Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020076/001.

Names and composition

"HABITROL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NICOTINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020076/001 HABITROL NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 7MG per 24HR
020076/002 HABITROL NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 14MG per 24HR
020076/003 HABITROL NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 21MG per 24HR
020076/004 HABITROL NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 7MG per 24HR
020076/005 HABITROL NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 14MG per 24HR
020076/006 HABITROL NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 21MG per 24HR

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019983/001 PROSTEP NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 11MG per 24HR
019983/002 PROSTEP NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 22MG per 24HR
019983/003 PROSTEP NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 11MG per 24HR
019983/004 PROSTEP NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 22MG per 24HR
020076/001 HABITROL NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 7MG per 24HR
020076/002 HABITROL NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 14MG per 24HR
020076/003 HABITROL NICOTINE Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 21MG per 24HR
020076/004 HABITROL NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 7MG per 24HR
020076/005 HABITROL NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 14MG per 24HR
020076/006 HABITROL NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 21MG per 24HR
020165/004 NICODERM CQ NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 21MG per 24HR
020165/005 NICODERM CQ NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 14MG per 24HR
020165/006 NICODERM CQ NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 7MG per 24HR
020385/001 NICOTROL NICOTINE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.5MG per SPRAY
020536/001 NICOTROL NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 15MG per 16HR
020714/001 NICOTROL NICOTINE INHALANT/ORAL 4MG per CARTRIDGE
074612/001 NICOTINE NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 21MG per 24HR
074612/002 NICOTINE NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 7MG per 24HR
074612/003 NICOTINE NICOTINE FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 14MG per 24HR

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Answered questions

How do I become a distributor of Habitrol Nicotene gum?
I have been chewing nicotene gum for years to control my smoking. I buy it from a lady on the internet. I would like to become a distributor and get it cheaper. It is called Habitrol from New Zealand, and is made by Novartis. Does anyone know how to become a distributor? Asked by Dann Polton 1 year ago.

try getting the address/email from the wrapper you get the gum in Answered by Delphine Nageotte 1 year ago.


Which nicotine patch is really good to quit smoking ?
Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System or nicoderm ..which one ? Asked by Esta Boccella 1 year ago.

Take it from some one who has tried them all,its all in your head.It doesn't matter which one you use if your not TRULY ready to quit.Good luck. Answered by Ai Bolch 1 year ago.

they are pretty much the same in terms of drug delivery and drug content. if I were you, I'd go for the pharmacy house brand to save some $$$...unless you've heard stories of the house brand not working. Answered by Toshiko Gowell 1 year ago.


What is the best method for quitting smoking?
Asked by Nathalie Vallo 1 year ago.

I used the Habitrol patch for about a month and a half and have now been smoke free for a year Jan 25th. My husband quit the same time and he used Nicorett gum and he has also been smoke free but he still gets cravings and chews the gum occasionally. It is really a hard thing to commit to, but if you are ready, go for it. Good Luck Answered by Chia Glassco 1 year ago.

For me, it started out with slowing down when i smoked, like at first i stopped smoking in the morning, then progressing i wouldn't smoke at work, then not at home. Then towards the end when putting the breaks on all the way, i quit going to bars, tried to stay away from people smoking then what happened i had to figure what to do with my hands when i started to go out again to a concert are a bar that was the test then one day i finally realized i really quit i can drink all night, play pool and never miss the smoking. and that my friend is a kick *** feeling. All in all it took like 2 years for me but i believe you could do all that in a years time, just don't pressure yourself into fully quitting right away focus on one thing at a time. Hope this info can help you, because i don't know if it is the best way ,but this is what worked for me. Answered by Alecia Sos 1 year ago.

There is no best method because everyone is different and should be treated by a doctor so your body can adjust to the change without too much stress. Answered by Terina Collozo 1 year ago.

After reading your question I sat here and thought about it for about 10 minutes...I have been a smoker for about 7 years now and I thought about it I believe the answer is willpower. Thats all you need is strong willpower...good luck :) Answered by Ginger Loffredo 1 year ago.


Do some brands of nicotine patches stick to the skin better than others?
My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he... Asked by Jesus Ruhn 1 year ago.

My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he bought his own box of nicotine patches, only he got the 14mg ones because the 21mg was making his arm feel weird. Also, he didn't usually smoke a whole pack a day. These were circular patches. They are Nicoderm brand.. He has been using them for almost a week and a half and they don't stick very well. He works outside for most of the day and as soon as he starts to sweat, the patches peel off. Is one brand circular and another square, or is that just to differentiate the 21mg and 14mg dosage? The square ones seemed to stick to the skin better. He doesn't want to tape the patch to his arm. Does anyone recommend a brand that sticks well? Answered by Philip Chasey 1 year ago.

the best one i have found is called --habitrol. they stick well and don't burn or sting very much. Answered by Hugo Gutteridge 1 year ago.

I worked in a facility that supplied patches to patients. Have him wipe the area he is applying the patch to with alcohol. Let dry. Apply patch. He can also add some waterproof adhesive tape over it because if he perspires alot almost any brand will lose it's adhesion. Answered by Jami Hans 1 year ago.

Im not too sure. You should ask your local chemist but i am pretty sure a more expensive brand will work better. Answered by Noriko Friedmann 1 year ago.

yep its funny lol Answered by Zonia Milewski 1 year ago.


Ok im still smokeless in ny im really trying not to smoke but my ? is does the patch really work ?
and should i invest in it or is it as bad as smoking a cig Asked by Dinah Bondoc 1 year ago.

The patch delivers nicotine into your system without the tar and carcinogens that you absorb when actually smoking. Because small amounts of nicotine are constantly being absorbed, you will find your cravings deminish and it might help you stay smoke free. You reduce the level of nicotine gradually, so over time, your dependance is reduced, which makes it easier to quit completely. I used the patch my first time quitting and it worked quite well for me, but the nicotine level was a bit high, so I took it off. My doctor recently told me it was ok to cut the patch in half, so I'm starting on it again on Monday. Keep in mind that, because you are not inhaling smoke, your body will continue to heal the damage that smoking has caused while you use the patch. Answered by Shanel Franqui 1 year ago.

The patch isn't as bad for your lungs as smoking, but it's still a source of nicotine, so it's just substituting one addiction for another. If you're able to stop smoking without the patch, you're probably better off. Answered by Albina Oury 1 year ago.

its still got addictive nicotine but its not bad for you because it does not contain tobacco. nicotine itself is not harmful, only addictive. Answered by Gretta Kleinwolterin 1 year ago.


What is the molecular formula of nicotine?
Please I have been stuck on this question for a long time if i could get a step by step help that would be greatly appreciated :) Nicotine has the empirical formula, C5H7N. A solution of 0.500 g of nicotine in 12.0 g of water boils at 100.140*C. What is the the molecular formula of nicotine? Asked by Floyd Ifversen 1 year ago.

THIS IS ALLOT. BUT IT IS Chemical Database Nicotine Identifications Formula: C10H14N2 Formula: C10H14N2O Formula: C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Elements: Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen CAS Number: 54-11-5 Caswell Number: 597 CCOHS Record Number: 446 RCRA Waste Number: P075 RTECS Number: QS5250000 Synonyms/Related: (+)-Nicotine (+-) NICOTINE (+-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (+-)-Nicotine (-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine (-)-Nicotine (2S) 3-(1-Methyl-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-pyridine (R)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (R,S)-Nicotine (S)-(-)-NICOTINE, 3-[(2S)-1-METHYL-2-PYRROLIDINYL] PYRIDINE (S)-3-(1-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl) Pyridine (S)-3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-3-(N-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-Nicotine .beta.-Pyridyl-.alpha.-N-methylpyrroli... .beta.-Pyrimidum 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)-pyrrolidene 1-Methyl-2-(3-pyridyl) pyrrolidine 2'-beta-H-Nicotine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine 3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine 3-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)) pyridine 3-(N-METHYLPYROLLIDINO) PYRIDINE 3-(N-Methylpyrrolidino) pyridine 3-(tetrahydro-1-methyl pyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine 3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N,N-diethyl- 3-[(2S)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl]pyridi... Anacardone Anacordone Astrocar beta-Pyridyl-alpha-N-methylpyrrolidine beta-Pyrimidum C00745 c0468 C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Camphozone Canfodiamina Carbamidal Cardamine Cardiagen Cardiamid Cardiamide Cardiamina Cardiamine Cardimon Citocor Coracon Coraetamidum Coraethamide Coraethamidum Coralept Coramine Coravita Corazone Cordiamid Cordiamin Cordiamine Corditon Cordynil Corediol Corespin Corethamide Coretone Corivo Cormed Cormid Cormotyl Cornotone Corotonin Corovit Corvin Corvitan Corvitol Corvotone Corywas D-Nicotine Danamine destruxol Destruxol orchid spray Diaethyl-nicotinamid Diaethyl-nicotinamid [German] Diaethylamidum acidi nicotinici Diethyl-Nicotamide Diethylamid kyseliny nikotinove [Czech] Diethylnicotinamide Dietilamide-Carbopiridina Dinacoryl DL-tetrahydronicotyrine Dynacoryl Dynamicarde Elitone Emo-nik ENT 3,424 Eucoran FLUX MAAG Flux Maay fumeto bac Fumetobac Habitrol Hansacor Inicardio Kardiamid Kardonyl Kordiamin L(-)-nicotine L-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine l-Nicotine Leptamin MACH-NIC Mediamid methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine Micotine N, N-Diethylnicotinamide N,N-Diethyl-3-pyridinecarboxamide N,N-DIETHYLNICOTINAMIDE NCT Ni-Cor niagara p.a. Niagara p.a. dust Niamine Nic-Sal Nicaethamidum Nicetamida [INN-Spanish] Nicetamide Nicetamide [DCIT] Nicethamide Nicethamidum [INN-Latin] Nico-dust Nico-fume Nicocide Nicor Nicordamin Nicorine Nicoryl Nicotin Nicotina Nicotina (ITALIAN) Nicotina [Italian] Nicotinamide, N,N-diethyl- Nicotine NICOTINE (L) (PYRROLIDINE,N-METHYL,ALPHA-(D-BETA-PYRI... Nicotine alkaloid Nicotine [BSI:ISO] Nicotine [USAN] Nicotine, (+-)- Nicotine, liquid Nicotinic acid diethylamide Nicotrol Nicotrol Inhaler Nicotrol NS Nikardin Niketamid Niketamide Nikethamide Nikethamide [BAN:INN] Niketharol Nikethyl Niketilamid Nikorin Nikotin Nikotin (GERMAN) Nikotin [German] Nikotyna Nikotyna (POLISH) Nikotyna [Polish] Niquetamida Nisetamide Ortho N-4 Ortho N-4 and N-5 dusts Ortho N-4 dust Ortho N-5 Ortho N-5 dust Percoral Procardine Procorman Prostep Pseudonicotine Pyricardyl Pyridine, 3- (1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- Pyridine, 3- (tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine, 3-((2S)-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (R)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (s)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine-3-carboxydiethylamide Pyridine-3-carboxylic acid diethylamide Pyrrolidine, 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)- Reformin Rehormin S-(-)-Nicotine Salvacard Salvacorin Sancora SDCCGMLS-0066911.P001 Solyacord Stellamine Stiminol Stimulin Tendust Tetrahydronicotyrine, dl- Tonocard Tonocor Vasazol Ventramine XL All Insecti-cide, Emo-Nib XL All Insecticide Properties Incompatiblities: strong acids strong oxidizers Health & Regulatory Guidelines EPA Regulations: Reportable Quantity: 100 Lbs NFPA 704 Rating: Health Hazardard Rating: 4 Fire Hazardard Rating: 1 Reactivity Hazardard Rating: 0 NIOSH Guidelines: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 IDLH: 5 mg/m3 OSHA Regulations: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 TWA Vacated: 0.5 mg/m3 Health Risks: Highly Toxic 49 CFR 172.101 - Hazardous Materials Table Hazardous materials description and proper shipping namesHaz class or divID#PGLCSpec prov §172.102Pack §173Qty limitVessel ExcepNon BulkBulkPass air/railCargo air onlyLocOther (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8A)(8B)... Current as of January 2006 Nicotine6.1UN1654II6.1IB2153202... 2004 E Answered by Anjanette Stgermaine 1 year ago.

I need points Answered by Adelle Hoagberg 1 year ago.


Ok health pros, here's one for you. I take medication for HTN, .....?
I AM a nurse, so I know part of the answer already, just thought I'd put it out there to get more info, thanks for the replies so far. Asked by Shawn Krantz 1 year ago.

HI The Only Solo Rose (very creative) I must commend you first for assisting many people with your time. Athough I have different concepts on how to heal people then modern medicine (mostly drugs) I still see the value and willingness doctors and nurses are trying to help people. We need more healers in the world and we come from all different backgrounds of training and education. Again I applaud you sharing your expertise with so many. Now Ill share my thoughts with you and I have no idea about drugs, but I am very keen on how the body functions. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke causes high blood pressure because of how smoking damages cells and narrows arteries. In addition, cigarettes contain an abundance of life-threatening chemicals that further increase overall health risks. Even smokeless tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and snuff can raise blood pressure levels because of the nicotine and sodium they contain. Many of the other chemicals contained in cigarettes can create a toxic burden on the liver to further disturb healthy body habits. Pharmaceutical Drugs: According to the Physicians` Desk Reference, the following drugs can all cause high blood pressure as a side effect of their use: Alfenta Injection, Aredia for Injection, Dobutrex Solution Vials, Epogen for Injection, Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System, Lupron Depot, Methergine Injection and Tablets, Orthoclone OKT3 Sterile Solution, Polygam Immune Globulin Intravenous Human, Procrit for Injection, Sandimmune, Sandimmune Soft Gelatin Capsules, Tolectin, Velban Vials, Ventolin Inhalation Aerosol and Refill, and Wellbutrin. ****Here are some ideas to contol your blood pressure: Quick Action Plan for High Blood Pressure 1. Make any necessary lifestyle changes. If you are overweight, commit to a weight loss plan. If you smoke, stop, and avoid all sources of secondhand smoke. Also exercise at least thirty minutes a day at least three to four times a week. Safe and effective exercise choices include brisk walking, bicycling, hiking, rebounding, and swimming. Additionally try a restorative yoga class, tai chi or chi gong; all can provide great stress relief and can be pleasurable ways to add movement to your life. 2. Adopt a healthy diet. In place of red meats, choose fish such as blue fish, cod, Greenland halibut, mackerel, and wild caught salmon, as well as free-range, organic poultry. If you want red meat choose bison, for a low fat option. 3. Emphasize fresh, organic fruits and vegetables that are rich in vital nutrients, such as avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, grapefruit, nectarines, oranges, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green peas, kidney and lima beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts such as almonds, cashews, walnuts and pecans, potatoes, squash, and yams, raw dairy, and whole grains like brown rice, buckwheat and quinoa. 4. Use raw virgin coconut butter or organic butter for cooking, and flaxseed and extra virgin olive oil for dressings. 5. Avoid alcohol, coffee, caffeine, and refined salt. 6. Supplement with vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin C, bioflavonoids (especially rutin), vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), evening primrose oil, fish oil, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and zinc, as well as the amino acids cysteine, taurine, and tryptophan. 7. Useful herbs for high blood pressure include garlic, hawthorn berry, olive leaf extract, and the medicinal mushrooms maitake and reishi. 8. Drink at least one 8-ounce glass of fresh squeezed, organic vegetable juice each day. Excellent juice combinations include beet, carrot, and celery; and carrot or cucumber, spinach, and parsley. For added benefit, add one clove of juiced garlic. 9. Adopt a stress management program of daily meditation and/or relaxation exercises. 10. Detoxify your body to eliminate toxins and heavy metals that can dramatically increase the risk of high blood pressure. Quick Action Plan for Addictions 1. Determine if the addiction stems from allergies, biochemical imbalances, genetics, and/or malabsorption of nutrients. 2. Repressed core emotions such as denied anger often lead to depression, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, and disassociation. Embracing your feelings is the most important aspect of beginning to deal with addictive behavior. 3. Regular chiropractic adjustments prove to be supportive, along with release-oriented tissue and bodywork techniques such as Rolfing. 4. Eat three meals and two snacks consistently. Emphasize quality protein foods such as organic poultry, bison, lamb, wild-caught fish, and eggs. Eat plenty of raw nuts and seeds, apples, berries, and other whole fruits; avoid all fruit juices. 5. A critical step in the recovery process is to cleanse, heal and support liver function by using herbs such as Milk Thistle, Dandelion and Bupleurum. 6. Blood-cleansing will support sluggish energy. Herbs in the form of tinctures or teas made from Oat Straw, Burdock Root, Echinacea, and Licorice Root are helpful, and are also vital to healthy kidney function. 7. To calm nerves and anxiety caused by addiction, use the herbs Skullcap, Valerian, and Vervain. 8. After eating a stable whole foods diet for at least 3 months, consider a juice fast of organic vegetable juices. 9. Take nutritional supplements. The B vitamins, particularly thiamin (B1) and B6 are important. Consider amino acid therapy for rebalancing brain chemistry, and to reduce cravings for alcohol, drugs, and/or nicotine. 10. Acupuncture, particularly auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture), is especially useful for drug addictions, and excellent for addressing addictive behaviors such as sex, gambling, and workaholicism. 11. Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Naturopathic Medicine and Orthomolecular Medicine are especially helpful for alcoholism, drug addiction, and smoking. Continue your quest to assisting people because the world is in great need. But we do need to have you happy and healthy. Learn about nutrition and drink a gallon of water a day (I do). Keep persuing the answers for all categories you want to know about. There are always higher level of truths to be found. Best of health to you Answered by Alecia Allateef 1 year ago.

Since you are a nurse, you probably know more about Hypotension than I do, but I'll give it a shot. First, remember that a persons BP can change drastically over a short period of time, often within minutes. No single reading can indicate High or Low BP. Several readings over time must be taken before there is a need for concern. Don't be alarmed by a single reading. Second, there are many factors that can affect your blood pressure. Some of those factors are: - Stress (Emotional, mental and physical) - Some medications (or combinations) can cause a rise or drop in BP - Poor sleep habits and sleep disorders (Sleep Apnea, not enough sleep, sleep disturbances, etc.) - Body position as the reading is taken (lying down. sitting, arm not level with heart, legs crossed, etc.) - Also there is a condition called "White Coat Hypertension". This is when a person visits a doctor and their BP goes up. It's an example of mental stress. - and of course smoking (or not). - How long it's been since your last meal. - Caffeine - Alcohol - Needing to go to the bathroom This comes from the FamilyDoctor.org website: "Hypotension, or low blood pressure, happens when your systolic pressure is consistently (several blood pressure readings over several days) below 90--or 25 points below your normal reading. Hypotension can be a sign of something serious such as shock, a life threatening condition. Contact your doctor immediately if you are dizzy or fainting" If you just started the medication, then it and quitting smoking has probably combined to cause this. It may take a little time for your body to adjust to both improvements and settle out. If you have been on the medication for some time, then I suspect the sudden drop in BP is due to the lack of smoking (nicotine) in your system. I have seen the same result when I don't smoke for several hours, though my BP never drops that low. But my HR varies from around 60 bpm to above 90 bpm (normally 68 to 84 bpm range) and my O2 Sat remains above 90% and is normally above 94%. I wouldn't worry about the HR at all, unless it continues to drop below 50 bpm or stays very near that for some time. As for the BP that is a concern if it remains there, but if it continues to drop I would suggest a visit to the ER is in order. My information comes from my research and experience with 5x Bypasses in Oct. 2006, High BP (Hypertension), High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia), COPD (Emphysema) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. I suggest the links below for more information. Answered by Aiko Leopoldo 1 year ago.

