Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018104/001.

Names and composition

"HYLOREL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GUANADREL SULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018104/001 HYLOREL GUANADREL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
018104/002 HYLOREL GUANADREL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 25MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018104/001 HYLOREL GUANADREL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
018104/002 HYLOREL GUANADREL SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 25MG

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Answered questions

Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Opal Ceasar 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Brock Raker 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Aileen Aukes 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Demetrice Ducceschi 1 year ago.


Can I take Ritalin with Phentermine at the same time?
Can I take Ritalin with Phentermine at the same time? Ritalin is a ADD med but I was wondering if I can take Phentermine at the same time? Help. Asked by Sallie Clontz 1 year ago.

Before taking phentermine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: -medicines to treat high blood pressure; -insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth; -guanadrel (Hylorel), guanethidine (Ismelin); -antidepressants such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft); or antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with phentermine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Megan Burgert 1 year ago.

I typed in Phentermine and Ritalin into a drug interaction checker and nothing came back--so you probably could take them both. Maybe tomorrow go ahead and call your Pharmacist to make sure, ok? Answered by Bunny Raucci 1 year ago.

Phentermine, a prescription medicine, is used as a weight loss aid, as it works on the brain’s satiety center. It works to reduce appetite and increase ANS activity. It can be used to reduce health risks which are often linked with obesity. It’s most effective when combined with healthy lifestyle changes, diet, and exercise. Answered by Dallas Somers 1 year ago.

i wouldn't advise it Ritalin is pretty strong even at a low dosage Answered by Adan Zagrodnik 1 year ago.


I take Adderall, should I avoid blood thinners?
Since Adderall can cause high blood pressure, is aspirin,alcohol, anything that thins the blood a bad mix? I assume it could cause stroke er something.. Asked by Francina Rofkahr 1 year ago.

I take Adderall as well, but have not heard anything specific about avoiding things that might thin the blood. I looked up some information, and it basically lists the types of meds that you should let your doc know about before mixing w/ adderall. Next time you are at the pharmacy or at the doctor's office, ask them any specific questions about the medicine(s) you are taking, since they would know best. Before taking amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: · insulin or another medicine to treat diabetes; · guanethidine (Ismelin) or reserpine (Diutensin-R); · doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), prazosin (Minipress), or guanadrel(Hylorel); · a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine); · lithium (Lithobid, Lithonate, Eskalith, others); · haloperidol (Haldol); or · a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Asendin), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil), clomipramine (Anafranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), or desipramine (Norpramin). • You may not be able to take amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with amphetamine-dextroamphetamine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products. Answered by Garnet Abel 1 year ago.

Is Adderall A Blood Thinner Answered by Kristeen Bronstein 1 year ago.

GOOD question. [ Worry not about those who make fun of your question - it is not a 'dumb' question at all.] Here's the MD - Hematologist answer. "Elizabeth" "Supernova" and "James T" have it right. "Blood thinner" is a misnomer - deceptive name. Anticoagulants such as heparin and coumadin inhibit blood clotting by interfering with the clotting proteins in the blood. There are 12 of these factors. More than you want to know. Drugs such as aspirin inhibit the function of platelets - - the small blood cells that often start the clot process. These agents do not decrease the number of platelets - - they decrease the function or "stickiness" (adhesion) of platelets so they no longer clump up and start clots. Answered by Maryanna Burgs 1 year ago.

What a great idea, as opposed to asking a licensed pharmicist, which are available 24 hours a day, and free to speak to, or asking a doctor, you have decided to take your medical advice from the general public. Outstanding choice. I say absolutely no, you should mix as many prescriptions as possible. If you start to feel funny, you are just not taking enough. Double your dose. Answered by Amelia Groskreutz 1 year ago.

When you say blood thinners and dont mention warfarin sodium anywhere, you obviously dont mean real blood thinners. You should ask your aspirin question to a pharm. Answered by Kristyn Bolejack 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Johnette Thrune 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Stefan Sugarman 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Tori Beucke 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Carry Bieschke 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Antionette Macartney 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Orlando Chorney 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Brianne Spasiano 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Arnita Euber 1 year ago.


Can I take Ritalin with Phentermine at the same time?
Can I take Ritalin with Phentermine at the same time? Ritalin is a ADD med but I was wondering if I can take Phentermine at the same time? Help. Asked by Queenie Gitlewski 1 year ago.

Before taking phentermine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: -medicines to treat high blood pressure; -insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth; -guanadrel (Hylorel), guanethidine (Ismelin); -antidepressants such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft); or antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with phentermine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Rozanne Chuppa 1 year ago.

I typed in Phentermine and Ritalin into a drug interaction checker and nothing came back--so you probably could take them both. Maybe tomorrow go ahead and call your Pharmacist to make sure, ok? Answered by Johanna Zwiebel 1 year ago.

Phentermine, a prescription medicine, is used as a weight loss aid, as it works on the brain’s satiety center. It works to reduce appetite and increase ANS activity. It can be used to reduce health risks which are often linked with obesity. It’s most effective when combined with healthy lifestyle changes, diet, and exercise. Answered by Jamel Joun 1 year ago.

i wouldn't advise it Ritalin is pretty strong even at a low dosage Answered by Fallon Laack 1 year ago.


I take Adderall, should I avoid blood thinners?
Since Adderall can cause high blood pressure, is aspirin,alcohol, anything that thins the blood a bad mix? I assume it could cause stroke er something.. Asked by Emilee Remo 1 year ago.

I take Adderall as well, but have not heard anything specific about avoiding things that might thin the blood. I looked up some information, and it basically lists the types of meds that you should let your doc know about before mixing w/ adderall. Next time you are at the pharmacy or at the doctor's office, ask them any specific questions about the medicine(s) you are taking, since they would know best. Before taking amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: · insulin or another medicine to treat diabetes; · guanethidine (Ismelin) or reserpine (Diutensin-R); · doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), prazosin (Minipress), or guanadrel(Hylorel); · a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine); · lithium (Lithobid, Lithonate, Eskalith, others); · haloperidol (Haldol); or · a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Asendin), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil), clomipramine (Anafranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), or desipramine (Norpramin). • You may not be able to take amphetamine-dextroamphetamine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with amphetamine-dextroamphetamine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products. Answered by Tony Wiechmann 1 year ago.

Is Adderall A Blood Thinner Answered by Kenyetta Police 1 year ago.

GOOD question. [ Worry not about those who make fun of your question - it is not a 'dumb' question at all.] Here's the MD - Hematologist answer. "Elizabeth" "Supernova" and "James T" have it right. "Blood thinner" is a misnomer - deceptive name. Anticoagulants such as heparin and coumadin inhibit blood clotting by interfering with the clotting proteins in the blood. There are 12 of these factors. More than you want to know. Drugs such as aspirin inhibit the function of platelets - - the small blood cells that often start the clot process. These agents do not decrease the number of platelets - - they decrease the function or "stickiness" (adhesion) of platelets so they no longer clump up and start clots. Answered by Janelle Shannon 1 year ago.

What a great idea, as opposed to asking a licensed pharmicist, which are available 24 hours a day, and free to speak to, or asking a doctor, you have decided to take your medical advice from the general public. Outstanding choice. I say absolutely no, you should mix as many prescriptions as possible. If you start to feel funny, you are just not taking enough. Double your dose. Answered by Shonna Swauger 1 year ago.

When you say blood thinners and dont mention warfarin sodium anywhere, you obviously dont mean real blood thinners. You should ask your aspirin question to a pharm. Answered by Pat Vandervelden 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Diedre Penfold 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Josette Curdy 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Jennette Misenheimer 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Manie Uselton 1 year ago.


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