Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017478/001.

Names and composition

"GALLIUM CITRATE GA 67" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017478/001 GALLIUM CITRATE GA 67 GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2mCi per ML
017700/001 GALLIUM CITRATE GA 67 GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1mCi per ML
018058/001 GALLIUM CITRATE GA 67 GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2mCi per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017478/001 GALLIUM CITRATE GA 67 GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2mCi per ML
017655/001 NEOSCAN GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2mCi per ML
017700/001 GALLIUM CITRATE GA 67 GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1mCi per ML
018058/001 GALLIUM CITRATE GA 67 GALLIUM CITRATE GA-67 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2mCi per ML

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Answered questions

How long will it take for a sample of Gallium citrate to decay to 10% of it's original mass?
Gallium citrate, containing the radioactive isotope gallium-67, is used medically as a tumor-seeking agent. It has a half-life of 78.2 h. How long will it take for a sample of gallium citrate to decay to 10.0% of its original activity? Asked by Cherie Volstad 1 year ago.

to do this question you would have to work out how may half lifes it takes to get from 100 % to 10%. To do this, you would have to model the decay as an equation. for the mass of gallium, you would put the orignal mass of ga*a number that decreases with time, or more specifically halves every set time period. original mass * 2^(kt) = mass of gallium at that time for the sake of simpleness i will use the original mass of gallium as 100g. 100g * 2^(kt) = mass of gallium at that time where k is the constant we have to find, and t is the time. when t=0, mass is 100g (which makes sense). btw we have to use the exponential base 2, because the type of exponential growth/decay here is done in powers of two (sorry for the crummy explanation, but trust me the answer and calculation is A-OK) since it takes 78.2 hours for the mass to half, we can write the equation as 100 * 2^(k*78.2) = 50g rearrange the equation to get k 100 * 2^(k*78.2) = 50g 2^(k*78.2) = 50/100 k*78.2 = Log (base 2) 50/100 k = ( Log (base 2) 50/100 ) / 78.2 k= ( -1) / 78.2 thus k = - 1/78.2 so our new equation is (mass of Gallium at time t) = 100 * 2 ^ (- 1/78.2 t) = 100 * 2 ^ ( -t/78.2) now, since the radioactivity is directly proportional to the mass of the sample of gallium (i.e. if the mass is halved, then the radioactivity is halved), we can just replace the word mass with " % of original activity " thus our final equation is ( % of original activity at time t) = 100% * 2 ^ ( -t/78.2) next we substitute the 10% on the left hand side, and rearrange to find t (finally!!!!) 10% = 100% * 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) 10% / 100% = 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) 0.1 = 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) log (base 2) 0.1 = - t/ 78.2 -3.322 = - t/ 78.2 -3.322 * 78.2 = - t - 259.77 = - t (the minuses cancel) Thus t = 259.77 (hours) Answered by Jared Klancnik 1 year ago.

The general equation for calculating the fraction remaining, given the half life is: fraction remaining = 2^-(number of half lives) In this case, the fraction remaining = 0.10, so 0.10 = 2^-(number of half lives) log(0.10) = -(number of half lives)log(2) number of half lives = -log(0.10)/log(2) number of half lives = 3.32 Time = number of half lives x length of half life Time = 3.32 x 78.2 = 260 hours Answered by Cecile Frogge 1 year ago.


What are the common diagnostic reference levels in American nuclear medicine?
I would like to know what doses are most often given to patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine investigations in the health care system of the United States. Im thinking things like HDP/MDP Tc99m Bones scans, myocardial perfusion, multiple gated heart analysis and renograms etc. Please note by dose I do... Asked by Juanita Kub 1 year ago.

I would like to know what doses are most often given to patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine investigations in the health care system of the United States. Im thinking things like HDP/MDP Tc99m Bones scans, myocardial perfusion, multiple gated heart analysis and renograms etc. Please note by dose I do not mean Sieverts or Grays but in terms of activity i.e. Curies or preferably Bequerels. Ta very much! Answered by Valeri Ladner 1 year ago.

