Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011245/003.

Names and composition

"GASTROGRAFIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE and DIATRIZOATE SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011245/003 GASTROGRAFIN DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL, RECTAL 66% and 10%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010040/001 RENOGRAFIN-76 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 66% and 10%
010040/006 RENOGRAFIN-60 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 52% and 8%
010040/019 RENOVIST II DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 28.5% and 29.1%
010040/020 RENOVIST DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 34.3% and 35%
010220/002 HYPAQUE-M,90% DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 60% and 30%
010220/003 HYPAQUE-M,75% DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50% and 25%
011245/003 GASTROGRAFIN DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL, RECTAL 66% and 10%
019292/001 MD-76R DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 66% and 10%
086505/001 HYPAQUE-76 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 66% and 10%
087073/001 MD-76 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 66% and 10%
087074/001 MD-60 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 52% and 8%
087388/001 MD-GASTROVIEW DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL, RECTAL 66% and 10%
087723/001 ANGIOVIST 370 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 66% and 10%
087724/001 ANGIOVIST 292 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 52% and 8%
087728/001 GASTROVIST DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL, RECTAL 66% and 10%
088166/001 DIATRIZOATE-60 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 52% and 8%
089347/001 RENOCAL-76 DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE; DIATRIZOATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 66% and 10%

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Forgot to drink gastrografin before CT scan?
Ok, talked to the doctor on call, she said that PROBABLY it's ok, but i'm not satisfied with "probably", so i have to call on monday and they'll take a closer look at my slides and if something i can only do another scan in a month :( Asked by Janetta Kessel 1 year ago.

I was cleaning my fridge today and found gastrografin which i was supposed to drink a week ago before my CT scan. Does it mean that I'll have to redo it? I know that it gives a more clear picture, but my scan was negative for everything, now I'm thinking that I didn't drink it and they didn't see something. What do you think? Friday night and I'm trying to find my doc's email :( Answered by Sena Stcroix 1 year ago.

Gastrograffin allows the intestines to be distinguished from other abdominal and pelvic organs. If you have an intestinal mass, it will show up better with gastrograffin. Definitely notify your doc, and call if you can't find email! (Although, they should be able to tell from reading the scan that you didn't take the gastrograffin.) Answered by Dedra Seedorff 1 year ago.

Yes let them all know ASAP and they can review the films and make the determination. Answered by Laraine Golumski 1 year ago.


How do you know if you have Gastrografin allergy?
How do you know if you have Gastrografin allergy? How do you know if have Gastrografin allergy? During CT scan on the abdomen you are to drink Gastrografin contrast media Does it cause any kind of allergy after drinking? If there is any experience on how to know this please share… Waiting for your help… Asked by Rosalina Hem 1 year ago.

You could not know until you took it. Gastrograffin is not the contrast agent typically used with CT scans, FWIW. Answered by Tanisha Wheeler 1 year ago.


Question for any ct or x-ray techs?
when using gastrografin for possible perforation, what is the ratio of contrast to water? Asked by Fabiola Fabio 1 year ago.

are you using it for CT or fluoro? If CT, 1:40 dilution is adequate but for fluoro, 1:5 or 1:3 depending on the radiologist's preference. Answered by Rosella Jurkovich 1 year ago.


Im going to have a cat scan taken ,im very leery of this?
this is my first cat scan,what can i expect ,i know i have to drink this stuff,some people get sick with this stuff,im healthy and during a routine sonogram of my internal organs ,my dr thought he saw a shadow on one of my kidneys, the cat scan itself doesnt scare me its the drink! i suffer like crazy when i get... Asked by Janell Nordgren 1 year ago.

this is my first cat scan,what can i expect ,i know i have to drink this stuff,some people get sick with this stuff,im healthy and during a routine sonogram of my internal organs ,my dr thought he saw a shadow on one of my kidneys, the cat scan itself doesnt scare me its the drink! i suffer like crazy when i get sick to my stomach,i hope this doest effect me like that. Answered by Henry Zumbo 1 year ago.

The stuff you drink is called oral contrast and there's two types barium and water soluble (usually gastrografin). Its used to visualize the bowels more clearly on the scan. If they have you pick it up ahead of time its usually barium and if you go to the hospital then start drinking you usually have water soluble flavored with crystal lite or juice which tastes better. It's always easier to drink either one when they are super cold. After you finish drinking they will probably give you IV contrast also. Its used to better visualize the blood vessels, organs and urinary system. They will start an IV (yes with a needle) just before the actual scan and then scan before, during and after the injection of contrast. You will probably get warm and flushed, a strange taste in your mouth, and what I call the "urination sensation" from the Iodine in the IV contrast. A combination of the two contrasts gives a pretty clear picture of what is going on inside you. If there is in fact a cyst or mass on your kidney it will enhance with the IV contrast and they will scan through your kidneys a couple of times to demonstrate the enhancement pattern to characterize whatever it is they saw on ultrasound. You'll do fine. Answered by Dotty Lockridge 1 year ago.

I have a bad stomach too, but the stuff you drink called contrast is a lot easier to drink nowadays. just make sure they put it on ice and drink it quickly Answered by Soo Vandenacre 1 year ago.

You'll be fine, don't worry. It's much easier than you expect and you have lots of support from the medical staff. good luck! P.S. Try another section and I think you'll get a better response. This is the "Pets" section. Answered by Berna Vanlinden 1 year ago.

Lol, this is the CAT section, like the animal. I understand if Y!A messed it up. Either try reposting it in the baby section, or you could see what answers you get. (Some may not be too nice.) In response to your question, you'll be fine! :) Good luck! Answered by Ceola Kopinski 1 year ago.

I had to drink it just last week. It tastes like flat pink lemonade without enough sugar. They served it cold. I kept it down. Answered by Marlon Bothe 1 year ago.


I have to have a CT scan how safe is the contrast dye?
how safe is the contrast dye for CT scan. I suffer from Asthma thanks doe Asked by Maire Patchell 1 year ago.

CT contrast agents, sometimes referred to as "dyes," are used to highlight specific areas so that the organs, blood vessels, or tissues are more visible. By increasing the visibility of all surfaces of the organ or tissue being studied, they can help the radiologist determine the presence and extent of disease or injury. Contrast agents are available in several different forms, but in general a CT contrast agent is a pharmaceutical substance. Some of the more common contrast agents used are: •Iodine •Barium •Barium sulfate •Gastrografin Contrast agents for CT examinations are administered in four different ways: •Intravenous injection •Oral administration •Rectal administration •Inhalation-this is a relatively uncommon procedure in which xenon gas is inhaled for a highly specialized form of lung or brain imaging. The technique, xenon CT, is only available at a small number of locations worldwide and is used only for rare cases. Intravenous contrast is used to highlight blood vessels and to enhance the structure of organs like the brain, spine, liver, and kidney. The contrast agent (usually an iodine compound) is clear, with a water-like consistency. Typically the contrast is contained in a special injector, which injects the contrast through a small needle taped in place (usually on the back of the hand) during a specific period in the CT exam. Once the contrast is injected into the bloodstream, it circulates throughout the body. The CT's x-ray beam is weakened as it passes through the blood vessels and organs that have "taken up" the contrast. These structures are enhanced by this process and show up as white areas on the CT images. When the test is finished, the kidneys and liver quickly eliminate the contrast from the body. Need To Know: Is Iodine a Safe Contrast Agent? Iodine is considered to be a safe contrast agent. It has been used for many years without serious side effects. Because iodine contrast increases the visibility of target tissues on the images, the benefits are considered to outweigh the risks. The most common side effect of iodine is a warm or "flushed" sensation during the actual injection of the iodine, followed sometimes by a metallic taste in the mouth that usually lasts for less than a minute. No treatment is necessary for this sensation, if experienced. Another mild reaction is itching over various parts of the body. This reaction lasts from several minutes to a few hours after the injection. When this reaction occurs, medication is usually administered to counteract the itching. More serious allergic reactions, while uncommon, include difficulty breathing and swelling of the throat or other parts of the body. These reactions, if experienced, are treated immediately. Newer forms of contrast help to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. If you have had an allergic reaction to iodine or a contrast agent in the past, the physician may recommend on of these newer agents. In some cases, CT can still provide valuable diagnostic information without the administration of a contrast agent, so the physician may decide this is the best course of action. Answered by Minda Vanstee 1 year ago.

Is Contrast Dye Safe Answered by Wynell Fierman 1 year ago.

I just had a brain ct scan with contrast and had a near-fatal allergic reaction....throat swelled, lungs were oppressed and several docs ran to administer epinephrine, steroids and other injectibles to reverse the reaction. Kept in hospital 2 days for "observation" and sent home with ventilator Rx..still feeling wiped out Answered by Ofelia Colbeth 1 year ago.

You need to discuss your situation with a radiologist that is proficient in both CT and MRI interpretation to discuss your options. Ask your OB doctor to ask radiologists that he/she knows if there is a radiologist available who can discuss other options with you. Or even better, ask your OB doctor (nicely) to directly ask the radiologist because you have doubts about the cardiologist's recommendations. The radiologist will need to know the dimensions of the aorta that the US provided and may need to look at the images. If the OB doctor can not do this, and you are still not satisfied, consider a second opinion. Answered by Scottie Maco 1 year ago.

Safe enough to put in your body. Answered by Belia Seel 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved