HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 040097/001.

Names and composition

"HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL and HYDROCORTISONE.

Answered questions

HELP! I have Ear Fungus?
I went to the doctors monday and he told me that I have ear fungus in my right ear and slight in my left, i have no ear wax due to the fact that i use QTips for cleaning. I use these because when i was younger i had a problem with wax build up, lol. He never told me what to do with it like do i keep it dry or... Asked by Weston Simmelink 3 months ago.

I went to the doctors monday and he told me that I have ear fungus in my right ear and slight in my left, i have no ear wax due to the fact that i use QTips for cleaning. I use these because when i was younger i had a problem with wax build up, lol. He never told me what to do with it like do i keep it dry or anything like that it was just write me out a precription and be done. He put me on Hydrocortisone/acetic acid drops and a pain killer. The ear it self is not painful and since monday I have only had one headache and it seems to be getting better. Im a little worried about this, What else can I do??? Answered by Salena Shealey 3 months ago.

Nothing. The fungus will die from the antibiotics, perhaps in a day or two, and your ear will begin to heal. Common symptoms of an outer ear infection are : nausea, headaches, muffled hearing, and crying. Answered by Candra Pettrey 3 months ago.

Go to your doctor. Answered by Floyd Batlle 3 months ago.

ewwww you creep go tell the doctor u gay creep Answered by Stefany Nickol 3 months ago.


What are the complications from an ear infection?
I was diagnosed with otitis externa a week ago and had to go back to the doctor again since the ear drops didn't work, actually made it worse. To begin, my inner ear was EXTREMELY itchy so I went to the doctor and was diagnosed with otitis externa so she gave me ear drops, Neomycin and Polymyxin B Sulfates and... Asked by Deane Vetterick 3 months ago.

I was diagnosed with otitis externa a week ago and had to go back to the doctor again since the ear drops didn't work, actually made it worse. To begin, my inner ear was EXTREMELY itchy so I went to the doctor and was diagnosed with otitis externa so she gave me ear drops, Neomycin and Polymyxin B Sulfates and Hydrocortisone, so I was like ok. She said if it doesn't work in four days than she would have to see me again. It didn't work it actually made it worse, still EXTREMELY itchy and now it is muffled and feels full. So, I went back and she looked at it at and she said she is going to give me a different ear drop, acetic acid otic solution 2%, and if that didn't work - improve in three days to call her to schedule an appointment for an ENT. So, I am on day 1 and it seems to be worse than the other medicine - now I can't hear and feels full. So, my question is if it doesn't improve what should I expect at the ENT's? Answered by Elouise Riggen 3 months ago.

It's itchy because it's healing. You have an outer ear infection, and they are much different than a middle ear infection (the more common "ear infection" people talk about). What you have is more commonly called swimmers ear. The fullness could be to you also having a middle ear infection or from wax impaction. Just wait and see. It could be that you have a fungal infection or a bacterial infection that is resistant to the drugs your doctor gave you. An ENT is much more versed in the treatment of ear diseases and will probably clean your ear out and prescribe more drops for you. This will give them more direct contact with your ear instead of with wax or other debris. Answered by Emmitt Trudell 3 months ago.


First Aid Kits?
I am making a first aid kit for my cub scout gruop that asked for it. I need to know a list of things i should get. Also telll me what the purposes are for tnx ahead of time Asked by Latanya Haverty 3 months ago.

