Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012122/001.

Names and composition

"GLUCAGON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012122/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012122/002 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 10MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020928/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON RECOMBINANT INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per VIAL
071022/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection EQ 1MG BASE per VIAL
071023/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection EQ 10MG BASE per VIAL
201849/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE POWDER/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS EQ 1MG BASE per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012122/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012122/002 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 10MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
071022/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection EQ 1MG BASE per VIAL
071023/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection EQ 10MG BASE per VIAL
201849/001 GLUCAGON GLUCAGON HYDROCHLORIDE POWDER/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS EQ 1MG BASE per VIAL

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Insulin/Glucagon Question?
Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Asked by Glenn Trueax 1 year ago.

Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Glucagon does not directly stimulate release of Insulin. It is a cycle and negative feedback mechanism of glycogenesis and glucogenesis. In state of starvation, hunger, or decrease/low bood glucose level, glycogenolysis will be stimulated. Glycogenolysis pathway(breakdown of stored glycogen in liver cell not in muscle cell) Glucagon stimulates the debranching enzyme(cis and trans) to cut-off glycogen to form free Glucose. Where as in a state of high glucose blood level a negative feed back mechanism will occur. Insulin from Beta cells of Pancreas wiil be stimulated(Glucagon came from Alpha cell of pancreas). Insulin will stimulate the glycogenesis pathway. Where-in the excess glucose will be stored as glycogen to liver and muscle cells. I made this explanation as brief and easy for you to understand. But if you are really interesterested in molecular level. Check out and read Carbohydrates Metabolism of Biochemistry book of Harpers. I hope this one is helpful to you.GoodLuck! Answered by Lourie Neyland 1 year ago.

It's a simple logic. When glucagon is released, the body needs glucose. Glucagon acts on liver primarily to convert stored glycogen into glucose. The glucose is then released into blood. However for glucose to be absorbed by tissues in the body such as the muscles, insulin is required. Therefore insulin is stimulated at the same time. So Insulin in this case acts as a modulatory of blood sugar levels. Answered by Julio Mcgreal 1 year ago.

This is fuzzy for me, but here we go. Glucagon is similar to epinephrine in action, and they both get released at the same time. (Low blood sugar results in rapid heart rate because of the action of epinephrine on the heart.) The pancreatic islet cells, in particular the beta cells (insulin) are stimulated in part by beta receptors. Therefore, when glucagon/epi is released, insulin is stimulated. This is to prevent hyperglycemia. Wether the glucagon is directly acting, or indirectly through epi, is unclear to me. Hope that helps somewhat. Answered by Nubia Brookfield 1 year ago.

Glucagon consists of a single chain of 29 amino acids and the first six amino acids bind to specific receptors in the liver. In turn, a cycle of events happen: the increased production of cAMP-> increased destruction of stored glycogen-->increased gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis-->which leads to an increase of blood glucose from the liver storage of glycogen. Answered by Christie Tuthill 1 year ago.


What disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion?
specific diseases only Asked by Melita Kelash 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion of glucagon is related to DM. Hypersecretion of glucagon is involved in the dysregulation of blood glucose that occurs with diabetes, the investigators point out. "A U-shaped dose-response relationship for glucose-regulated glucagon secretion may explain why diabetic patients with pronounced hyperglycemia display paradoxical hyperglucagonemia," they conclude. Another disease is the Cushing Syndrome. Hyposecretion of glucagon - chronic hypoglycemia A decreased ability to secrete glucagon from pancreatic alpha cells has been associated with chronic hypoglycemia. Other contributing factors to this condition would be: 1. A beta cell tumor 2. Defect in the mechanism releasing glucose from the liver. 3. Addison's disease - low levels of corticosteroids which enhance glucose production. 4. Hyposecretion of growth hormone - causing dwarfism. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids - Cushing's syndrome Chief causes of Cushing's syndrome: 1. Hypersecretion of ACTH - Pituitary Cushing's syndrome is responsible for 60 to 70% of these cases. This condition is brought on by a pituitary adenoma. 2. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids due to an adenoma of the adrenal cortex (20% of the cases) produces low levels of ACTH by negative feedback. This is called adrenal Cushing's syndrome. 3. Hypersecretion of ACTH by a non-endocrine cancer, e.g., lung carcinoma. This is called paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome and is responsible for 10 to 15% of the cases. 4. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is due to the long term use of glucocorticoids to control inflammation and edema or autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis Hypersecretion of glucagon, somatostatin, chromogranin, and calcitonin; ectopic secretion of ACTH (causing Cushing's syndrome); and hypersecretion of growth hormone–releasing hormone (causing acromegaly) sometimes occur in non-β-cell tumors. Answered by Leonardo Ruggiano 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion Of Glucagon Answered by Skye Dovenmuehler 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion? specific diseases only Answered by Helen Wikstrom 1 year ago.

