Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016796/001.

Names and composition

"INAPSINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DROPERIDOL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016796/001 INAPSINE DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016796/001 INAPSINE DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070992/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070993/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071645/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071750/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071754/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071755/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071941/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
071942/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
071981/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072018/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072019/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072020/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072021/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072123/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072272/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072335/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073520/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073521/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073523/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML

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A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Do antipsychotics lessen the effects of meth?
Since they both target the dopamine system in the brain I was thinking that they might interact. Asked by Russ Salyers 1 year ago.

In emergency situations involving methamphetamine or amphetamine toxicity (overdose) antipsychotics, typically high potent antipsychotics like Haldol (haloperidol), Inapsine (droperidol), or Zyprexa (olanzapine), which antagonize dopamine receptors to mitigate the excess dopamine produced from methamphetamine toxicity are commonly used. Multiple human and animal studies attest to the efficacy of droperidol and haloperidol in acute methamphetamine toxicity, olanzapine and other atypical antipsychotics are not as well studied. In addition benzodiazepines, particularly Ativan (lorazepam), Valium (diazepam), or Versed (midazolam) may be used to help calm a patient, to prevent seizure, and work with the antipsychotic to control a patients psychosis, agitation, and anxiety. In severe cases of toxicity Luminal (phenobarbital) may be required to control seizures (it also causes sedation, and other effects of drugs like Ativan and Valium). 5-10 mg of Haldol (haloperidol) with 2-4 mg of Ativan (lorazepam) are common combination used. However there are times when people take an antipsychotic and an amphetamine stimulant, including methamphetamine, for medical use without problems. When used appropriately both types of drugs (antipsychotics/dopamine antagonists and amphetamines) can be used together. Answered by Valda Lymaster 1 year ago.

They certainly will interact. It is interesting you ask this, to me, because I see now that they are advertising anti-psychotics for the use of depression. I am dismayed by this because the anti-psychotics have terrible side-effects. I was depressed and given anti-psychotics and suffered several life-threatening side-effects. Knowing a lot of people use meth, and that it will interact with the anti-psychotics they may be on, is disturbing to say the least. Good question. I hope you get some answers. And I hope people know what they are doing when they take anti-psychotics. Answered by Russell Brachman 1 year ago.

The effects of meth? Do you mean our bodies pathetic attempt to rid itself from this poison once ingested? If so , the first mucus membrane is the mouth resulting in the rotting of teeth from the roots on down. they do not lesson the effect one bit. That legacy is very real in it's physicality and loudly announces the cost this Sisyphean predicament exacts on the tweekers that imbibe. Answered by Gertrudis Warton 1 year ago.


What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Gerda Browing 1 year ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Anne Pozniak 1 year ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Branda Velazquez 1 year ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by Despina Genter 1 year ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Fernanda Malensek 1 year ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Milagro Bullivant 1 year ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Carrol Akemon 1 year ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Teri Weagel 1 year ago.

Masturbation is the system of bringing approximately a voluntary pleasure of the sexual facilities following mainly by means of the release of semen.Materbation is natural in younger guys,baby.The facet outcome of masterbation may be very harmful in long run if those turn out to be habbit is also Infertility,Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and lack of reminiscence.Unable to participate in any heavy bodily or intellectual paintings. Answered by Vena Saalfrank 1 year ago.


Strong "Fight or Flight" response with Endoscopy?
I have to have an upper endoscopy soon and had a horrible experience with my last one 10 years ago. I basically came off the table, and fell onto the floor, when they inserted the scope into the back of my throat. I remember being yelled at, picked up off the floor, and held down onto the table by a team of... Asked by Yan Boczar 1 year ago.

I have to have an upper endoscopy soon and had a horrible experience with my last one 10 years ago. I basically came off the table, and fell onto the floor, when they inserted the scope into the back of my throat. I remember being yelled at, picked up off the floor, and held down onto the table by a team of people, until they could further sedate me. In total, I was given 50 mcg of Fentanyl, 35 mg of Valium, and 1 cc of Inapsine. I'm terrified of having a repeat! I've tolerated other twilight sedation well, when I underwent IVF two different times. Are they using different medications for an endoscopy now or should I ask for a similar dose? Doesn't it seem like what they gave me was quite high? I'm 5'2 and was around 150 pounds at the time. Any other advice? Thanks! The report states: "The patient reacted quite strongly to the scope being advanced into the esophagus after having received significant premedication, and more medication was given up to the stated dose. The patient's reactivity suggests a very strong anxiety component or poor tolerance." Answered by Alisia Venture 1 year ago.

