ILOPERIDONE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 207231/001.

Names and composition

"ILOPERIDONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ILOPERIDONE.

Answered questions

Iloperidone is it officially approved? So where can I find the drug...?
I want to ask my doctor about it as I am looking into new meds. I just found this one online and the fact that it said superior to placebo stuck out to me. I read that it was approved in may 2009 but I have never heard of it before. Is this actually out as there does not seem to be a website? Thank you! Asked by Maris Henkhaus 4 months ago.

Superior to placebo, lol... Answered by Windy Vigorito 4 months ago.


Has anybody out there been on Fanapt (iloperidone) tablets to be used for bipolar disorder?
Not for schizophrenia Asked by Oda Thole 4 months ago.

Wow! Why many of your questions are so acute to drown all my beliefs, as strong tsunami ? Certainly for me it is also a good reason to build new thoughts and fresh thinking ... but how much they cost! The best whishes and thank you... Answered by Madalyn Jeanette 4 months ago.


I ran out of my anti-psychotic meds and I think I'm getting withdrawals?
I've only been on Fanapt for about a month, the pills I were taking came in sample boxes so I don't have a prescription. But they were working very well. If I go to a hospital, you think they'll just give me a prescription or something? And I am in the U.S. Asked by Antonia Hoffmeyer 4 months ago.

On Sunday I noticed I ran out of my Fanapt by taking the last one. Monday was a holiday so I couldn't call my psychiatrist..I didn't do it yesterday either, and I already had an appointment with him for this Friday. Should I wait? Today is day 2 without Fanapt and I feel really nauseous and jumpy and have twitched a bit. My chest kind of hurts, too. Are these because I stopped taking the Fanapt? Is it going to get worse?? What do I do? Answered by Cindi Bouie 4 months ago.

Iloperidone (Fanapt) is a pretty potent medication. It isn't a good idea to go for any period of time without your regular dose. I'd wager the symptoms you are having are related to withdrawal of some kind. I would advise that you call your psychiatrist's office and explain the situation, they should be able to arrange a prescription for you (at least they would in Australia, where I am). I'm unsure of how the laws work in the US (I assume you are American?) but in Australia your regular pharmacist can dispense a limited quantity of a regularly dispensed drug on an 'owed' prescription to get you by until you see your doctor. Failing all of these go to your local hospital or general practice. You are in a predicament and it would be incredibly ignorant and unethical of them to turn you away. Answered by Cherilyn Fearing 4 months ago.

Yes you should definitely call your doctors office, they can call in a prescription to a pharmacy for enough pills at least to get you through to the appointment. Normally a pharmacist would be able to give you a few pills just to tide you over, but it sounds like the doctor just gave you a box of samples rather than an actual prescription, in which case that option is out the door for legal reasons. These medications are probably because of being off the medication, and they may get worse, I would call the doctors office as soon as you can, I realize they are likely closed right now, but if you call most doctors offices even after hours they will have an answering service or a physician on call so you can deal with this sooner rather than later, I would advise doing that. Answered by Sharita Gleave 4 months ago.

You can ALWAYS call your psychiatrist, 365 days a year. That's what he/she is paid to do! Call your psychiatrist. He/she should have samples to get you through. If you still have an active prescription, the pharmacist will lend you some tablets from your next refill. Answered by Lamar Lowd 4 months ago.


I have voices in my head, can you help?
I have had voices in my head for about 3 years now, you know how you have your one internal voice, well mine split into two voices sometimes three. I am looking for a med that has help people in the past maybe from personal experence. I have been diagnosed with schizophrenia and I have had hallucinations,... Asked by Carletta Waldhoff 4 months ago.

I have had voices in my head for about 3 years now, you know how you have your one internal voice, well mine split into two voices sometimes three. I am looking for a med that has help people in the past maybe from personal experence. I have been diagnosed with schizophrenia and I have had hallucinations, dillusions, and many other symptoms but no med has worked wonders yet. Here are the meds I have been on risperdol risperdol consta abilify Haldol seroquel zyprexa invega geodon Do you have any suggestions that may help me out. I am open to natural methods to like herbs. Little help please, Thanks Much. MUCH LOVE! Answered by Nikki Shealey 4 months ago.

