Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018185/001.

Names and composition

"INDOCIN SR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of INDOMETHACIN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018185/001 INDOCIN SR INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016059/001 INDOCIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016059/002 INDOCIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017814/001 INDOCIN INDOMETHACIN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018185/001 INDOCIN SR INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018332/001 INDOCIN INDOMETHACIN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per 5ML
018690/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
018690/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
018730/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
018730/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
018806/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
018806/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
018829/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
018829/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
018851/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
018851/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
018858/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
018858/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
022536/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1MG BASE per VIAL
070067/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070068/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070266/001 INDO-LEMMON INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070267/001 INDO-LEMMON INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070326/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070327/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070353/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070354/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070487/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070488/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070529/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070530/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070592/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070624/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070635/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070651/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070673/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070674/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070719/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070756/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070782/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070784/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070785/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070813/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070900/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070900/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
071148/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
071149/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
071342/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
071343/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
071412/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per 5ML
071635/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
072410/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
072996/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
072997/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
073314/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 50MG
074464/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
076114/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
076666/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
076666/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
079175/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
090403/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
090403/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
091240/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
091240/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
091276/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
091276/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
091401/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
091401/002 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
091549/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
200529/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
201807/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
202139/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
202572/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
202706/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
203501/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
204243/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
204768/001 TIVORBEX INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
204768/002 TIVORBEX INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE/ORAL 40MG
204853/001 INDOMETHACIN INDOMETHACIN CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG

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Answered questions

Endocin &/or Azulphadin for Rheumatoid Arthritis? Comments?
I know someone who was cured from RA years ago. Endocin took the pain away in 2 days and after several months Azulphadin (or sp: Azulfadin) cured his disease. Anyone every hear of these medicines? Asked by Sharice Barie 1 year ago.

Indocin (generic name is indomethacin) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that reduces fever, pain and inflammation. Its been used for over 40 years as a anti-inflammatory. Indomethacin treats the pain, swelling and stiffness associated with arthritis, gout, bursitis or tendonitis. It is similar to ibuprofen (Motrin) and naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve), but stronger. Indomethacin works by reducing the production of prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are chemicals that the body uses to cause fever, pain and inflammation. Indomethacin blocks the enzymes that make prostaglandins (cyclooxygenase 1 and 2) and thereby reduces the levels of prostaglandins. As a result, fever, pain and inflammation are reduced. It is vaialble in a sustained (slow) release form (Indocin-SR). . The most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach discomfort, heartburn, rash, headache, dizziness and drowsiness. Indomethacin may cause or worsen stomach or intestinal bleeding or ulcers. It may lead to perforation of the intestine. Indomethacin also can increase blood pressure and decrease kidney function. Individuals who have nasal polyps or are allergic to aspirin or other NSAIDs should not use indomethacin because there is an increased risk of severe allergic reactions in these individuals. Because it can be hard on the stomach, it should be taken with food or immediately after meals to prevent stomach upset. Also consume a full glass (8 oz or 240 ml) of water unless your doctor directs you otherwise. Do not lie down for at least 30 minutes after taking this drug. Sustained release or long acting preparations must be swallowed whole. Azulfidine (Generic name: Sulfasalazine) is an anti-inflammatory medicine, primarily prescribed for the treatment ulcerative colitis . It is also used for RA as well. The most ommon side effects may include: abdominal pain, anemia, bluish skin, fever, headache, hives, inflammation of the mouth, itching, lack of appetite, nausea, rash, stomach distress, vomiting. Note: If you are sensitive to or have ever had an allergic reaction to Azulfidine, salicylates (aspirin), or other sulfa drugs, you should not take Azulfidine. Other possible issues: Men taking Azulfidine may experience temporary infertility and a low sperm count. Skin and urine may become yellow-orange in color while taking Azulfidine. In addition, prolonged exposure to the sun should be avoided. If Azulfidine is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Azulfidine with the following: Digoxin (Lanoxin) Folic acid (a B-complex vitamin) Methotrexate (Rheumatrex) Special information if you are pregnant or breastfeeding Regarding dosages for RA, the usual dose of Azulfidine EN-tabs for adults is 2 grams a day, divided into smaller doses. Your doctor may have you start with a lower dose, then raise the dosage to 3 grams after 12 weeks. For children aged 6 and older, the typical recommended daily dosage is 30 to 50 milligrams per 2.2 pounds of body weight, up to a maximum of 2 grams, taken in 2 equally divided doses. To reduce the chance of digestive side effects and other reactions, the doctor will probably start with a fraction of the typical dose and build up to it over a period of weeks. Children under 6 should not take this medicine. Answered by Many Manin 1 year ago.

Hi, I suggest u some Ayurvedic treatment from a good doctor. U can also take "Rumalaya forte" [ayurvedic] 2 tablets in the morning and 2 in the evening but be sure to maintain a gap of atleast 60 minutes in this and other medicines u might be taking. Apply Rumalaya gel. Do this for atleast 6 months without any break. U will surely benifit Answered by Fermina Terrel 1 year ago.


I need gout remedies, foods to avoid with gout, treatment for gout without drugs or doctor, and gout causes?
I have had gout for almost 3 years and gave up drinking because of it. And I have not had a gout attack in almost 3 years, until yesterday. Now I'm scratching my head wondering what has caused my gout to comeback. I didn't drink any alcohol. I'm looking for gout home remedies because I used to take the... Asked by Phoebe Lohn 1 year ago.