Maybe you had a paradoxical reaction to one of the medications. Paradoxical reactions are when the opposite of the expected effect of the medication is what happens to the patient. Although rare, they can happen. The drugs you were given were supposed to sedate you; maybe one of them you had the opposite reaction to, and that kept you from going to sleep normally. Perhaps that's why the other times you were sedated went OK; maybe they used a different combination of drugs. In any case, if you're concerned, talk to the doctor who will be doing it about the past endoscopy. They'll probably gladly work with you to make a plan to keep it from happening during their procedure. Answered by Katherina Yanetta 1 year ago.


What would a doctor perscribe for nausia?
Asked by Stacy Burner 1 year ago.

There are so many! Antivert Atarax Ativan Bonine Compazine Ginger Haldol Inapsine Phenadoz Phenergan Promethegan Reglan Thorazine Tigan Trilafon Vistaril Zofran Zofran and Haldol work extremely well from my experience - and ginger is a great natural remedy. Answered by Cathi Geist 1 year ago.

Minx (the answerer above is the best). If I had nausea I would get Pepto Bismol. Walmart or any drug store or grocery store should have it. I would ask myself if I ate something that might be better off coming out & as much as I would hate to throw up it is natures way of cleansing something toxic. Your first answered may have asked your Q. if you really just wanted names. Answered by Ghislaine Nickerson 1 year ago.

wow, the first poster gave you a pretty comprehensive list there ........ a nutritionally oriented physician would advice grating fresh ginger and steeping it in hot water for 10 minutes and drinking that .......... and would also check to see that you weren't simply dehydrated ....... dehydration will produce nausea and vomiting. peace baby ♥ Answered by Cordell Zaffino 1 year ago.


Why is my period purple?
so last week I shove a blue marker up there and I'm on my period now and everything is coming out purple... Like everything... and I was wondering if this maybe wouldn't have happened if I used a magic marker instead of a sharpie or what should I do. All in all I think it's really cool to see my... Asked by Beatriz Pigford 1 year ago.

so last week I shove a blue marker up there and I'm on my period now and everything is coming out purple... Like everything... and I was wondering if this maybe wouldn't have happened if I used a magic marker instead of a sharpie or what should I do. All in all I think it's really cool to see my favorite color every time I go to the restroom thou I think the janitors are getting suspicious of me because I like to stick the tampons into their buckets. Just wondering why my period is purple, thanks! Answered by Deneen Auyeung 1 year ago.

That is certainly a very unique scenario. I would recommend some of the following medications: Haldol, Serenace, Droleptan, and Inapsine. Answered by Carmel Yudell 1 year ago.

Blue and red make purple hahah :) Answered by Carly Pangallo 1 year ago.


Went in for endoscopy they gave me 2 injections what was the first one ?
one made me feel really dizzy and weird the other one made me sleepy . I was crying in the room so he said he would give me something to help me then i cant remember what he said after that thanks :] Asked by Mandie Garabedian 1 year ago.

It is hard to say- different physicians use different medications and, depending on the exact procedure along with any problems or issues would determine medication choices. However it is almost certain you were given a benzodiazepine likely either Versed (midazolam) or Valium (diazepam). Benzodiazepines are effective in providing a range of effects including anxiolysis (reduced anxiety), sedation, and amnesia (especially anterograde amnesia with some mild retrograde amnesia). The reason you don't remember things after you where given a medication is because of the anterograde amnesia. Anterograde amnesia means that amnesia (a loss of memory) occurs after an event. In this case the event was the administration of the drug so after the drug was given your ability to form memory was effected. Aside from the relaxing and sedating effects of benzodiazepines the amnesic effects are very useful for procedures because it helps a person forget the discomfort and unpleasantness of the procedure. Aside from benzodiazepines other medications are often used, often an opioid like meperidine or fentanyl is given to provide analgesia (pain relief). When an opioid and benzodiazepine are combined they have a synergistic effect enhancing the effect of each drug. Other drugs are sometimes used such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine), Phenergan (promethazine), or Inapsine (droperidol). These drugs reduce nausea/vomiting and are synergistic with opioids and benzodiazepines and thus enhance the effects of those types of medications. Answered by Rowena Crispell 1 year ago.