Have you tried the latest anti-psychotic "iloperidone"? It was approved by the FDA on May 9th, 2009. It has relatively minor side effects. Do consult a psychiatrist for a prescription. Answered by Maxwell Schor 4 months ago.

I have a friend who has schizophrenia and she is taking Lithium. I know how frustrating it is trying to find the one that will work for you. There are so many medications out there for this condition, you may want to be patient and see if your doctor will help you by finding the one that will work for you. Personally, since schizophrenia disorder is a serious disorder, I do not think herbs would be as helpful as medication would be. I had severe depression and spent a year with it until they finally found the medication that worked for me. I must have tried thousands of different ones. I am able to put that year behind me now, since they finally found the correct one for my system and I am now free of depression. Once again, as hard as I know it can be, try being patient until they find the one that will work for you. It will be worth it in the long run, once you get your normal life back. Good luck! Answered by Janie Jorgensen 4 months ago.

I can tell you that different medicines work for different people, meaning that one may not work for you whereas another does. I say keep searching for that one medicine to help you because from the list you've given, none of them are working if you still have the symptoms of schizophrenia. Actually, there is no absolute cure for said 'disease', just medication to silence it and control the outbursts. Answered by Cristina Barrack 4 months ago.

lol i can see your doing drugs,there little fella, hehe Answered by Robena Sansbury 4 months ago.


What are some pills that a doctor might prescribe a person for having paranoia?
Asked by Kayleigh Eilbeck 4 months ago.

Of course however you would need to be evaluated and get a proper diagnosis. Typically paranoia, when clinically significant (ie severe) is a symptom of disorders such as schizophrenia, major depressive disorder with psychosis, bipolar disorder, and many other psychiatric, neurological, and other disorders. If you can see a doctor, get a diagnosis, you can be appropriately treated (if that is required). It would be best to see a psychiatrist although a general practitioner may be a good first stop, especially to potentially rule out any physical problems that could be causing your paranoia. However paranoia without other symptoms is uncommon. Typically antipsychotics and in some cases anxiolytics (anti-anxiety) medications are typically used. Antipsychotics include: aripiprazole (Abilify) asenapine (Saphris) chlorpromazine (Thorazine) clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo) droperidol (Inapsine) fluphenazine (Prolixin) fluphenazine decanoate (Prolixin D) haloperidol (Haldol) haloperidol decanoate (Haldol D) iloperidone (Fanapt) Reserve loxapine (Loxitane) lurasidone (Latuda) olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zyprexa Zydis) olanzapine pamoate (Zyprexa Relprevv) paliperidone (Invega) paliperidone palmitate (Invega Sustenna) perphenazine (Trilafon) quetiapine (Seroquel) quetiapine (Seroquel XR) risperidone (Risperdal, Risperdal M-Tab) risperidone (Risperdal Consta) thioridazine (Mellaril) thiothixene (Navane) trifluoperazine (Stelazine) ziprasidone (Geodon) Anxiolytics include: alprazolam (Xanax, Xanax XR) chlordiazepoxide (Librium) clonazepam (Klonopin) clorazepate (Tranxene) diazepam (Valium) lorazepam (Ativan) oxazepam (Serax) Answered by Un Brentley 4 months ago.

