried Tarceva, which didn't help. She is now on a clinical trial where she takes 6 chemo pills daily. Her health has been very good. The docs told her she had a year to live almost 6 years ago. Find out exactly what kind of cancer you have, if it's spread, what treatment they recommend and what they expect the treatment to do. Get on the internet and research your cancer. That is the MOST important thing to do. Do not leave it all up to the doctors. Mostly they want you to do chemo and that's it. Try holistic methods. Change your eating habits - no sugar, because cancer loves sugar. Really - do a lot of research, and do NOT give up. Answered by Mariana Gironda 3 months ago.

From the moment we are dx'd, we are survivors. But I think you mean are there any survivors that have totally beat lung cancer and are now cancer free. Yes, there are more than you think. I have non small cell, if I listened to the dr's prognosis I would have been dead over a year ago. I was dx'd in May '06.. went thru chemo, it didn't work for me. I finished chemo 14 months ago and have had no further treatment. My cancer is stable right now.. my onc tells me its the natural treatments I am on that is helping me survive. There is a lot to be said of good nutrition.. we really are what we eat!! You can fight this.. I know of people who are now cancer free from lung cancer. If you ever need to talk, feel free to email me directly. Answered by Renea Nakhle 3 months ago.

I have not had lung cancer, but I want to give you some words of encouragement. Do NOT give up. Do NOT let the "statistics" run your life. I lost my dear father last year to pancreatic cancer. I should say he died WITH pancreatic cancer, not FROM it. He read too much on the Internet about how long he had to live, what was going to happen, etc. and let it go to his head. He gave up and basically lost his mind. PLEASE don't let that happen to you. Your body doesn't have an expiration date on it. No doctor can tell you when you will die. Your life's not in their hands. It's in God's hands. God bless you. Answered by Dia Helson 3 months ago.

Yes My Uncle had lung cancer really bad, because of smoking for all these years, and has been living now for about three years after he was diagnoesed and it cleared up really fast. God Bless, Emily :] Answered by Craig Lopaz 3 months ago.

i have not ever had long cancer but i hope that you overcome the disease i really hope you do! just keep fighting! Answered by Argentina Barban 3 months ago.


Anyone here have nsclc or know of anyone who has it? What treatments are you given for lung cancer?
has tarceva worked for any of you? Asked by Angelique Fouse 3 months ago.

My 60 year old sister has NSCLC, diagnosed in 2002. She never did chemo or radiation. She took the Iressa Pill, a chemo pill which helped her for a few years. She hasn't been on anything except clinical trials the past two years. She was told 3 weeks ago the cancer has spread to her brain. She is doing radiation for that, but now the Drs. think the cancer has gotten into her spinal fluid, and they say chemo may help, but she should get her affairs in order and that she probably has 6 months or less. She is a non-smoker. Answered by Wilfred Dininno 3 months ago.

I have nsclc. I was dx'd in May 06, did 6 rounds of Carboplatin & Paclitaxel, finished off the chemo in Dec. 06 and have had no further treatments. The chemo did not help me so I've been left to self treatments. Answered by Gino Kiyuna 3 months ago.

My husband was diagnosed March 20th 2006. He went through radiation, gamma knife procedure and took chemo for a short while. He also tried the tarceva but it was too late. Sadly he passed June 6th 2006. I do email a guy in India that is taking the tarceva But he is slowly losing ground. It worked for a while though. Answered by Cierra Hockley 3 months ago.

Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is defined by the following clinical stage groupings: T1, N2, M0 T2, N2, M0 T3, N1, M0 T3, N2, M0 Patients with clinical stage IIIA N2 disease have a 5-year survival rate of 10% to 15% overall; however, patients with bulky mediastinal involvement (i.e., visible on chest radiograph) have a 5-year survival rate of 2% to 5%. Depending on clinical circumstances, the principal forms of treatment that are considered for patients with stage IIIA NSCLC are radiation therapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and combinations of these modalities. Although most patients do not achieve a complete response to radiation therapy, a reproducible long-term survival benefit in 5% to 10% of patients treated with standard fractionation to 60 Gy occurs, and significant palliation often results. Patients with excellent performance status (PS) and those who require a thoracotomy to prove that a surgically unresectable tumor is present are most likely to benefit from radiation therapy.[1] Because of the poor long-term results, all patients with stage IIIA NSCLC are candidates for treatment on clinical trials. Trials examining fractionation schedules, brachytherapy, and combined modality approaches may lead to improvement in the control of this disease.[2] One prospective randomized clinical study showed that radiation therapy given as three daily fractions improved OS compared with radiation therapy given as one daily fraction.[3][Level of evidence: 1iiA] The addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy has been reported to improve survival in prospective clinical studies that have used modern cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens.[4,5,6,7] A meta-analysis of patient data from 11 randomized clinical trials showed that cisplatin-based combinations plus radiation therapy resulted in a 10% reduction in the risk of death compared with radiation therapy alone.[8] The optimal sequencing of modalities and schedule of drug administration is yet to be determined and is under study in ongoing clinical trials.[9] The use of preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) chemotherapy has been effective in 2 small randomized studies of a total of 120 patients with stage IIIA NSCLC.[10,11] In both studies, the 58 patients randomized to 3 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy before surgery had a median survival more than 3 times as long as patients treated with surgery but no chemotherapy. Two additional single-arm studies have evaluated either 2 to 4 cycles of combination chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy plus chest radiation therapy for 211 patients with histologically confirmed N2 stage IIIA NSCLC.[12] In these studies, 65% to 75% of patients had a resection of their cancers, and 27% to 28% of patients were alive 3 years later. These results are encouraging, and combined-modality therapy with neoadjuvant chemotherapy with surgery and/or chest radiation therapy should be considered for patients with good PS who have stage IIIA NSCLC. smoking can cause it....but i think u have to be a chain smoker for many years...a great website to go to is www.webmd.com...thats where i got the info.. i hope thta helped =) Answered by Adrianna Ortelli 3 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Antonietta Masten 3 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Yessenia Bizzard 3 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Norene Gassett 3 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Novella Lecourt 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021399/001 IRESSA GEFITINIB TABLET/ORAL 250MG
206995/001 IRESSA GEFITINIB TABLET/ORAL 250MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021399/001 IRESSA GEFITINIB TABLET/ORAL 250MG
206995/001 IRESSA GEFITINIB TABLET/ORAL 250MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
AstraZeneca UK Ltd

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved