Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012283/003.

Names and composition

"HYGROTON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLORTHALIDONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012283/003 HYGROTON CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012283/004 HYGROTON CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012283/003 HYGROTON CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012283/004 HYGROTON CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019574/001 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019574/002 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
086831/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086831/002 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087029/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087050/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087082/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087100/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087118/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087176/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087247/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087292/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087293/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087296/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087311/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087312/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087364/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087380/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087381/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087384/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087450/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087451/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087473/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087515/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087516/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087521/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087555/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087689/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087698/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087699/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087706/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087947/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088012/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088051/001 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088073/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088139/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088140/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088164/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088651/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088902/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088903/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089051/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089052/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089285/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089286/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089286/002 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089591/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089738/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089739/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
206904/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
206904/002 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG

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Answered questions

Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Wilbur Stellpflug 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Malia Gostowski 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Arnulfo Rethman 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Ursula Leapheart 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Ermelinda Citron 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Mariam Waler 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Audie Saintignon 1 year ago.


Help! I'm 22, with CHD having severe symptoms and I'm being refused help by doctors...?
I'm am a 22 year old female with a repaired VSD in 1996. I have been cleared from the doctor that I was a-ok since then. About a year now I have been experiencing some serious problems. My whole life my cholesterol, sugar, potassium, blood pressure, and what have you- have been perfect. My blood pressure now... Asked by Dusty Smolinsky 1 year ago.

I'm am a 22 year old female with a repaired VSD in 1996. I have been cleared from the doctor that I was a-ok since then. About a year now I have been experiencing some serious problems. My whole life my cholesterol, sugar, potassium, blood pressure, and what have you- have been perfect. My blood pressure now jumps from the 130's/90's to 170's/150's! I have episodes of extreme heart palpitations where it makes me feel faint, and there are times when my heart just pounds extremely hard, like it's going to beat out of my chest. At times it is pounding so hard I can feel it in my lips, fingers, toes and it gets so loud I can barely hear anything around me. I will get chest pains some shard, some stabbing, some squeezing. Although I never have the pounding/palpitations with chest pain.I get exhausted so easily, I am constantly dizzy and nauseous. If I am ever out and on my feet I end up being pushed in a wheel chair because I cannot stand without wanting to fall over. Since I've graduated from high school in 2006 I have been experiencing extreme fatigue. It's a daily thing with me, especially recently, if given the opportunity I can sleep for an entire day-no exaggeration there. I would skip school, and I have even missed work because of my lack of energy. I took myself to the emergency room one night, because I was scared. They did a full heart attack work-up. Heparin drip, Nitroglycerin patch, Oxygen, Blood work every four hours...they kept me for two days. The nurse noticed an abnormality on my first EKG, and noticed several PV-C's. Nothing of this was ever mentioned again, not even by the on-call cardiologist. I was referred to the MACH clinic in Detroit, the Adult Congenital Heart Clinic. I was put on holter/event monitors, had echos done, and more EK-Gs. The doctors there said I was in perfect condition and sent me home, come back in one year they said. Since then I have been in the hospital six more times, conditions worsened, including extreme dizziness to the point of passing out and nausea. I have been through 6 cardiologists who either shake their heads refusing to treat me because of my history and severity of symptoms and refer me back to the clinic, or have no clue on whats going on with me. I have been on a number of blood pressure medicines toprolol, metroprolol, bystolic.. of course their working for my blood pressure but it actually makes my symptoms worse. Currently my doctor has me on Lisinopril, Hygroton, and Atenolol and I have never felt so sick in my life. A year later I have ran out of resources, me being so sick if effecting my life severely, it is hard for me to do my job, I have had to post-pone making wedding arrangements, and it's almost impossible for my to start my career now that I am done with school. I am so frustrated and looking for a little light on my situation. I am only 22 years old, I do not want to take dozens of pills for the rest of my life. I cannot find a doctor who will just listen to me- it's not panic or stress and these blood pressure medicines will be the end of me! HELP! Answered by Rona Kafel 1 year ago.

