GEODON Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020825/001.

Names and composition

"GEODON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020825/001 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
020825/002 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
020825/003 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
020825/004 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
020919/001 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INTRAMUSCULAR EQ 20MG BASE per ML
021483/001 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
077560/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077560/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
077560/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
077561/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
077561/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077561/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
077561/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
077562/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
077562/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077562/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
077562/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
077565/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
077565/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077565/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
077565/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
090348/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
090348/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
090348/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
090348/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
202395/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
202395/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
202395/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
202395/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
204117/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
204117/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
204117/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
204117/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
204375/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
204375/002 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
204375/003 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
204375/004 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
077560/001 ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
020825/001 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
020825/002 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
020825/003 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 60MG BASE
020825/004 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 80MG BASE
021483/001 GEODON ZIPRASIDONE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per ML

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Geodon can't sleep feel weird obsessive thoughts?
I'm on Geodon I'm exhausted but I can't sleep I keep having ticks and obsessive thoughts. This happens two hours after I take it. I dont know what to do its ruining my life and school. I can't switch meds right now because then i wont be able to focus. Asked by Justin Sorey 1 month ago.

Geodon is an antipsychotic for psychosis (hallucinations and/or delusions). If you feel your obsessive thoughts are within reason and not to the level of being psychotic (not based on reality), you should probably be on something like luvox, an anti-depressant for OCD. However, obsessive thoughts can often distort reality and be like psychosis so it might be good for you to be on the geodon. The question is whether your symptoms are from you or side effects of the medications. Try to think about when they started happening and if they got worse since you've been on the geodon. I really don't know what to tell you about the ticks. I have had them before but not bad and again I'm not sure whether they're a symptom or a side effect. You should talk to your doctor. But what I would say is that if you think the med is causing you side effects and you are not having psychosis, then yes, you should titrate down on the med and switch to something that will deal with your particular symptoms if you need it. If you are having psychosis or think the geodon is helping with psychosis, then maybe you should stay on the geodon and deal with the side effects (geodon is a relatively friendly anti-psychotic, but everyone reacts differently) or switch to a different anti-psychotic where you might not get as bad side effects if geodon is having a particular adverse reaction with you. Yes, switching meds is always stressful because you are going through a change and will be unsure of the effects, but you don't want to be on a med that is causing you side effects that may not be helping you. Now you and your doctor have to evaluate and make your best judgement/educated guess whether this is the case and what is the best course of action for you. Hope this helps. Answered by Maribeth Mckennie 1 month ago.

I'm sorry about what has happened to you. I have had some similar things to that and it's not fun. It sounds like you've developed an obsessive compulsive disorder. Unfortunately there isn't a quick fix--it takes time to replace negative and unhealthy thoughts with the right ones. I'm not sure how you feel about God, but if I can be honest, He is the only sure thing that has really helped me. I too have compulsions like getting up over and over to check the locks, look all around the house, and fear of someone breaking in and all that. I just lie there and pray, and tell God what I'm feeling. Sometimes I pray out loud--hearing my own voice speaking the truth helps to keep my mind on it too. I also recite scripture out loud. Some of my favorites are Isaiah 41:13, Psalm 23, and Psalm 91. It's all a matter of convincing yourself of the truth. Somewhere deep down you know that the thoughts that you are having are lies, and you have to make the truth your reality. For compulsive behaviors like opening and closing doors and things like that, just consciously make yourself stop. Tell yourself over and over that nothing will happen to you if you do. The world will go on, you will be fine, everyone you know will be fine. Even name the fear and the obsessive thought. This is going to sound strange, but put a name on things--even if it's just "Fear" and "Obsession". To some people that may seem strange but to you these things are very, very real. Talk to them and tell them that they have no place in your life. Acknowlege the lie and replace it with the truth. It's not going to work like a charm right away, but repetition is key. Challenge yourself and your thoughts--right will win out. Also, you mentioned seeing a psychiatrist--find a good therapist that you can go to. Memories of trauma are extremely hard to deal with on your own, and someone like that can really help you sort things out and get to the root of your behavior. Anyways I hope this helps at least a little. I'll keep you in my prayers. Take care, Beth P.S. I just read the answer below me and it is really good--it actually helped me alot too, since I have suffered from a severe panic disorder and depression and alot of other stuff for a long time. Even though this isn't my question I just wanted to say thanks! Answered by Daniel Perricone 1 month ago.

You really ought to call your doctor. One of the side effects of neuroleptics can be tardive dyskinesia (the tics) which can be become perminant even after you stop the meds Answered by Sherrie Luague 1 month ago.


Geodon, what experiences have you had with this medication?
I'm mostly interested in how long does it take to work. What is your dose. How about side effects? How big of a person are you ( I'm 6' 1" and weigh 230 lbs). I'm asking your hight/weight because of the amount of dose you are given. Thanks for your answer and I will choose a best answer on this. Asked by Neomi Padalecki 1 month ago.

I'm mostly interested in how long does it take to work. What is your dose. How about side effects? How big of a person are you ( I'm 6' 1" and weigh 230 lbs). I'm asking your hight/weight because of the amount of dose you are given. Thanks for your answer and I will choose a best answer on this. Answered by Leonora Ronsini 1 month ago.

I love Geodon! I've been taking it on and off for about 6 years. When I went off of it, then I was hospitalized. I've been on it steadily for the past 3 years. I take 40 mg at night which is a fairly low dose. I am female 5'6" and 125 lbs. I have never had a problem with racing thoughts, mania or psychosis while on it. Not even remotely close. Also I'm in college and I have been on the Dean's List 3 times, so I'm able to think clearly while on the medication. Some people are against Geodon because they say it affects their creativity. I would agree that I am less creative on it-- but I'm still rather creative.. just not manic creative like I used to be. On the other hand, Geodon increases how pragmatic I am which is a good thing. The main side effects are fatigue and constipation, but at the low dose that I take these aren't too bad. How long does it take to work? When I was in the hospital, they put me on a high dose like 160 mg or something high like that... and it worked in two days. Then they weaned me down to my current dose which took about a month to gradually decrease the dosage. Overall, I would say Geodon works pretty fast compared to other medications I've been on. But a bad thing about Geodon is that it does nothing to help with depression. It's strictly a mania med, in my experience, but an extremely good mania med. I hope you have as good luck as I did with Geodon. For the record, my diagnosis is bi-polar with psychosis and I also take Lamictal 200 mg (mood stabilizer) and Abilify 10 mg (for depression). But there were 2 years when I was on Geodon alone so I know what it is like to just isolate that medication. The results I describe are purely attributable to Geodon. Answered by Willena Kaliher 1 month ago.

Geodon Experiences Answered by Suzette Buckalew 1 month ago.

I was just prescribed this recently, and they started me at 40mg, at night after dinner, then moved it up to 60mg a night. Im 5'1 and about 145lbs. It made me soooooo tired and groggy the next morning. like completely out of it where I had to crash on the couch for an extra 2 hours after waking up. I stopped taking it... Answered by Dennis Alario 1 month ago.


Should I continue with Geodon?
Geodon seems like it works. The problem is it makes you soo darn tired and drowsy. I reduced my intake to one pill a day, in the evening, at only 60mg. In the morning the effects of the pills have not worn off. I can't take it any earlier than 9 or 10pm because of the drowsiness. I was thinking of asking for... Asked by Nelle Jesseman 1 month ago.

Geodon seems like it works. The problem is it makes you soo darn tired and drowsy. I reduced my intake to one pill a day, in the evening, at only 60mg. In the morning the effects of the pills have not worn off. I can't take it any earlier than 9 or 10pm because of the drowsiness. I was thinking of asking for another type of medication. Any suggestions? SERIOUS REPLIES ONLY!!!! Answered by Lakeshia Egar 1 month ago.

I take Geodon for bi-polar with psychosis. My dose is lower than yours at 40 mg. I've been on as high as 160 mg (At the hospital-- not sure of the exact dose because I was pretty out of it.) The higher doses completely zoned me out. Even at 40 mg (which I take at night)...... I have problems getting up in the morning...... err, afternoon. :) But I have great results otherwise on this low dose of Geodon. No racing thoughts. Great grades in college. (I do force myself to get up in the morning for that.) No other medication controls my mania/psychosis like Geodon! I still have a problem with depression, but that's not a particular strength of Geodon. (I do take Abilify at 10 mg for depression. And Lamictal, too, as a mood stabilizer at 200 mg.) So I would try a lower dose of Geodon. 40 mg. 20 mg. I've found that it doesn't take much to control my symptoms. Also you can try going off it or switching to another medication. My doctor wanted to try me at a real high dose of Abilify and take me off the Geodon completely. I switched doctors because I have been off Geodon before and it was a train wreck. Med mixes take time to get right. Experiment. Work with your doctor or even switch doctors. You have to have side-effects that you can live with. Good luck to you! Answered by Maye Thierauf 1 month ago.