Sweetie, you need to do your own work! Try reading your text book! Answered by Darius Campus 1 year ago.

Controls the chemical balance of the body for the most part. Answered by Francina Kyer 1 year ago.

hypo/hyper glycaemia Answered by Lyda Streich 1 year ago.


What happens if there is not enough glucagon in the body? and what happens of there is not enough?
Asked by Clare Dandoy 1 year ago.

Glucagon is an important hormone involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Produced by the pancreas, it is released when the glucose level in the blood is low (hypoglycemia), causing the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The action of glucagon is thus opposite to that of insulin, which instructs the body's cells to take in glucose from the blood in times of satiation. Glucagon helps maintain the level of glucose in the blood by binding to glucagon receptors on hepatocytes, causing the liver to release glucose - stored in the form of glycogen - through a process known as glycogenolysis. As these stores become depleted, glucagon then encourages the liver to synthesize additional glucose by gluconeogenesis. This glucose is released into the bloodstream. Both of these mechanisms lead to glucose release by the liver, preventing the development of hypoglycemia. Increased free fatty acids and ketoacids into the blood Increased urea production Answered by Jillian Pavlas 1 year ago.

Okay if you don't have enough glucagon then you'll have trouble carrying out gluconeogenesis among other critical met. processes. Answered by Sherell Bayer 1 year ago.

if you have low glucagon levels, you'll have low glucose and high insulin. this is not good for sustained periods of time---you cannot make new glucose from body stores if insulin is at an elevated rate. Answered by Herta Eriksen 1 year ago.

Insufficient carbs will leads to fatigue, lack of motivation when training. Carbs are our "happy" foods. This is why it is very important to figure out just how much carbs, protein, and even fat you will need to consume. Answered by Sage Melfi 1 year ago.


Insulin/Glucagon Question?
Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Asked by Jacques Helgesen 1 year ago.

Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Glucagon does not directly stimulate release of Insulin. It is a cycle and negative feedback mechanism of glycogenesis and glucogenesis. In state of starvation, hunger, or decrease/low bood glucose level, glycogenolysis will be stimulated. Glycogenolysis pathway(breakdown of stored glycogen in liver cell not in muscle cell) Glucagon stimulates the debranching enzyme(cis and trans) to cut-off glycogen to form free Glucose. Where as in a state of high glucose blood level a negative feed back mechanism will occur. Insulin from Beta cells of Pancreas wiil be stimulated(Glucagon came from Alpha cell of pancreas). Insulin will stimulate the glycogenesis pathway. Where-in the excess glucose will be stored as glycogen to liver and muscle cells. I made this explanation as brief and easy for you to understand. But if you are really interesterested in molecular level. Check out and read Carbohydrates Metabolism of Biochemistry book of Harpers. I hope this one is helpful to you.GoodLuck! Answered by Hermila Eldert 1 year ago.

It's a simple logic. When glucagon is released, the body needs glucose. Glucagon acts on liver primarily to convert stored glycogen into glucose. The glucose is then released into blood. However for glucose to be absorbed by tissues in the body such as the muscles, insulin is required. Therefore insulin is stimulated at the same time. So Insulin in this case acts as a modulatory of blood sugar levels. Answered by Jonna Ranallo 1 year ago.

This is fuzzy for me, but here we go. Glucagon is similar to epinephrine in action, and they both get released at the same time. (Low blood sugar results in rapid heart rate because of the action of epinephrine on the heart.) The pancreatic islet cells, in particular the beta cells (insulin) are stimulated in part by beta receptors. Therefore, when glucagon/epi is released, insulin is stimulated. This is to prevent hyperglycemia. Wether the glucagon is directly acting, or indirectly through epi, is unclear to me. Hope that helps somewhat. Answered by Daron Bocek 1 year ago.

Glucagon consists of a single chain of 29 amino acids and the first six amino acids bind to specific receptors in the liver. In turn, a cycle of events happen: the increased production of cAMP-> increased destruction of stored glycogen-->increased gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis-->which leads to an increase of blood glucose from the liver storage of glycogen. Answered by Minna Selca 1 year ago.


What disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion?
specific diseases only Asked by Antoine Imperial 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion of glucagon is related to DM. Hypersecretion of glucagon is involved in the dysregulation of blood glucose that occurs with diabetes, the investigators point out. "A U-shaped dose-response relationship for glucose-regulated glucagon secretion may explain why diabetic patients with pronounced hyperglycemia display paradoxical hyperglucagonemia," they conclude. Another disease is the Cushing Syndrome. Hyposecretion of glucagon - chronic hypoglycemia A decreased ability to secrete glucagon from pancreatic alpha cells has been associated with chronic hypoglycemia. Other contributing factors to this condition would be: 1. A beta cell tumor 2. Defect in the mechanism releasing glucose from the liver. 3. Addison's disease - low levels of corticosteroids which enhance glucose production. 4. Hyposecretion of growth hormone - causing dwarfism. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids - Cushing's syndrome Chief causes of Cushing's syndrome: 1. Hypersecretion of ACTH - Pituitary Cushing's syndrome is responsible for 60 to 70% of these cases. This condition is brought on by a pituitary adenoma. 2. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids due to an adenoma of the adrenal cortex (20% of the cases) produces low levels of ACTH by negative feedback. This is called adrenal Cushing's syndrome. 3. Hypersecretion of ACTH by a non-endocrine cancer, e.g., lung carcinoma. This is called paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome and is responsible for 10 to 15% of the cases. 4. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is due to the long term use of glucocorticoids to control inflammation and edema or autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis Hypersecretion of glucagon, somatostatin, chromogranin, and calcitonin; ectopic secretion of ACTH (causing Cushing's syndrome); and hypersecretion of growth hormone–releasing hormone (causing acromegaly) sometimes occur in non-β-cell tumors. Answered by Lezlie Urdiano 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion Of Glucagon Answered by Octavia Heidtbrink 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion? specific diseases only Answered by Marcela Mennecke 1 year ago.

Sweetie, you need to do your own work! Try reading your text book! Answered by Sean Ferries 1 year ago.

Controls the chemical balance of the body for the most part. Answered by Meta Pico 1 year ago.

hypo/hyper glycaemia Answered by Elfrieda Tellman 1 year ago.


What happens if there is not enough glucagon in the body? and what happens of there is not enough?
Asked by Mimi Yann 1 year ago.

Glucagon is an important hormone involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Produced by the pancreas, it is released when the glucose level in the blood is low (hypoglycemia), causing the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The action of glucagon is thus opposite to that of insulin, which instructs the body's cells to take in glucose from the blood in times of satiation. Glucagon helps maintain the level of glucose in the blood by binding to glucagon receptors on hepatocytes, causing the liver to release glucose - stored in the form of glycogen - through a process known as glycogenolysis. As these stores become depleted, glucagon then encourages the liver to synthesize additional glucose by gluconeogenesis. This glucose is released into the bloodstream. Both of these mechanisms lead to glucose release by the liver, preventing the development of hypoglycemia. Increased free fatty acids and ketoacids into the blood Increased urea production Answered by Christina Mccanse 1 year ago.

Okay if you don't have enough glucagon then you'll have trouble carrying out gluconeogenesis among other critical met. processes. Answered by Winnifred Darington 1 year ago.

if you have low glucagon levels, you'll have low glucose and high insulin. this is not good for sustained periods of time---you cannot make new glucose from body stores if insulin is at an elevated rate. Answered by Sue Atzinger 1 year ago.

Insufficient carbs will leads to fatigue, lack of motivation when training. Carbs are our "happy" foods. This is why it is very important to figure out just how much carbs, protein, and even fat you will need to consume. Answered by Lory Postema 1 year ago.


Insulin/Glucagon Question?
Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Asked by Serena Dimauro 1 year ago.

Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Glucagon does not directly stimulate release of Insulin. It is a cycle and negative feedback mechanism of glycogenesis and glucogenesis. In state of starvation, hunger, or decrease/low bood glucose level, glycogenolysis will be stimulated. Glycogenolysis pathway(breakdown of stored glycogen in liver cell not in muscle cell) Glucagon stimulates the debranching enzyme(cis and trans) to cut-off glycogen to form free Glucose. Where as in a state of high glucose blood level a negative feed back mechanism will occur. Insulin from Beta cells of Pancreas wiil be stimulated(Glucagon came from Alpha cell of pancreas). Insulin will stimulate the glycogenesis pathway. Where-in the excess glucose will be stored as glycogen to liver and muscle cells. I made this explanation as brief and easy for you to understand. But if you are really interesterested in molecular level. Check out and read Carbohydrates Metabolism of Biochemistry book of Harpers. I hope this one is helpful to you.GoodLuck! Answered by Jack Rightmire 1 year ago.