Brain Metabolism F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Brain Perfusion Tc-99m ECD (740 MBq) or Tc-99m HMPAO (740 MBq) Cisternography In-111 DTPA (55.5 MBq) Ventricular Shunt Tc-99m DTPA (30 MBq) Angiography Brain & Peripheral Tc-99m DTPA (925 MBq) Cardiac Blood Pool Rest Tc – RBC (925 MBq) Lymphoscintrigraphy Tc-99m SC Filtered (0.1-0.2μ) (18.5 – 37 MBq) Myocardial Perfusion N-13 Ammonia (740 MBq) Myocardial Perfusion Rb-82 Chloride (1.85 – 2.22 GBq) Myocardial Perfusion Tc-99m Tetrofosmin (0.555 – 1.11 GBq) Tc99m Sestamibi (0.555 – 1.11 GBq) Myocardial Viability F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Perfusion & Viability Tl-201 Chloride (55.5 – 111 MBq) Neuroectodermal Norepinephrine I-123 – MIBG (370 MBq) I-131– MIBG (37 MBq) Parathyroid Tc-99m Sestamibi (925 MBq) Thyroid Imaging I-123 (18.5 MBq) Thyroid Imaging Tc-99m (185 MBq) Thyroid Metastases I-123 (74 MBq) I-131 (74 – 370 MBq) Thyroid Uptake I-123 (3.7 MBq) I-131 (0.37 MBq) Esophageal Transit Tc-99m SC in H 2 O (11.1 MBq) Gastric Emptying Tc-99m SC in Oatmeal (37 MBq) Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Tc-99m SC in Orange Juice (11.1 MBq) Gastrointestinal Bleeding Tc-99m RBC (925 MBq) H.Pylori Breath Test C-14 – Urea (0.037 MBq) Hepatic Artery Perfusion Tc-99m MAA (111 MBq) Hepatic Hemangioma Tc-99m RBC (925 MBq) Hepato – Biliary Tc-99m IDA (222 MBq) LeVeen Shunt Tc-99m MAA (185 MBq) Tc-99m SC (111 MBq) Liver – Spleen Tc-99m SC (222 MBq) Meckels Diverticulum Tc-99m 185 MBq) Cystogram Tc-99m (37 MBq) Tc-99m SC (37 MBq) Tc-99m DTPA (37 MBq) Renal – DMSA Tc-99m DMSA (185 MBq) Renal – DTPA Tc-99m DTPA (555 MBq) Renal – MAG3 Tc-99m MAG3 (370 MBq) Bone Marrow Tc-99m SC (555 MBq) Schilling’s Test Co-57 Vitamin B-12 (18.5 – 37 MBq) Gallium Ga-67 Citrate (222 – 370 MBq) WBC Activation F-18 FDG (370 -740 MBq) WBC Migration Study Tc-99m WBC – HMPAO (370 – 925 MBq) In-111 WBC (18.5 MBq) Lung Aerosol Tc-99m DTPA Aerosol (222 MBq) Lung Perfusion Tc-99m MAA (222 MBq) Lung Ventilation Xe-133 Gas (740 MBq) Skeletal – F-18 F-18 Chloride (370 – 740 MBq) Bone Mineral Study Tc-99m MDP (925 MBq) Tc-99m HMDP (925 MBq) B-Cell Lymphoma–Bexxar I-131 – Tositumomab (185 MBq) B-Cell Lymphoma-Zevalin In-111 – Ibritumomab Tiuxetan (185 MBq) Prostate Ca Study In-111 – Capromab Pendetide (185 MBq) Neuroendocrine Tumor In-111 – Pentetreotide (222 MBq) Tumor Glucose Metabolism F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Tumor Viability Tl-201 Chloride (185 MBq) Tc-99m Sestamibi (925 MBq) Tc-99m Tetrofosmin (925 MBq) Answered by Alvaro Rish 1 year ago.


How long will it take for a sample of Gallium citrate to decay to 10% of it's original mass?
Gallium citrate, containing the radioactive isotope gallium-67, is used medically as a tumor-seeking agent. It has a half-life of 78.2 h. How long will it take for a sample of gallium citrate to decay to 10.0% of its original activity? Asked by Lashell Ramelli 1 year ago.