I'm no pro, but I have an opinion, so I'll share it! First of all, I'm so glad to hear you are quitting smoking. It's a huge step, I'm sure, but a very important one. So kudos to you! Now, as to the hypotension issue, I'm guessing that if you called your doctor and suggested that a) your BP is running low as you withdraw from nicotine so b) you're contemplating scaling back the HTN meds, he would have no problem with it. You already monitor your BP regularly (apparently), so there's no reason that you can't carefully adjust your medications to keep your BP in line. That said, fainting ain't good. If this hasn't happened to you before, you really ought to get a more complete cardio workup. Just my 2 cents worth... Answered by Ma Antonetty 1 year ago.

I am not a doctor or a nurse, but I feel this is true. As you probably are aware smoking (the nicotine) causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. So actually with the nicotine going out of your system now it caused your BP to start dropping and your heart rate. The same thing happened to me when I quit smoking, heart rate decreased and so did my BP. I consulted my cardiologist and physician and they began to decrease my BP meds as they told me you should never just stop taking BP meds cold turkey. I monitored my BP with every decreased dosage they told me to do. My BP remained where it should and then I was off the BP meds. Unfortunately, then I started to smoke again, and my BP increased and so did my heart rate, went back on BP meds again, BUT NOW, I HAVE FINALLY KICKED THE HABIT, have not been smoking for a year now and BP and heart rate is fine. I am just talking from personal experience and I also know that nicotine does increase heart rate and blood pressure. Answered by Wilber Stoesser 1 year ago.

There are many different types of medications that act in different ways to lower BP. The first medication your Dr prescribes may not work well enough or have some adverse side effects. It is important to track BP when you start taking HTN medication and note any side effects you may experience. There are many types of medications available and different combinations of medications that can tried. It is important to treat HTN as it can lead to many serious medical problems. It is important to get your BP checked regularly so that you don’t suffer from the terrible effects of long term untreated HTN, since it is very treatable and the alternatives are costly in many ways, including an untimely death. Answered by Caren Sweep 1 year ago.

you probably have STDS go get a life! Answered by Vincenza Doshier 1 year ago.


Blood drug testing!! help!!?
Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages... Asked by Josefina Tanen 1 year ago.

Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages I didn't state how many times I had actually done each one of them, but when she asked me, I told her I had only smoked weed once and taken 4 valium all together (when in reality I had smoked probably 4-5 within the last month and 1/2). The irony of this all is that actually yesterday I had to go in for my yearly blood test so they could check my thyroid, cholesterol, ect, but my my just threatened me telling me that she was going to call the clinic and tell them to run a drug screening also, to make sure I wasn't lying and that maybe I was taking other drugs as well. Thats not what I'm worried about though, I'm just worried about her really seeing how much is really in my system. How much do blood tests show? Will it show everything I've done in the last 2 months or only what i've done in the last 2 weeks? Please help! (please don't go on about how I should have just told the truth in the first place, it was already really humiliating for me and i just told her what popped into my head first) THANK YOU!! Answered by Katherina Lipka 1 year ago.

"The length of time any drug (illicit or prescribed) stays in your system will vary. In large part, it depends on your physiological makeup (e.g., your physical height, weight, your amount of body fat, your age, current state of health, whether or not you exercise mildly-aggressively-or at all). Whether or not you are undergoing any degree of stress (i.e., your "state of mind") at the time you ingest drugs can play a part as well. Still other considerations include your "frequency" of use (1x per day? 3-5x per day?), the "quantity" of drug you used each time, and the "length of time" (days? weeks? months?) of your consistent drug-use prior to your drug test. Even the quality ("potency") of the drug you ingest determines "how long" the drug is detectable in your system when your urine is analyzed (tested) at the lab. However, for most people, detectable levels (i.e., shows up as a "positive" in a laboratory drug test) of the following drugs stay in the body for these approximate periods of time." Alcohol (Beer, Booze, Hooch, Liquor, Wine), 1 hour to perhaps 10 or 12 hours (Yes, alcohol IS a drug! Drinking more than "in moderation" can lead to alcohol (drug) abuse...and perhaps alcoholism. During 2002, more than 18,000 people in the U.S. were killed by too-boozed-up DRUNK drivers! DON'T BE ONE OF THEM THIS YEAR!) CLICK HERE for more information about alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Amphetamines (Biphetamine, Black Beauties, Crosses, Dexedrine, Hearts), 1-2 days Anabolic steroids (Stanzolol, Stanazolol, Nandrolene; Steroids, Roids, Juice), oral- up to 3 weeks; injected- up to 3-6 months and more Barbituates (Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Phenobarbital; Barbs), 2-3 days Benzodiazepines (e.g., Ativan, Halcion, Librium, Rohypnol, Valium; Roofies, Tranks, Xanax), most, 2-3 days; a few, 4-8 days Cocaine (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), 1-2 days Codeine (e.g., Fiorinal w/codeine, Robitussin A-C, Empirin w/codeine, Tylenol w/codeine, 1-2 days GHB (G, Grievous Bodily Harm, Goob, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X), 1-2 days Heroin (Horse, Smack), 1-2 days Inhalants, just a few hours Ketamine (K, Kit Kat, Special K, Vitamin K), 2-4 days LSD (Acid, Blotter, Microdot, Yellow sunshine), a few hours or up to 5 days Marijuana (Bud, Blunt, Grass, Herb, Pot, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Smoke, Weed), 2-5 days (the daily, heavy user can sometimes be detected up to 30+ days) MDMA (Ecstasy), 1-5 days Methadone, 1-7 days Methamphetamines (Crank, Crystal, Desoxyn, Glass, Ice, Speed), 2-4 days Methaqualone (Ludes, Quaaludes), 10-15 days Nicotine (Cigarettes, Cigars, Habitrol patch, Nicorette gum, Nicotrol spray, Prostep patch; Smokeless tobacco, Snuff, Spit tobacco), 1-2 days Opiates (i.e., Opium: China, Dreams, Laudanum, Paregoric; Dover's Powder), 1-2 days Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percolone, Roxicodone), 1-2 days PCP (Angel Dust, Boat, Hog, Love Boat), 1-8 days Basically, a blood test is just going to show if you have done drugs or now. The test can't tell how much you have done. If you only did the drugs a few times a couple of months ago, nothing is going to show up. But if you have a serious problem and you were doing the drugs multiple times EVERYDAY, then you can still get a positive reading on a drug test even a month later because the drugs will stay present in the system of a chronic user. I really wouldn't worry about what you think your mom is going to find. If you didn't do any drugs about 2 weeks before your blood test, then the chances that they will find something will be a very slim chance. Answered by Mark Lohnes 1 year ago.

I'm not quite sure, so wait for another answer... but I'm pretty sure the blood test doesn't say how much was in your system, just tests "positive" or "negative" for each individual thing... So, as long as you hadn't done any other drugs other than what you told her, the blood work would just say that you tested positive for THC and for whatever chemical metabolized valium produces. No quantity/amount or anything. Answered by Modesto Stemm 1 year ago.

um yeah. just don't do drugs. Simple. Answered by Ariana Sundin 1 year ago.


Recovering bulimic... really bad sore throat?
I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things... Asked by Augustine Meara 1 year ago.

I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things would only get better after stopping. I also quit smoking 2 weeks ago and I was using the nicotine gum habitrol, but I saw a side effect was a sore throat so I haven't used it in 3 days. I have been keeping myself hydrated constantly, avoiding rough and spicy foods, gargling salt water twice a day and drinking green tea to soothe the pain. Does anyone know how long this will last or anything I can do to make things heal faster? I know it's not a cold or strep because there are NO symptoms (no fever, no cough, no white spots, no swollen glands or anything.) I know it may take a while... but some peace of mind and knowing how long this will last will help alot. And don't waste your time dissing me because of my old bad habits, I am paying the consequences as I type this. Thanks for your time. =) Answered by Tereasa Lacks 1 year ago.

Sore throats happen. It's probably not related to the bulimia at all. If you have no fever, no trouble breathing, no cough, then keep doing what you're doing. If you develop other symptoms, call your doctor's office. Otherwise, just keep nursing it along until it gets better. If not feeling better after a week, schedule a doctor's appointment. Answered by Shaniqua Kloth 1 year ago.


How do I become a distributor of Habitrol Nicotene gum?
I have been chewing nicotene gum for years to control my smoking. I buy it from a lady on the internet. I would like to become a distributor and get it cheaper. It is called Habitrol from New Zealand, and is made by Novartis. Does anyone know how to become a distributor? Asked by Leonila Liestman 1 year ago.

try getting the address/email from the wrapper you get the gum in Answered by Porsche Burrola 1 year ago.


Which nicotine patch is really good to quit smoking ?
Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System or nicoderm ..which one ? Asked by Desiree Burnard 1 year ago.

Take it from some one who has tried them all,its all in your head.It doesn't matter which one you use if your not TRULY ready to quit.Good luck. Answered by Santana Regester 1 year ago.

they are pretty much the same in terms of drug delivery and drug content. if I were you, I'd go for the pharmacy house brand to save some $$$...unless you've heard stories of the house brand not working. Answered by Ray Sarrett 1 year ago.


What is the best method for quitting smoking?
Asked by Bradly Suneson 1 year ago.

I used the Habitrol patch for about a month and a half and have now been smoke free for a year Jan 25th. My husband quit the same time and he used Nicorett gum and he has also been smoke free but he still gets cravings and chews the gum occasionally. It is really a hard thing to commit to, but if you are ready, go for it. Good Luck Answered by Dora Fulginiti 1 year ago.

For me, it started out with slowing down when i smoked, like at first i stopped smoking in the morning, then progressing i wouldn't smoke at work, then not at home. Then towards the end when putting the breaks on all the way, i quit going to bars, tried to stay away from people smoking then what happened i had to figure what to do with my hands when i started to go out again to a concert are a bar that was the test then one day i finally realized i really quit i can drink all night, play pool and never miss the smoking. and that my friend is a kick *** feeling. All in all it took like 2 years for me but i believe you could do all that in a years time, just don't pressure yourself into fully quitting right away focus on one thing at a time. Hope this info can help you, because i don't know if it is the best way ,but this is what worked for me. Answered by Josh Floros 1 year ago.

There is no best method because everyone is different and should be treated by a doctor so your body can adjust to the change without too much stress. Answered by Jammie Lamarche 1 year ago.

After reading your question I sat here and thought about it for about 10 minutes...I have been a smoker for about 7 years now and I thought about it I believe the answer is willpower. Thats all you need is strong willpower...good luck :) Answered by Lashaun Swaine 1 year ago.


Do some brands of nicotine patches stick to the skin better than others?
My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he... Asked by Lavina Fedoriw 1 year ago.

My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he bought his own box of nicotine patches, only he got the 14mg ones because the 21mg was making his arm feel weird. Also, he didn't usually smoke a whole pack a day. These were circular patches. They are Nicoderm brand.. He has been using them for almost a week and a half and they don't stick very well. He works outside for most of the day and as soon as he starts to sweat, the patches peel off. Is one brand circular and another square, or is that just to differentiate the 21mg and 14mg dosage? The square ones seemed to stick to the skin better. He doesn't want to tape the patch to his arm. Does anyone recommend a brand that sticks well? Answered by Lottie Nakamori 1 year ago.

the best one i have found is called --habitrol. they stick well and don't burn or sting very much. Answered by Beryl Czolba 1 year ago.

I worked in a facility that supplied patches to patients. Have him wipe the area he is applying the patch to with alcohol. Let dry. Apply patch. He can also add some waterproof adhesive tape over it because if he perspires alot almost any brand will lose it's adhesion. Answered by Cathie Antoniak 1 year ago.

Im not too sure. You should ask your local chemist but i am pretty sure a more expensive brand will work better. Answered by Nickie Schockley 1 year ago.

yep its funny lol Answered by Gerry Artez 1 year ago.


Ok im still smokeless in ny im really trying not to smoke but my ? is does the patch really work ?
and should i invest in it or is it as bad as smoking a cig Asked by Enedina Nitchman 1 year ago.

The patch delivers nicotine into your system without the tar and carcinogens that you absorb when actually smoking. Because small amounts of nicotine are constantly being absorbed, you will find your cravings deminish and it might help you stay smoke free. You reduce the level of nicotine gradually, so over time, your dependance is reduced, which makes it easier to quit completely. I used the patch my first time quitting and it worked quite well for me, but the nicotine level was a bit high, so I took it off. My doctor recently told me it was ok to cut the patch in half, so I'm starting on it again on Monday. Keep in mind that, because you are not inhaling smoke, your body will continue to heal the damage that smoking has caused while you use the patch. Answered by Cathleen Forsman 1 year ago.

The patch isn't as bad for your lungs as smoking, but it's still a source of nicotine, so it's just substituting one addiction for another. If you're able to stop smoking without the patch, you're probably better off. Answered by Lettie Knochel 1 year ago.

its still got addictive nicotine but its not bad for you because it does not contain tobacco. nicotine itself is not harmful, only addictive. Answered by Kathrine Konkel 1 year ago.


What is the molecular formula of nicotine?
Please I have been stuck on this question for a long time if i could get a step by step help that would be greatly appreciated :) Nicotine has the empirical formula, C5H7N. A solution of 0.500 g of nicotine in 12.0 g of water boils at 100.140*C. What is the the molecular formula of nicotine? Asked by Reagan Farabee 1 year ago.

THIS IS ALLOT. BUT IT IS Chemical Database Nicotine Identifications Formula: C10H14N2 Formula: C10H14N2O Formula: C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Elements: Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen CAS Number: 54-11-5 Caswell Number: 597 CCOHS Record Number: 446 RCRA Waste Number: P075 RTECS Number: QS5250000 Synonyms/Related: (+)-Nicotine (+-) NICOTINE (+-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (+-)-Nicotine (-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine (-)-Nicotine (2S) 3-(1-Methyl-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-pyridine (R)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (R,S)-Nicotine (S)-(-)-NICOTINE, 3-[(2S)-1-METHYL-2-PYRROLIDINYL] PYRIDINE (S)-3-(1-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl) Pyridine (S)-3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-3-(N-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-Nicotine .beta.-Pyridyl-.alpha.-N-methylpyrroli... .beta.-Pyrimidum 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)-pyrrolidene 1-Methyl-2-(3-pyridyl) pyrrolidine 2'-beta-H-Nicotine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine 3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine 3-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)) pyridine 3-(N-METHYLPYROLLIDINO) PYRIDINE 3-(N-Methylpyrrolidino) pyridine 3-(tetrahydro-1-methyl pyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine 3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N,N-diethyl- 3-[(2S)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl]pyridi... Anacardone Anacordone Astrocar beta-Pyridyl-alpha-N-methylpyrrolidine beta-Pyrimidum C00745 c0468 C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Camphozone Canfodiamina Carbamidal Cardamine Cardiagen Cardiamid Cardiamide Cardiamina Cardiamine Cardimon Citocor Coracon Coraetamidum Coraethamide Coraethamidum Coralept Coramine Coravita Corazone Cordiamid Cordiamin Cordiamine Corditon Cordynil Corediol Corespin Corethamide Coretone Corivo Cormed Cormid Cormotyl Cornotone Corotonin Corovit Corvin Corvitan Corvitol Corvotone Corywas D-Nicotine Danamine destruxol Destruxol orchid spray Diaethyl-nicotinamid Diaethyl-nicotinamid [German] Diaethylamidum acidi nicotinici Diethyl-Nicotamide Diethylamid kyseliny nikotinove [Czech] Diethylnicotinamide Dietilamide-Carbopiridina Dinacoryl DL-tetrahydronicotyrine Dynacoryl Dynamicarde Elitone Emo-nik ENT 3,424 Eucoran FLUX MAAG Flux Maay fumeto bac Fumetobac Habitrol Hansacor Inicardio Kardiamid Kardonyl Kordiamin L(-)-nicotine L-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine l-Nicotine Leptamin MACH-NIC Mediamid methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine Micotine N, N-Diethylnicotinamide N,N-Diethyl-3-pyridinecarboxamide N,N-DIETHYLNICOTINAMIDE NCT Ni-Cor niagara p.a. Niagara p.a. dust Niamine Nic-Sal Nicaethamidum Nicetamida [INN-Spanish] Nicetamide Nicetamide [DCIT] Nicethamide Nicethamidum [INN-Latin] Nico-dust Nico-fume Nicocide Nicor Nicordamin Nicorine Nicoryl Nicotin Nicotina Nicotina (ITALIAN) Nicotina [Italian] Nicotinamide, N,N-diethyl- Nicotine NICOTINE (L) (PYRROLIDINE,N-METHYL,ALPHA-(D-BETA-PYRI... Nicotine alkaloid Nicotine [BSI:ISO] Nicotine [USAN] Nicotine, (+-)- Nicotine, liquid Nicotinic acid diethylamide Nicotrol Nicotrol Inhaler Nicotrol NS Nikardin Niketamid Niketamide Nikethamide Nikethamide [BAN:INN] Niketharol Nikethyl Niketilamid Nikorin Nikotin Nikotin (GERMAN) Nikotin [German] Nikotyna Nikotyna (POLISH) Nikotyna [Polish] Niquetamida Nisetamide Ortho N-4 Ortho N-4 and N-5 dusts Ortho N-4 dust Ortho N-5 Ortho N-5 dust Percoral Procardine Procorman Prostep Pseudonicotine Pyricardyl Pyridine, 3- (1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- Pyridine, 3- (tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine, 3-((2S)-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (R)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (s)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine-3-carboxydiethylamide Pyridine-3-carboxylic acid diethylamide Pyrrolidine, 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)- Reformin Rehormin S-(-)-Nicotine Salvacard Salvacorin Sancora SDCCGMLS-0066911.P001 Solyacord Stellamine Stiminol Stimulin Tendust Tetrahydronicotyrine, dl- Tonocard Tonocor Vasazol Ventramine XL All Insecti-cide, Emo-Nib XL All Insecticide Properties Incompatiblities: strong acids strong oxidizers Health & Regulatory Guidelines EPA Regulations: Reportable Quantity: 100 Lbs NFPA 704 Rating: Health Hazardard Rating: 4 Fire Hazardard Rating: 1 Reactivity Hazardard Rating: 0 NIOSH Guidelines: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 IDLH: 5 mg/m3 OSHA Regulations: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 TWA Vacated: 0.5 mg/m3 Health Risks: Highly Toxic 49 CFR 172.101 - Hazardous Materials Table Hazardous materials description and proper shipping namesHaz class or divID#PGLCSpec prov §172.102Pack §173Qty limitVessel ExcepNon BulkBulkPass air/railCargo air onlyLocOther (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8A)(8B)... Current as of January 2006 Nicotine6.1UN1654II6.1IB2153202... 2004 E Answered by Viva Grix 1 year ago.

I need points Answered by Elden Quilici 1 year ago.


Ok health pros, here's one for you. I take medication for HTN, .....?
I AM a nurse, so I know part of the answer already, just thought I'd put it out there to get more info, thanks for the replies so far. Asked by Pablo Jodon 1 year ago.

HI The Only Solo Rose (very creative) I must commend you first for assisting many people with your time. Athough I have different concepts on how to heal people then modern medicine (mostly drugs) I still see the value and willingness doctors and nurses are trying to help people. We need more healers in the world and we come from all different backgrounds of training and education. Again I applaud you sharing your expertise with so many. Now Ill share my thoughts with you and I have no idea about drugs, but I am very keen on how the body functions. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke causes high blood pressure because of how smoking damages cells and narrows arteries. In addition, cigarettes contain an abundance of life-threatening chemicals that further increase overall health risks. Even smokeless tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and snuff can raise blood pressure levels because of the nicotine and sodium they contain. Many of the other chemicals contained in cigarettes can create a toxic burden on the liver to further disturb healthy body habits. Pharmaceutical Drugs: According to the Physicians` Desk Reference, the following drugs can all cause high blood pressure as a side effect of their use: Alfenta Injection, Aredia for Injection, Dobutrex Solution Vials, Epogen for Injection, Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System, Lupron Depot, Methergine Injection and Tablets, Orthoclone OKT3 Sterile Solution, Polygam Immune Globulin Intravenous Human, Procrit for Injection, Sandimmune, Sandimmune Soft Gelatin Capsules, Tolectin, Velban Vials, Ventolin Inhalation Aerosol and Refill, and Wellbutrin. ****Here are some ideas to contol your blood pressure: Quick Action Plan for High Blood Pressure 1. Make any necessary lifestyle changes. If you are overweight, commit to a weight loss plan. If you smoke, stop, and avoid all sources of secondhand smoke. Also exercise at least thirty minutes a day at least three to four times a week. Safe and effective exercise choices include brisk walking, bicycling, hiking, rebounding, and swimming. Additionally try a restorative yoga class, tai chi or chi gong; all can provide great stress relief and can be pleasurable ways to add movement to your life. 2. Adopt a healthy diet. In place of red meats, choose fish such as blue fish, cod, Greenland halibut, mackerel, and wild caught salmon, as well as free-range, organic poultry. If you want red meat choose bison, for a low fat option. 3. Emphasize fresh, organic fruits and vegetables that are rich in vital nutrients, such as avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, grapefruit, nectarines, oranges, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green peas, kidney and lima beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts such as almonds, cashews, walnuts and pecans, potatoes, squash, and yams, raw dairy, and whole grains like brown rice, buckwheat and quinoa. 4. Use raw virgin coconut butter or organic butter for cooking, and flaxseed and extra virgin olive oil for dressings. 5. Avoid alcohol, coffee, caffeine, and refined salt. 6. Supplement with vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin C, bioflavonoids (especially rutin), vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), evening primrose oil, fish oil, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and zinc, as well as the amino acids cysteine, taurine, and tryptophan. 7. Useful herbs for high blood pressure include garlic, hawthorn berry, olive leaf extract, and the medicinal mushrooms maitake and reishi. 8. Drink at least one 8-ounce glass of fresh squeezed, organic vegetable juice each day. Excellent juice combinations include beet, carrot, and celery; and carrot or cucumber, spinach, and parsley. For added benefit, add one clove of juiced garlic. 9. Adopt a stress management program of daily meditation and/or relaxation exercises. 10. Detoxify your body to eliminate toxins and heavy metals that can dramatically increase the risk of high blood pressure. Quick Action Plan for Addictions 1. Determine if the addiction stems from allergies, biochemical imbalances, genetics, and/or malabsorption of nutrients. 2. Repressed core emotions such as denied anger often lead to depression, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, and disassociation. Embracing your feelings is the most important aspect of beginning to deal with addictive behavior. 3. Regular chiropractic adjustments prove to be supportive, along with release-oriented tissue and bodywork techniques such as Rolfing. 4. Eat three meals and two snacks consistently. Emphasize quality protein foods such as organic poultry, bison, lamb, wild-caught fish, and eggs. Eat plenty of raw nuts and seeds, apples, berries, and other whole fruits; avoid all fruit juices. 5. A critical step in the recovery process is to cleanse, heal and support liver function by using herbs such as Milk Thistle, Dandelion and Bupleurum. 6. Blood-cleansing will support sluggish energy. Herbs in the form of tinctures or teas made from Oat Straw, Burdock Root, Echinacea, and Licorice Root are helpful, and are also vital to healthy kidney function. 7. To calm nerves and anxiety caused by addiction, use the herbs Skullcap, Valerian, and Vervain. 8. After eating a stable whole foods diet for at least 3 months, consider a juice fast of organic vegetable juices. 9. Take nutritional supplements. The B vitamins, particularly thiamin (B1) and B6 are important. Consider amino acid therapy for rebalancing brain chemistry, and to reduce cravings for alcohol, drugs, and/or nicotine. 10. Acupuncture, particularly auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture), is especially useful for drug addictions, and excellent for addressing addictive behaviors such as sex, gambling, and workaholicism. 11. Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Naturopathic Medicine and Orthomolecular Medicine are especially helpful for alcoholism, drug addiction, and smoking. Continue your quest to assisting people because the world is in great need. But we do need to have you happy and healthy. Learn about nutrition and drink a gallon of water a day (I do). Keep persuing the answers for all categories you want to know about. There are always higher level of truths to be found. Best of health to you Answered by Erlinda Robicheau 1 year ago.

Since you are a nurse, you probably know more about Hypotension than I do, but I'll give it a shot. First, remember that a persons BP can change drastically over a short period of time, often within minutes. No single reading can indicate High or Low BP. Several readings over time must be taken before there is a need for concern. Don't be alarmed by a single reading. Second, there are many factors that can affect your blood pressure. Some of those factors are: - Stress (Emotional, mental and physical) - Some medications (or combinations) can cause a rise or drop in BP - Poor sleep habits and sleep disorders (Sleep Apnea, not enough sleep, sleep disturbances, etc.) - Body position as the reading is taken (lying down. sitting, arm not level with heart, legs crossed, etc.) - Also there is a condition called "White Coat Hypertension". This is when a person visits a doctor and their BP goes up. It's an example of mental stress. - and of course smoking (or not). - How long it's been since your last meal. - Caffeine - Alcohol - Needing to go to the bathroom This comes from the FamilyDoctor.org website: "Hypotension, or low blood pressure, happens when your systolic pressure is consistently (several blood pressure readings over several days) below 90--or 25 points below your normal reading. Hypotension can be a sign of something serious such as shock, a life threatening condition. Contact your doctor immediately if you are dizzy or fainting" If you just started the medication, then it and quitting smoking has probably combined to cause this. It may take a little time for your body to adjust to both improvements and settle out. If you have been on the medication for some time, then I suspect the sudden drop in BP is due to the lack of smoking (nicotine) in your system. I have seen the same result when I don't smoke for several hours, though my BP never drops that low. But my HR varies from around 60 bpm to above 90 bpm (normally 68 to 84 bpm range) and my O2 Sat remains above 90% and is normally above 94%. I wouldn't worry about the HR at all, unless it continues to drop below 50 bpm or stays very near that for some time. As for the BP that is a concern if it remains there, but if it continues to drop I would suggest a visit to the ER is in order. My information comes from my research and experience with 5x Bypasses in Oct. 2006, High BP (Hypertension), High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia), COPD (Emphysema) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. I suggest the links below for more information. Answered by Magen Vantreese 1 year ago.

I'm no pro, but I have an opinion, so I'll share it! First of all, I'm so glad to hear you are quitting smoking. It's a huge step, I'm sure, but a very important one. So kudos to you! Now, as to the hypotension issue, I'm guessing that if you called your doctor and suggested that a) your BP is running low as you withdraw from nicotine so b) you're contemplating scaling back the HTN meds, he would have no problem with it. You already monitor your BP regularly (apparently), so there's no reason that you can't carefully adjust your medications to keep your BP in line. That said, fainting ain't good. If this hasn't happened to you before, you really ought to get a more complete cardio workup. Just my 2 cents worth... Answered by Viola Vertz 1 year ago.

I am not a doctor or a nurse, but I feel this is true. As you probably are aware smoking (the nicotine) causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. So actually with the nicotine going out of your system now it caused your BP to start dropping and your heart rate. The same thing happened to me when I quit smoking, heart rate decreased and so did my BP. I consulted my cardiologist and physician and they began to decrease my BP meds as they told me you should never just stop taking BP meds cold turkey. I monitored my BP with every decreased dosage they told me to do. My BP remained where it should and then I was off the BP meds. Unfortunately, then I started to smoke again, and my BP increased and so did my heart rate, went back on BP meds again, BUT NOW, I HAVE FINALLY KICKED THE HABIT, have not been smoking for a year now and BP and heart rate is fine. I am just talking from personal experience and I also know that nicotine does increase heart rate and blood pressure. Answered by Lottie Birner 1 year ago.

There are many different types of medications that act in different ways to lower BP. The first medication your Dr prescribes may not work well enough or have some adverse side effects. It is important to track BP when you start taking HTN medication and note any side effects you may experience. There are many types of medications available and different combinations of medications that can tried. It is important to treat HTN as it can lead to many serious medical problems. It is important to get your BP checked regularly so that you don’t suffer from the terrible effects of long term untreated HTN, since it is very treatable and the alternatives are costly in many ways, including an untimely death. Answered by Vivan Norko 1 year ago.

you probably have STDS go get a life! Answered by Kena Carran 1 year ago.


Blood drug testing!! help!!?
Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages... Asked by Lisandra Guz 1 year ago.

Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages I didn't state how many times I had actually done each one of them, but when she asked me, I told her I had only smoked weed once and taken 4 valium all together (when in reality I had smoked probably 4-5 within the last month and 1/2). The irony of this all is that actually yesterday I had to go in for my yearly blood test so they could check my thyroid, cholesterol, ect, but my my just threatened me telling me that she was going to call the clinic and tell them to run a drug screening also, to make sure I wasn't lying and that maybe I was taking other drugs as well. Thats not what I'm worried about though, I'm just worried about her really seeing how much is really in my system. How much do blood tests show? Will it show everything I've done in the last 2 months or only what i've done in the last 2 weeks? Please help! (please don't go on about how I should have just told the truth in the first place, it was already really humiliating for me and i just told her what popped into my head first) THANK YOU!! Answered by Retha Hoffhines 1 year ago.

"The length of time any drug (illicit or prescribed) stays in your system will vary. In large part, it depends on your physiological makeup (e.g., your physical height, weight, your amount of body fat, your age, current state of health, whether or not you exercise mildly-aggressively-or at all). Whether or not you are undergoing any degree of stress (i.e., your "state of mind") at the time you ingest drugs can play a part as well. Still other considerations include your "frequency" of use (1x per day? 3-5x per day?), the "quantity" of drug you used each time, and the "length of time" (days? weeks? months?) of your consistent drug-use prior to your drug test. Even the quality ("potency") of the drug you ingest determines "how long" the drug is detectable in your system when your urine is analyzed (tested) at the lab. However, for most people, detectable levels (i.e., shows up as a "positive" in a laboratory drug test) of the following drugs stay in the body for these approximate periods of time." Alcohol (Beer, Booze, Hooch, Liquor, Wine), 1 hour to perhaps 10 or 12 hours (Yes, alcohol IS a drug! Drinking more than "in moderation" can lead to alcohol (drug) abuse...and perhaps alcoholism. During 2002, more than 18,000 people in the U.S. were killed by too-boozed-up DRUNK drivers! DON'T BE ONE OF THEM THIS YEAR!) CLICK HERE for more information about alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Amphetamines (Biphetamine, Black Beauties, Crosses, Dexedrine, Hearts), 1-2 days Anabolic steroids (Stanzolol, Stanazolol, Nandrolene; Steroids, Roids, Juice), oral- up to 3 weeks; injected- up to 3-6 months and more Barbituates (Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Phenobarbital; Barbs), 2-3 days Benzodiazepines (e.g., Ativan, Halcion, Librium, Rohypnol, Valium; Roofies, Tranks, Xanax), most, 2-3 days; a few, 4-8 days Cocaine (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), 1-2 days Codeine (e.g., Fiorinal w/codeine, Robitussin A-C, Empirin w/codeine, Tylenol w/codeine, 1-2 days GHB (G, Grievous Bodily Harm, Goob, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X), 1-2 days Heroin (Horse, Smack), 1-2 days Inhalants, just a few hours Ketamine (K, Kit Kat, Special K, Vitamin K), 2-4 days LSD (Acid, Blotter, Microdot, Yellow sunshine), a few hours or up to 5 days Marijuana (Bud, Blunt, Grass, Herb, Pot, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Smoke, Weed), 2-5 days (the daily, heavy user can sometimes be detected up to 30+ days) MDMA (Ecstasy), 1-5 days Methadone, 1-7 days Methamphetamines (Crank, Crystal, Desoxyn, Glass, Ice, Speed), 2-4 days Methaqualone (Ludes, Quaaludes), 10-15 days Nicotine (Cigarettes, Cigars, Habitrol patch, Nicorette gum, Nicotrol spray, Prostep patch; Smokeless tobacco, Snuff, Spit tobacco), 1-2 days Opiates (i.e., Opium: China, Dreams, Laudanum, Paregoric; Dover's Powder), 1-2 days Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percolone, Roxicodone), 1-2 days PCP (Angel Dust, Boat, Hog, Love Boat), 1-8 days Basically, a blood test is just going to show if you have done drugs or now. The test can't tell how much you have done. If you only did the drugs a few times a couple of months ago, nothing is going to show up. But if you have a serious problem and you were doing the drugs multiple times EVERYDAY, then you can still get a positive reading on a drug test even a month later because the drugs will stay present in the system of a chronic user. I really wouldn't worry about what you think your mom is going to find. If you didn't do any drugs about 2 weeks before your blood test, then the chances that they will find something will be a very slim chance. Answered by Deann Papps 1 year ago.

I'm not quite sure, so wait for another answer... but I'm pretty sure the blood test doesn't say how much was in your system, just tests "positive" or "negative" for each individual thing... So, as long as you hadn't done any other drugs other than what you told her, the blood work would just say that you tested positive for THC and for whatever chemical metabolized valium produces. No quantity/amount or anything. Answered by Cathern Kasper 1 year ago.

um yeah. just don't do drugs. Simple. Answered by Minh Ricucci 1 year ago.


Recovering bulimic... really bad sore throat?
I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things... Asked by Caitlyn Tarrenis 1 year ago.

I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things would only get better after stopping. I also quit smoking 2 weeks ago and I was using the nicotine gum habitrol, but I saw a side effect was a sore throat so I haven't used it in 3 days. I have been keeping myself hydrated constantly, avoiding rough and spicy foods, gargling salt water twice a day and drinking green tea to soothe the pain. Does anyone know how long this will last or anything I can do to make things heal faster? I know it's not a cold or strep because there are NO symptoms (no fever, no cough, no white spots, no swollen glands or anything.) I know it may take a while... but some peace of mind and knowing how long this will last will help alot. And don't waste your time dissing me because of my old bad habits, I am paying the consequences as I type this. Thanks for your time. =) Answered by Christene Gers 1 year ago.

Sore throats happen. It's probably not related to the bulimia at all. If you have no fever, no trouble breathing, no cough, then keep doing what you're doing. If you develop other symptoms, call your doctor's office. Otherwise, just keep nursing it along until it gets better. If not feeling better after a week, schedule a doctor's appointment. Answered by Yukiko Tye 1 year ago.


How do I become a distributor of Habitrol Nicotene gum?
I have been chewing nicotene gum for years to control my smoking. I buy it from a lady on the internet. I would like to become a distributor and get it cheaper. It is called Habitrol from New Zealand, and is made by Novartis. Does anyone know how to become a distributor? Asked by Retha Cage 1 year ago.

try getting the address/email from the wrapper you get the gum in Answered by Nellie Henke 1 year ago.


Which nicotine patch is really good to quit smoking ?
Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System or nicoderm ..which one ? Asked by Ginger Everly 1 year ago.

Take it from some one who has tried them all,its all in your head.It doesn't matter which one you use if your not TRULY ready to quit.Good luck. Answered by Kayla Truesdale 1 year ago.

they are pretty much the same in terms of drug delivery and drug content. if I were you, I'd go for the pharmacy house brand to save some $$$...unless you've heard stories of the house brand not working. Answered by Leonor Caldero 1 year ago.


What is the best method for quitting smoking?
Asked by Jeannetta Shatt 1 year ago.

I used the Habitrol patch for about a month and a half and have now been smoke free for a year Jan 25th. My husband quit the same time and he used Nicorett gum and he has also been smoke free but he still gets cravings and chews the gum occasionally. It is really a hard thing to commit to, but if you are ready, go for it. Good Luck Answered by Janae Wellenstein 1 year ago.

For me, it started out with slowing down when i smoked, like at first i stopped smoking in the morning, then progressing i wouldn't smoke at work, then not at home. Then towards the end when putting the breaks on all the way, i quit going to bars, tried to stay away from people smoking then what happened i had to figure what to do with my hands when i started to go out again to a concert are a bar that was the test then one day i finally realized i really quit i can drink all night, play pool and never miss the smoking. and that my friend is a kick *** feeling. All in all it took like 2 years for me but i believe you could do all that in a years time, just don't pressure yourself into fully quitting right away focus on one thing at a time. Hope this info can help you, because i don't know if it is the best way ,but this is what worked for me. Answered by Derrick Lubow 1 year ago.

There is no best method because everyone is different and should be treated by a doctor so your body can adjust to the change without too much stress. Answered by Winston Podolsky 1 year ago.

After reading your question I sat here and thought about it for about 10 minutes...I have been a smoker for about 7 years now and I thought about it I believe the answer is willpower. Thats all you need is strong willpower...good luck :) Answered by Melinda Piersaul 1 year ago.


Do some brands of nicotine patches stick to the skin better than others?
My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he... Asked by Ginger Carolin 1 year ago.

My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he bought his own box of nicotine patches, only he got the 14mg ones because the 21mg was making his arm feel weird. Also, he didn't usually smoke a whole pack a day. These were circular patches. They are Nicoderm brand.. He has been using them for almost a week and a half and they don't stick very well. He works outside for most of the day and as soon as he starts to sweat, the patches peel off. Is one brand circular and another square, or is that just to differentiate the 21mg and 14mg dosage? The square ones seemed to stick to the skin better. He doesn't want to tape the patch to his arm. Does anyone recommend a brand that sticks well? Answered by Shaquana Linke 1 year ago.

the best one i have found is called --habitrol. they stick well and don't burn or sting very much. Answered by Inga Furth 1 year ago.

I worked in a facility that supplied patches to patients. Have him wipe the area he is applying the patch to with alcohol. Let dry. Apply patch. He can also add some waterproof adhesive tape over it because if he perspires alot almost any brand will lose it's adhesion. Answered by Honey Selitto 1 year ago.

Im not too sure. You should ask your local chemist but i am pretty sure a more expensive brand will work better. Answered by Refugia Hanmore 1 year ago.

yep its funny lol Answered by Shanna Rabren 1 year ago.


Ok im still smokeless in ny im really trying not to smoke but my ? is does the patch really work ?
and should i invest in it or is it as bad as smoking a cig Asked by Chanda Branton 1 year ago.

The patch delivers nicotine into your system without the tar and carcinogens that you absorb when actually smoking. Because small amounts of nicotine are constantly being absorbed, you will find your cravings deminish and it might help you stay smoke free. You reduce the level of nicotine gradually, so over time, your dependance is reduced, which makes it easier to quit completely. I used the patch my first time quitting and it worked quite well for me, but the nicotine level was a bit high, so I took it off. My doctor recently told me it was ok to cut the patch in half, so I'm starting on it again on Monday. Keep in mind that, because you are not inhaling smoke, your body will continue to heal the damage that smoking has caused while you use the patch. Answered by Rosalina Orte 1 year ago.

The patch isn't as bad for your lungs as smoking, but it's still a source of nicotine, so it's just substituting one addiction for another. If you're able to stop smoking without the patch, you're probably better off. Answered by Stephnie Them 1 year ago.

its still got addictive nicotine but its not bad for you because it does not contain tobacco. nicotine itself is not harmful, only addictive. Answered by Melba Berdine 1 year ago.


What is the molecular formula of nicotine?
Please I have been stuck on this question for a long time if i could get a step by step help that would be greatly appreciated :) Nicotine has the empirical formula, C5H7N. A solution of 0.500 g of nicotine in 12.0 g of water boils at 100.140*C. What is the the molecular formula of nicotine? Asked by Idalia Zimmerly 1 year ago.

THIS IS ALLOT. BUT IT IS Chemical Database Nicotine Identifications Formula: C10H14N2 Formula: C10H14N2O Formula: C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Elements: Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen CAS Number: 54-11-5 Caswell Number: 597 CCOHS Record Number: 446 RCRA Waste Number: P075 RTECS Number: QS5250000 Synonyms/Related: (+)-Nicotine (+-) NICOTINE (+-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (+-)-Nicotine (-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine (-)-Nicotine (2S) 3-(1-Methyl-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-pyridine (R)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (R,S)-Nicotine (S)-(-)-NICOTINE, 3-[(2S)-1-METHYL-2-PYRROLIDINYL] PYRIDINE (S)-3-(1-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl) Pyridine (S)-3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-3-(N-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-Nicotine .beta.-Pyridyl-.alpha.-N-methylpyrroli... .beta.-Pyrimidum 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)-pyrrolidene 1-Methyl-2-(3-pyridyl) pyrrolidine 2'-beta-H-Nicotine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine 3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine 3-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)) pyridine 3-(N-METHYLPYROLLIDINO) PYRIDINE 3-(N-Methylpyrrolidino) pyridine 3-(tetrahydro-1-methyl pyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine 3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N,N-diethyl- 3-[(2S)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl]pyridi... Anacardone Anacordone Astrocar beta-Pyridyl-alpha-N-methylpyrrolidine beta-Pyrimidum C00745 c0468 C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Camphozone Canfodiamina Carbamidal Cardamine Cardiagen Cardiamid Cardiamide Cardiamina Cardiamine Cardimon Citocor Coracon Coraetamidum Coraethamide Coraethamidum Coralept Coramine Coravita Corazone Cordiamid Cordiamin Cordiamine Corditon Cordynil Corediol Corespin Corethamide Coretone Corivo Cormed Cormid Cormotyl Cornotone Corotonin Corovit Corvin Corvitan Corvitol Corvotone Corywas D-Nicotine Danamine destruxol Destruxol orchid spray Diaethyl-nicotinamid Diaethyl-nicotinamid [German] Diaethylamidum acidi nicotinici Diethyl-Nicotamide Diethylamid kyseliny nikotinove [Czech] Diethylnicotinamide Dietilamide-Carbopiridina Dinacoryl DL-tetrahydronicotyrine Dynacoryl Dynamicarde Elitone Emo-nik ENT 3,424 Eucoran FLUX MAAG Flux Maay fumeto bac Fumetobac Habitrol Hansacor Inicardio Kardiamid Kardonyl Kordiamin L(-)-nicotine L-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine l-Nicotine Leptamin MACH-NIC Mediamid methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine Micotine N, N-Diethylnicotinamide N,N-Diethyl-3-pyridinecarboxamide N,N-DIETHYLNICOTINAMIDE NCT Ni-Cor niagara p.a. Niagara p.a. dust Niamine Nic-Sal Nicaethamidum Nicetamida [INN-Spanish] Nicetamide Nicetamide [DCIT] Nicethamide Nicethamidum [INN-Latin] Nico-dust Nico-fume Nicocide Nicor Nicordamin Nicorine Nicoryl Nicotin Nicotina Nicotina (ITALIAN) Nicotina [Italian] Nicotinamide, N,N-diethyl- Nicotine NICOTINE (L) (PYRROLIDINE,N-METHYL,ALPHA-(D-BETA-PYRI... Nicotine alkaloid Nicotine [BSI:ISO] Nicotine [USAN] Nicotine, (+-)- Nicotine, liquid Nicotinic acid diethylamide Nicotrol Nicotrol Inhaler Nicotrol NS Nikardin Niketamid Niketamide Nikethamide Nikethamide [BAN:INN] Niketharol Nikethyl Niketilamid Nikorin Nikotin Nikotin (GERMAN) Nikotin [German] Nikotyna Nikotyna (POLISH) Nikotyna [Polish] Niquetamida Nisetamide Ortho N-4 Ortho N-4 and N-5 dusts Ortho N-4 dust Ortho N-5 Ortho N-5 dust Percoral Procardine Procorman Prostep Pseudonicotine Pyricardyl Pyridine, 3- (1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- Pyridine, 3- (tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine, 3-((2S)-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (R)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (s)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine-3-carboxydiethylamide Pyridine-3-carboxylic acid diethylamide Pyrrolidine, 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)- Reformin Rehormin S-(-)-Nicotine Salvacard Salvacorin Sancora SDCCGMLS-0066911.P001 Solyacord Stellamine Stiminol Stimulin Tendust Tetrahydronicotyrine, dl- Tonocard Tonocor Vasazol Ventramine XL All Insecti-cide, Emo-Nib XL All Insecticide Properties Incompatiblities: strong acids strong oxidizers Health & Regulatory Guidelines EPA Regulations: Reportable Quantity: 100 Lbs NFPA 704 Rating: Health Hazardard Rating: 4 Fire Hazardard Rating: 1 Reactivity Hazardard Rating: 0 NIOSH Guidelines: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 IDLH: 5 mg/m3 OSHA Regulations: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 TWA Vacated: 0.5 mg/m3 Health Risks: Highly Toxic 49 CFR 172.101 - Hazardous Materials Table Hazardous materials description and proper shipping namesHaz class or divID#PGLCSpec prov §172.102Pack §173Qty limitVessel ExcepNon BulkBulkPass air/railCargo air onlyLocOther (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8A)(8B)... Current as of January 2006 Nicotine6.1UN1654II6.1IB2153202... 2004 E Answered by Jerrod Tellio 1 year ago.

I need points Answered by Earline Servi 1 year ago.


Ok health pros, here's one for you. I take medication for HTN, .....?
I AM a nurse, so I know part of the answer already, just thought I'd put it out there to get more info, thanks for the replies so far. Asked by Daria Schweiss 1 year ago.

HI The Only Solo Rose (very creative) I must commend you first for assisting many people with your time. Athough I have different concepts on how to heal people then modern medicine (mostly drugs) I still see the value and willingness doctors and nurses are trying to help people. We need more healers in the world and we come from all different backgrounds of training and education. Again I applaud you sharing your expertise with so many. Now Ill share my thoughts with you and I have no idea about drugs, but I am very keen on how the body functions. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke causes high blood pressure because of how smoking damages cells and narrows arteries. In addition, cigarettes contain an abundance of life-threatening chemicals that further increase overall health risks. Even smokeless tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and snuff can raise blood pressure levels because of the nicotine and sodium they contain. Many of the other chemicals contained in cigarettes can create a toxic burden on the liver to further disturb healthy body habits. Pharmaceutical Drugs: According to the Physicians` Desk Reference, the following drugs can all cause high blood pressure as a side effect of their use: Alfenta Injection, Aredia for Injection, Dobutrex Solution Vials, Epogen for Injection, Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System, Lupron Depot, Methergine Injection and Tablets, Orthoclone OKT3 Sterile Solution, Polygam Immune Globulin Intravenous Human, Procrit for Injection, Sandimmune, Sandimmune Soft Gelatin Capsules, Tolectin, Velban Vials, Ventolin Inhalation Aerosol and Refill, and Wellbutrin. ****Here are some ideas to contol your blood pressure: Quick Action Plan for High Blood Pressure 1. Make any necessary lifestyle changes. If you are overweight, commit to a weight loss plan. If you smoke, stop, and avoid all sources of secondhand smoke. Also exercise at least thirty minutes a day at least three to four times a week. Safe and effective exercise choices include brisk walking, bicycling, hiking, rebounding, and swimming. Additionally try a restorative yoga class, tai chi or chi gong; all can provide great stress relief and can be pleasurable ways to add movement to your life. 2. Adopt a healthy diet. In place of red meats, choose fish such as blue fish, cod, Greenland halibut, mackerel, and wild caught salmon, as well as free-range, organic poultry. If you want red meat choose bison, for a low fat option. 3. Emphasize fresh, organic fruits and vegetables that are rich in vital nutrients, such as avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, grapefruit, nectarines, oranges, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green peas, kidney and lima beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts such as almonds, cashews, walnuts and pecans, potatoes, squash, and yams, raw dairy, and whole grains like brown rice, buckwheat and quinoa. 4. Use raw virgin coconut butter or organic butter for cooking, and flaxseed and extra virgin olive oil for dressings. 5. Avoid alcohol, coffee, caffeine, and refined salt. 6. Supplement with vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin C, bioflavonoids (especially rutin), vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), evening primrose oil, fish oil, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and zinc, as well as the amino acids cysteine, taurine, and tryptophan. 7. Useful herbs for high blood pressure include garlic, hawthorn berry, olive leaf extract, and the medicinal mushrooms maitake and reishi. 8. Drink at least one 8-ounce glass of fresh squeezed, organic vegetable juice each day. Excellent juice combinations include beet, carrot, and celery; and carrot or cucumber, spinach, and parsley. For added benefit, add one clove of juiced garlic. 9. Adopt a stress management program of daily meditation and/or relaxation exercises. 10. Detoxify your body to eliminate toxins and heavy metals that can dramatically increase the risk of high blood pressure. Quick Action Plan for Addictions 1. Determine if the addiction stems from allergies, biochemical imbalances, genetics, and/or malabsorption of nutrients. 2. Repressed core emotions such as denied anger often lead to depression, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, and disassociation. Embracing your feelings is the most important aspect of beginning to deal with addictive behavior. 3. Regular chiropractic adjustments prove to be supportive, along with release-oriented tissue and bodywork techniques such as Rolfing. 4. Eat three meals and two snacks consistently. Emphasize quality protein foods such as organic poultry, bison, lamb, wild-caught fish, and eggs. Eat plenty of raw nuts and seeds, apples, berries, and other whole fruits; avoid all fruit juices. 5. A critical step in the recovery process is to cleanse, heal and support liver function by using herbs such as Milk Thistle, Dandelion and Bupleurum. 6. Blood-cleansing will support sluggish energy. Herbs in the form of tinctures or teas made from Oat Straw, Burdock Root, Echinacea, and Licorice Root are helpful, and are also vital to healthy kidney function. 7. To calm nerves and anxiety caused by addiction, use the herbs Skullcap, Valerian, and Vervain. 8. After eating a stable whole foods diet for at least 3 months, consider a juice fast of organic vegetable juices. 9. Take nutritional supplements. The B vitamins, particularly thiamin (B1) and B6 are important. Consider amino acid therapy for rebalancing brain chemistry, and to reduce cravings for alcohol, drugs, and/or nicotine. 10. Acupuncture, particularly auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture), is especially useful for drug addictions, and excellent for addressing addictive behaviors such as sex, gambling, and workaholicism. 11. Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Naturopathic Medicine and Orthomolecular Medicine are especially helpful for alcoholism, drug addiction, and smoking. Continue your quest to assisting people because the world is in great need. But we do need to have you happy and healthy. Learn about nutrition and drink a gallon of water a day (I do). Keep persuing the answers for all categories you want to know about. There are always higher level of truths to be found. Best of health to you Answered by Forrest Haddock 1 year ago.

Since you are a nurse, you probably know more about Hypotension than I do, but I'll give it a shot. First, remember that a persons BP can change drastically over a short period of time, often within minutes. No single reading can indicate High or Low BP. Several readings over time must be taken before there is a need for concern. Don't be alarmed by a single reading. Second, there are many factors that can affect your blood pressure. Some of those factors are: - Stress (Emotional, mental and physical) - Some medications (or combinations) can cause a rise or drop in BP - Poor sleep habits and sleep disorders (Sleep Apnea, not enough sleep, sleep disturbances, etc.) - Body position as the reading is taken (lying down. sitting, arm not level with heart, legs crossed, etc.) - Also there is a condition called "White Coat Hypertension". This is when a person visits a doctor and their BP goes up. It's an example of mental stress. - and of course smoking (or not). - How long it's been since your last meal. - Caffeine - Alcohol - Needing to go to the bathroom This comes from the FamilyDoctor.org website: "Hypotension, or low blood pressure, happens when your systolic pressure is consistently (several blood pressure readings over several days) below 90--or 25 points below your normal reading. Hypotension can be a sign of something serious such as shock, a life threatening condition. Contact your doctor immediately if you are dizzy or fainting" If you just started the medication, then it and quitting smoking has probably combined to cause this. It may take a little time for your body to adjust to both improvements and settle out. If you have been on the medication for some time, then I suspect the sudden drop in BP is due to the lack of smoking (nicotine) in your system. I have seen the same result when I don't smoke for several hours, though my BP never drops that low. But my HR varies from around 60 bpm to above 90 bpm (normally 68 to 84 bpm range) and my O2 Sat remains above 90% and is normally above 94%. I wouldn't worry about the HR at all, unless it continues to drop below 50 bpm or stays very near that for some time. As for the BP that is a concern if it remains there, but if it continues to drop I would suggest a visit to the ER is in order. My information comes from my research and experience with 5x Bypasses in Oct. 2006, High BP (Hypertension), High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia), COPD (Emphysema) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. I suggest the links below for more information. Answered by Margarite Baillio 1 year ago.

I'm no pro, but I have an opinion, so I'll share it! First of all, I'm so glad to hear you are quitting smoking. It's a huge step, I'm sure, but a very important one. So kudos to you! Now, as to the hypotension issue, I'm guessing that if you called your doctor and suggested that a) your BP is running low as you withdraw from nicotine so b) you're contemplating scaling back the HTN meds, he would have no problem with it. You already monitor your BP regularly (apparently), so there's no reason that you can't carefully adjust your medications to keep your BP in line. That said, fainting ain't good. If this hasn't happened to you before, you really ought to get a more complete cardio workup. Just my 2 cents worth... Answered by Maureen Frankel 1 year ago.

I am not a doctor or a nurse, but I feel this is true. As you probably are aware smoking (the nicotine) causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. So actually with the nicotine going out of your system now it caused your BP to start dropping and your heart rate. The same thing happened to me when I quit smoking, heart rate decreased and so did my BP. I consulted my cardiologist and physician and they began to decrease my BP meds as they told me you should never just stop taking BP meds cold turkey. I monitored my BP with every decreased dosage they told me to do. My BP remained where it should and then I was off the BP meds. Unfortunately, then I started to smoke again, and my BP increased and so did my heart rate, went back on BP meds again, BUT NOW, I HAVE FINALLY KICKED THE HABIT, have not been smoking for a year now and BP and heart rate is fine. I am just talking from personal experience and I also know that nicotine does increase heart rate and blood pressure. Answered by Saturnina Brafford 1 year ago.

There are many different types of medications that act in different ways to lower BP. The first medication your Dr prescribes may not work well enough or have some adverse side effects. It is important to track BP when you start taking HTN medication and note any side effects you may experience. There are many types of medications available and different combinations of medications that can tried. It is important to treat HTN as it can lead to many serious medical problems. It is important to get your BP checked regularly so that you don’t suffer from the terrible effects of long term untreated HTN, since it is very treatable and the alternatives are costly in many ways, including an untimely death. Answered by Heide Yanity 1 year ago.

you probably have STDS go get a life! Answered by Eliza Nygaard 1 year ago.


Blood drug testing!! help!!?
Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages... Asked by Karl Stakkeland 1 year ago.

Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages I didn't state how many times I had actually done each one of them, but when she asked me, I told her I had only smoked weed once and taken 4 valium all together (when in reality I had smoked probably 4-5 within the last month and 1/2). The irony of this all is that actually yesterday I had to go in for my yearly blood test so they could check my thyroid, cholesterol, ect, but my my just threatened me telling me that she was going to call the clinic and tell them to run a drug screening also, to make sure I wasn't lying and that maybe I was taking other drugs as well. Thats not what I'm worried about though, I'm just worried about her really seeing how much is really in my system. How much do blood tests show? Will it show everything I've done in the last 2 months or only what i've done in the last 2 weeks? Please help! (please don't go on about how I should have just told the truth in the first place, it was already really humiliating for me and i just told her what popped into my head first) THANK YOU!! Answered by Lucretia Dozer 1 year ago.

"The length of time any drug (illicit or prescribed) stays in your system will vary. In large part, it depends on your physiological makeup (e.g., your physical height, weight, your amount of body fat, your age, current state of health, whether or not you exercise mildly-aggressively-or at all). Whether or not you are undergoing any degree of stress (i.e., your "state of mind") at the time you ingest drugs can play a part as well. Still other considerations include your "frequency" of use (1x per day? 3-5x per day?), the "quantity" of drug you used each time, and the "length of time" (days? weeks? months?) of your consistent drug-use prior to your drug test. Even the quality ("potency") of the drug you ingest determines "how long" the drug is detectable in your system when your urine is analyzed (tested) at the lab. However, for most people, detectable levels (i.e., shows up as a "positive" in a laboratory drug test) of the following drugs stay in the body for these approximate periods of time." Alcohol (Beer, Booze, Hooch, Liquor, Wine), 1 hour to perhaps 10 or 12 hours (Yes, alcohol IS a drug! Drinking more than "in moderation" can lead to alcohol (drug) abuse...and perhaps alcoholism. During 2002, more than 18,000 people in the U.S. were killed by too-boozed-up DRUNK drivers! DON'T BE ONE OF THEM THIS YEAR!) CLICK HERE for more information about alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Amphetamines (Biphetamine, Black Beauties, Crosses, Dexedrine, Hearts), 1-2 days Anabolic steroids (Stanzolol, Stanazolol, Nandrolene; Steroids, Roids, Juice), oral- up to 3 weeks; injected- up to 3-6 months and more Barbituates (Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Phenobarbital; Barbs), 2-3 days Benzodiazepines (e.g., Ativan, Halcion, Librium, Rohypnol, Valium; Roofies, Tranks, Xanax), most, 2-3 days; a few, 4-8 days Cocaine (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), 1-2 days Codeine (e.g., Fiorinal w/codeine, Robitussin A-C, Empirin w/codeine, Tylenol w/codeine, 1-2 days GHB (G, Grievous Bodily Harm, Goob, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X), 1-2 days Heroin (Horse, Smack), 1-2 days Inhalants, just a few hours Ketamine (K, Kit Kat, Special K, Vitamin K), 2-4 days LSD (Acid, Blotter, Microdot, Yellow sunshine), a few hours or up to 5 days Marijuana (Bud, Blunt, Grass, Herb, Pot, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Smoke, Weed), 2-5 days (the daily, heavy user can sometimes be detected up to 30+ days) MDMA (Ecstasy), 1-5 days Methadone, 1-7 days Methamphetamines (Crank, Crystal, Desoxyn, Glass, Ice, Speed), 2-4 days Methaqualone (Ludes, Quaaludes), 10-15 days Nicotine (Cigarettes, Cigars, Habitrol patch, Nicorette gum, Nicotrol spray, Prostep patch; Smokeless tobacco, Snuff, Spit tobacco), 1-2 days Opiates (i.e., Opium: China, Dreams, Laudanum, Paregoric; Dover's Powder), 1-2 days Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percolone, Roxicodone), 1-2 days PCP (Angel Dust, Boat, Hog, Love Boat), 1-8 days Basically, a blood test is just going to show if you have done drugs or now. The test can't tell how much you have done. If you only did the drugs a few times a couple of months ago, nothing is going to show up. But if you have a serious problem and you were doing the drugs multiple times EVERYDAY, then you can still get a positive reading on a drug test even a month later because the drugs will stay present in the system of a chronic user. I really wouldn't worry about what you think your mom is going to find. If you didn't do any drugs about 2 weeks before your blood test, then the chances that they will find something will be a very slim chance. Answered by Emmy Larkan 1 year ago.

I'm not quite sure, so wait for another answer... but I'm pretty sure the blood test doesn't say how much was in your system, just tests "positive" or "negative" for each individual thing... So, as long as you hadn't done any other drugs other than what you told her, the blood work would just say that you tested positive for THC and for whatever chemical metabolized valium produces. No quantity/amount or anything. Answered by Mikaela Thomas 1 year ago.

um yeah. just don't do drugs. Simple. Answered by Charmain Deritis 1 year ago.


Recovering bulimic... really bad sore throat?
I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things... Asked by Gaston Preseren 1 year ago.

I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things would only get better after stopping. I also quit smoking 2 weeks ago and I was using the nicotine gum habitrol, but I saw a side effect was a sore throat so I haven't used it in 3 days. I have been keeping myself hydrated constantly, avoiding rough and spicy foods, gargling salt water twice a day and drinking green tea to soothe the pain. Does anyone know how long this will last or anything I can do to make things heal faster? I know it's not a cold or strep because there are NO symptoms (no fever, no cough, no white spots, no swollen glands or anything.) I know it may take a while... but some peace of mind and knowing how long this will last will help alot. And don't waste your time dissing me because of my old bad habits, I am paying the consequences as I type this. Thanks for your time. =) Answered by Kimberly Leadingham 1 year ago.