Try to get your dad to stay up for a while and just watch him. It sometimes depends on which side of the brain it would be if he was having a stroke. Here is a simple 3 step test you can do that I got from the mayo clinic site. 1. ask him to smile. Does his smile look symmetrical? or does one side not come up? Some people have a slight difference but this would look a lot different than usual. 2. have him flap like a bird. If one of his arms comes up but the other is struggling, then it's another yes. 3. have him say, "The skies are blue in Cincinatti." if he slurs (obvious slurs) then maybe think about a visit to the hospital. There is a slight stroke that is benign that can only affect your face, however, the effects can be permanent. Tell your dad that you are worried and you would feel much better if he would just go. Also, you can try to guilt trip him a little bit by threatening to reschedule your interview (even if it's an empty threat). Good luck, hope he's okay. Answered by Santos Hatman 1 year ago.

maybe you could try to get into the Mayo clinic in Minnesota? I know how you feel, im only 17 and i also have CHD(aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, bicuspid aortic valve and an enlarged aorta) i have not had surgery yet, but i get severe shortness of breath with exercise, i get palpitations alot, heart pounding, dizziness, headaches, increase in appetite(i am literally always hungry, i always have that hollow hunger feeling in my stomach), extreme fatigue(i have missed school because of it also), chest pain, my hands and feet go randomly cold ect. I have gone to 2 cardiologist both saying my heart defects arent severe enough to cause problems, i have had an exercise stress test-only thing it said was my heart rate went up fast, and down slow, i have been to a pulmonologist and they said my lungs were perfect. So now i have no idea what to do, my parents dont really believe me and they think since the doctors say im fine then i am. So now i have no idea what to do. Maybe you should try other doctors other then a cardiologist? explore possibilities that it may not be your heart, it could be something else but from your symptoms something is DEFINITELY wrong and it sure isnt stress or anxiety. Good luck!!!! Answered by Quinn Debiasio 1 year ago.

You may need a pacemaker or defibrillator implant I am not trying to scare you but, something is going on it took several years for the doctors to pinpoint my problem also even after losing my mother, sister and brother to heart disease, not to mention a few other relatives. Have they check you for sleep-apena also. When the heart is not functioning correctly it leaves you very fatigue stay on your current doctor about this. I hope you have health insurance request to wear a monitor for a period of time you, just might have a episode. I am not a doctor but, I have been on the same track you are on it is frustrating when something is going on and the doctors act as if nothing is there. Pray that God show them. I will pray with you also. Good Luck! Answered by Nathaniel Sima 1 year ago.

check your blood sugar. Answered by Tillie Teper 1 year ago.


What does a postive ana mean?
I was pregnant in 10/05 and my ana blood test came back postive i was tested for lupus because my titer came back high what else could i have? Doctore doesnt seem to be too concerned. Should i be Asked by Samuel Solimeno 1 year ago.

An antinuclear antibody (ANA) test measures the amount and pattern of abnormal antibody that work against the body's tissues (autoantibody). Everyone has a small amount of autoantibody, but about 5% of people have a larger amount. About half of these 5% have an autoimmune disease, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. An ANA test alone cannot diagnose a specific disease. It is used in combination with an evaluation of symptoms and other tests. The body's immune system normally attacks and destroys foreign substances such as bacteria and viruses. However, in disorders known as autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks and destroys the body's normal tissues. When a person has an autoimmune disease, the immune system produces antibodies that attach to the body's own cells as though they were foreign substances, often causing them to be damaged or destroyed. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and other tests besides an ANA test are needed confirm a suspected autoimmune disease. A test for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is done to help diagnose conditions that include: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Rheumatoid arthritis Sjögren's syndrome. Scleroderma. Hashimoto's thyroid disease. A reaction to a medication. High values A high ANA titer may indicate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE can be present with titers from 1 to 40 and higher. Almost all people with SLE have a high ANA titer. However, most people with a high ANA titer do not have SLE. Only about one-third of people who are referred to a rheumatologist for high ANA titers are diagnosed with SLE. Other conditions may cause a high ANA titer. About 30% to 40% of people with rheumatoid arthritis have a high ANA titer. Many conditions may result in a high ANA titer. These conditions include autoimmune diseases, such as scleroderma, Sjögren's syndrome, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and myositis. Other conditions with a high ANA titer include Raynaud's syndrome, viral infections, and liver disease. Although an ANA titer may help support a diagnosis for these conditions, it is not used by itself to confirm a diagnosis. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and other tests are needed to confirm a suspected autoimmune disease. Some apparently healthy individuals have high levels of antinuclear antibodies. For instance, some people with a family history of autoimmune disease may have a high ANA titer. The higher the titer, however, the more likely it is that the person has an autoimmune disease. What Affects the Test Factors that can interfere with your test and the accuracy of the results include: Medications, such as hydralazine (Apresoline), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl, Promine), and certain anticonvulsants (such as Dilantin, Mysoline). These medications can cause a form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) called drug-induced lupus. Lupus resulting from these medications may cause a high antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer. Medications, such as antibiotics (isoniazid, penicillin, and tetracycline), birth control pills, lithium, and some diuretics, such as chlorthalidone (Hygroton). Heart or blood pressure medications, such as acebutolol (Sectral), captopril (Capoten), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), lovastatin (Mevacor), and quinidine. Aging. Some older adults (5% to 40%) may have mildly elevated levels. Older women appear to have higher ANA titers than older men. Steroids, which may cause a false-negative result. Answered by Francisca Camero 1 year ago.