to do this question you would have to work out how may half lifes it takes to get from 100 % to 10%. To do this, you would have to model the decay as an equation. for the mass of gallium, you would put the orignal mass of ga*a number that decreases with time, or more specifically halves every set time period. original mass * 2^(kt) = mass of gallium at that time for the sake of simpleness i will use the original mass of gallium as 100g. 100g * 2^(kt) = mass of gallium at that time where k is the constant we have to find, and t is the time. when t=0, mass is 100g (which makes sense). btw we have to use the exponential base 2, because the type of exponential growth/decay here is done in powers of two (sorry for the crummy explanation, but trust me the answer and calculation is A-OK) since it takes 78.2 hours for the mass to half, we can write the equation as 100 * 2^(k*78.2) = 50g rearrange the equation to get k 100 * 2^(k*78.2) = 50g 2^(k*78.2) = 50/100 k*78.2 = Log (base 2) 50/100 k = ( Log (base 2) 50/100 ) / 78.2 k= ( -1) / 78.2 thus k = - 1/78.2 so our new equation is (mass of Gallium at time t) = 100 * 2 ^ (- 1/78.2 t) = 100 * 2 ^ ( -t/78.2) now, since the radioactivity is directly proportional to the mass of the sample of gallium (i.e. if the mass is halved, then the radioactivity is halved), we can just replace the word mass with " % of original activity " thus our final equation is ( % of original activity at time t) = 100% * 2 ^ ( -t/78.2) next we substitute the 10% on the left hand side, and rearrange to find t (finally!!!!) 10% = 100% * 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) 10% / 100% = 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) 0.1 = 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) log (base 2) 0.1 = - t/ 78.2 -3.322 = - t/ 78.2 -3.322 * 78.2 = - t - 259.77 = - t (the minuses cancel) Thus t = 259.77 (hours) Answered by Tad Guilliam 1 year ago.

The general equation for calculating the fraction remaining, given the half life is: fraction remaining = 2^-(number of half lives) In this case, the fraction remaining = 0.10, so 0.10 = 2^-(number of half lives) log(0.10) = -(number of half lives)log(2) number of half lives = -log(0.10)/log(2) number of half lives = 3.32 Time = number of half lives x length of half life Time = 3.32 x 78.2 = 260 hours Answered by Mui Difrancisco 1 year ago.


What are the common diagnostic reference levels in American nuclear medicine?
I would like to know what doses are most often given to patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine investigations in the health care system of the United States. Im thinking things like HDP/MDP Tc99m Bones scans, myocardial perfusion, multiple gated heart analysis and renograms etc. Please note by dose I do... Asked by Hans Peden 1 year ago.

I would like to know what doses are most often given to patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine investigations in the health care system of the United States. Im thinking things like HDP/MDP Tc99m Bones scans, myocardial perfusion, multiple gated heart analysis and renograms etc. Please note by dose I do not mean Sieverts or Grays but in terms of activity i.e. Curies or preferably Bequerels. Ta very much! Answered by Yer Humbert 1 year ago.

Brain Metabolism F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Brain Perfusion Tc-99m ECD (740 MBq) or Tc-99m HMPAO (740 MBq) Cisternography In-111 DTPA (55.5 MBq) Ventricular Shunt Tc-99m DTPA (30 MBq) Angiography Brain & Peripheral Tc-99m DTPA (925 MBq) Cardiac Blood Pool Rest Tc – RBC (925 MBq) Lymphoscintrigraphy Tc-99m SC Filtered (0.1-0.2μ) (18.5 – 37 MBq) Myocardial Perfusion N-13 Ammonia (740 MBq) Myocardial Perfusion Rb-82 Chloride (1.85 – 2.22 GBq) Myocardial Perfusion Tc-99m Tetrofosmin (0.555 – 1.11 GBq) Tc99m Sestamibi (0.555 – 1.11 GBq) Myocardial Viability F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Perfusion & Viability Tl-201 Chloride (55.5 – 111 MBq) Neuroectodermal Norepinephrine I-123 – MIBG (370 MBq) I-131– MIBG (37 MBq) Parathyroid Tc-99m Sestamibi (925 MBq) Thyroid Imaging I-123 (18.5 MBq) Thyroid Imaging Tc-99m (185 MBq) Thyroid Metastases I-123 (74 MBq) I-131 (74 – 370 MBq) Thyroid Uptake I-123 (3.7 MBq) I-131 (0.37 MBq) Esophageal Transit Tc-99m SC in H 2 O (11.1 MBq) Gastric Emptying Tc-99m SC in Oatmeal (37 MBq) Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Tc-99m SC in Orange Juice (11.1 MBq) Gastrointestinal Bleeding Tc-99m RBC (925 MBq) H.Pylori Breath Test C-14 – Urea (0.037 MBq) Hepatic Artery Perfusion Tc-99m MAA (111 MBq) Hepatic Hemangioma Tc-99m RBC (925 MBq) Hepato – Biliary Tc-99m IDA (222 MBq) LeVeen Shunt Tc-99m MAA (185 MBq) Tc-99m SC (111 MBq) Liver – Spleen Tc-99m SC (222 MBq) Meckels Diverticulum Tc-99m 185 MBq) Cystogram Tc-99m (37 MBq) Tc-99m SC (37 MBq) Tc-99m DTPA (37 MBq) Renal – DMSA Tc-99m DMSA (185 MBq) Renal – DTPA Tc-99m DTPA (555 MBq) Renal – MAG3 Tc-99m MAG3 (370 MBq) Bone Marrow Tc-99m SC (555 MBq) Schilling’s Test Co-57 Vitamin B-12 (18.5 – 37 MBq) Gallium Ga-67 Citrate (222 – 370 MBq) WBC Activation F-18 FDG (370 -740 MBq) WBC Migration Study Tc-99m WBC – HMPAO (370 – 925 MBq) In-111 WBC (18.5 MBq) Lung Aerosol Tc-99m DTPA Aerosol (222 MBq) Lung Perfusion Tc-99m MAA (222 MBq) Lung Ventilation Xe-133 Gas (740 MBq) Skeletal – F-18 F-18 Chloride (370 – 740 MBq) Bone Mineral Study Tc-99m MDP (925 MBq) Tc-99m HMDP (925 MBq) B-Cell Lymphoma–Bexxar I-131 – Tositumomab (185 MBq) B-Cell Lymphoma-Zevalin In-111 – Ibritumomab Tiuxetan (185 MBq) Prostate Ca Study In-111 – Capromab Pendetide (185 MBq) Neuroendocrine Tumor In-111 – Pentetreotide (222 MBq) Tumor Glucose Metabolism F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Tumor Viability Tl-201 Chloride (185 MBq) Tc-99m Sestamibi (925 MBq) Tc-99m Tetrofosmin (925 MBq) Answered by Patty Weisbrod 1 year ago.