Sore throats happen. It's probably not related to the bulimia at all. If you have no fever, no trouble breathing, no cough, then keep doing what you're doing. If you develop other symptoms, call your doctor's office. Otherwise, just keep nursing it along until it gets better. If not feeling better after a week, schedule a doctor's appointment. Answered by Louisa Golab 1 year ago.


How do I become a distributor of Habitrol Nicotene gum?
I have been chewing nicotene gum for years to control my smoking. I buy it from a lady on the internet. I would like to become a distributor and get it cheaper. It is called Habitrol from New Zealand, and is made by Novartis. Does anyone know how to become a distributor? Asked by Micheal Darrisaw 1 year ago.

try getting the address/email from the wrapper you get the gum in Answered by Wilber Zank 1 year ago.


Which nicotine patch is really good to quit smoking ?
Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System or nicoderm ..which one ? Asked by Mindi Sanghani 1 year ago.

Take it from some one who has tried them all,its all in your head.It doesn't matter which one you use if your not TRULY ready to quit.Good luck. Answered by Karole Seegar 1 year ago.

they are pretty much the same in terms of drug delivery and drug content. if I were you, I'd go for the pharmacy house brand to save some $$$...unless you've heard stories of the house brand not working. Answered by Coletta Bostian 1 year ago.


What is the best method for quitting smoking?
Asked by Juli Stoutner 1 year ago.

I used the Habitrol patch for about a month and a half and have now been smoke free for a year Jan 25th. My husband quit the same time and he used Nicorett gum and he has also been smoke free but he still gets cravings and chews the gum occasionally. It is really a hard thing to commit to, but if you are ready, go for it. Good Luck Answered by Corey Vatterott 1 year ago.

For me, it started out with slowing down when i smoked, like at first i stopped smoking in the morning, then progressing i wouldn't smoke at work, then not at home. Then towards the end when putting the breaks on all the way, i quit going to bars, tried to stay away from people smoking then what happened i had to figure what to do with my hands when i started to go out again to a concert are a bar that was the test then one day i finally realized i really quit i can drink all night, play pool and never miss the smoking. and that my friend is a kick *** feeling. All in all it took like 2 years for me but i believe you could do all that in a years time, just don't pressure yourself into fully quitting right away focus on one thing at a time. Hope this info can help you, because i don't know if it is the best way ,but this is what worked for me. Answered by Antonietta Hunze 1 year ago.

There is no best method because everyone is different and should be treated by a doctor so your body can adjust to the change without too much stress. Answered by Vernita Vant 1 year ago.

After reading your question I sat here and thought about it for about 10 minutes...I have been a smoker for about 7 years now and I thought about it I believe the answer is willpower. Thats all you need is strong willpower...good luck :) Answered by Christal Lindquist 1 year ago.


Do some brands of nicotine patches stick to the skin better than others?
My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he... Asked by Emmitt Bellantone 1 year ago.

My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he bought his own box of nicotine patches, only he got the 14mg ones because the 21mg was making his arm feel weird. Also, he didn't usually smoke a whole pack a day. These were circular patches. They are Nicoderm brand.. He has been using them for almost a week and a half and they don't stick very well. He works outside for most of the day and as soon as he starts to sweat, the patches peel off. Is one brand circular and another square, or is that just to differentiate the 21mg and 14mg dosage? The square ones seemed to stick to the skin better. He doesn't want to tape the patch to his arm. Does anyone recommend a brand that sticks well? Answered by Queen Soluri 1 year ago.

the best one i have found is called --habitrol. they stick well and don't burn or sting very much. Answered by Nam Lesly 1 year ago.

I worked in a facility that supplied patches to patients. Have him wipe the area he is applying the patch to with alcohol. Let dry. Apply patch. He can also add some waterproof adhesive tape over it because if he perspires alot almost any brand will lose it's adhesion. Answered by Jewel Adib 1 year ago.

Im not too sure. You should ask your local chemist but i am pretty sure a more expensive brand will work better. Answered by Jazmin Creary 1 year ago.

yep its funny lol Answered by Tesha Surles 1 year ago.


Ok im still smokeless in ny im really trying not to smoke but my ? is does the patch really work ?
and should i invest in it or is it as bad as smoking a cig Asked by Mui Hehn 1 year ago.

The patch delivers nicotine into your system without the tar and carcinogens that you absorb when actually smoking. Because small amounts of nicotine are constantly being absorbed, you will find your cravings deminish and it might help you stay smoke free. You reduce the level of nicotine gradually, so over time, your dependance is reduced, which makes it easier to quit completely. I used the patch my first time quitting and it worked quite well for me, but the nicotine level was a bit high, so I took it off. My doctor recently told me it was ok to cut the patch in half, so I'm starting on it again on Monday. Keep in mind that, because you are not inhaling smoke, your body will continue to heal the damage that smoking has caused while you use the patch. Answered by Magan Cate 1 year ago.

The patch isn't as bad for your lungs as smoking, but it's still a source of nicotine, so it's just substituting one addiction for another. If you're able to stop smoking without the patch, you're probably better off. Answered by Sharyn Kulbida 1 year ago.

its still got addictive nicotine but its not bad for you because it does not contain tobacco. nicotine itself is not harmful, only addictive. Answered by Ailene Schaffner 1 year ago.


What is the molecular formula of nicotine?
Please I have been stuck on this question for a long time if i could get a step by step help that would be greatly appreciated :) Nicotine has the empirical formula, C5H7N. A solution of 0.500 g of nicotine in 12.0 g of water boils at 100.140*C. What is the the molecular formula of nicotine? Asked by Leanora Hohn 1 year ago.

THIS IS ALLOT. BUT IT IS Chemical Database Nicotine Identifications Formula: C10H14N2 Formula: C10H14N2O Formula: C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Elements: Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen CAS Number: 54-11-5 Caswell Number: 597 CCOHS Record Number: 446 RCRA Waste Number: P075 RTECS Number: QS5250000 Synonyms/Related: (+)-Nicotine (+-) NICOTINE (+-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (+-)-Nicotine (-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine (-)-Nicotine (2S) 3-(1-Methyl-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-pyridine (R)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (R,S)-Nicotine (S)-(-)-NICOTINE, 3-[(2S)-1-METHYL-2-PYRROLIDINYL] PYRIDINE (S)-3-(1-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl) Pyridine (S)-3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-3-(N-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-Nicotine .beta.-Pyridyl-.alpha.-N-methylpyrroli... .beta.-Pyrimidum 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)-pyrrolidene 1-Methyl-2-(3-pyridyl) pyrrolidine 2'-beta-H-Nicotine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine 3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine 3-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)) pyridine 3-(N-METHYLPYROLLIDINO) PYRIDINE 3-(N-Methylpyrrolidino) pyridine 3-(tetrahydro-1-methyl pyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine 3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N,N-diethyl- 3-[(2S)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl]pyridi... Anacardone Anacordone Astrocar beta-Pyridyl-alpha-N-methylpyrrolidine beta-Pyrimidum C00745 c0468 C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Camphozone Canfodiamina Carbamidal Cardamine Cardiagen Cardiamid Cardiamide Cardiamina Cardiamine Cardimon Citocor Coracon Coraetamidum Coraethamide Coraethamidum Coralept Coramine Coravita Corazone Cordiamid Cordiamin Cordiamine Corditon Cordynil Corediol Corespin Corethamide Coretone Corivo Cormed Cormid Cormotyl Cornotone Corotonin Corovit Corvin Corvitan Corvitol Corvotone Corywas D-Nicotine Danamine destruxol Destruxol orchid spray Diaethyl-nicotinamid Diaethyl-nicotinamid [German] Diaethylamidum acidi nicotinici Diethyl-Nicotamide Diethylamid kyseliny nikotinove [Czech] Diethylnicotinamide Dietilamide-Carbopiridina Dinacoryl DL-tetrahydronicotyrine Dynacoryl Dynamicarde Elitone Emo-nik ENT 3,424 Eucoran FLUX MAAG Flux Maay fumeto bac Fumetobac Habitrol Hansacor Inicardio Kardiamid Kardonyl Kordiamin L(-)-nicotine L-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine l-Nicotine Leptamin MACH-NIC Mediamid methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine Micotine N, N-Diethylnicotinamide N,N-Diethyl-3-pyridinecarboxamide N,N-DIETHYLNICOTINAMIDE NCT Ni-Cor niagara p.a. Niagara p.a. dust Niamine Nic-Sal Nicaethamidum Nicetamida [INN-Spanish] Nicetamide Nicetamide [DCIT] Nicethamide Nicethamidum [INN-Latin] Nico-dust Nico-fume Nicocide Nicor Nicordamin Nicorine Nicoryl Nicotin Nicotina Nicotina (ITALIAN) Nicotina [Italian] Nicotinamide, N,N-diethyl- Nicotine NICOTINE (L) (PYRROLIDINE,N-METHYL,ALPHA-(D-BETA-PYRI... Nicotine alkaloid Nicotine [BSI:ISO] Nicotine [USAN] Nicotine, (+-)- Nicotine, liquid Nicotinic acid diethylamide Nicotrol Nicotrol Inhaler Nicotrol NS Nikardin Niketamid Niketamide Nikethamide Nikethamide [BAN:INN] Niketharol Nikethyl Niketilamid Nikorin Nikotin Nikotin (GERMAN) Nikotin [German] Nikotyna Nikotyna (POLISH) Nikotyna [Polish] Niquetamida Nisetamide Ortho N-4 Ortho N-4 and N-5 dusts Ortho N-4 dust Ortho N-5 Ortho N-5 dust Percoral Procardine Procorman Prostep Pseudonicotine Pyricardyl Pyridine, 3- (1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- Pyridine, 3- (tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine, 3-((2S)-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (R)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (s)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine-3-carboxydiethylamide Pyridine-3-carboxylic acid diethylamide Pyrrolidine, 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)- Reformin Rehormin S-(-)-Nicotine Salvacard Salvacorin Sancora SDCCGMLS-0066911.P001 Solyacord Stellamine Stiminol Stimulin Tendust Tetrahydronicotyrine, dl- Tonocard Tonocor Vasazol Ventramine XL All Insecti-cide, Emo-Nib XL All Insecticide Properties Incompatiblities: strong acids strong oxidizers Health & Regulatory Guidelines EPA Regulations: Reportable Quantity: 100 Lbs NFPA 704 Rating: Health Hazardard Rating: 4 Fire Hazardard Rating: 1 Reactivity Hazardard Rating: 0 NIOSH Guidelines: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 IDLH: 5 mg/m3 OSHA Regulations: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 TWA Vacated: 0.5 mg/m3 Health Risks: Highly Toxic 49 CFR 172.101 - Hazardous Materials Table Hazardous materials description and proper shipping namesHaz class or divID#PGLCSpec prov §172.102Pack §173Qty limitVessel ExcepNon BulkBulkPass air/railCargo air onlyLocOther (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8A)(8B)... Current as of January 2006 Nicotine6.1UN1654II6.1IB2153202... 2004 E Answered by Dorethea Yuen 1 year ago.

I need points Answered by Markita Meli 1 year ago.


Ok health pros, here's one for you. I take medication for HTN, .....?
I AM a nurse, so I know part of the answer already, just thought I'd put it out there to get more info, thanks for the replies so far. Asked by Jarod Bridgmon 1 year ago.

HI The Only Solo Rose (very creative) I must commend you first for assisting many people with your time. Athough I have different concepts on how to heal people then modern medicine (mostly drugs) I still see the value and willingness doctors and nurses are trying to help people. We need more healers in the world and we come from all different backgrounds of training and education. Again I applaud you sharing your expertise with so many. Now Ill share my thoughts with you and I have no idea about drugs, but I am very keen on how the body functions. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke causes high blood pressure because of how smoking damages cells and narrows arteries. In addition, cigarettes contain an abundance of life-threatening chemicals that further increase overall health risks. Even smokeless tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and snuff can raise blood pressure levels because of the nicotine and sodium they contain. Many of the other chemicals contained in cigarettes can create a toxic burden on the liver to further disturb healthy body habits. Pharmaceutical Drugs: According to the Physicians` Desk Reference, the following drugs can all cause high blood pressure as a side effect of their use: Alfenta Injection, Aredia for Injection, Dobutrex Solution Vials, Epogen for Injection, Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System, Lupron Depot, Methergine Injection and Tablets, Orthoclone OKT3 Sterile Solution, Polygam Immune Globulin Intravenous Human, Procrit for Injection, Sandimmune, Sandimmune Soft Gelatin Capsules, Tolectin, Velban Vials, Ventolin Inhalation Aerosol and Refill, and Wellbutrin. ****Here are some ideas to contol your blood pressure: Quick Action Plan for High Blood Pressure 1. Make any necessary lifestyle changes. If you are overweight, commit to a weight loss plan. If you smoke, stop, and avoid all sources of secondhand smoke. Also exercise at least thirty minutes a day at least three to four times a week. Safe and effective exercise choices include brisk walking, bicycling, hiking, rebounding, and swimming. Additionally try a restorative yoga class, tai chi or chi gong; all can provide great stress relief and can be pleasurable ways to add movement to your life. 2. Adopt a healthy diet. In place of red meats, choose fish such as blue fish, cod, Greenland halibut, mackerel, and wild caught salmon, as well as free-range, organic poultry. If you want red meat choose bison, for a low fat option. 3. Emphasize fresh, organic fruits and vegetables that are rich in vital nutrients, such as avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, grapefruit, nectarines, oranges, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green peas, kidney and lima beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts such as almonds, cashews, walnuts and pecans, potatoes, squash, and yams, raw dairy, and whole grains like brown rice, buckwheat and quinoa. 4. Use raw virgin coconut butter or organic butter for cooking, and flaxseed and extra virgin olive oil for dressings. 5. Avoid alcohol, coffee, caffeine, and refined salt. 6. Supplement with vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin C, bioflavonoids (especially rutin), vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), evening primrose oil, fish oil, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and zinc, as well as the amino acids cysteine, taurine, and tryptophan. 7. Useful herbs for high blood pressure include garlic, hawthorn berry, olive leaf extract, and the medicinal mushrooms maitake and reishi. 8. Drink at least one 8-ounce glass of fresh squeezed, organic vegetable juice each day. Excellent juice combinations include beet, carrot, and celery; and carrot or cucumber, spinach, and parsley. For added benefit, add one clove of juiced garlic. 9. Adopt a stress management program of daily meditation and/or relaxation exercises. 10. Detoxify your body to eliminate toxins and heavy metals that can dramatically increase the risk of high blood pressure. Quick Action Plan for Addictions 1. Determine if the addiction stems from allergies, biochemical imbalances, genetics, and/or malabsorption of nutrients. 2. Repressed core emotions such as denied anger often lead to depression, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, and disassociation. Embracing your feelings is the most important aspect of beginning to deal with addictive behavior. 3. Regular chiropractic adjustments prove to be supportive, along with release-oriented tissue and bodywork techniques such as Rolfing. 4. Eat three meals and two snacks consistently. Emphasize quality protein foods such as organic poultry, bison, lamb, wild-caught fish, and eggs. Eat plenty of raw nuts and seeds, apples, berries, and other whole fruits; avoid all fruit juices. 5. A critical step in the recovery process is to cleanse, heal and support liver function by using herbs such as Milk Thistle, Dandelion and Bupleurum. 6. Blood-cleansing will support sluggish energy. Herbs in the form of tinctures or teas made from Oat Straw, Burdock Root, Echinacea, and Licorice Root are helpful, and are also vital to healthy kidney function. 7. To calm nerves and anxiety caused by addiction, use the herbs Skullcap, Valerian, and Vervain. 8. After eating a stable whole foods diet for at least 3 months, consider a juice fast of organic vegetable juices. 9. Take nutritional supplements. The B vitamins, particularly thiamin (B1) and B6 are important. Consider amino acid therapy for rebalancing brain chemistry, and to reduce cravings for alcohol, drugs, and/or nicotine. 10. Acupuncture, particularly auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture), is especially useful for drug addictions, and excellent for addressing addictive behaviors such as sex, gambling, and workaholicism. 11. Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Naturopathic Medicine and Orthomolecular Medicine are especially helpful for alcoholism, drug addiction, and smoking. Continue your quest to assisting people because the world is in great need. But we do need to have you happy and healthy. Learn about nutrition and drink a gallon of water a day (I do). Keep persuing the answers for all categories you want to know about. There are always higher level of truths to be found. Best of health to you Answered by Judith Depaulis 1 year ago.

Since you are a nurse, you probably know more about Hypotension than I do, but I'll give it a shot. First, remember that a persons BP can change drastically over a short period of time, often within minutes. No single reading can indicate High or Low BP. Several readings over time must be taken before there is a need for concern. Don't be alarmed by a single reading. Second, there are many factors that can affect your blood pressure. Some of those factors are: - Stress (Emotional, mental and physical) - Some medications (or combinations) can cause a rise or drop in BP - Poor sleep habits and sleep disorders (Sleep Apnea, not enough sleep, sleep disturbances, etc.) - Body position as the reading is taken (lying down. sitting, arm not level with heart, legs crossed, etc.) - Also there is a condition called "White Coat Hypertension". This is when a person visits a doctor and their BP goes up. It's an example of mental stress. - and of course smoking (or not). - How long it's been since your last meal. - Caffeine - Alcohol - Needing to go to the bathroom This comes from the FamilyDoctor.org website: "Hypotension, or low blood pressure, happens when your systolic pressure is consistently (several blood pressure readings over several days) below 90--or 25 points below your normal reading. Hypotension can be a sign of something serious such as shock, a life threatening condition. Contact your doctor immediately if you are dizzy or fainting" If you just started the medication, then it and quitting smoking has probably combined to cause this. It may take a little time for your body to adjust to both improvements and settle out. If you have been on the medication for some time, then I suspect the sudden drop in BP is due to the lack of smoking (nicotine) in your system. I have seen the same result when I don't smoke for several hours, though my BP never drops that low. But my HR varies from around 60 bpm to above 90 bpm (normally 68 to 84 bpm range) and my O2 Sat remains above 90% and is normally above 94%. I wouldn't worry about the HR at all, unless it continues to drop below 50 bpm or stays very near that for some time. As for the BP that is a concern if it remains there, but if it continues to drop I would suggest a visit to the ER is in order. My information comes from my research and experience with 5x Bypasses in Oct. 2006, High BP (Hypertension), High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia), COPD (Emphysema) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. I suggest the links below for more information. Answered by Liane Cantres 1 year ago.

I'm no pro, but I have an opinion, so I'll share it! First of all, I'm so glad to hear you are quitting smoking. It's a huge step, I'm sure, but a very important one. So kudos to you! Now, as to the hypotension issue, I'm guessing that if you called your doctor and suggested that a) your BP is running low as you withdraw from nicotine so b) you're contemplating scaling back the HTN meds, he would have no problem with it. You already monitor your BP regularly (apparently), so there's no reason that you can't carefully adjust your medications to keep your BP in line. That said, fainting ain't good. If this hasn't happened to you before, you really ought to get a more complete cardio workup. Just my 2 cents worth... Answered by Lauri Verity 1 year ago.

I am not a doctor or a nurse, but I feel this is true. As you probably are aware smoking (the nicotine) causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. So actually with the nicotine going out of your system now it caused your BP to start dropping and your heart rate. The same thing happened to me when I quit smoking, heart rate decreased and so did my BP. I consulted my cardiologist and physician and they began to decrease my BP meds as they told me you should never just stop taking BP meds cold turkey. I monitored my BP with every decreased dosage they told me to do. My BP remained where it should and then I was off the BP meds. Unfortunately, then I started to smoke again, and my BP increased and so did my heart rate, went back on BP meds again, BUT NOW, I HAVE FINALLY KICKED THE HABIT, have not been smoking for a year now and BP and heart rate is fine. I am just talking from personal experience and I also know that nicotine does increase heart rate and blood pressure. Answered by Loida Mahoe 1 year ago.