Pocket Dive/Wilderness Emergency Handbook 2 X 2-inch sterile gauze pads 4 X 4-inch sterile gauze pads 2-inch elastic wrap 4-inch elastic wrap 2-inch rolled gauze 4-inch rolled gauze Elastic and butterfly bandages Cotton swabs Adhesive tape Tweezers Scissors Forceps Wire cutters Soap Sterile eyewash Syringe, 30 mL Acetic acid 5% (vinegar) Isopropyl alcohol Hydrogen peroxide Sunscreen Instant heat pack Instant cold pack Regular first aid kit necessities first-aid manual sterile gauze adhesive tape adhesive bandages in several sizes elastic bandage antiseptic wipes soap antibiotic cream (triple-antibiotic ointment) antiseptic solution (like hydrogen peroxide) hydrocortisone cream (1%) acetaminophen and ibuprofen extra prescription medications (if the family is going on vacation) tweezers sharp scissors safety pins disposable instant cold packs calamine lotion alcohol wipes or ethyl alcohol thermometer plastic gloves (at least 2 pairs) flashlight and extra batteries mouthpiece for administering CPR (can be obtained from your local Red Cross) your list of emergency phone numbers blanket (stored nearby) Answered by Noelia Youd 3 months ago.

Band aids antiseptic wipes and spray to kill germs on cuts and scrapes Tweezers for splinters gauze pads gauze strips sterile tape for bandaging larger wounds Scissors to cut the gauze strips Sanitizing hand cleaner that needs no water so you can clean your own hands before handling someone elses wounds Rubber gloves because you don't want to use your bare hands on an open wound, in case the other person has a communicable disease face mask (the disposable type) because you don't want someone elses bodily fluids getting into your mouth accidentally. Answered by Linnea Kirbo 3 months ago.

I assume you can't buy one, you have to make one? You can go to a store and look at a kit, and write down what it has, then buy them. Here are some basics. Bandaids, small and large. Gauze pads, and gauze wrap Ace bandage Intibiotic ointment, like Neosporin Alcohol prep wipes Benedryl - for treating allergic reactions, like bee stings, etc. Tweezers, safety pins - splinters, etc. Medical Tape These are the basics - much more could be added. Answered by Danielle Felker 3 months ago.

some bandages or band-aids in various sizes, anti-septic cream, some hydrogen peroxide for disinfectant purposes, some gauges to cover cuts and wounds in various sizes, some tylenol for pain relief, and that should be good. you're only cub scout, so you don't need to go all out and buy the whole pharmacy..just keep it simple. Answered by Eura Holdt 3 months ago.

The only required items are gloves, some form of eye protection, soap, and a breathing barrier. I also recommend gauze squares, band-aids, a crevat, roller bandages, advil, and steril wipes. And please, whatever you do, don't add a snake bite kit. They just take up space. Answered by Nola Rapa 3 months ago.

Here's what I keep: Latex Gloves- Don't want to get my dirty hands in someones wound. Mouth barrier- For CPR Splint- for beroken bones- Gauze Pads and moleskin- wors for me as a remedy to blisters. Regular sized band-aids Roller Bandage 2"and 1" Triangular bandages Answered by Roslyn Mirao 3 months ago.

Use first aid kit in the search box of sportsmanguide.com. The list of ingredients should be self explanatory. Answered by Clyde Mcglohon 3 months ago.

pick up a trauma or first responder kit from the local medical supply their a bit pricy but they have everything you'll ever need for a life threatening emergency Answered by Chu Strudwick 3 months ago.

Gauze and more gauze for goodness sakes!!! Answered by Jeffie Christo 3 months ago.


My ears hurt....?
My ears hurt pretty bad.. im not really sure what's wrong but they hurt from the inside.. maybe its from air conditioner? because my throat hurts a bit too.. i never had though my ears hurting? like ringing a little and i dont hear that well as if im on an airplane ... please help. any advise! Asked by Cristin Curio 3 months ago.

Go to the Doctor to answer questions like: How long have they been hurting? What did you do prior to your ears hurting? What type of pain is it? Sharp? Dull? Persistent? Does the pain stop at any time? Here let me take a look at them. Wax buidlup? Water trapped in the ear? Hey look, a little blue fuzzy thing. Ok. Lets try the regular old Ear drops like Cipro HC(CIPROFLOXACIN/HYDROCORTISONE) . If it doesn't improve within a week, we'll have to go with the Acetic Acid with Desonide. 25 Dollars please... Answered by Jami Branes 3 months ago.