They did the same for me, they made fun and said it was a margarita to make me slightly sleepy,its to calm any nerves you have i think. Answered by Donna Cone 1 year ago.


What are the dangers of taking Zofran during the third trimester of pregnancy?
I was taking it before for hyperemesis gravidarum(severe nausea and vomiting),but I've gotten different answers from different drs. about whether it's ok in the 3rd trimester. I know the best thing to do is to stay away from most prescription drugs but I've been hospitalized for dehydration like 5 times... Asked by Marine Bologna 1 year ago.

I was taking it before for hyperemesis gravidarum(severe nausea and vomiting),but I've gotten different answers from different drs. about whether it's ok in the 3rd trimester. I know the best thing to do is to stay away from most prescription drugs but I've been hospitalized for dehydration like 5 times so far and this pill is the only thing that really helped me..has anyone else had HG during their 3rd trimester and how did they deal with it? Answered by Fidel Ouimette 1 year ago.

Zofran, also known as Ondansetron (HCl Dihydrate), is often prescribed for bouts of nausea and even severe morning sickness. However, the safety of this drug during pregnancy is not clearly established. In fact, some doctors would bypass it entirely just to be on the safe side. Ondansetron is not approved by the FDA to handle morning sickness. Unfortunately, there aren't any medications that have been established by the FDA to combat morning sickness. This does not mean that drugs are not dispensed anyway. Other prescribed medications apart from Zofran include Anergan, Dramamine, Benadryl, Compazine, Antivert, Phenergan, Inapsine, and Reglan. Hyperemesis gravidarum is a serious form of morning sickness that tends to result in severe dehydration and pH imbalances in the blood. If you feel your morning sickness is "out of control", seek medical attention. Answered by Liberty Stars 1 year ago.

Zofran Third Trimester Answered by Trevor Rasulo 1 year ago.

im not sure of the side affects of this tablet but when i was pregnant ihad to decide wheter to take an anti depressant i was prescribed at 34 weeks but was told due to possibility of side affects to my unborn baby such slowing of foetus growth, extra tiredness of newborn or the opposite unsettled newborn for first week or so. it was a tough decision even though the side affects werent life threatening to my baby. i decided at 36 weeks to start it as one doctor said to me when my baby was born she needed a healthy and happy mom to be there for her and this is what i needed to help me me a healthy mum. good luck Answered by Evonne Wesche 1 year ago.


What are some pills that a doctor might prescribe a person for having paranoia?
Asked by Karla Woullard 1 year ago.

Of course however you would need to be evaluated and get a proper diagnosis. Typically paranoia, when clinically significant (ie severe) is a symptom of disorders such as schizophrenia, major depressive disorder with psychosis, bipolar disorder, and many other psychiatric, neurological, and other disorders. If you can see a doctor, get a diagnosis, you can be appropriately treated (if that is required). It would be best to see a psychiatrist although a general practitioner may be a good first stop, especially to potentially rule out any physical problems that could be causing your paranoia. However paranoia without other symptoms is uncommon. Typically antipsychotics and in some cases anxiolytics (anti-anxiety) medications are typically used. Antipsychotics include: aripiprazole (Abilify) asenapine (Saphris) chlorpromazine (Thorazine) clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo) droperidol (Inapsine) fluphenazine (Prolixin) fluphenazine decanoate (Prolixin D) haloperidol (Haldol) haloperidol decanoate (Haldol D) iloperidone (Fanapt) Reserve loxapine (Loxitane) lurasidone (Latuda) olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zyprexa Zydis) olanzapine pamoate (Zyprexa Relprevv) paliperidone (Invega) paliperidone palmitate (Invega Sustenna) perphenazine (Trilafon) quetiapine (Seroquel) quetiapine (Seroquel XR) risperidone (Risperdal, Risperdal M-Tab) risperidone (Risperdal Consta) thioridazine (Mellaril) thiothixene (Navane) trifluoperazine (Stelazine) ziprasidone (Geodon) Anxiolytics include: alprazolam (Xanax, Xanax XR) chlordiazepoxide (Librium) clonazepam (Klonopin) clorazepate (Tranxene) diazepam (Valium) lorazepam (Ativan) oxazepam (Serax) Answered by Ouida Deputy 1 year ago.