A lot depends on why you take it - my experience with it was taking Geodan for bipolar disorder. I stopped taking Geodan for 2 reasons - 1. I could not get over the sedating effects. I was scared of falling asleep while driving, or even just walking. It made me so sleepy! 2. The second problem I had was it gave me panic attacks. However, to give you a good answer it would help to know what you are taking Geodan for. If you are taking it for bipolar then swap to something else immediately, for example a traditional mood stabilizer. If you are taking it to prevent psychosis DO NOT discontinue without talking to your psychiatrist. You need to get professional advice from a qualified medical expert. The only medical condition I can make medication suggestions for is bipolar. If that is your problem I suggest tried and true lithium. Good luck, and I hope you feel better soon. Answered by Sandra Bourdage 1 month ago.

Geodon, or atleast the dose you are taking, may not be right for you. Get on the phone with your Dr. TODAY. Let him stay informed and direct your dosage or med changes. There are other meds out there that should address your symptoms. Answered by Susan Weinzetl 1 month ago.


Geodon and its effects on you?
I have Borderline Personality Disorder and have been taking it for 3 days its it seems to work. Asked by Christeen Boward 1 month ago.

Geodon is known, along with Abilify, for being an anti-psychotic that doesn't cause weight gain like some of the others. I have taken 160mg of Geodon every day for two years, and have gained zero weight. The main problem with the medication is it makes me feel tired/sleepy. I used to take 80mg in the morning and 80mg at night, and I was falling asleep during the day and couldn't do my work. Now I take it all at night, and the only problem is that it is sometimes hard to get out of bed in the morning (I usually wake up at 6:30am to 7:00am, but the medication makes me unable to get up until 9:00am or so at least once a week). Geodon has treated the manic part of my bipolar disorder pretty well, but even with 160mg I was having some mania problems, so I also take 2.5mg Zyprexa. That seems to keep a lid on it, as I've had no manic episodes since 14 months ago (and prior to that I had five episodes in nine months). In addition to these two anti-psychotic medications, I take Wellbutrin, and anti-depressant, because Geodon does not help with depression. Answered by Izetta Zukof 1 month ago.

I took Geodon for a few years, I'm schizoaffective, it made me so manic and moody, I kept getting put in the hospital, which made the doctor think that I needed a higher dose, UGH! I ended up switching doctors and got put on Seroquel. Good thing about the Geodon though, I actually lost a lot of weight (I was on Zyprexa before), but I was always moving and didn't feel like eating. It was really good with my psychotic symptoms, hallucinations and such, but did not help with mania or mood swings, at least it didn't help me, works different for everyone. One really important thing, when you take Geodon, make sure you take it with food, your body won't totally absorb it if you don't eat something with it. Answered by Jeffrey Wohlfarth 1 month ago.

I had an adverse reaction to Geodon in the first week. My body / limbs involuntarily did hard jerking motions - enough to throw me off a bed - for 3 days and nights. Drs could find no way to get the violent jerking to stop, other than to stop the medication and let the reaction run its course until the medication had passed from my body. I was miserable - my family was scared to death. Answered by Cassie Streng 1 month ago.


I am currently taking the medicine Geodon, I would like to know about withdrawl.?
I have read all over the internet about the horror stories of coming off of this drug. Needless to say I am not exactly anticipating it. I have been on the medication for years. Probably close to 4 or 5 years. At one point my doctor said "Decrease then stop taking it." HA! I did that and didn't sleep... Asked by Jannette Agard 1 month ago.

I have read all over the internet about the horror stories of coming off of this drug. Needless to say I am not exactly anticipating it. I have been on the medication for years. Probably close to 4 or 5 years. At one point my doctor said "Decrease then stop taking it." HA! I did that and didn't sleep and had panic attacks the whole damn night into the next day. So I went back to my doctor and said look I don't want to be on this medicine I can't sleep if I don't take it and I don't like that he said "well just stay on it for now." next trip back to the doctor I saw a different one who corresponds with my current doctor and he too said "it stabilizes you" which is bullshit. I don't need this medication. So here is what I am asking. How long does withdrawal last? I am currently taking 40mg at night. I will be starting back to school shortly and I have a job so I am not quite sure how to figure this out around my daily schedule. Any help. Suggestions. Anything would be great! Thank you :) Meg Answered by Rene Shapleigh 1 month ago.