The top drugs used to treat paranoid personality disorder symptoms are as follows: 1. Anti-anxiety medications: Anxiety causes the paranoid person to suspect others. Anxiety makes the paranoid person believe that the other person has some ulterior motive. This causes distrust. Anxiety also makes the patient display paranoid personality disorder symptoms like being on guard or being overly alert, and expecting someone to take undue advantage of them. Some anti-anxiety medications are benzodiazepines such as Xanax®, Librium®, Klonopin®, Valium®, and Ativan®. Benzodiazepines are used for relieving short-term severe anxiety like the anxiety that is exhibited when a person diagnosed with paranoid personality disorder comes across a stranger. Other anti-anxiety medications are Azapirones, Barbiturates, Hydroxyzine, and Pregabalin. These drugs should be taken strictly under medical supervision and with a prescription. 2. Antipsychotic medications: These medications prevent psychosis symptoms caused by paranoid personality disorder. People exhibiting paranoia have disordered thoughts and delusions due to excessive suspicion. These delusions cause suspicion and the cycle continues. The antipsychotic medication works as a tranquilizer and reduces the psychotic behavior caused by paranoia. Some of the antipsychotic medications used in the treatment of paranoid personality disorder are the first-generation antipsychotics such as butyrophenones, phenothiazines, and thiozanthenes. The second-generation medications that are found to have lower side effects are clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, zotepine, sertindole, amisulpride, quetiapine, and paliperidone. Aripiprazole and partial agonists of dopamine are some of the third-generation antipsychotics. 3. Antidepressants are the other class of medications used in the treatment of paranoid personality disorder. Excessive suspicion may lead to social isolation and depression. And in some cases, depression may cause paranoia. Antidepression medication helps improve the brain chemicals that transmit messages to the neurons. These are SSRI as discussed earlier, SNRIs (serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), noradrenergic specific serotonergic antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. These medications are used in paranoid personality disorder treatment only after conducting paranoid personality disorder tests that confirm the diagnosis. These paranoid personality disorder medications have several side effects like nausea, vomiting, headache, disrupted metabolism, and are not recommended for people with heart or lung diseases and kidney diseases. Further, the effects of the medication need to be monitored before changing the dosage. Answered by Alva Warlick 4 months ago.

I do not mean to be imply however your appearing like a dumbsh*t. (no offense of direction you dumbsh*t) however your fitting a drug addict. And honestly I suppose your grandmother is utterly badass doing what she does. Paranoid manner to thinking whatever, for your case abusing drugs... I believe the fact that you bought caught with f*cking Marijuana of all bloody matters crosses the road of Paranoia and Factual proof. And honestly, in the event you doubled your doses of medicine in your Acute Social anxiousness and you still suppose you had no outcome? What makes you believe taking a more robust treatment will help you? Perhaps you must try applying your self to do better in college. And in case your simply insecure socially, recall there is no have got to be. Each person is just a little bit insecure, but they conceal it. Should you show that your insecure then your letting men and women know it, by means of keeping your head and staying proper and powerful to yourself, no one would understand and that you could just hold going on along with your lifestyles.. If that doesn't work, then maybe you could have a intellectual situation (retardation,? Maybe not in view that you appear pretty rattling intelligent with this 7 paragraph essay right here.) Edit: Marijuana abusers trying to stop report irritability, sleeplessness, lowered appetite, anxiety, and drug craving, all of which make it difficult to quit. Ultimately smoking whatever will ultimately destroy your physique (the smoke on my own will eventually result in melanoma and you'll reach a factor when you need to stop, but you'll be able to in finding yourself too addicted.) Marijuana most often.. Did you get it from a trustworthy institute or did you get it from bloke on the avenue? What they DONT inform you is that the "Marijuana" you get is laced with toxic chemical compounds so as to get that person extra addicted. So despite the fact that it did support in some bizzare way (which for your case along with your intellectual , has a chance to even motive schitzophrenia with you) why would you continue to do it? I doubt your utilising the marijuana with a view to do higher in institution anyway. And btw, I learn all those web pages, and truthfully I refuse to take any seriousness toward a bloke who compares espresso to Pot. (to not point out I feel that Cigarettes should be unlawful additionally.) You are not able to deny the fact that "advantages" these medications will do for you're going to underweigh the dangers it may intent. Also, from what I read about you trying to sneak capsules, even supposing medicines did support you, i will imagine you overdosing. Then what would you do? Answered by Ahmad Kronk 4 months ago.

A doctor might prescribe tranquilizers for paranoia but i wouldn't just take them without a doctors consent. Answered by Gina Loughran 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
207231/001 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
207231/002 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
207231/003 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
207231/004 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
207231/005 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
207231/006 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
207231/007 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 12MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
022192/001 FANAPT ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
022192/002 FANAPT ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
022192/003 FANAPT ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
022192/004 FANAPT ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
022192/005 FANAPT ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
022192/006 FANAPT ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
022192/007 FANAPT ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 12MG
207231/001 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
207231/002 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
207231/003 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
207231/004 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
207231/005 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
207231/006 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
207231/007 ILOPERIDONE ILOPERIDONE TABLET/ORAL 12MG

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