HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 074811/001.

Names and composition

"HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE.
It belongs to the class Butyrophenones and is used in Psychosis, mania (Central Nervous System)

Answered questions

What would happen with using 4 year old decanoate?
I have about 20 bottles of deca that expired july 2004. what would happen if I used it? Do you have iternet references? Asked by Jame Mullany 3 months ago.

20 bottles? There are a couple kinds of decanoate. Are you talking haloperidol decanoate? This is a slow release haldol generic injection. It has to have an expiration date on the vial. If you're referring to testosterone decanoate (delatestryl) that too should have a date. I'm hoping you're referring to the first as opposed to the steroid. I haven't seen or prescribed the steroidal use in many many years in my practice. Just go by the date. Actually if you're considering either after four years you should get a new prescription and throw out the old. Answered by Diedra Faulds 3 months ago.

yes :o i WOULD NOT suggest you to use it! Answered by Lacey Rufus 3 months ago.


A question on Haloperidol?
I have been diagnosed with a form of OCD, and my current medications are: Lexapro: 40mg a daySeroquel: 800 mg a dayGabapentin: 900mg a dayValium: 20mg a dayBut I ran out of Seroquel the other day so I've been taking Largactil. I've heard a drug named Haloperidol. My question is: Can Haloperidol... Asked by Irving Partible 3 months ago.

I have been diagnosed with a form of OCD, and my current medications are: Lexapro: 40mg a day Seroquel: 800 mg a day Gabapentin: 900mg a day Valium: 20mg a day But I ran out of Seroquel the other day so I've been taking Largactil. I've heard a drug named Haloperidol. My question is: Can Haloperidol help with severe anxiety associated with OCD problems? What is Haloperidol and what is the difference between that and Largactil? On its own, what does Haloperidol do? Thanks people. Answered by Harland Colaianni 3 months ago.

Haloperidol is a typical antipsychotic. It is in the butyrophenone class of antipsychotic medications and has pharmacological effects similar to the phenothiazines. Haloperidol is an older antipsychotic used in the treatment of schizophrenia and, more acutely, in the treatment of acute psychotic states and delirium. A long-acting decanoate ester is used as a long acting injection given every 4 weeks to people with schizophrenia or related illnesses who have a poor compliance with medication and suffer frequent relapses of illness. In some countries this can be involuntary under Community Treatment Orders. The above is taken fro Wikipedia. It does not mention that Haloperidol is used for OCD. Sounds though like a general antipsychotic, so it's probably ok for OCD and anxiety. Reading in Wikipedia again, there doesn't seem to be much difference between Haloperidol and Largactil....the are both "typical antipsychotics" Answered by Sigrid Fuery 3 months ago.

When a person has a genuine "need to know" about specific medications and dosages and interactions, they go to the qualified source of information - the Dr or the Pharmacist. It's only a phone call away. Haloperidol - is the generic name for Haldol this is known as an "anti-psychiotic" what it does is to help the person who takes it to re-connect with reality when the person senses things that are not true. When short on prescribed medication, immediately contact either your pharmacist or your Dr. Some medications can cause negative effects when stopped suddenly. If you want to further investigate specific medications, type the name into your Yahoo Search window. Answered by Sherita Kasper 3 months ago.


Can Haloperidol cause insomnia?
I've just started taking Serenace, 5mg, three times a day. Last night my dad took too many pills and consumed too much alcohol, so I didn't get to sleep until 5am. Then I was up at 7am. 2 hours sleep is not enogh for me. I need at least 6. Is it the stress and tension of making sure my dad didn't fall... Asked by Courtney Meling 3 months ago.

I've just started taking Serenace, 5mg, three times a day. Last night my dad took too many pills and consumed too much alcohol, so I didn't get to sleep until 5am. Then I was up at 7am. 2 hours sleep is not enogh for me. I need at least 6. Is it the stress and tension of making sure my dad didn't fall over and split his head open that I couldn't sleep, or is is the haldol? Bearing in mind, this is my third day in with this drug. Will 2mg of Clonazepam help me sleep? They say that Haldol is used for Mania, so thats what I must have now- can't switch off. Should I take another 5mg of Serenace to get me a few more hours? What do you think? And what are the short and long-term side effects of insomnia? Answered by Hester Patin 3 months ago.

Haloperidol is a typical antipsychotic. It is in the butyrophenone class of antipsychotic medications and has pharmacological effects similar to the phenothiazines. Haloperidol is an older antipsychotic used in the treatment of schizophrenia and, more acutely, in the treatment of acute psychotic states and delirium. A long-acting decanoate ester is used as a long-acting injection given every 4 weeks to people with schizophrenia or related illnesses who have a poor compliance with medication and suffer frequent relapses of illness, or to overcome the drawbacks inherent to its orally administered counterpart that burst dosage increases risk or intensity of side effects. In some countries this can be involuntary under Community Treatment Orders.ALWAYS TAKE CARE............ Answered by Jeanna Cujas 3 months ago.

Haldol can cause akathisia. Try googling that and see if that is more what is wrong rather than mania. When I got akathisia, I didn't pace around , the agitation was internal. I am sure being upset had a lot to do with this, maybe the entire explanation. Answered by Kasi Gruening 3 months ago.


What type of organic molecule is Haloperidol?
im pretty sure its an alkaloid...? Asked by Don Loskill 3 months ago.

Haloperidol is a dopamine antagonist of the typical antipsychotic class of medications. It is a butyrophenone derivative and has pharmacological effects similar to the phenothiazines. Haloperidol is an older antipsychotic used in the treatment of schizophrenia and acute psychotic states and delirium. A long-acting decanoate ester is used as an injection given every four weeks to people with schizophrenia or related illnesses who have poor adherence to medication regimens and suffer frequent relapses of illness, or to overcome the drawbacks inherent to its orally administered counterpart that burst dosage increases risk or intensity of side effects. Answered by Jaye Bumford 3 months ago.


Big question on Haloperidol and Benzatropine?
I now know that Haloperidol has sedative properties. I also know that Diazepam and Clonazepam can help with agitation. I already have 25 5mg Diazepams and 25 0.5 Clonazepams. I also have 25 2.5 Lorazepams. But, can these benzodiazepines stop a dystonic reaction from forming? Or what about Levodopa, Baclofen or... Asked by Christena Nadler 3 months ago.

I now know that Haloperidol has sedative properties. I also know that Diazepam and Clonazepam can help with agitation. I already have 25 5mg Diazepams and 25 0.5 Clonazepams. I also have 25 2.5 Lorazepams. But, can these benzodiazepines stop a dystonic reaction from forming? Or what about Levodopa, Baclofen or Diphenhydramine? Why does Benzatropine (Benztrop) and Benzhexol (Artane) cause pain behind the eyes? Is it serious? Or, should I just take some Panadeine Forte? In time, will the pain behind the eyes go away (daily dose of Benzatropine is 4mg)? I don't want to get acute narrow angle glaucoma. By the way, I have just had my eyes tested, and its all normal. I need to know, what prescription medications can I take to stop dystonias without experiencing pain behind the eyes? I don't want to go blind. If I were to use 15mg of Haloperidol a day, with 4mg of Benzatropine, for 6 months, would I be allright? I mean, apart from Tardive Dyskinesia, what other problems could it produce? The pain behind the eyes is what is worrying me the most. My Pharmacist said that if I am taking Panadeine Forte for pain, I would not experience psychotic withdrawal symptoms. But, if I am abusing it, which I am, It could. Can you tell me a little about Haldol Decanoate? I think its a 50mg injection. If I were to have that, would I need to take Benzatropine every day? Will 15mg of Haloperidol a day turn me into a zombie? How powerful is it excactly? I want sedation and tranquility. If I develop a severe agitation or a state of restlessness to Haloperidol, what can I take to get rid of the agitation and restlessness? Will I get this by using 15mg a day? One more thing. In your opinion, what Benzodiazepine is the most powerful? I believe the strongest ones are Flunitrazepam, Alprazolam, and Clonazepam. What do you think? And also, in your opinion, what is the most sedating Anti-Psychotic? I believe Quetiapine and Chlorpromazine: What do you think? Anyway, I think thats enough of me babbling on... But please, I must stress this point: Are there any medications that can stop dystonias without giving pain behind they eyes? That is my main question. The reason I ask this is because I want to be on Haloperidol long-term. And I need a medication that stops dystonic reactions without creating pain behind the eyes. If there is anything about Haloperidol or Benzatropine that you think I should know, please tell me. This is a big question (s). Time to wrap it up. I appreciate you taking time out to answer all my questions. Thank you very much for your help and I look forward to receiving a response to my question (s) Answered by Gennie Tourigny 3 months ago.