Geodon Withdrawal Geodon is considered a novel antipsychotic medication, one in the newer class of antipsychotics or neuroleptic medications, designed to provide treatment for mental disorders without the negative side effects of many of the older antipsychotic drugs. The FDA approved Geodon to treat symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, particularly bipolar mania. Geodon is a powerful medication and should be taken exactly as prescribed. It should not be discontinued without the approval of a physician. Withdrawal symptoms may be present if Geodon is discontinued abruptly. Withdrawal symptoms usually occur within 24 to 48 hours after stopping the medication. Abrupt symptoms may begin two to three days after the sudden withdrawal from Geodon. These are rare, but often severe, and include: gastritis; nausea; vomiting; dizziness; tremors; feelings of warmth or cold; sweating; tachycardia (rapid heart rate); headache and insomnia. In addition to withdrawal symptoms, patients who abruptly go off Geodon may also suffer from rebound neurological symptoms including akathisia (inner restlessness and continuous leg movements), dystonia (slow, involuntary, arrhythmic muscle contractions that produce distorted postures), and Parkinson''s disease-like symptoms within the first few days of withdrawal. Tardive dyskinesia, a non-reversible involuntary movement disorder, which results from dopamine hypersensitivity after long-term treatment with an antipsychotic drug, has also been reported within one to four weeks of withdrawal from Geodon. Tardive dyskinesia most commonly affects the tongue, jaw and facial expressions, causing distorted movements of each. The most serious withdrawal symptom that may occur after discontinuing treatment with Geodon is a psychotic relapse. While minor symptoms of the disorder may persist in patients who end Geodon treatment, there is also a risk of a major psychotic episode. Doctors must use extreme care in gradually weaning patients off Geodon and other antipsychotic medications to avoid severe withdrawal symptoms and possible psychotic relapses. There is no cure for psychotic disorders. Ongoing treatment is the best way to relieve symptoms and prevent further episodes. Answered by Billy Gosso 1 month ago.


Is it safe to start geodon at 80mg?
Asked by Trish Pudenz 1 month ago.

Geodon Dosage capsules are available by prescription to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The recommended starting dosage for Geodon is 20–40 mg twice a day. It comes in capsule form and is available in several different strengths, including: Geodon 20 mg capsules Geodon 40 mg capsules Geodon 60 mg capsules Geodon 80 mg capsules. The recommended starting Geodon dose for treating schizophrenia is 20 mg twice daily with food. For the treatment of bipolar disorder, most people start with 40 mg twice a day with food. If your symptoms do not improve, your healthcare provider may increase your dosage as needed; Geodon 80 mg capsules are the highest recommended strength (one capsule, twice a day). Geodon dosage that your healthcare provider recommends will vary depending on a number of factors, including: The medical condition being treated .The severity of your condition .Other medical conditions you may have .Other medications you may be currently taking. do not change your Geodon dosage unless your healthcare provider specifically instructs you to do so.Take care as always!!! Answered by Garnet Skaggs 1 month ago.


Is anyone taken geodon before iwould like to know how it has or hasn't helped you and is it safe?
I am on geodon and have been on it for 4 days how long does it kick in? My doc doesn't take it I need to hear from a taker. thank Asked by Rosalee Eskuchen 1 month ago.

I love Geodon. I take a low dose of 40 mg. It's for mania in bi-polar. It should kick-in fairly quickly-- when I first took it, my doctor put me on a high dose of 160 mg because I was in a delusional, manic episode. My situation was bad, but Geodon took that down in two days. I never have a problem with racing thoughts or mania or even psychosis while on Geodon. It just completely cures that problem for me. The low dose is good... at higher doses then I had problems with fatigue during the day and constipation. I was taking a laxative when I was on the higher dose, but at the low dose it's fine. The bad thing about Geodon is that it does nothing to help depression. But as a mania med, it's very good. I've been taking it steadily for the past 3 years. During that time, I returned to college and I have been on the Dean's list several times for good grades. So you can definitely be clear headed and test well while taking Geodon. Some people complain that Geodon stifles their creativity.. you'll have to see for yourself. I would say that I was more creative in a manic phase as well, but I prefer being stable to those manic highs. It's a choice that you will have to see what works best for you. I'm very pragmatic on the Geodon which I like. ~good luck~ Answered by Barton Janise 1 month ago.

I took it for a while, but had to stop because it made me have constant nausea/heartburn. It takes a few weeks to really kick in if it's going to work for you. It's a relatively safe medication as long as you take it as prescribed. There's always possible side effects, but it's not guarenteed. Answered by Arlie Smitley 1 month ago.


Geodon and side affects?
I took geodon for one day and got extremely anxious. Anyone know anything about this? Asked by Elmo Matson 1 month ago.