It's a simple logic. When glucagon is released, the body needs glucose. Glucagon acts on liver primarily to convert stored glycogen into glucose. The glucose is then released into blood. However for glucose to be absorbed by tissues in the body such as the muscles, insulin is required. Therefore insulin is stimulated at the same time. So Insulin in this case acts as a modulatory of blood sugar levels. Answered by Ebony Neglio 1 year ago.

This is fuzzy for me, but here we go. Glucagon is similar to epinephrine in action, and they both get released at the same time. (Low blood sugar results in rapid heart rate because of the action of epinephrine on the heart.) The pancreatic islet cells, in particular the beta cells (insulin) are stimulated in part by beta receptors. Therefore, when glucagon/epi is released, insulin is stimulated. This is to prevent hyperglycemia. Wether the glucagon is directly acting, or indirectly through epi, is unclear to me. Hope that helps somewhat. Answered by Latashia Ondrusek 1 year ago.

Glucagon consists of a single chain of 29 amino acids and the first six amino acids bind to specific receptors in the liver. In turn, a cycle of events happen: the increased production of cAMP-> increased destruction of stored glycogen-->increased gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis-->which leads to an increase of blood glucose from the liver storage of glycogen. Answered by Arla Wydo 1 year ago.


What disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion?
specific diseases only Asked by Rosalyn Reuland 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion of glucagon is related to DM. Hypersecretion of glucagon is involved in the dysregulation of blood glucose that occurs with diabetes, the investigators point out. "A U-shaped dose-response relationship for glucose-regulated glucagon secretion may explain why diabetic patients with pronounced hyperglycemia display paradoxical hyperglucagonemia," they conclude. Another disease is the Cushing Syndrome. Hyposecretion of glucagon - chronic hypoglycemia A decreased ability to secrete glucagon from pancreatic alpha cells has been associated with chronic hypoglycemia. Other contributing factors to this condition would be: 1. A beta cell tumor 2. Defect in the mechanism releasing glucose from the liver. 3. Addison's disease - low levels of corticosteroids which enhance glucose production. 4. Hyposecretion of growth hormone - causing dwarfism. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids - Cushing's syndrome Chief causes of Cushing's syndrome: 1. Hypersecretion of ACTH - Pituitary Cushing's syndrome is responsible for 60 to 70% of these cases. This condition is brought on by a pituitary adenoma. 2. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids due to an adenoma of the adrenal cortex (20% of the cases) produces low levels of ACTH by negative feedback. This is called adrenal Cushing's syndrome. 3. Hypersecretion of ACTH by a non-endocrine cancer, e.g., lung carcinoma. This is called paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome and is responsible for 10 to 15% of the cases. 4. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is due to the long term use of glucocorticoids to control inflammation and edema or autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis Hypersecretion of glucagon, somatostatin, chromogranin, and calcitonin; ectopic secretion of ACTH (causing Cushing's syndrome); and hypersecretion of growth hormone–releasing hormone (causing acromegaly) sometimes occur in non-β-cell tumors. Answered by Marinda Johll 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion Of Glucagon Answered by Yasuko Piscopo 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion? specific diseases only Answered by Terina Dowey 1 year ago.

Sweetie, you need to do your own work! Try reading your text book! Answered by Lee Francher 1 year ago.

Controls the chemical balance of the body for the most part. Answered by Silva Camfield 1 year ago.

hypo/hyper glycaemia Answered by Terence Protano 1 year ago.


What happens if there is not enough glucagon in the body? and what happens of there is not enough?
Asked by Maura Hilyer 1 year ago.