You may have an ear infection. Go see your doctor. He'll perscrible you some medicine and you'll be fine in acouple days. Answered by Adelina Pebbles 3 months ago.

Have you been swimming? It could be an ear infection. If it doesn't go away I'd see a doctor. Answered by Coy Tedesko 3 months ago.


Unknown health problem ? (with itching spots on feet)?
recently me and my mum noticed that we had itching spots on our feet mostly i'm very unsure of what it is and what is causing it . my other brothers or sisters don't have it it's just me and it's started to appear on my arms now can you tell me whats wrong with me. Asked by Alina Treff 3 months ago.

Chiggers are commonly found on the tip of blades of grasses to catch a host, so keeping grass short, and removing brush and wood debris where potential mite hosts may live, can limit their impact on an area. Sunlight that penetrates the grass will make the lawn drier and make it less favorable for chigger survival. Chiggers seem to affect warm covered areas of the body more than drier areas.[2][3] Thus, the bites are often clustered behind the knees, or beneath tight undergarments such as socks, underwear, or brassieres. Areas higher in the body (chest, back, waist-band, and under-arms) are affected more easily in small children than in adults, since children are shorter and are more likely than adults come in contact with low-lying vegetation and dry grass where chiggers thrive. Application of repellent to the shoes, lower trousers and skin is also useful. Because they are found in grass, staying on trails, roads, or paths can prevent contact. Dusting sulfur is used commercially for mite control and can be used to control chiggers in yards. The dusting of shoes, socks and trouser legs with sulfur can be highly effective in repelling chiggers.[4] Another good strategy is to recognize the chigger habitat to avoid exposure in the first place. Chiggers in North America thrive late in summer, in dry tall grasses and other thick, unshaded vegetation. Insect repellents containing one of the following active ingredients are recommended: DEET, catnip oil extract (nepetalactone), citronella oil or eucalyptus oil extract. However, in 1993 issue a study reported on tests of two commercial repellants: DEET and citrus oil: "All chiggers exposed on the filter papers treated with DEET died and did not move off the treated papers. None of the chiggers that were placed on papers treated with citrus oil were killed."[5] It was concluded that DEET was more effective than citrus oil. Chiggers can also be treated using common household vinegar (5% acetic acid)[1]. For personal protection, apply insect repellent to feet, legs, and mid-section. To reduce the itching, an application of anti-itch cream containing hydrocortisone, calamine, or benzyl benzoate is often used (though calamine has been shown not to be effective). Hydrogen peroxide and capsaicin cream has also been effective. Another good way to relieve itching is to apply heat—either by using a hand held shower with water hot as one can stand, or by heating the bite with a hair dryer. The heat method will relieve itching for about four hours and will require repeating. Applying fingernail polish to the affected area does not kill the chigger; the chigger is actually no longer present by the time a rash is noticed.[6] The most effective way of removing chiggers is by washing the affected areas with warm water and soap. This must be done as soon as possible after exposure or possible exposure. Carefully wash the ankles, feet, behind the knees, and under the arms and chest.[4] An Epsom salt bath may help alleviate itching. If one is near the seashore, wading for a few minutes in salt water will both get rid of the mites on one's skin and clothing and also alleviate the itching from their bites. Clothing, especially underwear, should be immediately discarded after returning from areas where exposure may have occurred. However, once symptoms appear, it may be too late to prevent further bites. Taking a hot bath when already covered with chigger bites may in fact be very uncomfortable and increase itching symptoms. Do not rub and scratch the skin aggressively, as this can break the skin and leave it vulnerable to a more serious infection.[4][6] In some cases, the chigger is still present when the bite appears. A 10X magnifier can be used to see the chigger and it may be removed with fine-tipped tweezers. Once it is gone, covering the bite with nail polish, calamine lotion, vaseline or other petroleum jelly, baby oil, or anything else may help the pain and itching, but will neither suffocate the chigger nor help the bites heal any faster. Medication such as antihistamines or corticosteroid creams may be prescribed by doctors, and might help in some instances. Answered by Susann Uhri 3 months ago.