Geodon (ziprasidone) is an FDA approved atypical anti-psychotic. Taking it for one day is not time enough to ascertain any effects it may have. Your anxiety may just be from uncertainty as to the medications effects not due to the medication itself. I recommend giving it a longer time in use to find out its' effects. In any case you should consult with your prescribing physician about any untoward symptoms. Look up "geodon" and "ziprasidone" in Yahoo! web search for much more info on this medication including side effects. If you are diagnosed schizophrenic you should be on med's. do not discontinue them abruptly, good mental health, peace and Love! Answered by Wm Homza 1 month ago.


Anyone with Geodon? Have problems?
Monday night I slept around 4 hours and then combined Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday maybe 4 hours total sleep for all three days. Asked by Cheri Castle 1 month ago.

My doctor gave me Geodon on Monday to treat hypomania .... tell me if this is normal? I started taking it and had extreme fatigue , tremors, racing heart, muscle contractions (involuntary) was sooooo exhausted but was unable to sleep or stay still? They started me at 60 mg at night. I was unable to function at work , had trouble even focusing my eyes? Is this normal adjustment problem? I went to the emergency room on Wednesday and had blood pressure of 148/108 with palpitations. Is this normal? Answered by Lottie Grip 1 month ago.

Wow, those experiences are totally not like my experience on Geodon. I'm sorry to read that you are going through this........ I've been on Geodon steadily for the past 3 years. I take a low dose of 40 mg. I don't really experience any side effects. However, although it works great to prevent mania, it has never worked to prevent depression. (I've taken Geodon alone so I know it doesn't work as a depression med for me.) I also take: Lamictal 200 mg (mood stabilizer) Abilify 10 mg (for depression) ~good luck finding a good med mix for you~ P.S. Don't take Depakote as a mood stabilizer because it makes you gain weight. Answered by Lezlie Karst 1 month ago.

I'm on Geodon and have not had the same symptoms. Sounds like you should try something else. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Roscoe Suares 1 month ago.

yeah i awas pretty much parolized for a day and a half. the doc told me it would take some time to get used to bu ti was unable to get out of my bed and was in the worst pain. let me know if you have any other questions about it Answered by Torri Decillis 1 month ago.


What is geodon and it's side effects?
Asked by Lindy Bogda 1 month ago.

Geodon is an atypical antipsychotic. When I took it is made me nauseous and gave me acid reflux. The side effects according to rxlist.com are: Dizziness, drowsiness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, runny nose, and cough may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: severe/persistent dizziness, fainting, mental/mood changes (e.g., agitation, anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts), feelings of restlessness, mask-like facial expression (pseudoparkinsonism), shakiness (tremors), muscle spasm/stiffness, numbness/tingling, trouble swallowing, vision problems, difficulty walking. Seek immediate medical attention if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: chest pain, jaw/left arm pain, slow/fast/irregular heartbeat, seizures. This drug may rarely cause a condition known as tardive dyskinesia. In some cases, this condition may be permanent. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop any unusual uncontrolled movements (especially of the face, mouth, tongue, arms or legs). This medication may rarely cause a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome. The risk may increase when this medication is used with certain other drugs such as "triptans" used to treat migraine headaches (e.g., sumatriptan, eletriptan), certain antidepressants including SSRIs (e.g., citalopram, paroxetine) and SNRIs (e.g., duloxetine, venlafaxine), lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, or a certain drug to treat obesity (sibutramine). Before taking this drug, tell your doctor if you take any of these medications. Seek immediate medical attention if you develop some of the following symptoms: hallucinations, unusual restlessness, loss of coordination, fast heartbeat, severe dizziness, unexplained fever, severe nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, twitchy muscles. Medications used for a similar purpose to ziprasidone may infrequently cause a serious (rarely fatal) nervous system disorder called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). Seek immediate medical attention if you notice any of the following rare but very serious side effects: confusion, fever, fast heartbeat, muscle stiffness, increased sweating. In rare instances, this medication may increase your level of a certain chemical made by the body (prolactin). For females, this increase in prolactin may result in unwanted breast milk, missing/stopped periods, or difficulty becoming pregnant. For males, it may result in decreased sexual ability, inability to produce sperm, or enlarged breasts. If you develop these symptoms, tell your doctor immediately. For males, in the very unlikely event you have a painful or prolonged erection lasting 4 or more hours, stop using this drug and seek immediate medical attention, or permanent problems could occur. A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: rash, itching, swelling, severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. Answered by Genesis Dick 1 month ago.

I've read the results on geodon. For most people, it sucks big time. Answered by Vi Figuerda 1 month ago.


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