How long will it take for a sample of Gallium citrate to decay to 10% of it's original mass?
Gallium citrate, containing the radioactive isotope gallium-67, is used medically as a tumor-seeking agent. It has a half-life of 78.2 h. How long will it take for a sample of gallium citrate to decay to 10.0% of its original activity? Asked by Ileana Dire 1 year ago.

to do this question you would have to work out how may half lifes it takes to get from 100 % to 10%. To do this, you would have to model the decay as an equation. for the mass of gallium, you would put the orignal mass of ga*a number that decreases with time, or more specifically halves every set time period. original mass * 2^(kt) = mass of gallium at that time for the sake of simpleness i will use the original mass of gallium as 100g. 100g * 2^(kt) = mass of gallium at that time where k is the constant we have to find, and t is the time. when t=0, mass is 100g (which makes sense). btw we have to use the exponential base 2, because the type of exponential growth/decay here is done in powers of two (sorry for the crummy explanation, but trust me the answer and calculation is A-OK) since it takes 78.2 hours for the mass to half, we can write the equation as 100 * 2^(k*78.2) = 50g rearrange the equation to get k 100 * 2^(k*78.2) = 50g 2^(k*78.2) = 50/100 k*78.2 = Log (base 2) 50/100 k = ( Log (base 2) 50/100 ) / 78.2 k= ( -1) / 78.2 thus k = - 1/78.2 so our new equation is (mass of Gallium at time t) = 100 * 2 ^ (- 1/78.2 t) = 100 * 2 ^ ( -t/78.2) now, since the radioactivity is directly proportional to the mass of the sample of gallium (i.e. if the mass is halved, then the radioactivity is halved), we can just replace the word mass with " % of original activity " thus our final equation is ( % of original activity at time t) = 100% * 2 ^ ( -t/78.2) next we substitute the 10% on the left hand side, and rearrange to find t (finally!!!!) 10% = 100% * 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) 10% / 100% = 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) 0.1 = 2 ^ ( - t/ 78.2) log (base 2) 0.1 = - t/ 78.2 -3.322 = - t/ 78.2 -3.322 * 78.2 = - t - 259.77 = - t (the minuses cancel) Thus t = 259.77 (hours) Answered by Wilda Gidaro 1 year ago.

The general equation for calculating the fraction remaining, given the half life is: fraction remaining = 2^-(number of half lives) In this case, the fraction remaining = 0.10, so 0.10 = 2^-(number of half lives) log(0.10) = -(number of half lives)log(2) number of half lives = -log(0.10)/log(2) number of half lives = 3.32 Time = number of half lives x length of half life Time = 3.32 x 78.2 = 260 hours Answered by Lavonda Byer 1 year ago.


What are the common diagnostic reference levels in American nuclear medicine?
I would like to know what doses are most often given to patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine investigations in the health care system of the United States. Im thinking things like HDP/MDP Tc99m Bones scans, myocardial perfusion, multiple gated heart analysis and renograms etc. Please note by dose I do... Asked by Stephen Yule 1 year ago.

I would like to know what doses are most often given to patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine investigations in the health care system of the United States. Im thinking things like HDP/MDP Tc99m Bones scans, myocardial perfusion, multiple gated heart analysis and renograms etc. Please note by dose I do not mean Sieverts or Grays but in terms of activity i.e. Curies or preferably Bequerels. Ta very much! Answered by Terrence Branseum 1 year ago.

Brain Metabolism F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Brain Perfusion Tc-99m ECD (740 MBq) or Tc-99m HMPAO (740 MBq) Cisternography In-111 DTPA (55.5 MBq) Ventricular Shunt Tc-99m DTPA (30 MBq) Angiography Brain & Peripheral Tc-99m DTPA (925 MBq) Cardiac Blood Pool Rest Tc – RBC (925 MBq) Lymphoscintrigraphy Tc-99m SC Filtered (0.1-0.2μ) (18.5 – 37 MBq) Myocardial Perfusion N-13 Ammonia (740 MBq) Myocardial Perfusion Rb-82 Chloride (1.85 – 2.22 GBq) Myocardial Perfusion Tc-99m Tetrofosmin (0.555 – 1.11 GBq) Tc99m Sestamibi (0.555 – 1.11 GBq) Myocardial Viability F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Perfusion & Viability Tl-201 Chloride (55.5 – 111 MBq) Neuroectodermal Norepinephrine I-123 – MIBG (370 MBq) I-131– MIBG (37 MBq) Parathyroid Tc-99m Sestamibi (925 MBq) Thyroid Imaging I-123 (18.5 MBq) Thyroid Imaging Tc-99m (185 MBq) Thyroid Metastases I-123 (74 MBq) I-131 (74 – 370 MBq) Thyroid Uptake I-123 (3.7 MBq) I-131 (0.37 MBq) Esophageal Transit Tc-99m SC in H 2 O (11.1 MBq) Gastric Emptying Tc-99m SC in Oatmeal (37 MBq) Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Tc-99m SC in Orange Juice (11.1 MBq) Gastrointestinal Bleeding Tc-99m RBC (925 MBq) H.Pylori Breath Test C-14 – Urea (0.037 MBq) Hepatic Artery Perfusion Tc-99m MAA (111 MBq) Hepatic Hemangioma Tc-99m RBC (925 MBq) Hepato – Biliary Tc-99m IDA (222 MBq) LeVeen Shunt Tc-99m MAA (185 MBq) Tc-99m SC (111 MBq) Liver – Spleen Tc-99m SC (222 MBq) Meckels Diverticulum Tc-99m 185 MBq) Cystogram Tc-99m (37 MBq) Tc-99m SC (37 MBq) Tc-99m DTPA (37 MBq) Renal – DMSA Tc-99m DMSA (185 MBq) Renal – DTPA Tc-99m DTPA (555 MBq) Renal – MAG3 Tc-99m MAG3 (370 MBq) Bone Marrow Tc-99m SC (555 MBq) Schilling’s Test Co-57 Vitamin B-12 (18.5 – 37 MBq) Gallium Ga-67 Citrate (222 – 370 MBq) WBC Activation F-18 FDG (370 -740 MBq) WBC Migration Study Tc-99m WBC – HMPAO (370 – 925 MBq) In-111 WBC (18.5 MBq) Lung Aerosol Tc-99m DTPA Aerosol (222 MBq) Lung Perfusion Tc-99m MAA (222 MBq) Lung Ventilation Xe-133 Gas (740 MBq) Skeletal – F-18 F-18 Chloride (370 – 740 MBq) Bone Mineral Study Tc-99m MDP (925 MBq) Tc-99m HMDP (925 MBq) B-Cell Lymphoma–Bexxar I-131 – Tositumomab (185 MBq) B-Cell Lymphoma-Zevalin In-111 – Ibritumomab Tiuxetan (185 MBq) Prostate Ca Study In-111 – Capromab Pendetide (185 MBq) Neuroendocrine Tumor In-111 – Pentetreotide (222 MBq) Tumor Glucose Metabolism F-18 FDG (370 – 740 MBq) Tumor Viability Tl-201 Chloride (185 MBq) Tc-99m Sestamibi (925 MBq) Tc-99m Tetrofosmin (925 MBq) Answered by Scottie Bulla 1 year ago.


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