There are many different types of medications that act in different ways to lower BP. The first medication your Dr prescribes may not work well enough or have some adverse side effects. It is important to track BP when you start taking HTN medication and note any side effects you may experience. There are many types of medications available and different combinations of medications that can tried. It is important to treat HTN as it can lead to many serious medical problems. It is important to get your BP checked regularly so that you don’t suffer from the terrible effects of long term untreated HTN, since it is very treatable and the alternatives are costly in many ways, including an untimely death. Answered by Ona Hirn 1 year ago.

you probably have STDS go get a life! Answered by Victor Horovitz 1 year ago.


Blood drug testing!! help!!?
Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages... Asked by Werner Messner 1 year ago.

Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages I didn't state how many times I had actually done each one of them, but when she asked me, I told her I had only smoked weed once and taken 4 valium all together (when in reality I had smoked probably 4-5 within the last month and 1/2). The irony of this all is that actually yesterday I had to go in for my yearly blood test so they could check my thyroid, cholesterol, ect, but my my just threatened me telling me that she was going to call the clinic and tell them to run a drug screening also, to make sure I wasn't lying and that maybe I was taking other drugs as well. Thats not what I'm worried about though, I'm just worried about her really seeing how much is really in my system. How much do blood tests show? Will it show everything I've done in the last 2 months or only what i've done in the last 2 weeks? Please help! (please don't go on about how I should have just told the truth in the first place, it was already really humiliating for me and i just told her what popped into my head first) THANK YOU!! Answered by Lourie Guthmiller 1 year ago.

"The length of time any drug (illicit or prescribed) stays in your system will vary. In large part, it depends on your physiological makeup (e.g., your physical height, weight, your amount of body fat, your age, current state of health, whether or not you exercise mildly-aggressively-or at all). Whether or not you are undergoing any degree of stress (i.e., your "state of mind") at the time you ingest drugs can play a part as well. Still other considerations include your "frequency" of use (1x per day? 3-5x per day?), the "quantity" of drug you used each time, and the "length of time" (days? weeks? months?) of your consistent drug-use prior to your drug test. Even the quality ("potency") of the drug you ingest determines "how long" the drug is detectable in your system when your urine is analyzed (tested) at the lab. However, for most people, detectable levels (i.e., shows up as a "positive" in a laboratory drug test) of the following drugs stay in the body for these approximate periods of time." Alcohol (Beer, Booze, Hooch, Liquor, Wine), 1 hour to perhaps 10 or 12 hours (Yes, alcohol IS a drug! Drinking more than "in moderation" can lead to alcohol (drug) abuse...and perhaps alcoholism. During 2002, more than 18,000 people in the U.S. were killed by too-boozed-up DRUNK drivers! DON'T BE ONE OF THEM THIS YEAR!) CLICK HERE for more information about alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Amphetamines (Biphetamine, Black Beauties, Crosses, Dexedrine, Hearts), 1-2 days Anabolic steroids (Stanzolol, Stanazolol, Nandrolene; Steroids, Roids, Juice), oral- up to 3 weeks; injected- up to 3-6 months and more Barbituates (Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Phenobarbital; Barbs), 2-3 days Benzodiazepines (e.g., Ativan, Halcion, Librium, Rohypnol, Valium; Roofies, Tranks, Xanax), most, 2-3 days; a few, 4-8 days Cocaine (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), 1-2 days Codeine (e.g., Fiorinal w/codeine, Robitussin A-C, Empirin w/codeine, Tylenol w/codeine, 1-2 days GHB (G, Grievous Bodily Harm, Goob, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X), 1-2 days Heroin (Horse, Smack), 1-2 days Inhalants, just a few hours Ketamine (K, Kit Kat, Special K, Vitamin K), 2-4 days LSD (Acid, Blotter, Microdot, Yellow sunshine), a few hours or up to 5 days Marijuana (Bud, Blunt, Grass, Herb, Pot, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Smoke, Weed), 2-5 days (the daily, heavy user can sometimes be detected up to 30+ days) MDMA (Ecstasy), 1-5 days Methadone, 1-7 days Methamphetamines (Crank, Crystal, Desoxyn, Glass, Ice, Speed), 2-4 days Methaqualone (Ludes, Quaaludes), 10-15 days Nicotine (Cigarettes, Cigars, Habitrol patch, Nicorette gum, Nicotrol spray, Prostep patch; Smokeless tobacco, Snuff, Spit tobacco), 1-2 days Opiates (i.e., Opium: China, Dreams, Laudanum, Paregoric; Dover's Powder), 1-2 days Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percolone, Roxicodone), 1-2 days PCP (Angel Dust, Boat, Hog, Love Boat), 1-8 days Basically, a blood test is just going to show if you have done drugs or now. The test can't tell how much you have done. If you only did the drugs a few times a couple of months ago, nothing is going to show up. But if you have a serious problem and you were doing the drugs multiple times EVERYDAY, then you can still get a positive reading on a drug test even a month later because the drugs will stay present in the system of a chronic user. I really wouldn't worry about what you think your mom is going to find. If you didn't do any drugs about 2 weeks before your blood test, then the chances that they will find something will be a very slim chance. Answered by Destiny Adlam 1 year ago.

I'm not quite sure, so wait for another answer... but I'm pretty sure the blood test doesn't say how much was in your system, just tests "positive" or "negative" for each individual thing... So, as long as you hadn't done any other drugs other than what you told her, the blood work would just say that you tested positive for THC and for whatever chemical metabolized valium produces. No quantity/amount or anything. Answered by Antoinette Mansouri 1 year ago.

um yeah. just don't do drugs. Simple. Answered by Kasandra Arps 1 year ago.


Recovering bulimic... really bad sore throat?
I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things... Asked by Wilford Klee 1 year ago.

I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things would only get better after stopping. I also quit smoking 2 weeks ago and I was using the nicotine gum habitrol, but I saw a side effect was a sore throat so I haven't used it in 3 days. I have been keeping myself hydrated constantly, avoiding rough and spicy foods, gargling salt water twice a day and drinking green tea to soothe the pain. Does anyone know how long this will last or anything I can do to make things heal faster? I know it's not a cold or strep because there are NO symptoms (no fever, no cough, no white spots, no swollen glands or anything.) I know it may take a while... but some peace of mind and knowing how long this will last will help alot. And don't waste your time dissing me because of my old bad habits, I am paying the consequences as I type this. Thanks for your time. =) Answered by Janine Castleman 1 year ago.

Sore throats happen. It's probably not related to the bulimia at all. If you have no fever, no trouble breathing, no cough, then keep doing what you're doing. If you develop other symptoms, call your doctor's office. Otherwise, just keep nursing it along until it gets better. If not feeling better after a week, schedule a doctor's appointment. Answered by Carlena Rasbury 1 year ago.


How do I become a distributor of Habitrol Nicotene gum?
I have been chewing nicotene gum for years to control my smoking. I buy it from a lady on the internet. I would like to become a distributor and get it cheaper. It is called Habitrol from New Zealand, and is made by Novartis. Does anyone know how to become a distributor? Asked by Jerold Stanier 1 year ago.

try getting the address/email from the wrapper you get the gum in Answered by Faustino Jackman 1 year ago.


Which nicotine patch is really good to quit smoking ?
Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System or nicoderm ..which one ? Asked by Latanya Reekie 1 year ago.

Take it from some one who has tried them all,its all in your head.It doesn't matter which one you use if your not TRULY ready to quit.Good luck. Answered by Van Kasparek 1 year ago.

they are pretty much the same in terms of drug delivery and drug content. if I were you, I'd go for the pharmacy house brand to save some $$$...unless you've heard stories of the house brand not working. Answered by Jimmie Pellegren 1 year ago.


What is the best method for quitting smoking?
Asked by Norene Quince 1 year ago.

I used the Habitrol patch for about a month and a half and have now been smoke free for a year Jan 25th. My husband quit the same time and he used Nicorett gum and he has also been smoke free but he still gets cravings and chews the gum occasionally. It is really a hard thing to commit to, but if you are ready, go for it. Good Luck Answered by Amos Devincentis 1 year ago.

For me, it started out with slowing down when i smoked, like at first i stopped smoking in the morning, then progressing i wouldn't smoke at work, then not at home. Then towards the end when putting the breaks on all the way, i quit going to bars, tried to stay away from people smoking then what happened i had to figure what to do with my hands when i started to go out again to a concert are a bar that was the test then one day i finally realized i really quit i can drink all night, play pool and never miss the smoking. and that my friend is a kick *** feeling. All in all it took like 2 years for me but i believe you could do all that in a years time, just don't pressure yourself into fully quitting right away focus on one thing at a time. Hope this info can help you, because i don't know if it is the best way ,but this is what worked for me. Answered by Paulita Dagraca 1 year ago.

There is no best method because everyone is different and should be treated by a doctor so your body can adjust to the change without too much stress. Answered by Lucio Morgner 1 year ago.

After reading your question I sat here and thought about it for about 10 minutes...I have been a smoker for about 7 years now and I thought about it I believe the answer is willpower. Thats all you need is strong willpower...good luck :) Answered by Hugh Ridens 1 year ago.


Do some brands of nicotine patches stick to the skin better than others?
My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he... Asked by Elvera Keenom 1 year ago.

My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he bought his own box of nicotine patches, only he got the 14mg ones because the 21mg was making his arm feel weird. Also, he didn't usually smoke a whole pack a day. These were circular patches. They are Nicoderm brand.. He has been using them for almost a week and a half and they don't stick very well. He works outside for most of the day and as soon as he starts to sweat, the patches peel off. Is one brand circular and another square, or is that just to differentiate the 21mg and 14mg dosage? The square ones seemed to stick to the skin better. He doesn't want to tape the patch to his arm. Does anyone recommend a brand that sticks well? Answered by Joseph Azapinto 1 year ago.

the best one i have found is called --habitrol. they stick well and don't burn or sting very much. Answered by Madaline Koskinen 1 year ago.

I worked in a facility that supplied patches to patients. Have him wipe the area he is applying the patch to with alcohol. Let dry. Apply patch. He can also add some waterproof adhesive tape over it because if he perspires alot almost any brand will lose it's adhesion. Answered by Silva Jabour 1 year ago.

Im not too sure. You should ask your local chemist but i am pretty sure a more expensive brand will work better. Answered by Karl Swagger 1 year ago.

yep its funny lol Answered by Brenton Hugghis 1 year ago.


Ok im still smokeless in ny im really trying not to smoke but my ? is does the patch really work ?
and should i invest in it or is it as bad as smoking a cig Asked by Kendrick Richmeier 1 year ago.

The patch delivers nicotine into your system without the tar and carcinogens that you absorb when actually smoking. Because small amounts of nicotine are constantly being absorbed, you will find your cravings deminish and it might help you stay smoke free. You reduce the level of nicotine gradually, so over time, your dependance is reduced, which makes it easier to quit completely. I used the patch my first time quitting and it worked quite well for me, but the nicotine level was a bit high, so I took it off. My doctor recently told me it was ok to cut the patch in half, so I'm starting on it again on Monday. Keep in mind that, because you are not inhaling smoke, your body will continue to heal the damage that smoking has caused while you use the patch. Answered by Guillermina Dobbs 1 year ago.

The patch isn't as bad for your lungs as smoking, but it's still a source of nicotine, so it's just substituting one addiction for another. If you're able to stop smoking without the patch, you're probably better off. Answered by Belinda Lovitt 1 year ago.

its still got addictive nicotine but its not bad for you because it does not contain tobacco. nicotine itself is not harmful, only addictive. Answered by Janey Schwarze 1 year ago.


What is the molecular formula of nicotine?
Please I have been stuck on this question for a long time if i could get a step by step help that would be greatly appreciated :) Nicotine has the empirical formula, C5H7N. A solution of 0.500 g of nicotine in 12.0 g of water boils at 100.140*C. What is the the molecular formula of nicotine? Asked by Julie Mraz 1 year ago.

THIS IS ALLOT. BUT IT IS Chemical Database Nicotine Identifications Formula: C10H14N2 Formula: C10H14N2O Formula: C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Elements: Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen CAS Number: 54-11-5 Caswell Number: 597 CCOHS Record Number: 446 RCRA Waste Number: P075 RTECS Number: QS5250000 Synonyms/Related: (+)-Nicotine (+-) NICOTINE (+-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (+-)-Nicotine (-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine (-)-Nicotine (2S) 3-(1-Methyl-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-pyridine (R)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (R,S)-Nicotine (S)-(-)-NICOTINE, 3-[(2S)-1-METHYL-2-PYRROLIDINYL] PYRIDINE (S)-3-(1-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl) Pyridine (S)-3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-3-(N-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-Nicotine .beta.-Pyridyl-.alpha.-N-methylpyrroli... .beta.-Pyrimidum 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)-pyrrolidene 1-Methyl-2-(3-pyridyl) pyrrolidine 2'-beta-H-Nicotine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine 3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine 3-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)) pyridine 3-(N-METHYLPYROLLIDINO) PYRIDINE 3-(N-Methylpyrrolidino) pyridine 3-(tetrahydro-1-methyl pyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine 3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N,N-diethyl- 3-[(2S)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl]pyridi... Anacardone Anacordone Astrocar beta-Pyridyl-alpha-N-methylpyrrolidine beta-Pyrimidum C00745 c0468 C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Camphozone Canfodiamina Carbamidal Cardamine Cardiagen Cardiamid Cardiamide Cardiamina Cardiamine Cardimon Citocor Coracon Coraetamidum Coraethamide Coraethamidum Coralept Coramine Coravita Corazone Cordiamid Cordiamin Cordiamine Corditon Cordynil Corediol Corespin Corethamide Coretone Corivo Cormed Cormid Cormotyl Cornotone Corotonin Corovit Corvin Corvitan Corvitol Corvotone Corywas D-Nicotine Danamine destruxol Destruxol orchid spray Diaethyl-nicotinamid Diaethyl-nicotinamid [German] Diaethylamidum acidi nicotinici Diethyl-Nicotamide Diethylamid kyseliny nikotinove [Czech] Diethylnicotinamide Dietilamide-Carbopiridina Dinacoryl DL-tetrahydronicotyrine Dynacoryl Dynamicarde Elitone Emo-nik ENT 3,424 Eucoran FLUX MAAG Flux Maay fumeto bac Fumetobac Habitrol Hansacor Inicardio Kardiamid Kardonyl Kordiamin L(-)-nicotine L-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine l-Nicotine Leptamin MACH-NIC Mediamid methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine Micotine N, N-Diethylnicotinamide N,N-Diethyl-3-pyridinecarboxamide N,N-DIETHYLNICOTINAMIDE NCT Ni-Cor niagara p.a. Niagara p.a. dust Niamine Nic-Sal Nicaethamidum Nicetamida [INN-Spanish] Nicetamide Nicetamide [DCIT] Nicethamide Nicethamidum [INN-Latin] Nico-dust Nico-fume Nicocide Nicor Nicordamin Nicorine Nicoryl Nicotin Nicotina Nicotina (ITALIAN) Nicotina [Italian] Nicotinamide, N,N-diethyl- Nicotine NICOTINE (L) (PYRROLIDINE,N-METHYL,ALPHA-(D-BETA-PYRI... Nicotine alkaloid Nicotine [BSI:ISO] Nicotine [USAN] Nicotine, (+-)- Nicotine, liquid Nicotinic acid diethylamide Nicotrol Nicotrol Inhaler Nicotrol NS Nikardin Niketamid Niketamide Nikethamide Nikethamide [BAN:INN] Niketharol Nikethyl Niketilamid Nikorin Nikotin Nikotin (GERMAN) Nikotin [German] Nikotyna Nikotyna (POLISH) Nikotyna [Polish] Niquetamida Nisetamide Ortho N-4 Ortho N-4 and N-5 dusts Ortho N-4 dust Ortho N-5 Ortho N-5 dust Percoral Procardine Procorman Prostep Pseudonicotine Pyricardyl Pyridine, 3- (1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- Pyridine, 3- (tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine, 3-((2S)-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (R)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (s)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine-3-carboxydiethylamide Pyridine-3-carboxylic acid diethylamide Pyrrolidine, 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)- Reformin Rehormin S-(-)-Nicotine Salvacard Salvacorin Sancora SDCCGMLS-0066911.P001 Solyacord Stellamine Stiminol Stimulin Tendust Tetrahydronicotyrine, dl- Tonocard Tonocor Vasazol Ventramine XL All Insecti-cide, Emo-Nib XL All Insecticide Properties Incompatiblities: strong acids strong oxidizers Health & Regulatory Guidelines EPA Regulations: Reportable Quantity: 100 Lbs NFPA 704 Rating: Health Hazardard Rating: 4 Fire Hazardard Rating: 1 Reactivity Hazardard Rating: 0 NIOSH Guidelines: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 IDLH: 5 mg/m3 OSHA Regulations: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 TWA Vacated: 0.5 mg/m3 Health Risks: Highly Toxic 49 CFR 172.101 - Hazardous Materials Table Hazardous materials description and proper shipping namesHaz class or divID#PGLCSpec prov §172.102Pack §173Qty limitVessel ExcepNon BulkBulkPass air/railCargo air onlyLocOther (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8A)(8B)... Current as of January 2006 Nicotine6.1UN1654II6.1IB2153202... 2004 E Answered by Everette Sottosanti 1 year ago.

I need points Answered by Charley Leppla 1 year ago.


Ok health pros, here's one for you. I take medication for HTN, .....?
I AM a nurse, so I know part of the answer already, just thought I'd put it out there to get more info, thanks for the replies so far. Asked by Delphia Hanel 1 year ago.

HI The Only Solo Rose (very creative) I must commend you first for assisting many people with your time. Athough I have different concepts on how to heal people then modern medicine (mostly drugs) I still see the value and willingness doctors and nurses are trying to help people. We need more healers in the world and we come from all different backgrounds of training and education. Again I applaud you sharing your expertise with so many. Now Ill share my thoughts with you and I have no idea about drugs, but I am very keen on how the body functions. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke causes high blood pressure because of how smoking damages cells and narrows arteries. In addition, cigarettes contain an abundance of life-threatening chemicals that further increase overall health risks. Even smokeless tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and snuff can raise blood pressure levels because of the nicotine and sodium they contain. Many of the other chemicals contained in cigarettes can create a toxic burden on the liver to further disturb healthy body habits. Pharmaceutical Drugs: According to the Physicians` Desk Reference, the following drugs can all cause high blood pressure as a side effect of their use: Alfenta Injection, Aredia for Injection, Dobutrex Solution Vials, Epogen for Injection, Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System, Lupron Depot, Methergine Injection and Tablets, Orthoclone OKT3 Sterile Solution, Polygam Immune Globulin Intravenous Human, Procrit for Injection, Sandimmune, Sandimmune Soft Gelatin Capsules, Tolectin, Velban Vials, Ventolin Inhalation Aerosol and Refill, and Wellbutrin. ****Here are some ideas to contol your blood pressure: Quick Action Plan for High Blood Pressure 1. Make any necessary lifestyle changes. If you are overweight, commit to a weight loss plan. If you smoke, stop, and avoid all sources of secondhand smoke. Also exercise at least thirty minutes a day at least three to four times a week. Safe and effective exercise choices include brisk walking, bicycling, hiking, rebounding, and swimming. Additionally try a restorative yoga class, tai chi or chi gong; all can provide great stress relief and can be pleasurable ways to add movement to your life. 2. Adopt a healthy diet. In place of red meats, choose fish such as blue fish, cod, Greenland halibut, mackerel, and wild caught salmon, as well as free-range, organic poultry. If you want red meat choose bison, for a low fat option. 3. Emphasize fresh, organic fruits and vegetables that are rich in vital nutrients, such as avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, grapefruit, nectarines, oranges, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green peas, kidney and lima beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts such as almonds, cashews, walnuts and pecans, potatoes, squash, and yams, raw dairy, and whole grains like brown rice, buckwheat and quinoa. 4. Use raw virgin coconut butter or organic butter for cooking, and flaxseed and extra virgin olive oil for dressings. 5. Avoid alcohol, coffee, caffeine, and refined salt. 6. Supplement with vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin C, bioflavonoids (especially rutin), vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), evening primrose oil, fish oil, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and zinc, as well as the amino acids cysteine, taurine, and tryptophan. 7. Useful herbs for high blood pressure include garlic, hawthorn berry, olive leaf extract, and the medicinal mushrooms maitake and reishi. 8. Drink at least one 8-ounce glass of fresh squeezed, organic vegetable juice each day. Excellent juice combinations include beet, carrot, and celery; and carrot or cucumber, spinach, and parsley. For added benefit, add one clove of juiced garlic. 9. Adopt a stress management program of daily meditation and/or relaxation exercises. 10. Detoxify your body to eliminate toxins and heavy metals that can dramatically increase the risk of high blood pressure. Quick Action Plan for Addictions 1. Determine if the addiction stems from allergies, biochemical imbalances, genetics, and/or malabsorption of nutrients. 2. Repressed core emotions such as denied anger often lead to depression, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, and disassociation. Embracing your feelings is the most important aspect of beginning to deal with addictive behavior. 3. Regular chiropractic adjustments prove to be supportive, along with release-oriented tissue and bodywork techniques such as Rolfing. 4. Eat three meals and two snacks consistently. Emphasize quality protein foods such as organic poultry, bison, lamb, wild-caught fish, and eggs. Eat plenty of raw nuts and seeds, apples, berries, and other whole fruits; avoid all fruit juices. 5. A critical step in the recovery process is to cleanse, heal and support liver function by using herbs such as Milk Thistle, Dandelion and Bupleurum. 6. Blood-cleansing will support sluggish energy. Herbs in the form of tinctures or teas made from Oat Straw, Burdock Root, Echinacea, and Licorice Root are helpful, and are also vital to healthy kidney function. 7. To calm nerves and anxiety caused by addiction, use the herbs Skullcap, Valerian, and Vervain. 8. After eating a stable whole foods diet for at least 3 months, consider a juice fast of organic vegetable juices. 9. Take nutritional supplements. The B vitamins, particularly thiamin (B1) and B6 are important. Consider amino acid therapy for rebalancing brain chemistry, and to reduce cravings for alcohol, drugs, and/or nicotine. 10. Acupuncture, particularly auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture), is especially useful for drug addictions, and excellent for addressing addictive behaviors such as sex, gambling, and workaholicism. 11. Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Naturopathic Medicine and Orthomolecular Medicine are especially helpful for alcoholism, drug addiction, and smoking. Continue your quest to assisting people because the world is in great need. But we do need to have you happy and healthy. Learn about nutrition and drink a gallon of water a day (I do). Keep persuing the answers for all categories you want to know about. There are always higher level of truths to be found. Best of health to you Answered by Debbra Mintor 1 year ago.