Glucagon is an important hormone involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Produced by the pancreas, it is released when the glucose level in the blood is low (hypoglycemia), causing the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The action of glucagon is thus opposite to that of insulin, which instructs the body's cells to take in glucose from the blood in times of satiation. Glucagon helps maintain the level of glucose in the blood by binding to glucagon receptors on hepatocytes, causing the liver to release glucose - stored in the form of glycogen - through a process known as glycogenolysis. As these stores become depleted, glucagon then encourages the liver to synthesize additional glucose by gluconeogenesis. This glucose is released into the bloodstream. Both of these mechanisms lead to glucose release by the liver, preventing the development of hypoglycemia. Increased free fatty acids and ketoacids into the blood Increased urea production Answered by Cheri Chanin 1 year ago.

Okay if you don't have enough glucagon then you'll have trouble carrying out gluconeogenesis among other critical met. processes. Answered by Otilia Benda 1 year ago.

if you have low glucagon levels, you'll have low glucose and high insulin. this is not good for sustained periods of time---you cannot make new glucose from body stores if insulin is at an elevated rate. Answered by Winford Moring 1 year ago.

Insufficient carbs will leads to fatigue, lack of motivation when training. Carbs are our "happy" foods. This is why it is very important to figure out just how much carbs, protein, and even fat you will need to consume. Answered by Danielle Kukura 1 year ago.


Insulin/Glucagon Question?
Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Asked by Khalilah Schlottman 1 year ago.

Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Glucagon does not directly stimulate release of Insulin. It is a cycle and negative feedback mechanism of glycogenesis and glucogenesis. In state of starvation, hunger, or decrease/low bood glucose level, glycogenolysis will be stimulated. Glycogenolysis pathway(breakdown of stored glycogen in liver cell not in muscle cell) Glucagon stimulates the debranching enzyme(cis and trans) to cut-off glycogen to form free Glucose. Where as in a state of high glucose blood level a negative feed back mechanism will occur. Insulin from Beta cells of Pancreas wiil be stimulated(Glucagon came from Alpha cell of pancreas). Insulin will stimulate the glycogenesis pathway. Where-in the excess glucose will be stored as glycogen to liver and muscle cells. I made this explanation as brief and easy for you to understand. But if you are really interesterested in molecular level. Check out and read Carbohydrates Metabolism of Biochemistry book of Harpers. I hope this one is helpful to you.GoodLuck! Answered by Tasha Ciersezwski 1 year ago.

It's a simple logic. When glucagon is released, the body needs glucose. Glucagon acts on liver primarily to convert stored glycogen into glucose. The glucose is then released into blood. However for glucose to be absorbed by tissues in the body such as the muscles, insulin is required. Therefore insulin is stimulated at the same time. So Insulin in this case acts as a modulatory of blood sugar levels. Answered by Otha Dinora 1 year ago.

This is fuzzy for me, but here we go. Glucagon is similar to epinephrine in action, and they both get released at the same time. (Low blood sugar results in rapid heart rate because of the action of epinephrine on the heart.) The pancreatic islet cells, in particular the beta cells (insulin) are stimulated in part by beta receptors. Therefore, when glucagon/epi is released, insulin is stimulated. This is to prevent hyperglycemia. Wether the glucagon is directly acting, or indirectly through epi, is unclear to me. Hope that helps somewhat. Answered by Sadye Pleiss 1 year ago.

Glucagon consists of a single chain of 29 amino acids and the first six amino acids bind to specific receptors in the liver. In turn, a cycle of events happen: the increased production of cAMP-> increased destruction of stored glycogen-->increased gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis-->which leads to an increase of blood glucose from the liver storage of glycogen. Answered by Kathern Maury 1 year ago.


What disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion?
specific diseases only Asked by Jannette Kasmir 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion of glucagon is related to DM. Hypersecretion of glucagon is involved in the dysregulation of blood glucose that occurs with diabetes, the investigators point out. "A U-shaped dose-response relationship for glucose-regulated glucagon secretion may explain why diabetic patients with pronounced hyperglycemia display paradoxical hyperglucagonemia," they conclude. Another disease is the Cushing Syndrome. Hyposecretion of glucagon - chronic hypoglycemia A decreased ability to secrete glucagon from pancreatic alpha cells has been associated with chronic hypoglycemia. Other contributing factors to this condition would be: 1. A beta cell tumor 2. Defect in the mechanism releasing glucose from the liver. 3. Addison's disease - low levels of corticosteroids which enhance glucose production. 4. Hyposecretion of growth hormone - causing dwarfism. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids - Cushing's syndrome Chief causes of Cushing's syndrome: 1. Hypersecretion of ACTH - Pituitary Cushing's syndrome is responsible for 60 to 70% of these cases. This condition is brought on by a pituitary adenoma. 2. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids due to an adenoma of the adrenal cortex (20% of the cases) produces low levels of ACTH by negative feedback. This is called adrenal Cushing's syndrome. 3. Hypersecretion of ACTH by a non-endocrine cancer, e.g., lung carcinoma. This is called paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome and is responsible for 10 to 15% of the cases. 4. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is due to the long term use of glucocorticoids to control inflammation and edema or autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis Hypersecretion of glucagon, somatostatin, chromogranin, and calcitonin; ectopic secretion of ACTH (causing Cushing's syndrome); and hypersecretion of growth hormone–releasing hormone (causing acromegaly) sometimes occur in non-β-cell tumors. Answered by Maryln Maeweather 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion Of Glucagon Answered by Monica Fiorilli 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion? specific diseases only Answered by Lesli Briand 1 year ago.

