Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012674/001.

Names and composition

"HEXADROL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DEXAMETHASONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012674/001 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
012675/004 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
012675/007 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
012675/009 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
012675/010 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
014694/002 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE SODIUM PHOSPHATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 4MG PHOSPHATE per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
014694/003 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE SODIUM PHOSPHATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 10MG PHOSPHATE per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
014694/004 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE SODIUM PHOSPHATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 20MG PHOSPHATE per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011664/001 DECADRON DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011664/002 DECADRON DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011664/003 DECADRON DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011664/004 DECADRON DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011664/005 DECADRON DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011664/006 DECADRON DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 6MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012376/002 DECADRON DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
012674/001 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
012675/004 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
012675/007 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
012675/009 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
012675/010 HEXADROL DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
012731/002 DECASPRAY DEXAMETHASONE AEROSOL/TOPICAL 0.04% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
013422/001 MAXIDEX DEXAMETHASONE SUSPENSION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.1%
013538/001 DECADERM DEXAMETHASONE GEL/TOPICAL 0.1%
022315/001 OZURDEX DEXAMETHASONE IMPLANT/INTRAVITREAL 0.7MG
040700/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
080399/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
080968/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
083296/002 AEROSEB-DEX DEXAMETHASONE AEROSOL/TOPICAL 0.01% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
083420/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
083806/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
084013/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
084081/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
084084/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
084086/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
084327/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
084457/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
084610/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
084611/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
084612/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084613/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
084614/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
084754/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
084763/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
084764/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
084765/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
084766/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
084990/001 DEXONE 1.5 DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
084991/001 DEXONE 0.5 DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
084992/001 DEXONE 4 DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
084993/001 DEXONE 0.75 DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
085376/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
085455/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
085456/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
085458/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
085818/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
085840/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
087533/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
087534/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
087916/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
088148/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
088149/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
088160/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 0.75MG
088237/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
088238/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
088248/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE SOLUTION/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
088252/001 DEXAMETHASONE INTENSOL DEXAMETHASONE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 1MG per ML
088254/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
088306/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
088316/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
088481/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 6MG
088997/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
089170/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE SUSPENSION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.1%
090891/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
091188/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.5MG per 5ML
201270/001 DEXAMETHASONE DEXAMETHASONE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG

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Answered questions

Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Carolann Farson 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Mitchell Spriggle 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Eric Capozzoli 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Zackary Panakos 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Agustin Celaya 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Lavette Mohring 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Santa Alvino 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Tamar Minarcin 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Chin Agostini 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Angeline Hemric 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Denny Lutkins 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Carli Domas 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Rikki Loegering 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Rickie Orscheln 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Odelia Paluzzi 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Meryl Overfield 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Bethany Lachat 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Shonda Dumdei 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Ingeborg Maenpaa 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Jeffrey Bousley 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Eleni Girardeau 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Marlene Kiesel 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Claudio Akapo 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Deedee Autery 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Sheridan Ruehle 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Marisa Kahae 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Bob Lohden 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Lewis Mazzaferro 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Marshall Willig 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Olinda Holladay 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Jeanna Pata 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Meredith Genier 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Chanelle Cristiano 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Chassidy Hotze 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Sanjuanita Eshom 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by Christopher Trigo 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Jack Bend 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Mi Mcclurkin 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Leonora Dieterich 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Adah Wenzell 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Lashawna Hershfield 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Eladia Sannutti 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Oliver Deleppo 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Evangelina Hamley 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by Theressa Cunliffe 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Emily Gutkin 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Brianne Lotthammer 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Johanne Delemos 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Herb Samperi 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Iluminada Woester 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Lesli Gasch 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Latrice Rager 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Shantae Kilian 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Frank Ruscetti 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Delois Penhollow 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by Janise Brummett 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Julia Blois 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Leeanna Lozier 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Debbi Tunnell 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Britt Craine 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Vickie Rockovich 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Danica Foo 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Kiley Cappa 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Alysa Klez 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Thuy Piatkowski 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Abel Bogin 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Jessi Manter 11 months ago.


Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Magaly Walley 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Janina Wadlington 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Margarette Kopriva 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Liza Gabrelcik 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Allen Barbarin 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Juan Millette 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Polly Spacht 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Fay Rupe 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Vanessa Allio 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Izetta Demelo 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Veola Strelow 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Fredric Fina 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Ilana Tyra 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Delicia Longbottom 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Bernetta Manternach 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Milagros Carnall 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Jessie Tobiassen 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Pura Gandolfi 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Alyce Clemmon 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Lonnie Nater 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Keeley Mcquillan 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Matha Ureta 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Art Pluvoise 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Genie Luckett 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Sonya Munk 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Jody Gaiters 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Gayla Roghair 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Audie Christy 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Leslie Cuello 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Barbra Sandland 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Cristine Farina 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Cleo Vattes 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Jimmy Pickelsimer 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Marica Babjeck 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Graciela Trost 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by Maris Haflett 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Tammera Schindler 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Hubert Sagredo 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Toby Gonzale 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Margarita Hussian 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Walter Molinari 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Ester Tatnall 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Paul Doser 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Tessa Sweat 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by Majorie Dompe 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Vanesa Swinney 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Louanne Visaya 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Yuette Gilberg 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Lavonna Edgecomb 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Melisa Yballe 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Sebrina Stefanowicz 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Mariella Roder 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Herman Larbie 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Rozella Hultgren 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Elois Austgen 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by May Gathje 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Jamey Mccollough 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Sierra Mathieu 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Bethann Bultema 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Marylin Infinger 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Marie Edgell 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Deon Thilmony 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Malvina Everding 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Donald Blixt 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Paulina Hamel 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Karyn Awe 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Brant Keithan 11 months ago.


Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Niesha Plexico 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Lavette Horsfall 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Mitchell Benedict 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Dimple Manger 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Lupe Verfaillie 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Brandy Castles 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Hilde Seiersen 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Tressie Malicoat 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Ladawn Baldwyn 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Keith Veater 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Drusilla Seraiva 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Winnifred Guilbeault 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Sari Barrett 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Blanca Rykert 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Mallory Haroun 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Andre Mongold 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Norman Zinck 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Paulita Napue 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Marine Kinikini 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Ryann Marrone 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Jesusita Siebold 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Ileen Selan 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Arline Kingdom 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Clarence Rasp 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Eric Grigalonis 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Glenda Hentrich 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Werner Bubolz 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Ingeborg Montreuil 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Heather Eikmeier 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Ilene Bierkortte 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Lelah Lewi 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Lanell Tsao 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Shon Oshey 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Dominica Smugala 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Ingeborg Calco 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by Tifany Kuilan 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Sacha Prvitt 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Dacia Stensrud 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Efren Disbro 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Rosalee Muckelvaney 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Tammara Courtright 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Lovella Konopski 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Latrisha Mceachran 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Tarsha Sin 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by Yu Devarona 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Jeannette Casler 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Earlene Debnam 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Daphine Hollerman 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Rea Papin 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Amiee Behanna 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Kathlyn Harger 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Terrence Cruiz 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Doloris Recupero 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Diedre Negbenebor 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Aura Murgia 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by Carletta Santopietro 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Karlyn Gehlhausen 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Inocencia Lockrem 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Christin Friedrichsen 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Christina Toaston 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Robbyn Heusinkveld 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Lucien Fruchey 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Carie Maggit 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Demetria Schiltz 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Chong Stoneking 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Ferdinand Tinch 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Malia Hehir 11 months ago.


Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Milan Toppa 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Anderson Vrias 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Manuela Broncheau 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Ozie Muncher 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Caitlin Largena 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Isiah Wehrle 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Bonita Steiniger 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Billy Andersson 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Nicky Gogocha 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Shirely Kridler 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Jackeline Bliler 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Tyler Bundick 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Reva Rickert 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Kristyn Jamie 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Marylynn Macha 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Billi Filippides 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Bella Hemminger 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Florinda Reichenbach 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Kenisha Dantonio 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Anissa Miesen 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Walter Aldrige 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Merlene Waska 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Liliana Wellard 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Bernetta Eldredge 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Peter Tulley 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Tina Alberti 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Nida Bonugli 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Hayden Weatherhead 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Angle Kindel 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Antony Laurence 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Alexis Korando 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Audria Celli 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Dina Kolosky 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Cherilyn Marchionese 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Kemberly Garced 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by In Doubrava 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Cherelle Lewczyk 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Catheryn Gipple 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Corliss Hasch 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Jerica Janski 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Ena Keator 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Michelina Cicero 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Wilber Rousell 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Lakenya Umeh 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by George Ingole 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Austin Shirer 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Ruben Hertzler 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Marketta Lomartire 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Jeanne Quinzi 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Annabel Loudermilk 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Jene Kervin 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Meggan Moleski 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Anissa Mcnish 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Tangela Budz 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Fay Kirkling 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by Jovan Kotch 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Alessandra Greenleaf 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Valentine Zbikowski 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Darell Insognia 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Shaunte Brar 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Theressa Lowrie 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Jenine Daughrity 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Justin Durando 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Elisabeth Cecchetti 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Aaron Kjergaard 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Celine Leen 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Brittaney Lobello 11 months ago.


Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Page Keomany 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Glendora Persia 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Voncile Lovato 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Russel Hallmon 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Wava Testa 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Gregory Togashi 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Don Nirenberg 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Romeo Nirschl 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Royce Schiffler 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Wilson Engnath 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Earle Hamano 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Charline Racioppo 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Judith Petzold 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Suzi Jennifer 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Shaun Hollingsworth 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Aida Derocher 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Janey Kliever 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Hui Gellert 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Adrian Bilkiss 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Latricia Juilfs 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Mabel Pitcher 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Chase Starrett 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Luvenia Daudt 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Cherrie Deldeo 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Holly Behran 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Kelle Bertolami 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Wynell Lab 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Brittni Kogen 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Stevie Kounick 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Jesusita Ansell 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Teodoro Nagengast 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Osvaldo Schaad 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Emory Conkright 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Lashawna Glatzel 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Deandra Pupa 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by Estela Dergance 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Floretta Flaum 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Hellen Ganim 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Jacqulyn Daigneault 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Krystin Niimi 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Autumn Mair 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Chloe Mansour 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Jay Mcintyde 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Sheila Burkey 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by Katharyn Googe 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Corinne Niehus 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Vernon Dunphe 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Deangelo Muckenthaler 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Vanita Aw 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Rena Turvaville 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Ines Namisnak 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Dyan Weekly 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Terresa Heiberger 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Osvaldo Donchez 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Tanesha Ramjan 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by Stacy Eastes 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Star Swank 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Codi Bordenkircher 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Romelia Bang 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Madelene Declet 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Augustine Miers 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Belinda Stouch 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Horace Salzano 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Elene Lemasters 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Elouise Hugger 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Maricruz Curnow 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Margot Bever 11 months ago.


Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Becky Routzen 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Ai Dobrosky 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Eula Vanduyne 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Jinny Nishina 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Terra Kowitz 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Antoine Mildren 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Ike Mccusker 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Latoyia Shonka 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Mercy Hoell 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Mellie Heter 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Toya Pizur 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by In Pourvase 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Vallie Amado 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Maisie Boumthavee 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Cinthia Alberti 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Thurman Kief 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Fredric Stain 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Sandi Hick 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Kira Beninati 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Anya Brye 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Glenda Barters 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Wendolyn Kaplin 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Myong Masood 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Luis Allegre 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Cedric Coughenour 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Christia Brakebill 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Scott Jewel 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Babette Brano 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Cathy Morarity 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Lynn Pankiw 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Michiko Aronowitz 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Joeann Abramoff 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Tracy Simi 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Jeffrey Jakeman 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Alton Mauseth 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by Mariann Reinders 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Florinda Litchford 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Magan Nissan 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Tilda Scavone 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Era Higgin 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Rheba Bigalk 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Katharyn Bosio 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Evelin Kirksey 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Miquel Tierce 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by Beata Vandellen 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Maryln Marien 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Frederic Emoto 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Jesica Sylney 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Matthew Scripter 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Lonna Vettel 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Zenia Tacke 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Lamonica Daye 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Asley Leicht 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Jeanine Darrow 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Dee Fengler 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by Kevin Renneker 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Mindi Esselman 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Glenn Prescod 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Melvina Hankey 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Rayford Stobie 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Edwina Sterker 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Shani Her 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Tristan Kiekbusch 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Kelsi Tennies 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Viki Broadnax 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Germaine Piguet 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Erlene Heid 11 months ago.


Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Kalyn Keesee 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Lucinda Hougham 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Katherina Courcelle 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Janessa Diponio 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Gerald Flair 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Stacia Gores 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Adrian Reatherford 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Rogelio Piermont 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Sierra Banana 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Alta Zarlengo 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Chastity Stania 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Chae Kellar 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Kerry Vokes 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Odell Ingels 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Royce Saas 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Ellsworth Crovo 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Dario Dacanay 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Kendal Macia 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Vernon Stickler 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Lolita Reff 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Louetta Tewksbury 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Genna Bachtold 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Nicholle Stmarie 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Shaun Farrill 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Maritza Bohnenkamp 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Numbers Hanstein 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Anitra Mcgaffey 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Blake Modena 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Shanti Mathew 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Marguerita Charves 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Raleigh Rinaldi 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Peggie Bona 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Corine Mellom 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Lia Kallio 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Helene Bocage 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by Vanna Shelite 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Jerilyn Warning 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Michelle Weidower 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Maria Scoresby 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Joan Jesko 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Zonia Dansie 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Desire Liao 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Thurman Carreon 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Una Presume 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by Donnell Boham 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Marion Bagni 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Ivory Romanski 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Pearle Josephsen 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Natalya Beucler 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Coralie Provine 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Theresia Levielle 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Georgina Weneck 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Sigrid Szymkowski 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Wm Silvestro 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Latonya Biddy 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by Daryl Eustice 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Marlon Bullock 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Vivan Suleiman 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Domenica Mccraven 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Florentino Shelenberger 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Shakira Raviscioni 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Lavona Birtcher 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Dayna Voto 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Allan Vanhoutte 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Laurinda Kochanski 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Chere Oline 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Rosendo Frierson 11 months ago.


Some one who HAD Gynecomastia, can you help me please?
when did it go away? and did you work out? if soo did it make it worse Asked by Jalisa Parmele 11 months ago.

Well if u like to see a doctor u can ask about these certain medications:Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia Answered by Arie Lempicki 11 months ago.

My brother, who is 57, has had gynecomastia ever since puberty. Yes, he does work out. You may want to consult an endocrinologist. I know my brother has Kleinfelter's Syndrome, which is quite rare. He never consulted the right doctor. Answered by Wilbur Soltero 11 months ago.


I have had a very slight case of gynecomastia all my life. Could this be caused by allergy medication?
I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it.... Asked by Emile Kalbfleisch 11 months ago.

I looked up the causes because I was curious. I could not find anything that stated any causes that might be causes for my gynecomastia. I have had several blood test done over my life and all of my levels of hormones and such were well within the normal. It is killing me to find out why I cannot get rid of it. Could allergy medication cause it? It's about the only thing I can recall taht I have been on since I first had gynecomastia? Answered by Hattie Diblase 11 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Sanora Woodke 11 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Bertha Klitzner 11 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Nena Altamirano 11 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Jacquline College 11 months ago.


Man boobs??
I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse... Asked by Pamula Brescia 11 months ago.

I am a 15 yr old male and I have a sort of weird prob. My chest is swollen and my friends say it looks like man boobs and laugh at me. My gf says she likes them but I think she's just trying not to hurt my feelings. I'm embarrassed to take off my clothes in the locker room and it just keeps getting worse because I jiggle so I tried on my sister's bra to see if that would help, it's a B and it's too small. I'm not fat so it looks really out of proportion and weird. What's wrong with me? Answered by Grazyna Cuneo 11 months ago.

You need to see your doctor. This is a phase for some boys. You should try to get some compress shirts. Here is what WEBMD states: Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Ramona Earheart 11 months ago.

man boobs or gynecomastia occurs in up to 1/3 of adolescent males. In many guys, it will go away as you physicallly mature. In a smaller proportion of guys, it may remain into adulthood. Toning the muscles of the chest can help to reduce the appearance of gynecomastia by burning the fat component. But if there is a significant glandular componenet to the gynecomastia, the only solution is to have it surgically removed. Answered by Perry Dilday 11 months ago.

i'm not saying you do, but if you smoke pot it can cause man boobs. if you smoke up, then quit, if not go see a doctor, breast cance can strike men as well! Answered by Leatha Nickolls 11 months ago.

Start working out on your pecs and deltoids to help tighten and firm your chest and hopefully decrease the mass of your cheast fat. Answered by Bernie Alpis 11 months ago.

It might be more than just gynecomastia. Get a doctor to check it. Answered by Muoi Frobish 11 months ago.

how about doing some chest exercises. you can build up your muscles and so-called boobs will disappear. Answered by Dreama Hibbits 11 months ago.


How do you treat gynecomastia?
Hi all! I'm a 15 year old male who has gynecomastia. I find it very bothering... I'm not fat and am of normal weight. How do i treat gynecomastia non-surgically? Thank you Asked by Carson Diekema 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, teen boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In teen boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. In pre-teen boys, gynecomastia is very rare. In a few cases, it has been linked to regular use of lavender or tea tree oil in certain lotions or oils.1 Gynecomastia can also be caused by an estrogen-producing tumor. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by another condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or by hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medicines may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medicines used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medicines used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medicines. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cell DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medicines (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Products containing tea tree oil or lavender oil.1 What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, a biopsy may be done to rule out other problems. Any man who finds a one-sided breast lump should let his doctor know if he has close relatives who have had breast cancer (mother, sister, or daughter). If there is any concern about cancer, a lump can be checked with a biopsy or surgery. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and teens normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medicine or disease, stopping the medicine or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Myrta Lesure 11 months ago.

I noticed I had it since I wa 10 and I'm 17 now . you need surgery to remove the tissue as you can't burn it or exercise it off Answered by Felipa Gowin 11 months ago.

treat it like a normal and this is not critical at all Answered by Devora Polinsky 11 months ago.

TL;dr Andractim gel can help you with that. Answered by Jazmine Koinzan 11 months ago.


Question for someone who knows about birth control?
Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective.I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill.If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and... Asked by Rachele Marreo 11 months ago.

For the past couple of days, I have been spotting slightly (pink when I wipe). My breasts have been a bit more tender than normal. They're large, and often are, anyway, but like I said, a bit more than normal. Other pregnancy symptoms don't count mostly, since they're typical of me, anyway. I pee a lot, sleep a lot, etc. Because of the spotting, my bf worried a bit I may be pregnant, which I didn't even think of, since I'm always careful with my birth control. I'm on the pill, Lo Ovral. To see if I did anything wrong, I researched a bit and found this: Answered by Migdalia Saris 11 months ago.

Some drugs can make Lo Ovral less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using Lo Ovral, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C); * phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin); * modafinil (Provigil); * dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol); * an antibiotic; * seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others; * a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or * HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others. Answered by Tashina Sturdnant 11 months ago.

I knew about the prescription stuff, but what I'm worried about is the tylenol (I take it usually for headaches and neck-aches) and the Vitamin C (which I take 1000 mg a day to boost my immune system). Does anyone know how much less effective these can make my birth control? I'm concerned, because I really don't want to be pregnant right now. And yes, I know I can take a home pregnancy test. Answered by Gertrudis Mastin 11 months ago.

Yes, the pill is all I count on, since it is 99% effective. I'm 22, living with my bf, and we have sex day and night, so I don't worry about if I'm ovulating since again, I count on the pill. If I am pregnant, I don't even know what I'll do, since I know I don't want to have kids yet, and I don't even know for sure if I WANT to have any... I enjoy my freedom. :) You can't see the world if you're toting a baby along, which is why I've done my best to be responsible and not end up like my mom did (preggy at 15, had child at 16). Answered by Diane Simkowitz 11 months ago.

Sweetie, don't count on just the pill. I have 3 kids and was on birth control with all 3. Thank the Lord I was married when we got pregnant and I din't have to worry. The best advice I can give you is take the test and see that way you can make plans on how to care for yourself and the baby. You don't want to be pregnant and keep taking the pill. Hope that helps!! Good Luck and God Bless!! Answered by Lovie Mathena 11 months ago.

The only way to be sure is to go see your doctor. i dont see how Tylenol would affect the effectiveness, but im no expert in the pills. I do know that the lower the hormonal level, the higher the incidence is to get pregnant. Wait a little bit and go have a Doctor do a blood test. The blood may just be spotting which is common while on the pill. Best of luck to you. Answered by Voncile Eversoll 11 months ago.

Did you just get on this pill? Because spotting is a side effect. I got spotting for the first time at different occassions within 3 months of getting on a new pill. If this is a new pill, the fact that your breasts are tender could mean that your breasts are growing because some pills make breasts grow! I doubt it that you are pregnant, but why don't you just take a pregancy test to find out the truth? Answered by Kiera Mcquiddy 11 months ago.

Well have you done any of those things to make it not work? As with all birth control pills you gotta be careful not to take any other pills thats might cancel out that one and think really hard...do you think you had sex when you were ovulating? that is 2 weeks after your period if so then there could be a chance because other than that you cant concieve unless you ovulate Answered by Amanda Sindt 11 months ago.

Cough syrup can make your birth control less effective, any kind of medicine can. basically, wait til you miss your period before worrying that you're pregnant, take a test then. also, if you've only been on the pill a couple months, your body takes time to adjust to it, so you can spot at random times in your cycle Answered by Paulette Edith 11 months ago.

i wouldn't get too worried about the spotting. i'm on birth control and about once a month i'll have a little pink as well. its nothing to worry about... just a side affect of birth control. the breast tenderness could also just be another side affect. expecially if you are spotting, that means that ur body has those hormones actively, so it would make sense for your breasts to be tender and have spotting at the same time. i wouldnt get too worried at this point! Answered by Nickolas Hermanson 11 months ago.

I'd say you should invest in a pregnancy test, just to be safe. If you recently switced birth control (method or brand), spotting tends to be a common side effect, but if you've been on it a while, taking a test can't hurt. Answered by Thanh Beu 11 months ago.

Sometimres your body starts to not work correctly with the current pill, I was on one for about 8 months and started spotting, it turned out that the hormones in my body didn't like it and it was not strong enough for me. Go to you doctor she may think the same thing for you, and it could be easy enough to stop by just changing the pill you on. Answered by Perry Witcraft 11 months ago.

While the pill is very affective it isn't full proof so you could be pregnant if you aren't using condoms as backup ... but the pill can sometime cause pregnancy symptoms. Answered by Lyn Gerow 11 months ago.


Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i... Asked by Ted Infante 11 months ago.

im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful. Answered by Felicia Chubbs 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Wilford Cabe 11 months ago.

the above answer was great but surely copied and would have been better if u provided him with a link Answered by Chas Newball 11 months ago.

plastic surgeon..... Answered by Michael Papasergi 11 months ago.


Male Boobs Why? weight is not the only factor, Hormones???
"male boobs not so funny if you have them I know they are from overweight issues but what else is a cause I have had boobs to a degree even as a child" in Yahoo! Answers Asked by Eufemia Muska 11 months ago.

What is gynecomastia? Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. What causes gynecomastia? In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth. In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected. When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). What are the symptoms? In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own. How is gynecomastia diagnosed? Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems. How is it treated? Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Lyndia Caroll 11 months ago.

A complete srs done by a competent surgeon would provide this procedure so that one could pretty well "pass" (as the say) in society. T'is a marvelous end result to see this happen and to see from whence it cumeth.. It's a very costly venture indeed. But for the time being, I'll be satisfied to remain a long time married transvestite, and like Kathryn I too don't have an adam's apple - I guess when I was born, they were fresh out of apples, but I did manage to get a couple of plums, which we "hide away" for when they're needed.. Rachelle In High Heels Answered by Laquanda Beachamp 11 months ago.

Genetics and estrogen. To get rid of them if they are caused by estrogen, you need to take Clomid. Many men are plagued by this condition. Good luck Answered by Doloris Setters 11 months ago.

Gynecomastia (American English) or gynaecomastia (British English) is the development of abnormally large breasts on men. The term comes from the Greek gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates, in adolescents, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys, 90% of such cases the symptoms disappear in a matter of months to a few years at most. It is generally a result of an imbalance in hormones, although there are many different root causes. Gynecomastia is not simply a buildup of adipose tissue, but includes the development of glandular tissue as well. Physiologic gynecomastia occurs in neonates, at puberty and with aging. Potential pathologic causes of gynecomastia are: medications including hormones, increased serum estrogen, decreased testosterone production, androgen receptor defects, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, HIV, and other chronic illness. Gynecomastia as a result of spinal cord injury and refeeding after starvation has been reported. In 25% of cases, the cause of the gynecomastia is not known. Medications cause 10-20% of cases of gynecomastia. These include cimetidine, omeprazole, spironolactone, finasteride and certain antipsychotics. Some act directly on the breast tissue, while other lead to increased secretion of prolactin from the pituitary by blocking the actions of dopamine (prolactin-inhibiting factor/PIF) on the lactotrope cell groups in the anterior pituitary. Androstenedione, used as a performance enhancing food supplement, can lead to breast enlargement by excess estrogen activity. Medications used in the treatment of prostate cancer, such as antiandrogens and GnRH analogs can also cause gynecomastia. Marijuana use is also thought by some to be a possible cause, but this is controversial. Increased estrogen levels can also occur in certain testicular tumors, and in hyperthyroidism. Certain adrenal tumors cause elevated levels of androstenedione which is converted by the enzyme aromatase into estrone, a form of estrogen. Other tumors that secrete hCG can increase estrogen. A decrease in estrogen clearance can occur in liver disease, and this may be the mechanism of gynecomastia in liver cirrhosis. Obesity tends to increase estrogen levels. Decreased testosterone production can occur in congenital or acquired testicular failure, for example in genetic disorders such as Klinefelter Syndrome. Diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary can also lead to low testosterone. Abuse of anabolic steroids has a similar effect. Although stopping these medications can lead to regression of the gynecomastia, surgery is sometimes necessary to eliminate the condition. The condition usually can be diagnosed by examination by a physician. Occasionally, imaging by X-rays or ultrasound is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Blood tests are required to see if there is any underlying disease causing the gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is not physically harmful, but in some cases can be an indicator of other more dangerous underlying conditions. Furthermore, it can frequently present social and psychological difficulties for the sufferer. Weight loss can alter the condition in cases where it is triggered by obesity, but for many it will not eliminate it as the breast tissue remains. Treating the underlying cause of the gynecomastia may lead to improvement in the condition. Patients should stop taking medications which can cause gynecomastia. Anti-estrogen medications, such as tamoxifen and clomiphene or androgens can be used. Aromatase inhibitors are another treatment option, although they are not universally approved for the treatment of gynecomastia. Endocrinological attention may help during the first 2-3 years. After that window, however, the breast tissue tends to remain and harden, leaving surgery (either liposuction or reduction mammoplasty) the only treatment option. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to prevent gynecomastia in patients with prostate cancer prior to estrogen therapy. There are people who choose to live with the condition and use a bra as an option for treatment. Answered by Sana Humburg 11 months ago.

Try Estrogenex. It will block the conversion of testosterone to estrogen, a cause for gyno (***** ****) on men. Answered by Warner Cosby 11 months ago.

My best friend took clomid, took 2 years but now he isnt afraid to go to the beach anymore. Answered by Ulysses Lampsas 11 months ago.

theres a name for it and i cant remember the name but later on, plastic surgery will remove it for you. Is genetic. Do not worry, it can be taken care of. Answered by Kasie Koneval 11 months ago.


Uh Oh hormone question Manbooobs?
Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls...Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and... Asked by Collette Imfeld 11 months ago.

I've got man boobs, I'm 20 and not fat, I'm not skinny but i'm not at the manboob size. I went to the doc and he sent me to an endrocronologist. My question is, if I end up taking hormones or w/e to get rid of these... how long does it normally take for changes to actually happen physically speaking? Is this gonna take like 5 years or some sh!t to change or will it be the week after I change things up? Also could I just get a reduction done? If so anyone know a good doc for it? Or how to start about getting it done. I've read that you can get it covered by insurance if you can show how it's a health problem (which won't be hard...) Answered by Natisha Fukumoto 11 months ago.

Also, I can't seem to lose weight... I can't go in public to exercise cause it's just too freaking embarrassing to do and I can't puke because when I do it feels like I'm getting kicked in the balls... Also, plz don't just tell me to do pushups, I've done more than I can count and they've done nothing (but maybe got bigger... I dunno) Answered by Tuan Delguercio 11 months ago.

you have what is called gynecomastia. Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men. Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including: Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol. Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine). Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]). Digitalis and other heart medications. Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth. Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone). Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants). Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed. Answered by Jean Shouldice 11 months ago.

man boobs are normal... don't get upset... you need to build up the chest area.. tighten those muscles up. women love a big chest on a man... medication is only going to mess you up chemically.... look at other men... some are sunken chested... and others have big chests.. just did they strengthen up their chests are do their chests sag? some exercise regiment and a program to help tone your muscles can help considerably... instead of the endocrinologist how about a dietitian and a physical trainer! some foods do go to the chest like some carbs and fats.... and you may have that problem... a dietitian can help you figure out what foods may work better for you in the long run and a physical trainer can help you build up flabby and effect muscle that seems to sag much quicker than other muscle tissues. researching online about foods and their effects on the body and help and muscle building (moderate) that can help build up muscle that tends to resist the usual activity such as your chest.. belly and rear end. :D try this before some doctor screws you up with drugs. Answered by Eura Grunewald 11 months ago.

Oscar's video is the creation to Mark Ranson and Katy B music anyplace on this planet in the event you concentrate to it at two:14 of the vid you'll be able to right here the music coming in however it is a Remix of it and there are plenty of remixes. Answered by Drew Mesaros 11 months ago.


I have a blood diease called lupus.what do i do?
im 23 years old and i lost 2 kids cause of this.also this dease has called me to loose so much weight.im only 88lbs and i tryed everything to gain weight,i hate going n e where ,nothing fits me not even a zero! i need help! Asked by Torrie Nisly 11 months ago.

(m) Treating Lupus Diagnosing and treating lupus are often a team effort between the patient and several types of health care professionals. A person with lupus can go to his or her family doctor or internist, or can visit a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases (arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, often involving the immune system). Clinical immunologists (doctors specializing in immune system disorders) may also treat people with lupus. As treatment progresses, other professionals often help. These may include nurses, psychologists, social workers, nephrologists (doctors who treat kidney disease), hematologists (doctors specializing in blood disorders), dermatologists (doctors who treat skin disease), and neurologists (doctors specializing in disorders of the nervous system). The range and effectiveness of treatments for lupus have increased dramatically, giving doctors more choices in how to manage the disease. It is important for the patient to work closely with the doctor and take an active role in managing the disease. Once lupus has been diagnosed, the doctor will develop a treatment plan based on the patient's age, sex, health, symptoms, and lifestyle. Treatment plans are tailored to the individual's needs and may change over time. In developing a treatment plan, the doctor has several goals: to prevent flares, to treat them when they do occur, and to minimize organ damage and complications. The doctor and patient should reevaluate the plan regularly to ensure it is as effective as possible. NSAIDs: For people with joint or chest pain or fever, drugs that decrease inflammation, called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are often used. While some NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are available over the counter, a doctor's prescription is necessary for others. NSAIDs may be used alone or in combination with other types of drugs to control pain, swelling, and fever. Even though some NSAIDs may be purchased without a prescription, it is important that they be taken under a doctor's direction. Common side effects of NSAIDs can include stomach upset, heartburn, diarrhea, and fluid retention. Some people with lupus also develop liver, kidney, or even neurological complications, making it especially important to stay in close contact with the doctor while taking these medications. Antimalarials: Antimalarials are another type of drug commonly used to treat lupus. These drugs were originally used to treat malaria, but doctors have found that they also are useful for lupus. A common antimalarial used to treat lupus is hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)*. It may be used alone or in combination with other drugs and generally is used to treat fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes, and inflammation of the lungs. Clinical studies have found that continuous treatment with antimalarials may prevent flares from recurring. Side effects of anti-malarials can include stomach upset and, extremely rarely, damage to the retina of the eye. * Brand names included in this publication are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory. Corticosteroids: The mainstay of lupus treatment involves the use of corticosteroid hormones, such as prednisone (Deltasone), hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol). Corticosteroids are related to cortisol, which is a natural anti-inflammatory hormone. They work by rapidly suppressing inflammation. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, in creams applied to the skin, or by injection. Because they are potent drugs, the doctor will seek the lowest dose with the greatest benefit. Short-term side effects of corticosteroids include swelling, increased appetite, and weight gain. These side effects generally stop when the drug is stopped. It is dangerous to stop taking corticosteroids suddenly, so it is very important that the doctor and patient work together in changing the corticosteroid dose. Sometimes doctors give very large amounts of corticosteroid by vein over a brief period of time (days) ("bolus" or "pulse" therapy). With this treatment, the typical side effects are less likely and slow withdrawal is unnecessary. Long-term side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks on the skin, weakened or damaged bones (osteoporosis and osteonecrosis), high blood pressure, damage to the arteries, high blood sugar (diabetes), infections, and cataracts. Typically, the higher the dose and the longer they are taken, the greater the risk and severity of side effects. Researchers are working to develop ways to limit or offset the use of corticosteroids. For example, corticosteroids may be used in combination with other, less potent drugs, or the doctor may try to slowly decrease the dose once the disease is under control. People with lupus who are using corticosteroids should talk to their doctors about taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D or other drugs to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (weakened, fragile bones). Immunosuppressives: For some patients whose kidneys or central nervous systems are affected by lupus, a type of drug called an immunosuppressive may be used. Immunosuppressives, such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), restrain the overactive immune system by blocking the production of immune cells. These drugs may be given by mouth or by infusion (dripping the drug into the vein through a small tube). Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bladder problems, decreased fertility, and increased risk of cancer and infection. The risk for side effects increases with the length of treatment. As with other treatments for lupus, there is a risk of relapse after the immunosuppressives have been stopped. Other Therapies: In some patients, methotrexate (Folex, Mexate, Rheumatrex), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, may be used to help control the disease. Working closely with the doctor helps ensure that treatments for lupus are as successful as possible. Because some treatments may cause harmful side effects, it is important to report any new symptoms to the doctor promptly. It is also important not to stop or change treatments without talking to the doctor first. Alternative and Complementary Therapies: Because of the nature and cost of the medications used to treat lupus and the potential for serious side effects, many patients seek other ways of treating the disease. Some alternative approaches people have tried include special diets, nutritional supplements, fish oils, ointments and creams, chiropractic treatment, and homeopathy. Although these methods may not be harmful in and of themselves, and may be associated with symptomatic or psychosocial benefit, no research to date shows that they affect the disease process or prevent organ damage. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help the patient cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. If the doctor feels the approach has value and will not be harmful, it can be incorporated into the patient's treatment plan. However, it is important not to neglect regular health care or treatment of serious symptoms. An open dialogue between the patient and physician about the relative values of complementary and alternative therapies allows the patient to make an informed choice about treatment options. Answered by Jenae Heyden 11 months ago.

Since lupus is an autoimmune disorder, I'd suggest taking supplements to boost your immune system, especially vitamin C. Cut out refined sugar, deep fried foods, alcohol and other foods that are hard on your body. A vegetarian diet may be beneficial to you. Check the source link for more immune boosting nutrients. Answered by Donte Golightley 11 months ago.

It is a very serious disease. I have a few friends that have it. My girlfriend next door lost so much weight that the doc had to put her on steroids, now she is just the opposite....can't lose the weight. She has it real bad and has for a long time. She is almost 45 yrs old. Make sure that you are seeing a doctor regularly and have him advise you. Answered by Delois Sirk 11 months ago.

You've lost your children yet what you are worried about is your dress size? If you have lupus then prednisone is often used to treat lupus and this often makes you gain weight and puts the lupus into remission. You need to see a rheumatologist and find out if you really have lupus (often hard to diagnose) and if so seek proper treatment. Answered by Freida Calnen 11 months ago.

Try looking on www.webmd.com Also, talk to your doctor. Those of us on answers probably can't give you the help you need. Good luck, though. I'll pray for you! Cassidy Answered by Barton Soun 11 months ago.

Follow all your Doctors instructions. The web site Web MD has lots of info and various deceases. Try reading up on it. Answered by Keiko Saurer 11 months ago.

don't pig out see a doctor immeditly even if you pay $5 a month for the rest of your life they legally can't turn you away and I'm very sorry about your miscarriges :( Answered by Genevieve Delee 11 months ago.

My aunt has lupus and she takes pills that makes her gain weight. Talk to a doctor seriously. Answered by Frances Leuenberger 11 months ago.

Ask your Dr to refer you to a specialist. Go to the Mayo Clinic site and see what they say about lupus. Answered by Halina Sammons 11 months ago.

You need to see an endocrinologist ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this is a serous disease & you need immediate treatment. There are 2 different types of Lupus-one is systemic, which means that the enrire bodily organs are affected. Please get your primary care physician & get the referral. Good luck! Answered by Deana Wende 11 months ago.

well, you need to educate yourself, there are a tremendous amount of websites that will give you info about lupus. lupus is not a blood disease, its an auto immune disease. read up! Answered by Karl Hichens 11 months ago.


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