Since you are a nurse, you probably know more about Hypotension than I do, but I'll give it a shot. First, remember that a persons BP can change drastically over a short period of time, often within minutes. No single reading can indicate High or Low BP. Several readings over time must be taken before there is a need for concern. Don't be alarmed by a single reading. Second, there are many factors that can affect your blood pressure. Some of those factors are: - Stress (Emotional, mental and physical) - Some medications (or combinations) can cause a rise or drop in BP - Poor sleep habits and sleep disorders (Sleep Apnea, not enough sleep, sleep disturbances, etc.) - Body position as the reading is taken (lying down. sitting, arm not level with heart, legs crossed, etc.) - Also there is a condition called "White Coat Hypertension". This is when a person visits a doctor and their BP goes up. It's an example of mental stress. - and of course smoking (or not). - How long it's been since your last meal. - Caffeine - Alcohol - Needing to go to the bathroom This comes from the FamilyDoctor.org website: "Hypotension, or low blood pressure, happens when your systolic pressure is consistently (several blood pressure readings over several days) below 90--or 25 points below your normal reading. Hypotension can be a sign of something serious such as shock, a life threatening condition. Contact your doctor immediately if you are dizzy or fainting" If you just started the medication, then it and quitting smoking has probably combined to cause this. It may take a little time for your body to adjust to both improvements and settle out. If you have been on the medication for some time, then I suspect the sudden drop in BP is due to the lack of smoking (nicotine) in your system. I have seen the same result when I don't smoke for several hours, though my BP never drops that low. But my HR varies from around 60 bpm to above 90 bpm (normally 68 to 84 bpm range) and my O2 Sat remains above 90% and is normally above 94%. I wouldn't worry about the HR at all, unless it continues to drop below 50 bpm or stays very near that for some time. As for the BP that is a concern if it remains there, but if it continues to drop I would suggest a visit to the ER is in order. My information comes from my research and experience with 5x Bypasses in Oct. 2006, High BP (Hypertension), High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia), COPD (Emphysema) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. I suggest the links below for more information. Answered by Shantae Charry 1 year ago.

I'm no pro, but I have an opinion, so I'll share it! First of all, I'm so glad to hear you are quitting smoking. It's a huge step, I'm sure, but a very important one. So kudos to you! Now, as to the hypotension issue, I'm guessing that if you called your doctor and suggested that a) your BP is running low as you withdraw from nicotine so b) you're contemplating scaling back the HTN meds, he would have no problem with it. You already monitor your BP regularly (apparently), so there's no reason that you can't carefully adjust your medications to keep your BP in line. That said, fainting ain't good. If this hasn't happened to you before, you really ought to get a more complete cardio workup. Just my 2 cents worth... Answered by Stefani Zlotnik 1 year ago.

I am not a doctor or a nurse, but I feel this is true. As you probably are aware smoking (the nicotine) causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. So actually with the nicotine going out of your system now it caused your BP to start dropping and your heart rate. The same thing happened to me when I quit smoking, heart rate decreased and so did my BP. I consulted my cardiologist and physician and they began to decrease my BP meds as they told me you should never just stop taking BP meds cold turkey. I monitored my BP with every decreased dosage they told me to do. My BP remained where it should and then I was off the BP meds. Unfortunately, then I started to smoke again, and my BP increased and so did my heart rate, went back on BP meds again, BUT NOW, I HAVE FINALLY KICKED THE HABIT, have not been smoking for a year now and BP and heart rate is fine. I am just talking from personal experience and I also know that nicotine does increase heart rate and blood pressure. Answered by Halina Guziec 1 year ago.

There are many different types of medications that act in different ways to lower BP. The first medication your Dr prescribes may not work well enough or have some adverse side effects. It is important to track BP when you start taking HTN medication and note any side effects you may experience. There are many types of medications available and different combinations of medications that can tried. It is important to treat HTN as it can lead to many serious medical problems. It is important to get your BP checked regularly so that you don’t suffer from the terrible effects of long term untreated HTN, since it is very treatable and the alternatives are costly in many ways, including an untimely death. Answered by Arden Kanable 1 year ago.

you probably have STDS go get a life! Answered by Lavera Strater 1 year ago.


Blood drug testing!! help!!?
Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages... Asked by Reva Hallmark 1 year ago.

Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages I didn't state how many times I had actually done each one of them, but when she asked me, I told her I had only smoked weed once and taken 4 valium all together (when in reality I had smoked probably 4-5 within the last month and 1/2). The irony of this all is that actually yesterday I had to go in for my yearly blood test so they could check my thyroid, cholesterol, ect, but my my just threatened me telling me that she was going to call the clinic and tell them to run a drug screening also, to make sure I wasn't lying and that maybe I was taking other drugs as well. Thats not what I'm worried about though, I'm just worried about her really seeing how much is really in my system. How much do blood tests show? Will it show everything I've done in the last 2 months or only what i've done in the last 2 weeks? Please help! (please don't go on about how I should have just told the truth in the first place, it was already really humiliating for me and i just told her what popped into my head first) THANK YOU!! Answered by Santiago Pavlat 1 year ago.

"The length of time any drug (illicit or prescribed) stays in your system will vary. In large part, it depends on your physiological makeup (e.g., your physical height, weight, your amount of body fat, your age, current state of health, whether or not you exercise mildly-aggressively-or at all). Whether or not you are undergoing any degree of stress (i.e., your "state of mind") at the time you ingest drugs can play a part as well. Still other considerations include your "frequency" of use (1x per day? 3-5x per day?), the "quantity" of drug you used each time, and the "length of time" (days? weeks? months?) of your consistent drug-use prior to your drug test. Even the quality ("potency") of the drug you ingest determines "how long" the drug is detectable in your system when your urine is analyzed (tested) at the lab. However, for most people, detectable levels (i.e., shows up as a "positive" in a laboratory drug test) of the following drugs stay in the body for these approximate periods of time." Alcohol (Beer, Booze, Hooch, Liquor, Wine), 1 hour to perhaps 10 or 12 hours (Yes, alcohol IS a drug! Drinking more than "in moderation" can lead to alcohol (drug) abuse...and perhaps alcoholism. During 2002, more than 18,000 people in the U.S. were killed by too-boozed-up DRUNK drivers! DON'T BE ONE OF THEM THIS YEAR!) CLICK HERE for more information about alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Amphetamines (Biphetamine, Black Beauties, Crosses, Dexedrine, Hearts), 1-2 days Anabolic steroids (Stanzolol, Stanazolol, Nandrolene; Steroids, Roids, Juice), oral- up to 3 weeks; injected- up to 3-6 months and more Barbituates (Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Phenobarbital; Barbs), 2-3 days Benzodiazepines (e.g., Ativan, Halcion, Librium, Rohypnol, Valium; Roofies, Tranks, Xanax), most, 2-3 days; a few, 4-8 days Cocaine (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), 1-2 days Codeine (e.g., Fiorinal w/codeine, Robitussin A-C, Empirin w/codeine, Tylenol w/codeine, 1-2 days GHB (G, Grievous Bodily Harm, Goob, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X), 1-2 days Heroin (Horse, Smack), 1-2 days Inhalants, just a few hours Ketamine (K, Kit Kat, Special K, Vitamin K), 2-4 days LSD (Acid, Blotter, Microdot, Yellow sunshine), a few hours or up to 5 days Marijuana (Bud, Blunt, Grass, Herb, Pot, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Smoke, Weed), 2-5 days (the daily, heavy user can sometimes be detected up to 30+ days) MDMA (Ecstasy), 1-5 days Methadone, 1-7 days Methamphetamines (Crank, Crystal, Desoxyn, Glass, Ice, Speed), 2-4 days Methaqualone (Ludes, Quaaludes), 10-15 days Nicotine (Cigarettes, Cigars, Habitrol patch, Nicorette gum, Nicotrol spray, Prostep patch; Smokeless tobacco, Snuff, Spit tobacco), 1-2 days Opiates (i.e., Opium: China, Dreams, Laudanum, Paregoric; Dover's Powder), 1-2 days Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percolone, Roxicodone), 1-2 days PCP (Angel Dust, Boat, Hog, Love Boat), 1-8 days Basically, a blood test is just going to show if you have done drugs or now. The test can't tell how much you have done. If you only did the drugs a few times a couple of months ago, nothing is going to show up. But if you have a serious problem and you were doing the drugs multiple times EVERYDAY, then you can still get a positive reading on a drug test even a month later because the drugs will stay present in the system of a chronic user. I really wouldn't worry about what you think your mom is going to find. If you didn't do any drugs about 2 weeks before your blood test, then the chances that they will find something will be a very slim chance. Answered by Roscoe Sleigh 1 year ago.

I'm not quite sure, so wait for another answer... but I'm pretty sure the blood test doesn't say how much was in your system, just tests "positive" or "negative" for each individual thing... So, as long as you hadn't done any other drugs other than what you told her, the blood work would just say that you tested positive for THC and for whatever chemical metabolized valium produces. No quantity/amount or anything. Answered by Reed Froman 1 year ago.

um yeah. just don't do drugs. Simple. Answered by Lynda Lindeen 1 year ago.


Recovering bulimic... really bad sore throat?
I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things... Asked by Harold Paiva 1 year ago.

I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things would only get better after stopping. I also quit smoking 2 weeks ago and I was using the nicotine gum habitrol, but I saw a side effect was a sore throat so I haven't used it in 3 days. I have been keeping myself hydrated constantly, avoiding rough and spicy foods, gargling salt water twice a day and drinking green tea to soothe the pain. Does anyone know how long this will last or anything I can do to make things heal faster? I know it's not a cold or strep because there are NO symptoms (no fever, no cough, no white spots, no swollen glands or anything.) I know it may take a while... but some peace of mind and knowing how long this will last will help alot. And don't waste your time dissing me because of my old bad habits, I am paying the consequences as I type this. Thanks for your time. =) Answered by Jacqueline Duesenberg 1 year ago.

Sore throats happen. It's probably not related to the bulimia at all. If you have no fever, no trouble breathing, no cough, then keep doing what you're doing. If you develop other symptoms, call your doctor's office. Otherwise, just keep nursing it along until it gets better. If not feeling better after a week, schedule a doctor's appointment. Answered by Reanna Mokiao 1 year ago.


How do I become a distributor of Habitrol Nicotene gum?
I have been chewing nicotene gum for years to control my smoking. I buy it from a lady on the internet. I would like to become a distributor and get it cheaper. It is called Habitrol from New Zealand, and is made by Novartis. Does anyone know how to become a distributor? Asked by Jenniffer Karren 1 year ago.

try getting the address/email from the wrapper you get the gum in Answered by Kendrick Denoyer 1 year ago.


Which nicotine patch is really good to quit smoking ?
Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System or nicoderm ..which one ? Asked by Merilyn Starley 1 year ago.

Take it from some one who has tried them all,its all in your head.It doesn't matter which one you use if your not TRULY ready to quit.Good luck. Answered by Bula Fabrizius 1 year ago.

they are pretty much the same in terms of drug delivery and drug content. if I were you, I'd go for the pharmacy house brand to save some $$$...unless you've heard stories of the house brand not working. Answered by Mariam Binkerd 1 year ago.


What is the best method for quitting smoking?
Asked by Denise Schronce 1 year ago.

I used the Habitrol patch for about a month and a half and have now been smoke free for a year Jan 25th. My husband quit the same time and he used Nicorett gum and he has also been smoke free but he still gets cravings and chews the gum occasionally. It is really a hard thing to commit to, but if you are ready, go for it. Good Luck Answered by Fumiko Killmer 1 year ago.

For me, it started out with slowing down when i smoked, like at first i stopped smoking in the morning, then progressing i wouldn't smoke at work, then not at home. Then towards the end when putting the breaks on all the way, i quit going to bars, tried to stay away from people smoking then what happened i had to figure what to do with my hands when i started to go out again to a concert are a bar that was the test then one day i finally realized i really quit i can drink all night, play pool and never miss the smoking. and that my friend is a kick *** feeling. All in all it took like 2 years for me but i believe you could do all that in a years time, just don't pressure yourself into fully quitting right away focus on one thing at a time. Hope this info can help you, because i don't know if it is the best way ,but this is what worked for me. Answered by Luna Driskill 1 year ago.

There is no best method because everyone is different and should be treated by a doctor so your body can adjust to the change without too much stress. Answered by Almeda Obregon 1 year ago.

After reading your question I sat here and thought about it for about 10 minutes...I have been a smoker for about 7 years now and I thought about it I believe the answer is willpower. Thats all you need is strong willpower...good luck :) Answered by Joan Italiano 1 year ago.


Do some brands of nicotine patches stick to the skin better than others?
My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he... Asked by Jack Lamons 1 year ago.

My boyfriend recently stopped smoking. His mom had given him one of the square nicotine patches to see if it would work for him. It seemed to stick really well, and it even left some sticky stuff on his skin when he took it off. He doesn't remember the brand, but it provided 21mg daily. The next day, he bought his own box of nicotine patches, only he got the 14mg ones because the 21mg was making his arm feel weird. Also, he didn't usually smoke a whole pack a day. These were circular patches. They are Nicoderm brand.. He has been using them for almost a week and a half and they don't stick very well. He works outside for most of the day and as soon as he starts to sweat, the patches peel off. Is one brand circular and another square, or is that just to differentiate the 21mg and 14mg dosage? The square ones seemed to stick to the skin better. He doesn't want to tape the patch to his arm. Does anyone recommend a brand that sticks well? Answered by Joleen Frazell 1 year ago.

the best one i have found is called --habitrol. they stick well and don't burn or sting very much. Answered by Lavonda Remey 1 year ago.

I worked in a facility that supplied patches to patients. Have him wipe the area he is applying the patch to with alcohol. Let dry. Apply patch. He can also add some waterproof adhesive tape over it because if he perspires alot almost any brand will lose it's adhesion. Answered by Alaina Steele 1 year ago.

Im not too sure. You should ask your local chemist but i am pretty sure a more expensive brand will work better. Answered by Charline Kutzner 1 year ago.

yep its funny lol Answered by Carlos Cinnamond 1 year ago.


Ok im still smokeless in ny im really trying not to smoke but my ? is does the patch really work ?
and should i invest in it or is it as bad as smoking a cig Asked by Estella Revis 1 year ago.

The patch delivers nicotine into your system without the tar and carcinogens that you absorb when actually smoking. Because small amounts of nicotine are constantly being absorbed, you will find your cravings deminish and it might help you stay smoke free. You reduce the level of nicotine gradually, so over time, your dependance is reduced, which makes it easier to quit completely. I used the patch my first time quitting and it worked quite well for me, but the nicotine level was a bit high, so I took it off. My doctor recently told me it was ok to cut the patch in half, so I'm starting on it again on Monday. Keep in mind that, because you are not inhaling smoke, your body will continue to heal the damage that smoking has caused while you use the patch. Answered by Porsche Rasulo 1 year ago.

The patch isn't as bad for your lungs as smoking, but it's still a source of nicotine, so it's just substituting one addiction for another. If you're able to stop smoking without the patch, you're probably better off. Answered by Althea Brosco 1 year ago.

its still got addictive nicotine but its not bad for you because it does not contain tobacco. nicotine itself is not harmful, only addictive. Answered by Velia Truiolo 1 year ago.


What is the molecular formula of nicotine?
Please I have been stuck on this question for a long time if i could get a step by step help that would be greatly appreciated :) Nicotine has the empirical formula, C5H7N. A solution of 0.500 g of nicotine in 12.0 g of water boils at 100.140*C. What is the the molecular formula of nicotine? Asked by Beau Locklear 1 year ago.

THIS IS ALLOT. BUT IT IS Chemical Database Nicotine Identifications Formula: C10H14N2 Formula: C10H14N2O Formula: C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Elements: Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen CAS Number: 54-11-5 Caswell Number: 597 CCOHS Record Number: 446 RCRA Waste Number: P075 RTECS Number: QS5250000 Synonyms/Related: (+)-Nicotine (+-) NICOTINE (+-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (+-)-Nicotine (-)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine (-)-Nicotine (2S) 3-(1-Methyl-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-pyridine (R)-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine (R,S)-Nicotine (S)-(-)-NICOTINE, 3-[(2S)-1-METHYL-2-PYRROLIDINYL] PYRIDINE (S)-3-(1-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl) Pyridine (S)-3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-3-(N-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (S)-Nicotine .beta.-Pyridyl-.alpha.-N-methylpyrroli... .beta.-Pyrimidum 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)-pyrrolidene 1-Methyl-2-(3-pyridyl) pyrrolidine 2'-beta-H-Nicotine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine 3-(1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine 3-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)) pyridine 3-(N-METHYLPYROLLIDINO) PYRIDINE 3-(N-Methylpyrrolidino) pyridine 3-(tetrahydro-1-methyl pyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine 3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N,N-diethyl- 3-[(2S)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl]pyridi... Anacardone Anacordone Astrocar beta-Pyridyl-alpha-N-methylpyrrolidine beta-Pyrimidum C00745 c0468 C5H4NC4H7NCH3 Camphozone Canfodiamina Carbamidal Cardamine Cardiagen Cardiamid Cardiamide Cardiamina Cardiamine Cardimon Citocor Coracon Coraetamidum Coraethamide Coraethamidum Coralept Coramine Coravita Corazone Cordiamid Cordiamin Cordiamine Corditon Cordynil Corediol Corespin Corethamide Coretone Corivo Cormed Cormid Cormotyl Cornotone Corotonin Corovit Corvin Corvitan Corvitol Corvotone Corywas D-Nicotine Danamine destruxol Destruxol orchid spray Diaethyl-nicotinamid Diaethyl-nicotinamid [German] Diaethylamidum acidi nicotinici Diethyl-Nicotamide Diethylamid kyseliny nikotinove [Czech] Diethylnicotinamide Dietilamide-Carbopiridina Dinacoryl DL-tetrahydronicotyrine Dynacoryl Dynamicarde Elitone Emo-nik ENT 3,424 Eucoran FLUX MAAG Flux Maay fumeto bac Fumetobac Habitrol Hansacor Inicardio Kardiamid Kardonyl Kordiamin L(-)-nicotine L-3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl) pyridine l-Nicotine Leptamin MACH-NIC Mediamid methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) pyridine Micotine N, N-Diethylnicotinamide N,N-Diethyl-3-pyridinecarboxamide N,N-DIETHYLNICOTINAMIDE NCT Ni-Cor niagara p.a. Niagara p.a. dust Niamine Nic-Sal Nicaethamidum Nicetamida [INN-Spanish] Nicetamide Nicetamide [DCIT] Nicethamide Nicethamidum [INN-Latin] Nico-dust Nico-fume Nicocide Nicor Nicordamin Nicorine Nicoryl Nicotin Nicotina Nicotina (ITALIAN) Nicotina [Italian] Nicotinamide, N,N-diethyl- Nicotine NICOTINE (L) (PYRROLIDINE,N-METHYL,ALPHA-(D-BETA-PYRI... Nicotine alkaloid Nicotine [BSI:ISO] Nicotine [USAN] Nicotine, (+-)- Nicotine, liquid Nicotinic acid diethylamide Nicotrol Nicotrol Inhaler Nicotrol NS Nikardin Niketamid Niketamide Nikethamide Nikethamide [BAN:INN] Niketharol Nikethyl Niketilamid Nikorin Nikotin Nikotin (GERMAN) Nikotin [German] Nikotyna Nikotyna (POLISH) Nikotyna [Polish] Niquetamida Nisetamide Ortho N-4 Ortho N-4 and N-5 dusts Ortho N-4 dust Ortho N-5 Ortho N-5 dust Percoral Procardine Procorman Prostep Pseudonicotine Pyricardyl Pyridine, 3- (1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- Pyridine, 3- (tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine, 3-((2S)-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (R)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (s)- Pyridine, 3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)- (9CI) Pyridine, 3-(tetrahydro-1-methylpyrrol-2-yl) Pyridine-3-carboxydiethylamide Pyridine-3-carboxylic acid diethylamide Pyrrolidine, 1-methyl-2-(3-pyridal)- Reformin Rehormin S-(-)-Nicotine Salvacard Salvacorin Sancora SDCCGMLS-0066911.P001 Solyacord Stellamine Stiminol Stimulin Tendust Tetrahydronicotyrine, dl- Tonocard Tonocor Vasazol Ventramine XL All Insecti-cide, Emo-Nib XL All Insecticide Properties Incompatiblities: strong acids strong oxidizers Health & Regulatory Guidelines EPA Regulations: Reportable Quantity: 100 Lbs NFPA 704 Rating: Health Hazardard Rating: 4 Fire Hazardard Rating: 1 Reactivity Hazardard Rating: 0 NIOSH Guidelines: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 IDLH: 5 mg/m3 OSHA Regulations: TWA: 0.5 mg/m3 TWA Vacated: 0.5 mg/m3 Health Risks: Highly Toxic 49 CFR 172.101 - Hazardous Materials Table Hazardous materials description and proper shipping namesHaz class or divID#PGLCSpec prov §172.102Pack §173Qty limitVessel ExcepNon BulkBulkPass air/railCargo air onlyLocOther (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8A)(8B)... Current as of January 2006 Nicotine6.1UN1654II6.1IB2153202... 2004 E Answered by Jimmie Evinger 1 year ago.

I need points Answered by Tamala Purpora 1 year ago.


Ok health pros, here's one for you. I take medication for HTN, .....?
I AM a nurse, so I know part of the answer already, just thought I'd put it out there to get more info, thanks for the replies so far. Asked by Duane Udani 1 year ago.

HI The Only Solo Rose (very creative) I must commend you first for assisting many people with your time. Athough I have different concepts on how to heal people then modern medicine (mostly drugs) I still see the value and willingness doctors and nurses are trying to help people. We need more healers in the world and we come from all different backgrounds of training and education. Again I applaud you sharing your expertise with so many. Now Ill share my thoughts with you and I have no idea about drugs, but I am very keen on how the body functions. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke causes high blood pressure because of how smoking damages cells and narrows arteries. In addition, cigarettes contain an abundance of life-threatening chemicals that further increase overall health risks. Even smokeless tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and snuff can raise blood pressure levels because of the nicotine and sodium they contain. Many of the other chemicals contained in cigarettes can create a toxic burden on the liver to further disturb healthy body habits. Pharmaceutical Drugs: According to the Physicians` Desk Reference, the following drugs can all cause high blood pressure as a side effect of their use: Alfenta Injection, Aredia for Injection, Dobutrex Solution Vials, Epogen for Injection, Habitrol Nicotine Transdermal System, Lupron Depot, Methergine Injection and Tablets, Orthoclone OKT3 Sterile Solution, Polygam Immune Globulin Intravenous Human, Procrit for Injection, Sandimmune, Sandimmune Soft Gelatin Capsules, Tolectin, Velban Vials, Ventolin Inhalation Aerosol and Refill, and Wellbutrin. ****Here are some ideas to contol your blood pressure: Quick Action Plan for High Blood Pressure 1. Make any necessary lifestyle changes. If you are overweight, commit to a weight loss plan. If you smoke, stop, and avoid all sources of secondhand smoke. Also exercise at least thirty minutes a day at least three to four times a week. Safe and effective exercise choices include brisk walking, bicycling, hiking, rebounding, and swimming. Additionally try a restorative yoga class, tai chi or chi gong; all can provide great stress relief and can be pleasurable ways to add movement to your life. 2. Adopt a healthy diet. In place of red meats, choose fish such as blue fish, cod, Greenland halibut, mackerel, and wild caught salmon, as well as free-range, organic poultry. If you want red meat choose bison, for a low fat option. 3. Emphasize fresh, organic fruits and vegetables that are rich in vital nutrients, such as avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, grapefruit, nectarines, oranges, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green peas, kidney and lima beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts such as almonds, cashews, walnuts and pecans, potatoes, squash, and yams, raw dairy, and whole grains like brown rice, buckwheat and quinoa. 4. Use raw virgin coconut butter or organic butter for cooking, and flaxseed and extra virgin olive oil for dressings. 5. Avoid alcohol, coffee, caffeine, and refined salt. 6. Supplement with vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6, vitamin C, bioflavonoids (especially rutin), vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), evening primrose oil, fish oil, calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and zinc, as well as the amino acids cysteine, taurine, and tryptophan. 7. Useful herbs for high blood pressure include garlic, hawthorn berry, olive leaf extract, and the medicinal mushrooms maitake and reishi. 8. Drink at least one 8-ounce glass of fresh squeezed, organic vegetable juice each day. Excellent juice combinations include beet, carrot, and celery; and carrot or cucumber, spinach, and parsley. For added benefit, add one clove of juiced garlic. 9. Adopt a stress management program of daily meditation and/or relaxation exercises. 10. Detoxify your body to eliminate toxins and heavy metals that can dramatically increase the risk of high blood pressure. Quick Action Plan for Addictions 1. Determine if the addiction stems from allergies, biochemical imbalances, genetics, and/or malabsorption of nutrients. 2. Repressed core emotions such as denied anger often lead to depression, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, and disassociation. Embracing your feelings is the most important aspect of beginning to deal with addictive behavior. 3. Regular chiropractic adjustments prove to be supportive, along with release-oriented tissue and bodywork techniques such as Rolfing. 4. Eat three meals and two snacks consistently. Emphasize quality protein foods such as organic poultry, bison, lamb, wild-caught fish, and eggs. Eat plenty of raw nuts and seeds, apples, berries, and other whole fruits; avoid all fruit juices. 5. A critical step in the recovery process is to cleanse, heal and support liver function by using herbs such as Milk Thistle, Dandelion and Bupleurum. 6. Blood-cleansing will support sluggish energy. Herbs in the form of tinctures or teas made from Oat Straw, Burdock Root, Echinacea, and Licorice Root are helpful, and are also vital to healthy kidney function. 7. To calm nerves and anxiety caused by addiction, use the herbs Skullcap, Valerian, and Vervain. 8. After eating a stable whole foods diet for at least 3 months, consider a juice fast of organic vegetable juices. 9. Take nutritional supplements. The B vitamins, particularly thiamin (B1) and B6 are important. Consider amino acid therapy for rebalancing brain chemistry, and to reduce cravings for alcohol, drugs, and/or nicotine. 10. Acupuncture, particularly auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture), is especially useful for drug addictions, and excellent for addressing addictive behaviors such as sex, gambling, and workaholicism. 11. Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Naturopathic Medicine and Orthomolecular Medicine are especially helpful for alcoholism, drug addiction, and smoking. Continue your quest to assisting people because the world is in great need. But we do need to have you happy and healthy. Learn about nutrition and drink a gallon of water a day (I do). Keep persuing the answers for all categories you want to know about. There are always higher level of truths to be found. Best of health to you Answered by Candy Woolcock 1 year ago.

Since you are a nurse, you probably know more about Hypotension than I do, but I'll give it a shot. First, remember that a persons BP can change drastically over a short period of time, often within minutes. No single reading can indicate High or Low BP. Several readings over time must be taken before there is a need for concern. Don't be alarmed by a single reading. Second, there are many factors that can affect your blood pressure. Some of those factors are: - Stress (Emotional, mental and physical) - Some medications (or combinations) can cause a rise or drop in BP - Poor sleep habits and sleep disorders (Sleep Apnea, not enough sleep, sleep disturbances, etc.) - Body position as the reading is taken (lying down. sitting, arm not level with heart, legs crossed, etc.) - Also there is a condition called "White Coat Hypertension". This is when a person visits a doctor and their BP goes up. It's an example of mental stress. - and of course smoking (or not). - How long it's been since your last meal. - Caffeine - Alcohol - Needing to go to the bathroom This comes from the FamilyDoctor.org website: "Hypotension, or low blood pressure, happens when your systolic pressure is consistently (several blood pressure readings over several days) below 90--or 25 points below your normal reading. Hypotension can be a sign of something serious such as shock, a life threatening condition. Contact your doctor immediately if you are dizzy or fainting" If you just started the medication, then it and quitting smoking has probably combined to cause this. It may take a little time for your body to adjust to both improvements and settle out. If you have been on the medication for some time, then I suspect the sudden drop in BP is due to the lack of smoking (nicotine) in your system. I have seen the same result when I don't smoke for several hours, though my BP never drops that low. But my HR varies from around 60 bpm to above 90 bpm (normally 68 to 84 bpm range) and my O2 Sat remains above 90% and is normally above 94%. I wouldn't worry about the HR at all, unless it continues to drop below 50 bpm or stays very near that for some time. As for the BP that is a concern if it remains there, but if it continues to drop I would suggest a visit to the ER is in order. My information comes from my research and experience with 5x Bypasses in Oct. 2006, High BP (Hypertension), High Cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia), COPD (Emphysema) and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. I suggest the links below for more information. Answered by Maryellen Carver 1 year ago.

I'm no pro, but I have an opinion, so I'll share it! First of all, I'm so glad to hear you are quitting smoking. It's a huge step, I'm sure, but a very important one. So kudos to you! Now, as to the hypotension issue, I'm guessing that if you called your doctor and suggested that a) your BP is running low as you withdraw from nicotine so b) you're contemplating scaling back the HTN meds, he would have no problem with it. You already monitor your BP regularly (apparently), so there's no reason that you can't carefully adjust your medications to keep your BP in line. That said, fainting ain't good. If this hasn't happened to you before, you really ought to get a more complete cardio workup. Just my 2 cents worth... Answered by Geri Swaine 1 year ago.

I am not a doctor or a nurse, but I feel this is true. As you probably are aware smoking (the nicotine) causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. So actually with the nicotine going out of your system now it caused your BP to start dropping and your heart rate. The same thing happened to me when I quit smoking, heart rate decreased and so did my BP. I consulted my cardiologist and physician and they began to decrease my BP meds as they told me you should never just stop taking BP meds cold turkey. I monitored my BP with every decreased dosage they told me to do. My BP remained where it should and then I was off the BP meds. Unfortunately, then I started to smoke again, and my BP increased and so did my heart rate, went back on BP meds again, BUT NOW, I HAVE FINALLY KICKED THE HABIT, have not been smoking for a year now and BP and heart rate is fine. I am just talking from personal experience and I also know that nicotine does increase heart rate and blood pressure. Answered by Latasha Nasuti 1 year ago.

There are many different types of medications that act in different ways to lower BP. The first medication your Dr prescribes may not work well enough or have some adverse side effects. It is important to track BP when you start taking HTN medication and note any side effects you may experience. There are many types of medications available and different combinations of medications that can tried. It is important to treat HTN as it can lead to many serious medical problems. It is important to get your BP checked regularly so that you don’t suffer from the terrible effects of long term untreated HTN, since it is very treatable and the alternatives are costly in many ways, including an untimely death. Answered by Sergio Osmundson 1 year ago.

you probably have STDS go get a life! Answered by Dreama Montesino 1 year ago.


Blood drug testing!! help!!?
Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages... Asked by Katerine Budreau 1 year ago.

Okay, so my mom went through my myspace today because I forgot to log off. And in my messages, I was talking about how I had done valium recently, smoked week a couple times, ect. So in a nutshell, she found out I had been doing drugs (I'm really stopping good for now so please don't preach at me). In the messages I didn't state how many times I had actually done each one of them, but when she asked me, I told her I had only smoked weed once and taken 4 valium all together (when in reality I had smoked probably 4-5 within the last month and 1/2). The irony of this all is that actually yesterday I had to go in for my yearly blood test so they could check my thyroid, cholesterol, ect, but my my just threatened me telling me that she was going to call the clinic and tell them to run a drug screening also, to make sure I wasn't lying and that maybe I was taking other drugs as well. Thats not what I'm worried about though, I'm just worried about her really seeing how much is really in my system. How much do blood tests show? Will it show everything I've done in the last 2 months or only what i've done in the last 2 weeks? Please help! (please don't go on about how I should have just told the truth in the first place, it was already really humiliating for me and i just told her what popped into my head first) THANK YOU!! Answered by Aubrey Hallstrom 1 year ago.

"The length of time any drug (illicit or prescribed) stays in your system will vary. In large part, it depends on your physiological makeup (e.g., your physical height, weight, your amount of body fat, your age, current state of health, whether or not you exercise mildly-aggressively-or at all). Whether or not you are undergoing any degree of stress (i.e., your "state of mind") at the time you ingest drugs can play a part as well. Still other considerations include your "frequency" of use (1x per day? 3-5x per day?), the "quantity" of drug you used each time, and the "length of time" (days? weeks? months?) of your consistent drug-use prior to your drug test. Even the quality ("potency") of the drug you ingest determines "how long" the drug is detectable in your system when your urine is analyzed (tested) at the lab. However, for most people, detectable levels (i.e., shows up as a "positive" in a laboratory drug test) of the following drugs stay in the body for these approximate periods of time." Alcohol (Beer, Booze, Hooch, Liquor, Wine), 1 hour to perhaps 10 or 12 hours (Yes, alcohol IS a drug! Drinking more than "in moderation" can lead to alcohol (drug) abuse...and perhaps alcoholism. During 2002, more than 18,000 people in the U.S. were killed by too-boozed-up DRUNK drivers! DON'T BE ONE OF THEM THIS YEAR!) CLICK HERE for more information about alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Amphetamines (Biphetamine, Black Beauties, Crosses, Dexedrine, Hearts), 1-2 days Anabolic steroids (Stanzolol, Stanazolol, Nandrolene; Steroids, Roids, Juice), oral- up to 3 weeks; injected- up to 3-6 months and more Barbituates (Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Phenobarbital; Barbs), 2-3 days Benzodiazepines (e.g., Ativan, Halcion, Librium, Rohypnol, Valium; Roofies, Tranks, Xanax), most, 2-3 days; a few, 4-8 days Cocaine (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), (Candy, Coke, Crack, Flake, Rocks, Snow, Whitecoat), 1-2 days Codeine (e.g., Fiorinal w/codeine, Robitussin A-C, Empirin w/codeine, Tylenol w/codeine, 1-2 days GHB (G, Grievous Bodily Harm, Goob, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X), 1-2 days Heroin (Horse, Smack), 1-2 days Inhalants, just a few hours Ketamine (K, Kit Kat, Special K, Vitamin K), 2-4 days LSD (Acid, Blotter, Microdot, Yellow sunshine), a few hours or up to 5 days Marijuana (Bud, Blunt, Grass, Herb, Pot, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Smoke, Weed), 2-5 days (the daily, heavy user can sometimes be detected up to 30+ days) MDMA (Ecstasy), 1-5 days Methadone, 1-7 days Methamphetamines (Crank, Crystal, Desoxyn, Glass, Ice, Speed), 2-4 days Methaqualone (Ludes, Quaaludes), 10-15 days Nicotine (Cigarettes, Cigars, Habitrol patch, Nicorette gum, Nicotrol spray, Prostep patch; Smokeless tobacco, Snuff, Spit tobacco), 1-2 days Opiates (i.e., Opium: China, Dreams, Laudanum, Paregoric; Dover's Powder), 1-2 days Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percolone, Roxicodone), 1-2 days PCP (Angel Dust, Boat, Hog, Love Boat), 1-8 days Basically, a blood test is just going to show if you have done drugs or now. The test can't tell how much you have done. If you only did the drugs a few times a couple of months ago, nothing is going to show up. But if you have a serious problem and you were doing the drugs multiple times EVERYDAY, then you can still get a positive reading on a drug test even a month later because the drugs will stay present in the system of a chronic user. I really wouldn't worry about what you think your mom is going to find. If you didn't do any drugs about 2 weeks before your blood test, then the chances that they will find something will be a very slim chance. Answered by Chantay Elsberry 1 year ago.

I'm not quite sure, so wait for another answer... but I'm pretty sure the blood test doesn't say how much was in your system, just tests "positive" or "negative" for each individual thing... So, as long as you hadn't done any other drugs other than what you told her, the blood work would just say that you tested positive for THC and for whatever chemical metabolized valium produces. No quantity/amount or anything. Answered by Annalisa Gosier 1 year ago.

um yeah. just don't do drugs. Simple. Answered by Regina Klamm 1 year ago.


Recovering bulimic... really bad sore throat?
I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things... Asked by Olin Sotto 1 year ago.

I know that the title isn't really a question but I really need some help! I used to be bulimic, in fact I have only gone almost 2 weeks without purging it may not sound like a lot but it's really a challenge. But a day or two after I stopped my throat became REALLY sore, and I would think that things would only get better after stopping. I also quit smoking 2 weeks ago and I was using the nicotine gum habitrol, but I saw a side effect was a sore throat so I haven't used it in 3 days. I have been keeping myself hydrated constantly, avoiding rough and spicy foods, gargling salt water twice a day and drinking green tea to soothe the pain. Does anyone know how long this will last or anything I can do to make things heal faster? I know it's not a cold or strep because there are NO symptoms (no fever, no cough, no white spots, no swollen glands or anything.) I know it may take a while... but some peace of mind and knowing how long this will last will help alot. And don't waste your time dissing me because of my old bad habits, I am paying the consequences as I type this. Thanks for your time. =) Answered by Fawn Klinge 1 year ago.

Sore throats happen. It's probably not related to the bulimia at all. If you have no fever, no trouble breathing, no cough, then keep doing what you're doing. If you develop other symptoms, call your doctor's office. Otherwise, just keep nursing it along until it gets better. If not feeling better after a week, schedule a doctor's appointment. Answered by Maurice Ainslie 1 year ago.


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