Ana Titer Levels Answered by Jannet Ruyle 1 year ago.


What are the benefits of a diuretic?
coffee, jamaica, etc... Asked by Donnie Justak 1 year ago.

Diuretics, which cause reduction of water and sodium, have been the mainstays of anti-hypertensive therapy.Diuretics are inexpensive and are the drug of choice for most people with hypertension. Diuretics significantly reduce the risk for stroke; they may in fact be the most important anti-hypertensive agent for preventing this brain attack. They also appear to protect against stroke in people without hypertension. They are associated with lower risk for heart attack (although this is not as significant as their protection against stroke). They may protect against blood clots. Diuretics may help reduce the risk for dementia and the rate of fractures in elderly people who have taken them for a long time. Three primary types of diuretics exist: Thiazides. Thiazides often serve as the basis for high blood pressure treatment, either taken alone for mild to moderate hypertension or used in combination with other types of drugs. There are many thiazides and thiazide-related drugs; some common ones are chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton), indapamide (Lozol), and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDiuril). Loop diuretics. Loop diuretics block sodium transport in parts of the kidney; they act faster than thiazides and have a great diuretic effect. It is important therefore to control the medication and avoid dehydration and potassium loss. Loop diuretics include bumetanide (Bumex), furosemide (Lasix), and ethacrynic acid (Edecrin). Potassium sparing agents. Some potassium-sparing diuretics include amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium). I hope this was helpful,Take Care!!! :) Answered by Cari Shehab 1 year ago.

gets out excess fluids if you are retaining them. Answered by Linnie Mohrlock 1 year ago.


What are the tests made to diagnose kidney stones?
does anybody knows.. what are the posible medications given to patients with this kind of disease? Asked by Irving Schmelzle 1 year ago.

Kidney stones (renal calculi)are formed of mineral deposits, most commonly calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate; however uric acid, struvite, and cystine are also calculus formers. Renal calculi can remain asymptomatic until passed into a ureter and/or urine flow is obstructed. A person with kidney stones may report history of recent/ chronic UTI; previous obstruction (calculi); decreased urinary output, bladder fullnes, burning sensation and urgency with urination, diarrhea, hematuria (presence of blood in the urine), pyuria (pus in the urine), and alterations in voiding pattern. Person may also report nausea, vomiting, abdominal tenderness, diet high in purines, calcium oxalate, and/or phosphates, insufficient fluid intake, does not drink fluids well; exhibits abdominal distention, flank pain, elevated BP/pulse, decreased/absent bowel sounds. diagnostic studies include: 1. urinalysis: color may be yellow, dark brown, bloody. commonly shows RBCs, WBCs, crystals (cystine, uric acid, calcium oxalate), casts, minerals, bacteria, pus; pH may be less than 5 (promotes cystine and uric acid stones) or higher than 7.5 (promotes magnesium, struvite, phosphate, or calcium phosphate stones). 2. biochemical survey: elevated levels of magnesium, calcium, uric acid, phosphate, protein, electrolytes 3. serum and urine BUN/Cr: abnormal (high in serum/low in urine) secondary to high obstructive stone in kidney causing ischemia/necrosis 4. serum chloride and bicarbonate levels: elevation of chloride and decreased levels of bicarbonate suggests developing renal tubular acidosis 5. CBC: Hgb/Hct:abnormal if client is severely dehydrated or polycythemia is present (encourage precipitation of solids), or client is anemic (hemorrhage, kidney dysfunction or failure) RBCs: usually normal WBCs: may be increased (indicating infection or septicemia) KUB xray: show presence of calculi and/or anatomical changes in the area of the kidney or along the course of the ureter IVP: provides rapid confirmation of urolithiasis as a cause of abdominal or flank pain. shows abnormalities in anatomical structures (distended ureter) and outline of calculi cystoureteroscopy: direct visualization of bladder and ureter may reveal stone and/or obstructive effects CT scan: identify/delineates calculi and other masses; kidney, ureteral, and bladder distention Kidney Ultrasound: to determine obstructive change, location of stone; without the risk of failure induced by contrast medium Medications to be given will depend greatly on the type of stones formed. narcotics e.g., meperidine (demerol), morphine: to promote muscle relaxation antispasmodics, e.g., flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan): to decrease reflex spasm, colic and pain corticosteroids: to reduce tissue edema to facilitate movement of stone Acetazolamide (Diamox), allopurinol (Zyloprim); increase urine pH and reduce formation of acid stones. antigout agents such as allopurinol (Zyloprim) also lower uric acid production and potential of stone formation. Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDIURIL), chlorthalidone (Hygroton); may be given to prevent urinary stasis and decrease calcium stone formation if not caused by underlying disease process such as primary hyperthyroidism or vitamin D abnormalities. Ammonium chloride; potassium or sodium phosphate; reduce phosphate stone formation Antibiotics; presence of UTI/ alkaline urine potentiates stone formation Sodium bicarbonate; replaces losses incurred during bicarbonate wasting and/or alkalinization of urine; may reduce/prevent formation of some calculi Ascorbic acid; acidifies urine to prevent recurrence of alkaline stone formation Answered by Giselle Daschofsky 1 year ago.

There are several ways they can diagnose kidney stones. One is to do an ultrasound of your kidneys. This is pretty reliable but if you are overweight it can be hard. Another way is to have a CT scan. But the most popular test is the good ole IVP. This test is given with dye. The big stones usually don't cause much pain. It is usually the little bitty stones that will put you on the floor. All medications given for this problem is usually based on the make up of the stones. Answered by Marty Trostel 1 year ago.

okay ivee had kidney stones twice now- once during pregnancy that required surgical removal since the stone was a 10 mm most stones that cause pain are 3-4 mm....the testing done is an IVP you have to get an injection in the arm and then they xray you using the dye the injected to examine the kidneys, another way is by ultrasound but this can be blurry for DRs so they prefer a more sufficent test..they sometimes use a CT scan for diagnosis.....unless yuo are pregnant- then all they can do is an ultrasound since all other test can cause stress and possibly injury to the baby....once your diagnosed youd usually get pain meds but some doctors dont prefer to give since these meds will often challenge your kidneys even more- it kinda depends on the person...theyll usually give you vicodin or percocet but if it is to the point where they are moving alot- youll know when this is because it is very and i mean very painful the pain willl come in waves and possibly cause nausea...theyre often compared to labor pains and if you were to be treated in an emergency room they may give you morphine-itll burn when they first inject it but the pain will become more bearable and at that point the doctor will decide how to remove them if he wants- often a doc will tell the patient to return when theyre having severe pain -if he does remove theres 3 surguries and depending on where the stone is located (in kidney or in the tube that passes your urine to your kidney) that ll be the decideing factor on what type surgery- the do and ultrasonic ping where its ultrasonically shattered and you pass it , laser removale is another and worst case- theyll cut ya and dig it out ( this was my surgery) as for meds i dont know the name but i was told by my doctor that the medications that aid in preventing stones are often not worth taking since they cause ill side affects to the user and should only be considered in severe repeatious cases....one thing they can do is try to figure out what caused the stones by a metabolic work up by your doc and they can let you know how to possible (no guarentees) avoid the pain in the future.....good luck!!! Answered by Emery Smestad 1 year ago.

A Urologist. You need to go to the hospital and have a I.V.P done. That will tell the doctor exactly where the stone is. You don't need to drink anymore if it's not coming out. That meens the stone is too big and is blocking your urethra. You need to go to the hospital. I know, I just went through all this 4 months ago and had to have a stent put in because of scare tissue from it. Get it checked ASAP. I know what I am talking about, PROMISE! Answered by Melynda Borgmann 1 year ago.

hi everyone ,if anyone else wants to learn about kidney stones treatment try Imforda Simple Stones Guide (should be on google have a look ) ? Ive heard some amazing things about it and my m8 got amazing success with it. Answered by Leon Imperato 1 year ago.