Obviously, you need to talk to a doctor about this. But, most benzodiazapenes could be used to help distonia. The pain behind the eyes thing is weird and i have no information on that. Might be a sign of increased BP or glaucoma, but idk man. Haloperidol is a powerful hypnotic and will take you down a few notches. Answered by Alfonzo Sahara 3 months ago.


Yarbigys toxicology challenge.?
there are all things that I've run across working with the russian armed forces as a medical tech. (we do cross training in civil hospitals to increase our exposeur to things and a few are from that)so there are probably more then one possiblity for some of the answers, but I am going with the one that I... Asked by Gayla Jacquot 3 months ago.

just for fun, I am going to post some hypothetical patient presentations, and whoever gets gets the most/all right, gets 10 points. I'll post my answers when I pick best answer. I will give credit as long as one guesses the correct class of agent or receptor type that is responsible (I.e. tricyclic's is as acceptable as amitrypaline, and acetylcholine antagonist is as acceptable as scopolamine) all are due to a medicine, drug or poison or interaction thereof. 1. patient appears agitated and complains of a tension feeling in him. He is noticeably fidgety and restless. Furthermore, movements are rigid and have an under laying tremor. the patient also complains of being very fatigued, yet unable to rest. He also asks for numerous snacks and sips of water. A routine examination of the body reveals what appears to be a deep IM injection site. ECG shows long QT interval. You also notice a fine tremor or movement in the mans tongue and his manner of speaking seems a little "off". 2. Post Surgical. Patient is hostile and combative towards staff and is talking to phantoms and shows a general loss of touch with reality. Very poor co-ordination is shown in their (feeble) at temps to fight staff. 3. male, young 18-24, appears to be part of your police or military forces, some major event has just unfolded, but details are Shaky at best. you notice extreme meiosis, excess mucus production (runny nose, drooling, watering eyes) tremor/convulsion, emesis products on the clothing and in the mouth, and the subject has defecated and urinated one self. Bowel sounds are very rumbly and active. Subject is non conscious and enters respiratory arrest several minutes after you receive him. 4. A young girl is brought in by EMS crews. She is agitated and complains of hallucinations. EMS reports that she was picked up in the city's club area, its 3am, saturday morning. she is shivering and sweating, and her temp is measured at 41C. Resting pulse is 140/bpm. The subject undergoes emesis and the results of are not remarkable, just fluids. she has a tremor and bowel sounds are once again rumbly. She has mild mydrasis that is responsive to light. tip---combination/interaction---- 5. Elderly male is presented by EMS who where called by his family. He is listless and detached. respiration rate is low and bowel sounds are quiet/absent. extreme miosis is found. an examination shows he recently underwent major surgery. Answered by Carroll Marcia 3 months ago.

there are all things that I've run across working with the russian armed forces as a medical tech. (we do cross training in civil hospitals to increase our exposeur to things and a few are from that) so there are probably more then one possiblity for some of the answers, but I am going with the one that I came across. Its just for fun, so anyone who wants answer go ahead, not just doctors, med students and nurses! Answered by Michel Rainbow 3 months ago.

I'll give this a crack. I feel a bit at a disadvantage here, as I don't really do anything.. clinical. 1. I was going to go methamphetamine injection then thought. I'm going to go with an utterly ballsy choice here: The IM injection site is from Haloperidol decanoate a long acting form of Haldol, or a more recent injection of a classic antipsychotic. My reasons for picking this one: the dry mouth and request for water can be explained by AP anticholinergic activity resulting in dry mouth. APs cause the long QT, and amphetamines don't typically. Rigid movement and tremors suggests tardive dyskinesia, particularly in regards to the tongue. TD symptoms, as well as the what the drug is used to treat (acute mania, schizophrenia) can muck with sleep. Schizophrenia, would certainly make a manner of speaking 'off'. 2. Heard of this with mixed action opiates like tramadol and meperidine. In the US, meperidine is probably one of the most commonly used injectable opiates. It gets used in some cases instead of fentanyl for post-surgical analgesia. One person I actually know personally started pulling the IV out while loaded up with this after a surgery, while technically still out. Apparently after the third time a nurse replaced it, there was screaming and a lot of disoriented fist swinging - some of which connected. He woke up in full restraints and no memory of this. I have -no- idea of the mechanism, or drug causing this, I've simply heard of it among the array of odd post-anesthesia stories. 3. Cholinergic 'nerve' agent of some kind. Organophosphate, nerve gas, physostigmine. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. Unless he's got some sort of condition that requires him to take them, the means of exposure is likely to be worthy of television. The 'oversecretion' is typical of parasympathetomimetic drugs, if not definitive characteristic. That and the loss of muscle control including sphincters. Delightful. Atropine and benzo time. 4. Ecstasy. Period. This isn't even a question. Elevated body temperature + rapid heart rate + club is always either ecstasy. The hallucinations are unusual, but not unheard of particularly when other serotonergic agents are mixed in. Hallucinogens, sometimes serotonergic antidepressants. Mydriasis is probably due to ecstasy's noradrenergic action on sympathetic innervation of the pupil. This really can be a -staggering- variety of different combos, but I'd expect hallucinogen + ecstasy, or antidepressant + ecstasy. Could be low level serotonin syndrome, but as there's no screaming and muscle spasm, I wouldn't be betting. Serotonin antagonist would be ideal, and ironically I can remember the structure, but I can't remember the name of the one to use. 5. Opiate overdose or adverse reaction, either that or mixture with a CNS sedative. Major surgery means he's got some kind of heavy opiate on hand for pain management - a hydrocodone or oxycodone mixture if this were the US. Elderly means more prone to adverse reaction, or he just forgot and took multiple doses. Taking a stab, it's been a loooooong week. Almost finals here and there are undergraduates running around like headless chickens and I've got grading to do. Apologies for any incoherency. Edit: Thanks! I know there are alternatives to meperidine, yes it's a terrible drug, but there's still plenty of it being used, if for no other reason than that people have used it for decades now. There's two urgent care facilities I know of locally where it is the -only- opiate they keep on hand, if you can believe that. And they still advise MAOI users to wear alert bracelets, as this is this painkiller is still used by emergency medical responders around the country. Answered by Melvina Anderlik 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
074811/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
074893/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
074893/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075176/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
075176/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075305/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075393/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
075393/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075440/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
075440/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
076463/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
076463/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
205241/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
205241/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018701/001 HALDOL HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
018701/002 HALDOL HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
074811/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
074893/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
074893/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075176/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
075176/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075305/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075393/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
075393/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
075440/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
075440/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
076463/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
076463/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
205241/001 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 50MG BASE per ML
205241/002 HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE HALOPERIDOL DECANOATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Janssen-Cilag Ltd

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