I have had gout for almost 3 years and gave up drinking because of it. And I have not had a gout attack in almost 3 years, until yesterday. Now I'm scratching my head wondering what has caused my gout to comeback. I didn't drink any alcohol. I'm looking for gout home remedies because I used to take the drug indomethacin for my gout relief, but that medication is so hard on the liver that I would rather look for a natural remedy. Any info is much appreciated. Answered by Jeneva Carrubba 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Alicia Mcardell 1 year ago.

Fellow gout sufferer here. There's a ton of people that get gout and just are not sure what to do. So here's my information that I've learned in 11 years of fighting gout, and I seem to be getting it under control. Best website I’ve found so far: www.best-gout-remedies.com. When a person gets gout, you need to help your body do two things: not produce extra uric acid, and do an excellent job of getting rid of uric acid. For gout attacks, indomethacine and/ or colchicine. You'll need scripts from your dr. for these. For the rest of your life, do these things: drink lots of water, 1 oz for every 2 lbs of body weight, each day. Once or twice a day, sip on 8 oz of water mixed with 1/2 tsp of baking soda. Helps the body be more alkaline (opposite of acidic) and get rid of uric acid. Take allopurinol every day. Very inexpensive and no side effects, you’ll need a script for this. Helps the body get rid of uric acid. Take celery seed pills. These may help the liver not to create so much uric acid. For diet, stay away from things that dehydrate the body, like beer and coffee. Don't eat organ meats, high fructose corn syrup. Avoid beer; red wine occasionally is ok. Eat lots of fruits and veggies, cottage cheese, sour cream, plain yogurt in smoothies mixed with orange juice and fruit. Drink fruit juices that are 100% juice, V8 VFusion is my favorite, it comes in many flavors. Look into probiotics. A person really should take these after any antibiotics from a doctor. The probiotics help the immune system in the intestines. Educate yourself on foods that are high in purines, avoid these foods as the body turns purines into uric acid. Good luck to you! Answered by Jolie Betzner 1 year ago.

i stole these answers from these websites. maybe they can help you out though! reasons: Hyperuricemia (high uric acid levels) is the primary risk factor for gout. Staying with a treatment plan may help keep your gout under control. The higher the level of uric acid in your blood, the more likely you are to have a painful flare. Maintain a healthy and well-balanced diet. Avoid alcohol, especially beer. Try to avoid foods that are high in purines, like certain types of meat, seafood, and even vegetables. Find out which specific foods are high in purines. Exercise regularly and maintain a healthy body weight. Lose weight if you are overweight, but do not go on quick-loss diets because they can actually increase uric acid levels in the blood. Take the medicines your health care provider has prescribed. Carefully follow instructions about how much medicine to take and when to take it. Tell your health care provider about any other medicines and vitamins you take, including natural or herbal supplements. He or she will know if any of them could be increasing your risk of gout attacks. Keep all your follow-up appointments with your health care provider and ask about monitoring your progress through measuring your levels of uric acid. Talk with your health care provider about other ways to help manage gout. What Causes Attacks? Although a gout flare may occur for no apparent reason, there are a few known causes, or triggers. These include: Stress or stressful events Joint injury Drinking too much alcohol Eating too much of certain foods Infection or another illness Surgery Crash diets Rapid lowering of uric acid levels with uric acid–lowering medicines Certain medicines known to raise serum uric acid levels Some cancer treatments Answered by Lucinda Carson 1 year ago.

Red wine, seafood and red meat tend to bring on flare ups of your gout. Some can go a while without their meds for the gout but don't think its ever really "cured". Its like a type of arthritis, but watch your diet and you can cut back on the meds if you are very careful with that. Answered by Erica Waldrep 1 year ago.

Gout.com Foods To Avoid Answered by Antony Howle 1 year ago.


What are some drugs that contain NSAIDs?
I just need like 5 different ones. Thanks! Asked by Dotty Sandborg 1 year ago.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs or NAIDs, are drugs with analgesic and antipyretic (fever-reducing) effects and which have, in higher doses, anti-inflammatory effects (reducing inflammation). The term "nonsteroidal" is used to distinguish these drugs from steroids, which (among a broad range of other effects) have a similar eicosanoid-depressing, anti-inflammatory action. As analgesics, NSAIDs are unusual in that they are non-narcotic. NSAIDs are sometimes also referred to as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents/analgesics (NSAIAs) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). The most prominent members of this group of drugs are aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen partly because they are available over-the-counter in many areas. Classification NSAIDs can be broadly classified based on their chemical structure. Propionic acid derivatives * Ibuprofen * Naproxen * Fenoprofen * Ketoprofen * Flurbiprofen * Oxaprozin Acetic acid derivatives * Indomethacin * Sulindac * Etodolac * Diclofenac (Safety alert by FDA) Enolic acid (Oxicam) derivatives * Piroxicam * Meloxicam * Tenoxicam * Droxicam * Lornoxicam * Isoxicam Fenamic acid derivatives * Mefenamic acid * Meclofenamic acid * Flufenamic acid * Tolfenamic acid Selective COX-2 inhibitors (Coxibs) * Celecoxib (FDA alert) * Rofecoxib (withdrawn from market) * Valdecoxib (withdrawn from market) * Parecoxib FDA withdrawn * Lumiracoxib TGA cancelled registration * Etoricoxib FDA withdrawn Answered by Angelina Gauld 1 year ago.

The main ones used: 1- Ibuprofen 2- Naproxen 3- Mefenamic acid 4- Ketoprofen 5- Diclofenac sodium or potassium Answered by Pura Roffman 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Mariko Rosica 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Yung Gardocki 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Joanie Matuszeski 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Kareem Scherf 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Loraine Rynerson 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by September Gattie 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Alva Lundie 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Jae Shamp 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Renato Schriner 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Barabara Defino 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Shavonne Tedrow 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Truman Taborda 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Rickie Gillenwater 1 year ago.


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