An Adominal ultrasound is painless and free from radiation and they can now disperse kidney stones with a lazer no surgery involved Answered by Maida Spikes 1 year ago.

The main test is the IVP, they shoot dye in your arm and look at your kidneys under Xray. Answered by Man Pagel 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Rozanne Sengbusch 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Nellie Sanks 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Daniela Rasico 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Earlie Tosado 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Shelton Goldtrap 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Matha Rahall 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Charlette Harcum 1 year ago.


Help! I'm 22, with CHD having severe symptoms and I'm being refused help by doctors...?
I'm am a 22 year old female with a repaired VSD in 1996. I have been cleared from the doctor that I was a-ok since then. About a year now I have been experiencing some serious problems. My whole life my cholesterol, sugar, potassium, blood pressure, and what have you- have been perfect. My blood pressure now... Asked by Lou Kaukola 1 year ago.

I'm am a 22 year old female with a repaired VSD in 1996. I have been cleared from the doctor that I was a-ok since then. About a year now I have been experiencing some serious problems. My whole life my cholesterol, sugar, potassium, blood pressure, and what have you- have been perfect. My blood pressure now jumps from the 130's/90's to 170's/150's! I have episodes of extreme heart palpitations where it makes me feel faint, and there are times when my heart just pounds extremely hard, like it's going to beat out of my chest. At times it is pounding so hard I can feel it in my lips, fingers, toes and it gets so loud I can barely hear anything around me. I will get chest pains some shard, some stabbing, some squeezing. Although I never have the pounding/palpitations with chest pain.I get exhausted so easily, I am constantly dizzy and nauseous. If I am ever out and on my feet I end up being pushed in a wheel chair because I cannot stand without wanting to fall over. Since I've graduated from high school in 2006 I have been experiencing extreme fatigue. It's a daily thing with me, especially recently, if given the opportunity I can sleep for an entire day-no exaggeration there. I would skip school, and I have even missed work because of my lack of energy. I took myself to the emergency room one night, because I was scared. They did a full heart attack work-up. Heparin drip, Nitroglycerin patch, Oxygen, Blood work every four hours...they kept me for two days. The nurse noticed an abnormality on my first EKG, and noticed several PV-C's. Nothing of this was ever mentioned again, not even by the on-call cardiologist. I was referred to the MACH clinic in Detroit, the Adult Congenital Heart Clinic. I was put on holter/event monitors, had echos done, and more EK-Gs. The doctors there said I was in perfect condition and sent me home, come back in one year they said. Since then I have been in the hospital six more times, conditions worsened, including extreme dizziness to the point of passing out and nausea. I have been through 6 cardiologists who either shake their heads refusing to treat me because of my history and severity of symptoms and refer me back to the clinic, or have no clue on whats going on with me. I have been on a number of blood pressure medicines toprolol, metroprolol, bystolic.. of course their working for my blood pressure but it actually makes my symptoms worse. Currently my doctor has me on Lisinopril, Hygroton, and Atenolol and I have never felt so sick in my life. A year later I have ran out of resources, me being so sick if effecting my life severely, it is hard for me to do my job, I have had to post-pone making wedding arrangements, and it's almost impossible for my to start my career now that I am done with school. I am so frustrated and looking for a little light on my situation. I am only 22 years old, I do not want to take dozens of pills for the rest of my life. I cannot find a doctor who will just listen to me- it's not panic or stress and these blood pressure medicines will be the end of me! HELP! Answered by Aldo Hanmore 1 year ago.

Try to get your dad to stay up for a while and just watch him. It sometimes depends on which side of the brain it would be if he was having a stroke. Here is a simple 3 step test you can do that I got from the mayo clinic site. 1. ask him to smile. Does his smile look symmetrical? or does one side not come up? Some people have a slight difference but this would look a lot different than usual. 2. have him flap like a bird. If one of his arms comes up but the other is struggling, then it's another yes. 3. have him say, "The skies are blue in Cincinatti." if he slurs (obvious slurs) then maybe think about a visit to the hospital. There is a slight stroke that is benign that can only affect your face, however, the effects can be permanent. Tell your dad that you are worried and you would feel much better if he would just go. Also, you can try to guilt trip him a little bit by threatening to reschedule your interview (even if it's an empty threat). Good luck, hope he's okay. Answered by Starla Scriven 1 year ago.

maybe you could try to get into the Mayo clinic in Minnesota? I know how you feel, im only 17 and i also have CHD(aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, bicuspid aortic valve and an enlarged aorta) i have not had surgery yet, but i get severe shortness of breath with exercise, i get palpitations alot, heart pounding, dizziness, headaches, increase in appetite(i am literally always hungry, i always have that hollow hunger feeling in my stomach), extreme fatigue(i have missed school because of it also), chest pain, my hands and feet go randomly cold ect. I have gone to 2 cardiologist both saying my heart defects arent severe enough to cause problems, i have had an exercise stress test-only thing it said was my heart rate went up fast, and down slow, i have been to a pulmonologist and they said my lungs were perfect. So now i have no idea what to do, my parents dont really believe me and they think since the doctors say im fine then i am. So now i have no idea what to do. Maybe you should try other doctors other then a cardiologist? explore possibilities that it may not be your heart, it could be something else but from your symptoms something is DEFINITELY wrong and it sure isnt stress or anxiety. Good luck!!!! Answered by Howard Esquinaldo 1 year ago.

You may need a pacemaker or defibrillator implant I am not trying to scare you but, something is going on it took several years for the doctors to pinpoint my problem also even after losing my mother, sister and brother to heart disease, not to mention a few other relatives. Have they check you for sleep-apena also. When the heart is not functioning correctly it leaves you very fatigue stay on your current doctor about this. I hope you have health insurance request to wear a monitor for a period of time you, just might have a episode. I am not a doctor but, I have been on the same track you are on it is frustrating when something is going on and the doctors act as if nothing is there. Pray that God show them. I will pray with you also. Good Luck! Answered by Damien Wurgler 1 year ago.

check your blood sugar. Answered by Anneliese Creech 1 year ago.


What does a postive ana mean?
I was pregnant in 10/05 and my ana blood test came back postive i was tested for lupus because my titer came back high what else could i have? Doctore doesnt seem to be too concerned. Should i be Asked by Miesha Brosey 1 year ago.

An antinuclear antibody (ANA) test measures the amount and pattern of abnormal antibody that work against the body's tissues (autoantibody). Everyone has a small amount of autoantibody, but about 5% of people have a larger amount. About half of these 5% have an autoimmune disease, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. An ANA test alone cannot diagnose a specific disease. It is used in combination with an evaluation of symptoms and other tests. The body's immune system normally attacks and destroys foreign substances such as bacteria and viruses. However, in disorders known as autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks and destroys the body's normal tissues. When a person has an autoimmune disease, the immune system produces antibodies that attach to the body's own cells as though they were foreign substances, often causing them to be damaged or destroyed. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and other tests besides an ANA test are needed confirm a suspected autoimmune disease. A test for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is done to help diagnose conditions that include: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Rheumatoid arthritis Sjögren's syndrome. Scleroderma. Hashimoto's thyroid disease. A reaction to a medication. High values A high ANA titer may indicate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE can be present with titers from 1 to 40 and higher. Almost all people with SLE have a high ANA titer. However, most people with a high ANA titer do not have SLE. Only about one-third of people who are referred to a rheumatologist for high ANA titers are diagnosed with SLE. Other conditions may cause a high ANA titer. About 30% to 40% of people with rheumatoid arthritis have a high ANA titer. Many conditions may result in a high ANA titer. These conditions include autoimmune diseases, such as scleroderma, Sjögren's syndrome, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and myositis. Other conditions with a high ANA titer include Raynaud's syndrome, viral infections, and liver disease. Although an ANA titer may help support a diagnosis for these conditions, it is not used by itself to confirm a diagnosis. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and other tests are needed to confirm a suspected autoimmune disease. Some apparently healthy individuals have high levels of antinuclear antibodies. For instance, some people with a family history of autoimmune disease may have a high ANA titer. The higher the titer, however, the more likely it is that the person has an autoimmune disease. What Affects the Test Factors that can interfere with your test and the accuracy of the results include: Medications, such as hydralazine (Apresoline), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl, Promine), and certain anticonvulsants (such as Dilantin, Mysoline). These medications can cause a form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) called drug-induced lupus. Lupus resulting from these medications may cause a high antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer. Medications, such as antibiotics (isoniazid, penicillin, and tetracycline), birth control pills, lithium, and some diuretics, such as chlorthalidone (Hygroton). Heart or blood pressure medications, such as acebutolol (Sectral), captopril (Capoten), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), lovastatin (Mevacor), and quinidine. Aging. Some older adults (5% to 40%) may have mildly elevated levels. Older women appear to have higher ANA titers than older men. Steroids, which may cause a false-negative result. Answered by Ernestine Friesenhahn 1 year ago.

Ana Titer Levels Answered by Chung Went 1 year ago.


What are the benefits of a diuretic?
coffee, jamaica, etc... Asked by Jimmy Shively 1 year ago.

Diuretics, which cause reduction of water and sodium, have been the mainstays of anti-hypertensive therapy.Diuretics are inexpensive and are the drug of choice for most people with hypertension. Diuretics significantly reduce the risk for stroke; they may in fact be the most important anti-hypertensive agent for preventing this brain attack. They also appear to protect against stroke in people without hypertension. They are associated with lower risk for heart attack (although this is not as significant as their protection against stroke). They may protect against blood clots. Diuretics may help reduce the risk for dementia and the rate of fractures in elderly people who have taken them for a long time. Three primary types of diuretics exist: Thiazides. Thiazides often serve as the basis for high blood pressure treatment, either taken alone for mild to moderate hypertension or used in combination with other types of drugs. There are many thiazides and thiazide-related drugs; some common ones are chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton), indapamide (Lozol), and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDiuril). Loop diuretics. Loop diuretics block sodium transport in parts of the kidney; they act faster than thiazides and have a great diuretic effect. It is important therefore to control the medication and avoid dehydration and potassium loss. Loop diuretics include bumetanide (Bumex), furosemide (Lasix), and ethacrynic acid (Edecrin). Potassium sparing agents. Some potassium-sparing diuretics include amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium). I hope this was helpful,Take Care!!! :) Answered by Jackie Vallentine 1 year ago.

gets out excess fluids if you are retaining them. Answered by Krysten Villalvazo 1 year ago.


What are the tests made to diagnose kidney stones?
does anybody knows.. what are the posible medications given to patients with this kind of disease? Asked by Louvenia Millington 1 year ago.

Kidney stones (renal calculi)are formed of mineral deposits, most commonly calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate; however uric acid, struvite, and cystine are also calculus formers. Renal calculi can remain asymptomatic until passed into a ureter and/or urine flow is obstructed. A person with kidney stones may report history of recent/ chronic UTI; previous obstruction (calculi); decreased urinary output, bladder fullnes, burning sensation and urgency with urination, diarrhea, hematuria (presence of blood in the urine), pyuria (pus in the urine), and alterations in voiding pattern. Person may also report nausea, vomiting, abdominal tenderness, diet high in purines, calcium oxalate, and/or phosphates, insufficient fluid intake, does not drink fluids well; exhibits abdominal distention, flank pain, elevated BP/pulse, decreased/absent bowel sounds. diagnostic studies include: 1. urinalysis: color may be yellow, dark brown, bloody. commonly shows RBCs, WBCs, crystals (cystine, uric acid, calcium oxalate), casts, minerals, bacteria, pus; pH may be less than 5 (promotes cystine and uric acid stones) or higher than 7.5 (promotes magnesium, struvite, phosphate, or calcium phosphate stones). 2. biochemical survey: elevated levels of magnesium, calcium, uric acid, phosphate, protein, electrolytes 3. serum and urine BUN/Cr: abnormal (high in serum/low in urine) secondary to high obstructive stone in kidney causing ischemia/necrosis 4. serum chloride and bicarbonate levels: elevation of chloride and decreased levels of bicarbonate suggests developing renal tubular acidosis 5. CBC: Hgb/Hct:abnormal if client is severely dehydrated or polycythemia is present (encourage precipitation of solids), or client is anemic (hemorrhage, kidney dysfunction or failure) RBCs: usually normal WBCs: may be increased (indicating infection or septicemia) KUB xray: show presence of calculi and/or anatomical changes in the area of the kidney or along the course of the ureter IVP: provides rapid confirmation of urolithiasis as a cause of abdominal or flank pain. shows abnormalities in anatomical structures (distended ureter) and outline of calculi cystoureteroscopy: direct visualization of bladder and ureter may reveal stone and/or obstructive effects CT scan: identify/delineates calculi and other masses; kidney, ureteral, and bladder distention Kidney Ultrasound: to determine obstructive change, location of stone; without the risk of failure induced by contrast medium Medications to be given will depend greatly on the type of stones formed. narcotics e.g., meperidine (demerol), morphine: to promote muscle relaxation antispasmodics, e.g., flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan): to decrease reflex spasm, colic and pain corticosteroids: to reduce tissue edema to facilitate movement of stone Acetazolamide (Diamox), allopurinol (Zyloprim); increase urine pH and reduce formation of acid stones. antigout agents such as allopurinol (Zyloprim) also lower uric acid production and potential of stone formation. Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDIURIL), chlorthalidone (Hygroton); may be given to prevent urinary stasis and decrease calcium stone formation if not caused by underlying disease process such as primary hyperthyroidism or vitamin D abnormalities. Ammonium chloride; potassium or sodium phosphate; reduce phosphate stone formation Antibiotics; presence of UTI/ alkaline urine potentiates stone formation Sodium bicarbonate; replaces losses incurred during bicarbonate wasting and/or alkalinization of urine; may reduce/prevent formation of some calculi Ascorbic acid; acidifies urine to prevent recurrence of alkaline stone formation Answered by Reba Dearden 1 year ago.

There are several ways they can diagnose kidney stones. One is to do an ultrasound of your kidneys. This is pretty reliable but if you are overweight it can be hard. Another way is to have a CT scan. But the most popular test is the good ole IVP. This test is given with dye. The big stones usually don't cause much pain. It is usually the little bitty stones that will put you on the floor. All medications given for this problem is usually based on the make up of the stones. Answered by Gia Honeyestewa 1 year ago.

okay ivee had kidney stones twice now- once during pregnancy that required surgical removal since the stone was a 10 mm most stones that cause pain are 3-4 mm....the testing done is an IVP you have to get an injection in the arm and then they xray you using the dye the injected to examine the kidneys, another way is by ultrasound but this can be blurry for DRs so they prefer a more sufficent test..they sometimes use a CT scan for diagnosis.....unless yuo are pregnant- then all they can do is an ultrasound since all other test can cause stress and possibly injury to the baby....once your diagnosed youd usually get pain meds but some doctors dont prefer to give since these meds will often challenge your kidneys even more- it kinda depends on the person...theyll usually give you vicodin or percocet but if it is to the point where they are moving alot- youll know when this is because it is very and i mean very painful the pain willl come in waves and possibly cause nausea...theyre often compared to labor pains and if you were to be treated in an emergency room they may give you morphine-itll burn when they first inject it but the pain will become more bearable and at that point the doctor will decide how to remove them if he wants- often a doc will tell the patient to return when theyre having severe pain -if he does remove theres 3 surguries and depending on where the stone is located (in kidney or in the tube that passes your urine to your kidney) that ll be the decideing factor on what type surgery- the do and ultrasonic ping where its ultrasonically shattered and you pass it , laser removale is another and worst case- theyll cut ya and dig it out ( this was my surgery) as for meds i dont know the name but i was told by my doctor that the medications that aid in preventing stones are often not worth taking since they cause ill side affects to the user and should only be considered in severe repeatious cases....one thing they can do is try to figure out what caused the stones by a metabolic work up by your doc and they can let you know how to possible (no guarentees) avoid the pain in the future.....good luck!!! Answered by Naoma Keser 1 year ago.

A Urologist. You need to go to the hospital and have a I.V.P done. That will tell the doctor exactly where the stone is. You don't need to drink anymore if it's not coming out. That meens the stone is too big and is blocking your urethra. You need to go to the hospital. I know, I just went through all this 4 months ago and had to have a stent put in because of scare tissue from it. Get it checked ASAP. I know what I am talking about, PROMISE! Answered by Robt Barnt 1 year ago.

hi everyone ,if anyone else wants to learn about kidney stones treatment try Imforda Simple Stones Guide (should be on google have a look ) ? Ive heard some amazing things about it and my m8 got amazing success with it. Answered by Reyes Greaver 1 year ago.

An Adominal ultrasound is painless and free from radiation and they can now disperse kidney stones with a lazer no surgery involved Answered by Brunilda Lening 1 year ago.

The main test is the IVP, they shoot dye in your arm and look at your kidneys under Xray. Answered by Chung Dahill 1 year ago.


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