Sweetie, you need to do your own work! Try reading your text book! Answered by Brinda Metge 1 year ago.

Controls the chemical balance of the body for the most part. Answered by Richie Brite 1 year ago.

hypo/hyper glycaemia Answered by Phuong Hoffine 1 year ago.


What happens if there is not enough glucagon in the body? and what happens of there is not enough?
Asked by Alfonzo Fent 1 year ago.

Glucagon is an important hormone involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Produced by the pancreas, it is released when the glucose level in the blood is low (hypoglycemia), causing the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The action of glucagon is thus opposite to that of insulin, which instructs the body's cells to take in glucose from the blood in times of satiation. Glucagon helps maintain the level of glucose in the blood by binding to glucagon receptors on hepatocytes, causing the liver to release glucose - stored in the form of glycogen - through a process known as glycogenolysis. As these stores become depleted, glucagon then encourages the liver to synthesize additional glucose by gluconeogenesis. This glucose is released into the bloodstream. Both of these mechanisms lead to glucose release by the liver, preventing the development of hypoglycemia. Increased free fatty acids and ketoacids into the blood Increased urea production Answered by Pamila Beltron 1 year ago.

Okay if you don't have enough glucagon then you'll have trouble carrying out gluconeogenesis among other critical met. processes. Answered by Estella Myrlie 1 year ago.

if you have low glucagon levels, you'll have low glucose and high insulin. this is not good for sustained periods of time---you cannot make new glucose from body stores if insulin is at an elevated rate. Answered by Leon Rencher 1 year ago.

Insufficient carbs will leads to fatigue, lack of motivation when training. Carbs are our "happy" foods. This is why it is very important to figure out just how much carbs, protein, and even fat you will need to consume. Answered by Indira Linsner 1 year ago.


Insulin/Glucagon Question?
Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Asked by Oren Hasbni 1 year ago.

Insulin inhibits glucagon release BUT why does glucagon STIMULATE release of insulin? Glucagon does not directly stimulate release of Insulin. It is a cycle and negative feedback mechanism of glycogenesis and glucogenesis. In state of starvation, hunger, or decrease/low bood glucose level, glycogenolysis will be stimulated. Glycogenolysis pathway(breakdown of stored glycogen in liver cell not in muscle cell) Glucagon stimulates the debranching enzyme(cis and trans) to cut-off glycogen to form free Glucose. Where as in a state of high glucose blood level a negative feed back mechanism will occur. Insulin from Beta cells of Pancreas wiil be stimulated(Glucagon came from Alpha cell of pancreas). Insulin will stimulate the glycogenesis pathway. Where-in the excess glucose will be stored as glycogen to liver and muscle cells. I made this explanation as brief and easy for you to understand. But if you are really interesterested in molecular level. Check out and read Carbohydrates Metabolism of Biochemistry book of Harpers. I hope this one is helpful to you.GoodLuck! Answered by Anjanette Steere 1 year ago.

It's a simple logic. When glucagon is released, the body needs glucose. Glucagon acts on liver primarily to convert stored glycogen into glucose. The glucose is then released into blood. However for glucose to be absorbed by tissues in the body such as the muscles, insulin is required. Therefore insulin is stimulated at the same time. So Insulin in this case acts as a modulatory of blood sugar levels. Answered by Philomena Amentler 1 year ago.