Thanks for the answer on Chiggers, I am in Australia and we don't have them. Lots of other nasties. Itchy spots on Feet. Too vague, could be Athlete's foot starting up or 3.Dyshidrosis. Google images and dermnet.nz ...... does it look like this? It is allergy to a dermatophyte, which is any kind of skin loving bug. mold, yeast, bacteria, virus, parasite, pollen. It could be anywhere on your body. The rash on the hands(or feet) is just a red flag. Take anti-histamines for immediate relief. Fexofenadine 180mg, and 12 hours later 60mg, then every 12 hours 60mg. This is not the cure. But it will stop the itching. Go to [email protected] for treatments and information. Answered by Margy Ranallo 3 months ago.


What to do for a jellyfish bite?
2 years ago i was in hawaii and got stung really bad by a jellyfish...i still hav the scar and it's pretty ugly looking. i'm in hawaii again and i got stung. then a couple of days ago my sister got stung. does anyone know what's the best thing(s) are to put on it so it will heal? Asked by Elina Neufville 3 months ago.

i found this. idk: Jellyfish Sting Treatment * Rinse with seawater. Avoid fresh water because it will increase pain. Do not rub the wound or apply ice to it. * For classic box jellyfish stings, apply topical acetic acid (vinegar) or isopropyl alcohol. * Remove tentacles with tweezers. * Apply shaving cream or a paste of baking soda or mud to the wound. Shave the area with a razor or knife and then reapply vinegar or alcohol. The shaving cream or paste prevents nematocysts that have not been activated from discharging toxin during removal with the razor. * Immobilize the extremity because movement may cause the venom to spread. * Hydrocortisone cream may be applied 2-3 times daily to relieve itching. Discontinue immediately if any signs of infection appear. * Eye stings should be irrigated with 1 gallon of fresh water. * Mouth stings should be treated with 1/4 strength vinegar. Avoid vinegar if oral swelling or difficulty swallowing occurs. * For a box jellyfish sting, after treatment with vinegar or alcohol, use the pressure-immobilization technique. o The extremity should be wrapped with a bandage in a style similar to wrapping a sprained ankle. o Bind the limb firmly but do not stop the circulation. The fingers and toes should remain pink. o Leave bandages intact until medical personnel are available for treatment. * CPR may be necessary. Answered by Devorah Bigwood 3 months ago.

well, depending on the type of jellyfish it is I guess...you should ask a local nurse/doctor. Usually here in Washington when someone gets stung they put some meat tenderizer on it...I know it sounds funny, but it works! I've also heard urine (human) helps take away the sting (remember the Friends show?!) Good luck! Answered by Daisey Lazor 3 months ago.

1. Rinse off with salt water. Do not use fresh water, it will worsen the stinging pain. 2. Use vinegar (acetic acid) to neutralize the toxin in the nematocysts. 3. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen will help relieve pain. Ice or heat may also help. ***Urine will not work on a jellyfish sting. Some victims have reported pain relief, but urine does not always have enough acid to neutralize the venom. Use vinegar. Use mederma on your scar, it work on both new and old scars. Answered by Avelina Barreneche 3 months ago.

It depends on what part of the world you live in. If you were stung by a jelly fish of the coast in Australia and if they did not get you to a local ER fast enough you would croak. A jellyfishes stink carris neurotoxin and some of the worst is in Australia. Answered by Sunday Klatte 3 months ago.

u r not gonna like this but .. pea.. it works i had 2 go 2 the hospita 4 a jellyfish bite and they said that pea worked try it sumtime ~and a tip take a shower after Answered by Mimi Knittle 3 months ago.

Meat tenderizer. You can also use full strength vinegar because urine does not have enough acid to stop the sting as well. Also first rinse off in salt water, not tap water first. Answered by Valery Oropesa 3 months ago.

OK. i know exactly cause my sis got stung and it cured it right away.(she didnt fell it anymore). You can either rub cold coffee grinds on it or urine(pee). Trust me it'll work. Answered by Kathlyn Steketee 3 months ago.

no lie you put dog **** on it and it will cure it with in 48 hours my dad is a doctor, a few years ago i was at the atlantic city shore and got stung he smeared dog **** on there and it cleared it up but i have a tiny scar Answered by Jerry Richarson 3 months ago.

Life guards use a combination of vinegar and water. Answered by Cammie Hautamaki 3 months ago.

Try triple antibiotic ointment Answered by Jack Hoeke 3 months ago.


If i inured by jellyfish what can i do?
please hurry up Asked by Maria Jeschon 3 months ago.

Jellyfish Sting Treatment * Rinse with seawater. Avoid fresh water because it will increase pain. Do not rub the wound or apply ice to it. * For classic box jellyfish stings, apply topical acetic acid (vinegar) or isopropyl alcohol. * Remove tentacles with tweezers. * Apply shaving cream or a paste of baking soda or mud to the wound. Shave the area with a razor or knife and then reapply vinegar or alcohol. The shaving cream or paste prevents nematocysts that have not been activated from discharging toxin during removal with the razor. * Immobilize the extremity because movement may cause the venom to spread. * Hydrocortisone cream may be applied 2-3 times daily to relieve itching. Discontinue immediately if any signs of infection appear. * Eye stings should be irrigated with 1 gallon of fresh water. * Mouth stings should be treated with 1/4 strength vinegar. Avoid vinegar if oral swelling or difficulty swallowing occurs. * For a box jellyfish sting, after treatment with vinegar or alcohol, use the pressure-immobilization technique. o The extremity should be wrapped with a bandage in a style similar to wrapping a sprained ankle. o Bind the limb firmly but do not stop the circulation. The fingers and toes should remain pink. Answered by Alden Solkowitz 3 months ago.

I've also heard raw meat (like hamburger etc) and I myself have used tobacco which helps some. Answered by Tessa Truglio 3 months ago.

I know it sounds gross but urine can alleviate the pain and poison in the system. Answered by Cortney Schwendemann 3 months ago.

isopropyl alcohol or vinegar Answered by Lidia Krystek 3 months ago.


How do i treat a lot of jellyfish stings and make it feel better?
Need answers fast!!! Thanx Asked by Lolita Tilt 3 months ago.

Jellyfish Sting Treatment Rinse with seawater. Avoid fresh water because it will increase pain. Do not rub the wound or apply ice to it. For classic box jellyfish stings, apply topical acetic acid (vinegar) or isopropyl alcohol. Remove tentacles with tweezers. Apply shaving cream or a paste of baking soda or mud to the wound. Shave the area with a razor or knife and then reapply vinegar or alcohol. The shaving cream or paste prevents nematocysts that have not been activated from discharging toxin during removal with the razor. Immobilize the extremity because movement may cause the venom to spread. Hydrocortisone cream may be applied 2-3 times daily to relieve itching. Discontinue immediately if any signs of infection appear. Eye stings should be irrigated with 1 gallon of fresh water. Mouth stings should be treated with 1/4 strength vinegar. Avoid vinegar if oral swelling or difficulty swallowing occurs. For a box jellyfish sting, after treatment with vinegar or alcohol, use the pressure-immobilization technique. The extremity should be wrapped with a bandage in a style similar to wrapping a sprained ankle. Bind the limb firmly but do not stop the circulation. The fingers and toes should remain pink. Leave bandages intact until medical personnel are available for treatment. CPR may be necessary. Answered by Lona Vandeusen 3 months ago.

If you're bitten by a jelly fish the first priority is to stop the bleeding. Apply direct pressure to the wound with a gauze pad (depending on the severity, and ABD Pad). Apply pressure until bleeding stops. If bleeding does not stop after 15 minutes while applying pressure, use a pressure point to stop the blood flow until the bleeding stops (not exceeding 10 minutes). Once bleeding has stopped, lightly rise in the area with water. If bleeding persists, call 9-1-1 at once! (You may also want to apply some sort of vinegar based ointment to the area). If you're able to get the bleeding to stop, bandage the wound and take it easy. If you begin to have excessive pain in the area in which you were stung, you have difficulty breathing, begin to vomit or begin to get confused/disoriented, call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest UCC or ER. You may also with to take some Tylenol, Motrin or Ibuprofen for general pain. Answered by Numbers Hankinson 3 months ago.

surprisingly... meat tenderizer. it woks really good. Answered by Robin Kuwana 3 months ago.


Stung by a jellyfish?
Asked by Miguelina Boedecker 3 months ago.

1. Rinse with seawater. Avoid fresh water because it will increase pain. Do not rub the wound or apply ice to it. 2. For classic box jellyfish stings, apply topical acetic acid (vinegar) or isopropyl alcohol. 3. Remove tentacles with tweezers. 4. Apply shaving cream or a paste of baking soda or mud to the wound. 5. Shave the area with a razor or knife and then reapply vinegar or alcohol. The shaving cream or paste prevents nematocysts that have not been activated from discharging toxin during removal with the razor. 6. Immobilize the extremity because movement may cause the venom to spread. 7. Hydrocortisone cream may be applied 2-3 times daily to relieve itching. Discontinue immediately if any signs of infection appear. 8. Eye stings should be irrigated with 1 gallon of fresh water. 9. Mouth stings should be treated with 1/4 strength vinegar. Avoid vinegar if oral swelling or difficulty swallowing occurs. 10. For a box jellyfish sting, after treatment with vinegar or alcohol, use the pressure-immobilization technique. 11. The extremity should be wrapped with a bandage in a style similar to wrapping a sprained ankle. 12. Bind the limb firmly but do not stop the circulation. The fingers and toes should remain pink. 13. Leave bandages intact until medical personnel are available for treatment. 14. CPR may be necessary. Answered by Elois Condiff 3 months ago.

How did you get to a computer so fast with a jellyfish sting? This question is just a few minutes old. Answered by Arlen Crone 3 months ago.

Put meat tenderizer on it and the sting will go away. Answered by Georgette Branes 3 months ago.

mist with rubbing alcohol Answered by Micheline Fohl 3 months ago.

well this is gonna sound weird but your gonna have to pee on it sorry Answered by Kami Strohschein 3 months ago.

Thanks for sharing that. Do you have a question? Answered by Paulina Lara 3 months ago.


What other things can I do to make Seborrheic Dermatitis less milld?
I'm sorry i did not specify where this is occuring. It is happening a little bit to the right of my mouth, in the crease of my nose, on the right side of my face close to the nose area, behind my ears, and obviously my scalp. Asked by Conchita Baldassara 3 months ago.

Okay so yesterday I saw a Dermatologist and yes I have the dreaded Seborrheic Dermatitis. I am a 19 year old male by the way. I know this conditon is uncurable but I have to stay as positive as I can about it. It really sucks but there is nothing I can do about it. The things I was prescribed for it was Triamcinolone 0.025% Cream, Salex Cream, and Ketoconazole Shampoo. I know these will help it and I am not worried as I actually know what I have now. But if anyone could tell me some other ways to help it as far as diet is concerned. Also working out, I like to try and work out a few times a week to stay in shape for the winter. Will excessive exercise help or harm me? I was also wondering if going fake tanning would help it as I know UV rays help the skin greatly. Any advice would be helpful (:. Answered by Julia Sherill 3 months ago.

Hello, (This is a Yahoo! answer; elsewhere it has been hijacked). I'm a retired uk gp, and have myself suffered with seb derm for a lifetime, or 50 years anyway. Being a doctor myself, naturally I have reasearched the subject thoroughly. My experience with myself and with other patients has been, that unless you control the rash on your scalp, it is pointless trying to control it on your face and body, (you don't say where you are most affected). Also, regular removal of the scalp's natural output of "sebum" (skin oil) gives the Seb Derm germ/bug much less "food to eat." The Seb Derm germ (a yeast), lives by feeding on your fresh skin oil. It is the breakdown-products of your skin oil, (or the Seb Derm germ's "poo"), that so irritate the skin. I would recommend washing your hair every day, with a plain detergent, (I use Fairy Liquid ). This de-greases the scalp wonderfully. If you are taking either DHEA, or Androgenic Steroids, for body-building, stop. It's the androgen male hormones that cause the scalp to produce so much skin oil. You don't need any extra androgen. I used to use prescribed "2% salicylic acid lotion" on my scalp at night, to dissolve the dandruff scales, and wash it off next morning. I see you are using 6% salicylic acid cream, (Salex), same idea. But now I do the "cheapskate" thing by making my own acid/alcohol mixture; I use a home-made mixture of one-third neat vodka (40% alcohol), and two-thirds white vinegar, (5% acetic acid). It works just as well, except that my wife objects to the gross vinegar smell until it dries, Your ketoconazole shampoo works by killing off the Seb Derm yeast germ, temporarily. Shampoo also removes hair grease, although not as effectively as a detergent. When I'm bad, I first wash my scalp with Fairy Liquid, then with Selsun shampoo, ("Selsun" is Selenium Sulphide shampoo, - a competitor to Ketoconazole Shampoo, - I suggest it might be worth trying them both, to see which works best for you). Exercise may affect you via the sweating of the scalp during exercise. If you are getting the rash at the edges of your hair, then profuse sweating may irritate the rash, washing down onto the forehead. On the other hand, if taking exercise results in your showering (washing your hair) twice a day, expect the rash to get much better. Fake tanning has not helped me, although any cosmetic product to obscure the rash will make it less obvious. Fake tanning these days is via a spray. The old kind of fake tanning which is "active," - where you apply a cream to the skin which reacts chemically with the skin over the next 4 to 6 hours, - has maybe flared up my seb derm temporarily. I don't think diet has a great role to play in treatment, certainly it has never helped me any. I have nothing aginst trying anything that might work to reduce skin oil, theoretically. I would caution you against using too much Triamcinolone cream on your face, where, (because it is one of the stronger cortisone creams), it can cause thinning of the skin long-term, and also "capillary spiders." Most UK Dermatologists advise nothing stronger than 1% Hydrocortisone cream directly on the face. Cortisone creams do not kill the bug, and they do not reduce the output of the skin-oils which the yeast bug feeds on. They only work by damping down skin inflammation. They can however, be apparently miraculously effective on first use, - and the temptation is then to use more and more cream as this effect wears off. In the long term, you are much better controlling skin oil with detergent, applying ketoconazole or selsun shampoo, and dissolving scales (dandruff) away with salicylic acid/alcohol or acetic acid/alcohol on the scalp. For the face, you can also get Ketoconazole cream, which works in a more "fundamental" way by killing the yeast-bug responsible. I have experience of having taken a course of Ketoconazole *tablets* for this, (in fact I took a similar, close-relative drug). I found I was completely cured for a whole month, with no other treatment being needed. However, after a month it all gradually came back, and no longer responded to the drug by mouth, (I assumed that a drug-resistant form of the yeast-bug had emerged). This idea might be worth keeping in reserve. On the scalp, I have found a "Gel" better than a "Cream," because it's less sticky on the hair. I would recopmmend "Synalar Gel," which is the same idea and same strength as triamcinolone, but is a clear jelly preparation. Also helps keep the hair in place. I hope this is of some help. Best wishes, Belliger retired uk gp Answered by Adelina Minzy 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What other things can I do to make Seborrheic Dermatitis less milld? Okay so yesterday I saw a Dermatologist and yes I have the dreaded Seborrheic Dermatitis. I am a 19 year old male by the way. I know this conditon is uncurable but I have to stay as positive as I can about it. It really sucks but there is nothing I can do about it. The things I was prescribed for... Answered by Theola Culcasi 3 months ago.

Okay, I had the same exact thing you did very bad actually a few years ago. I found something that worked for me and it hasn't returned in almost 5 years now. I had it really bad on my face and especially all over my nose and the sides and up under the eyes at the cheek bones. It can be very embarrassing when out in public. I have very sensitive skin only on my face so certain creams that the doctors prescribed just made it worse expect for the potent steroid cream which is not good to use every day as it can cause permanent thinning of the skin which you don't want. The only thing I use now to treat this is unscented glycerin soap which is something you can purchase at a whole foods market or go online and order some. It's very inexpensive and my face is 100% clear and has never returned. You can get a whole bar of it for around $1.50 or so. Every time I go I purchase 6 or 7 bars of it in the unscented of course and it last me several months. I use that one bar on my face and body and have never had a break out since. Mine cleared all up within a few days and I had it very bad. This was the only thing that worked for me after years of seeing dermatologists and I discovered it myself. Glycerin soap is all natural and gives you that squeaky clean feel and does not dry out your skin at all which is what I always had problems with before with other products over the counter and what the doctors prescribed. Dermatologist sometimes don't understand that people with extremely sensitive skin can make matters worse with the products they suggest. Right now I have the clearest skin I ever had in my whole life. The product I use now is "365" unscented glycerin soap and it's the only thing that has saved me. But if you use it don't use anything else because it can make it worse. Just use this and let me know how it worked for you. It's very simple and cheap and a lot of people don't really know much about it. Answered by Demetrius Korwatch 3 months ago.

Hi Belliger. Many thanks on behalf of all SD sufferers for your article and advice which I am sure will be benefit to some if not all SD sufferers. I am a 37 year old male and started getting the condition aroun 5 years ago. It mainly effects my scalp, forehead, nose, chin, cheeks, basically anywhere above my neck line. I have read hundreds of articles and spent hundreds of pounds on different medication but have never found an effective treatment for myself. I was therefore very interested in your comments (having never read this anywhere else) about the scalp condition must be treated or everywhere else will continue to be a problem. You mention that you wash your hair daily with a plain detergent (Fairy Liquid), along with your 'cheapskate' mixture which you do at night. My question is how often do you apply the 'cheapskate' mixture, daily, weekly etc. Also, do you wash your hair if anything other then the detergent. I thought if I try your tried and tested method then it would be a good starting point for me. Many thanks in anticipation of your response and your time in writing this article. Answered by Colton Lourence 3 months ago.

This is the same technique I have taught over 138,000 men and women in 157 countries to successfully treat their excessive sweating condition over the past 7 years! Remember: Watch the whole video, as the ending will pleasantly surprise you� Answered by Wilbur Tallon 3 months ago.

always when i post a question, even if it is the easiest one, they cant provide me a good informed answer on this site. wtf happened to people that really make the effort to write an answer?? Answered by Mickey Maret 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
040097/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
040168/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
040609/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
088759/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012770/001 VOSOL HC ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
040097/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
040168/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
040609/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
085492/001 ACETIC ACID W/ HYDROCORTISONE ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
086844/001 ORLEX HC ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
087143/001 ACETASOL HC ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%
088759/001 HYDROCORTISONE AND ACETIC ACID ACETIC ACID, GLACIAL; HYDROCORTISONE SOLUTION/DROPS/OTIC 2% and 1%

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