The top drugs used to treat paranoid personality disorder symptoms are as follows: 1. Anti-anxiety medications: Anxiety causes the paranoid person to suspect others. Anxiety makes the paranoid person believe that the other person has some ulterior motive. This causes distrust. Anxiety also makes the patient display paranoid personality disorder symptoms like being on guard or being overly alert, and expecting someone to take undue advantage of them. Some anti-anxiety medications are benzodiazepines such as Xanax®, Librium®, Klonopin®, Valium®, and Ativan®. Benzodiazepines are used for relieving short-term severe anxiety like the anxiety that is exhibited when a person diagnosed with paranoid personality disorder comes across a stranger. Other anti-anxiety medications are Azapirones, Barbiturates, Hydroxyzine, and Pregabalin. These drugs should be taken strictly under medical supervision and with a prescription. 2. Antipsychotic medications: These medications prevent psychosis symptoms caused by paranoid personality disorder. People exhibiting paranoia have disordered thoughts and delusions due to excessive suspicion. These delusions cause suspicion and the cycle continues. The antipsychotic medication works as a tranquilizer and reduces the psychotic behavior caused by paranoia. Some of the antipsychotic medications used in the treatment of paranoid personality disorder are the first-generation antipsychotics such as butyrophenones, phenothiazines, and thiozanthenes. The second-generation medications that are found to have lower side effects are clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, zotepine, sertindole, amisulpride, quetiapine, and paliperidone. Aripiprazole and partial agonists of dopamine are some of the third-generation antipsychotics. 3. Antidepressants are the other class of medications used in the treatment of paranoid personality disorder. Excessive suspicion may lead to social isolation and depression. And in some cases, depression may cause paranoia. Antidepression medication helps improve the brain chemicals that transmit messages to the neurons. These are SSRI as discussed earlier, SNRIs (serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), noradrenergic specific serotonergic antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. These medications are used in paranoid personality disorder treatment only after conducting paranoid personality disorder tests that confirm the diagnosis. These paranoid personality disorder medications have several side effects like nausea, vomiting, headache, disrupted metabolism, and are not recommended for people with heart or lung diseases and kidney diseases. Further, the effects of the medication need to be monitored before changing the dosage. Answered by Vicky Francese 1 year ago.

I do not mean to be imply however your appearing like a dumbsh*t. (no offense of direction you dumbsh*t) however your fitting a drug addict. And honestly I suppose your grandmother is utterly badass doing what she does. Paranoid manner to thinking whatever, for your case abusing drugs... I believe the fact that you bought caught with f*cking Marijuana of all bloody matters crosses the road of Paranoia and Factual proof. And honestly, in the event you doubled your doses of medicine in your Acute Social anxiousness and you still suppose you had no outcome? What makes you believe taking a more robust treatment will help you? Perhaps you must try applying your self to do better in college. And in case your simply insecure socially, recall there is no have got to be. Each person is just a little bit insecure, but they conceal it. Should you show that your insecure then your letting men and women know it, by means of keeping your head and staying proper and powerful to yourself, no one would understand and that you could just hold going on along with your lifestyles.. If that doesn't work, then maybe you could have a intellectual situation (retardation,? Maybe not in view that you appear pretty rattling intelligent with this 7 paragraph essay right here.) Edit: Marijuana abusers trying to stop report irritability, sleeplessness, lowered appetite, anxiety, and drug craving, all of which make it difficult to quit. Ultimately smoking whatever will ultimately destroy your physique (the smoke on my own will eventually result in melanoma and you'll reach a factor when you need to stop, but you'll be able to in finding yourself too addicted.) Marijuana most often.. Did you get it from a trustworthy institute or did you get it from bloke on the avenue? What they DONT inform you is that the "Marijuana" you get is laced with toxic chemical compounds so as to get that person extra addicted. So despite the fact that it did support in some bizzare way (which for your case along with your intellectual , has a chance to even motive schitzophrenia with you) why would you continue to do it? I doubt your utilising the marijuana with a view to do higher in institution anyway. And btw, I learn all those web pages, and truthfully I refuse to take any seriousness toward a bloke who compares espresso to Pot. (to not point out I feel that Cigarettes should be unlawful additionally.) You are not able to deny the fact that "advantages" these medications will do for you're going to underweigh the dangers it may intent. Also, from what I read about you trying to sneak capsules, even supposing medicines did support you, i will imagine you overdosing. Then what would you do? Answered by Caitlyn Brignac 1 year ago.

A doctor might prescribe tranquilizers for paranoia but i wouldn't just take them without a doctors consent. Answered by Drusilla Guisbert 1 year ago.


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