This is fuzzy for me, but here we go. Glucagon is similar to epinephrine in action, and they both get released at the same time. (Low blood sugar results in rapid heart rate because of the action of epinephrine on the heart.) The pancreatic islet cells, in particular the beta cells (insulin) are stimulated in part by beta receptors. Therefore, when glucagon/epi is released, insulin is stimulated. This is to prevent hyperglycemia. Wether the glucagon is directly acting, or indirectly through epi, is unclear to me. Hope that helps somewhat. Answered by Yuki Taliaferro 1 year ago.

Glucagon consists of a single chain of 29 amino acids and the first six amino acids bind to specific receptors in the liver. In turn, a cycle of events happen: the increased production of cAMP-> increased destruction of stored glycogen-->increased gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis-->which leads to an increase of blood glucose from the liver storage of glycogen. Answered by Kiesha Starcic 1 year ago.


What disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion?
specific diseases only Asked by Katelyn Denzler 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion of glucagon is related to DM. Hypersecretion of glucagon is involved in the dysregulation of blood glucose that occurs with diabetes, the investigators point out. "A U-shaped dose-response relationship for glucose-regulated glucagon secretion may explain why diabetic patients with pronounced hyperglycemia display paradoxical hyperglucagonemia," they conclude. Another disease is the Cushing Syndrome. Hyposecretion of glucagon - chronic hypoglycemia A decreased ability to secrete glucagon from pancreatic alpha cells has been associated with chronic hypoglycemia. Other contributing factors to this condition would be: 1. A beta cell tumor 2. Defect in the mechanism releasing glucose from the liver. 3. Addison's disease - low levels of corticosteroids which enhance glucose production. 4. Hyposecretion of growth hormone - causing dwarfism. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids - Cushing's syndrome Chief causes of Cushing's syndrome: 1. Hypersecretion of ACTH - Pituitary Cushing's syndrome is responsible for 60 to 70% of these cases. This condition is brought on by a pituitary adenoma. 2. Hypersecretion of adrenal steroids due to an adenoma of the adrenal cortex (20% of the cases) produces low levels of ACTH by negative feedback. This is called adrenal Cushing's syndrome. 3. Hypersecretion of ACTH by a non-endocrine cancer, e.g., lung carcinoma. This is called paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome and is responsible for 10 to 15% of the cases. 4. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is due to the long term use of glucocorticoids to control inflammation and edema or autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis Hypersecretion of glucagon, somatostatin, chromogranin, and calcitonin; ectopic secretion of ACTH (causing Cushing's syndrome); and hypersecretion of growth hormone–releasing hormone (causing acromegaly) sometimes occur in non-β-cell tumors. Answered by Galen Misura 1 year ago.

Hypersecretion Of Glucagon Answered by Lulu Halbur 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what disease would occur if there's hyposecretion of glucagon? how about if hypersecretion? specific diseases only Answered by Kyle Guimares 1 year ago.

Sweetie, you need to do your own work! Try reading your text book! Answered by Camilla Stupar 1 year ago.

Controls the chemical balance of the body for the most part. Answered by Kala Minato 1 year ago.

hypo/hyper glycaemia Answered by Annita Hieatt 1 year ago.


What happens if there is not enough glucagon in the body? and what happens of there is not enough?
Asked by Lupita Ruediger 1 year ago.

Glucagon is an important hormone involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Produced by the pancreas, it is released when the glucose level in the blood is low (hypoglycemia), causing the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The action of glucagon is thus opposite to that of insulin, which instructs the body's cells to take in glucose from the blood in times of satiation. Glucagon helps maintain the level of glucose in the blood by binding to glucagon receptors on hepatocytes, causing the liver to release glucose - stored in the form of glycogen - through a process known as glycogenolysis. As these stores become depleted, glucagon then encourages the liver to synthesize additional glucose by gluconeogenesis. This glucose is released into the bloodstream. Both of these mechanisms lead to glucose release by the liver, preventing the development of hypoglycemia. Increased free fatty acids and ketoacids into the blood Increased urea production Answered by Tawnya Medieros 1 year ago.

Okay if you don't have enough glucagon then you'll have trouble carrying out gluconeogenesis among other critical met. processes. Answered by Chandra Bruyere 1 year ago.

if you have low glucagon levels, you'll have low glucose and high insulin. this is not good for sustained periods of time---you cannot make new glucose from body stores if insulin is at an elevated rate. Answered by Eleanore Donaway 1 year ago.

Insufficient carbs will leads to fatigue, lack of motivation when training. Carbs are our "happy" foods. This is why it is very important to figure out just how much carbs, protein, and even fat you will need to consume. Answered by Donya Procaccino 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved